52 Ancestors: #34 James INGRAM, Where Did You Hide the Key?

“The challenge: have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor.”

This is entry #34 in Amy Johnson Crow’s Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.

#34 James INGRAM, Where Did You Hide the Key?

Oral tradition, passed on through the generations, can help our genealogy research but it can also be a hindrance. When I started my Facebook page, more than a year before I started blogging, I wrote short summaries about my brick walls. My 4th great-grandfather James INGRAM, born between 1771-1774 in Virginia and died fall of 1865 in West Virginia, was the subject of the post I wrote in December 2012. Unfortunately, no headway has been made on his parentage. One of these days I’ll find the key to open the door in the INGRAM brick wall.

Speculation

Ester INGRAM (also seen as Esther and Easter) may have been the mother of James INGRAM (b. 1771-1774 d. 1865). She is the first INGRAM to be found in Greenbrier County Personal Property Tax Lists in 1792 suggesting that she was a widow by this time.1,2 She sold a 95-acre land grant received in 1795 in 1800 and had at least two daughters who married in Greenbrier with her permission.

◉ Patience INGRAM and David STAY
Easter INGRAM signed a marriage permission slip for “my daughter” on 19 May 1790. David STAY and John KING went bond. Easter’s husband was not named in these records.3 The register of marriages in Greenbrier County includes the minister who married the couple, likely information taken from the minister’s returns. Per this register, they were married by Jno McCue on 23 May 1791 (sic, 1790).4

◉ Elizabeth INGRAM and Francis STORY
Nancy C. Story Adkins obtained a photocopy of the original marriage bond from the Greenbrier Historical Society. It states they married on 20 December 1798 and Elizabeth’s mother Esther INGRAM gave her permission.5 The couple was married by John Alderson.6

I had a slight panic attack when I was pulling this together and realized that Ester could have been the first name for a male. I checked the original land grant for the 95 acres that she sold in 1800 at the Library of Virginia and it shows that she was a female.7

grant
Ester Ingram and her Heirs…

Was Ester INGRAM the mother of our James INGRAM? Who was the husband of Ester INGRAM? Was James the brother of Nancy INGRAM (md. 1787 William SLAVEN)8 and Parnal INGRAM (md. 1793 Eliza CARMONS)9 who also married in Greenbrier? Note: Nancy has been listed as the daughter of Abraham INGRAM but without supporting evidence.

Speculation Aside, Let’s Have a Look at His Life

James INGRAM is first found in Greenbrier County on a list of rangers in 1793. The Rangers militia was organized to protect the frontier and its settlers from Indian attacks. On 27 May 1793 Captain Hugh CAPERTON’s company of rangers were at Fort Lee on the Elk and Kanawha Rivers guarding the Kanawha Valley settlers near what is now Charleston, West Virginia.10 “Mad Anthony” WAYNE’s victory over the Indians in 1794 ended the Indian threat in what is now West Virginia.

roster

James INGRAM was not with the rangers on 6 May 1792. Was he too young at the time?

In 1795 and 1797 James is seen in the Greenbrier County court orders:

◉ 31 March 1795 – John MATHEWS vs. James INGRAM in debt11

◉ 1 April 1797 – Jonathan MATHEWS assee of James INGRAM vs. William GILLILAND in debt12

James was on a Personal Property Tax List on 16 April 1799 in Greenbrier County with 1 tithable and 2 horses.13 This was the first time he was on a list. His surname was spelled INGRIM. Also on this list was a John INGRIM with 1 tithable and 1 horse. No further trace of him has been found. Was he a brother?

Taxation: Virginia began keeping records of residents’ payments of personal property and land taxes in 1782. The Library of Virginia has these on microfilm. Published abstracts of some of these can be found online. I am convinced that this may be the key to opening the doors in many of my brick walls in Virginia. Living overseas I can only hope that the full collection will someday be found on the internet. I want to be able to look at each year, study the neighbors of each ancestor, and see the things that may not have been included in the abstracts.

Update (17 August 2022): The personal property tax lists for Virginia counties on FamilySearch have changed from being restricted to being available to browse online from 2019-2021. The Greenbrier lists were checked for Ingram on 27 November 2021. James INGRAM was found as early as 1798. Other persons with the INGRAM surname were found and will be shared in a future post.

A month later, on 28 May 1799, James was “on jury” in Greenbrier.14 He was next seen on the 1803 (below) and 1805 tax lists of Greenbrier County, both times with 1 titable and 1 horse.15,16

1803tax
Source: http://www.binnsgenealogy.com/VirginiaTaxListCensuses/Greenbrier/1803PersonalB/10.jpg

On 28 February 1809 John CONNER and his wife Mary sold 120 acres for $1.00 to James INGRAM on Meadow River and Sewel on the ridge opposite Buffalow Lick in Greenbrier County.17

Later in the year, James INGRAM married Margaret KINCAID, daughter of John KINCAID and Elizabeth GILLESPIE, on 24 October 1809 in Greenbrier County.18 They were married by Rev. Josiah OSBURN of the Baptist church.19

James and Margaret were not found on the 1810 census as Greenbrier was one of the “lost” counties. He was still in the county as he is on the 1810 Personal Property List B with 1 tithable:20

1810tax
1810 Personal Property List B > Greenbrier County, Virginia. Source: http://www.binnsgenealogy.com/FreeSample/CDR-000484/1810/1810PersonalB/06.pdf

James and Margaret’s first child, a son James Jr., was born about 1811 most likely on the land in Greenbrier County that James bought from the CONNERs in 1809.

On 25 February 1812 James and wife Margaret sold the 120 acres that James bought in 1809 for $1.00 to Newbury STOCKTON. The land, conveyed to James INGRAM by John CONNER in 1809, was “on point of ridge that leads to Buffaloe Lick in Greenbrier County.”21

During the War of 1812 (18 Jun 1812-24 Dec 1814) James and Margaret’s second son, Joshua (1813-ca.1861) was born. His birth has been estimated at about 1813 in Greenbrier. In 1815 James was on the Personal Property Tax Lists of Greenbrier with 1 tithable, 3 horses, and 5 cows.22 The next child, a daughter, born during the 1810s, was followed by my 3rd great-grandfather Robert (1819-1902) born about 1819 in Greenbrier.

1820censusingram
1820 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Greenbrier [ancestry.com]
James was listed in the 1820 census of Greenbrier County with the following persons in his household: 3 males under 10 yo (James Jr., Joshua, Robert), 1 male over 45 yo (James), 1 female under 10 yo (unknown daughter), 1 female over 45 yo (Margaret, her age would be ca. 26 per 1850 census), 1 person engaged in agriculture, 6 persons in household.23

Three more children were born during the 1820s: John about 1820, Matthew on 9 January 182424, and Cynthia on 25 March 1829 (or 1828).25,26

Ingram Cabin

“A century and a half ago, a pioneer cabin stood in a little valley drained by a branch that flows down from cotton Hill to New River at the Narrow Falls, opposite and slightly above the mouth of Cane Branch. The little stream was known as Ingram Branch, from the name of the family that lived in the cabin. Two surveys made there in 1829 refer to Ingram’s house, to his road leading down to the river, and to Ingram Branch, the tiny tributary of New River. Though the first name of the settler is not given, it may be suspected that this was James Ingram who married Margaret (Peggy) Kincaid, daughter of John and Elizabeth Kincaid, who settled on the opposite side of the river at Cane Branch as early as 1811, and who patented land there and at the mouth of Gauley.
Ingram apparently took no steps to secure formal title to his improvement, however, and in 1829 two residents of Kanawha Falls set up rival claims to Ingram’s improvement and to some hundreds of acres surrounding it, by reason of entries and surveys made for them in that year. The map accompanying these surveys shows the location of the Ingram house to be on the branch approximately one hundred thirty poles above its mouth. This was doubtless the first cabin in that little nook of the hills. Ingram was not a permanent settler, however. He was succeeded there by Andrew and Mary Blake, and soon after the above date, James and Margaret Ingram appeared as settlers on the upper part of Loup Creek at a branch which also came to be called Ingram Branch. There they were permanent settlers and the name has survived both as a place name and family.
Ingram, also written as Inghram and Ingraham, was originally Ingelram, a Norman-French personal name.”27

It is said that James probably settled on Loup Creek (also seen as Loop Creek) at about the same time as James KINCAID (1792-1852), brother of Margaret, or soon after. The place he selected was at the mouth of a branch three miles farther up Loup Creek than Kincaid’s cabin. The branch is now called Ingram Branch. The 120-acre tract, including Ingram’s improvement, was patented by his sons, Robert and Matthew, in 1843, several years after the settlement.28 The move may have been in the 1820s.  Ingram Branch become part of Fayette County in 1831 when the county was formed. At the time of the 1830 census, it was most likely part of Kanawha County as the family was on the census of that county.

120acres

a certain Tract of Land, containing one hundred and twenty acres: lying and being in Fayette County on Loop creek and bounded as follow, towit Beginning at a white oak and gum corner to John Kincaid, on the Left hand side of the creek & with crossing the same S6W54 poles to a sugar tree & beech corner to same and leaving S67W60 poles to two chestnut oaks on a point S88W106 poles to a white oak North 48 poles to a white oak on a ridge N19W66 poles to a maple and hickory N48 W24 poles to a maple and beech N8W (crossing the creek) 34 poles to two chestnuts on a South hillside S69E230 poles to the beginning with its appurtenances.

First Ingram Child Married in 1829?

During this period of time, James INGRAM’s family was the only family of this name in the area of Greenbrier, Kanawha, Monroe, and Nicholas counties. I have not done a complete study of all Ingram, Ingrum, Inghram, and Ingharam in the early censuses of Virginia. There were Inghram and Ingharam individuals in Lewis, Wood, Tyler, and Ohio counties. Lewis and Wood bordered Kanawha County in 1829 (see Interactive Map of West Virginia County Formation History).

Charles WALKER married Elizabeth INGRAM on 4 August 1829 in Kanawha County, (West) Virginia.29 No further information has been found on this marriage or couple. Was Elizabeth the unknown daughter listed in the 1820 census?

1830censusingram
1830 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Kanawha [ancestry.com]
James was listed in the 1830 census of Kanawha County with the following persons in his household: 1 male under 5 (Matthew), 1 male 5-10 (John), 2 males 10-15 (Joshua & Robert), 1 male 15-20 (James Jr.), 1 male 50-60 (James), 1 female under 5 (Cynthia), and 1 female 40-50 (Margaret), 8 persons in household.30

James and Margaret’s youngest child Ruth was born about 1832 in Fayette County. Between 1831 and 1835, the oldest son, James Jr., died in early manhood without marrying.31 He is buried in the Kincaid Cemetery in Kincaid, Fayette County, West Virginia.32

In 1834 James was listed as having an account with Mr. LANDCRAFT, a store owner. I discovered the September 1834 inventory and appraisement of the estate of Melitus J. Landcraft while searching through the early Will Books for Fayette County. Mr. LANDCRAFT appears to have been a merchant (goods are listed) and many of my Fayette County relatives had accounts on his books and/or notes of debts. Very helpful are several “son of” mentions following the names.33

In an election held on 1 April 1835 in Fayette County to determine the location of the new Court House and County Seat, “James INGRAHM” and his son “Joshua INGRAHAM” voted for Kanawha Falls.34

1840censusingram
1840 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Fayett [ancestry.com]
James was listed in the 1840 census of Fayette County with the following persons in his household: 2 males 10-15 (Matthew & John), 1 male 15-20 (Robert), 1 male 60-70 (James), 1 female 5-10 (Ruth), 1 female 10-15 (Cynthia), 1 female 50-60 (Margaret), 7 persons in household, 2 engaged in agriculture. James’ oldest living child Joshua had his own household nearby.35

Following the 1840 census, James’ sons began to marry. Geraldine Dempsey Workman (1931-2007) wrote, “….pages are missing from the Marriage book at the courthouse.” We can only assume that Robert married Huldah JOHNSON (1817-1880) about 1841 and Joshua married Mahala C. STEELE (1823-1888) bet. 1841-1845 and that their marriage records may have been on these missing pages.

According to family tradition, James’ son John was the first to leave the area. He moved to the Poca River in Kanawha County before the 1850 census.36

In 1850 James, age 70, a laborer, unable to read or write, is in the household of John TINCHER, a widower with three young children and his widowed mother.37 At the same time, Margaret INGRAM, 56, is with her/their children Ruth, 18, Matthew, 25, and Cynthia, 23 living next door to her/their son Robert.38 Was James boarding with the family while working away from home? Or were James and Margaret separated?

1850censusingram
1850 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Fayette [ancestry.com]
In 1851 James INGRAM and his wife Margaret saw three of their children marrying and setting up housekeeping. On January 9, Ruth was married to John DARLINGTON, the youngest son of Benjamin DARLINGTON and Mary JOHNSON, and lived at various places on Loup Creek.39 On February 13, John married Lucy Jane SKAGGS, the daughter of Joseph Preston SKAGGS and Mary LEWIS in Fayette County.40 On March 23, Cynthia INGRAM married John “Johnny” TINCHER, the son of William and Patsy TINCHER of Loup Creek.41

In 1852 Matthew followed his brother John to Sissonville on the Poca River in Kanawha County. Robert bought Matthew’s interest in the 120-acre grant and became the sole owner.42 Matthew was the last of James’ children to marry on 20 August 1854 in Meigs County, Ohio, to Sarah Francis MARTIN, the daughter of Dio Clesian MARTIN and Catherine KIDD.43

James’ son John, who was widowed in the 1850s, married Delilah CRAIG (1826-1869) on 12 July 1860 in Kanawha County.44

1860census
1860 U.S. Federal Census > WV > Fayette > District 4 > Rock Hill > Page 126/422 > HH # 917-864 [ancestry.com]
In 1860 James is, once again, not living with his wife Margaret. He is listed as 86 years old and a laborer living alone in between James and Eleanor BERRY and John and  Lovina GODDARD in the Rocky Hill P.O. district.45 Margaret may have been living at the home of her nephew James Gillespie KINCAID Jr. in Kincaid as this is where she died about 1865 according to family tradition.

James’ son Joshua died between 1860-1862. The death record has not been found however his widow Mahala C. INGRAHAM remarried on 23 August 1862 in Meigs County, Ohio, to Isaac E. LEWIS, a veteran of the Mexican War.46

According to family tradition in the summer of 1865, after the death of his wife, James went to live with his son Matthew in Sissonville in Kanawha County. James may have held his youngest grandchild Absolam, son of Matthew, born 30 September 1865, in his arms before the child died on 3 October 1865. James died in the fall of 1865 at the home of his son Matthew. He is estimated to have been about 90 years old and may be buried near the Methodist Church in Sissonville but this has not been proven.47

James INGRAM was survived by his sons Robert, John, and Matthew; his daughters Cynthia TINCHER and Ruth DARLINGTON, and at least 30 grandchildren and possibly a great-grandchild through his son Joshua’s eldest daughter Mary.

The family would continue to grow with a total of 42 grandchildren. Son John, once again widowed, married a third time to Mary F. LEGG (1843-1870) on 1 December 1869 in Kanawha County.48 He died before 1880. Daughter Ruth died before 1900. Son Matthew died on 12 July 1900 in Sissonville and was buried in Pauley Cemetery on Little Sandy in Elk District in Kanawha County.49 Son Robert died about 1902 at the home of his cousin Preston KINCAID. And finally daughter Cynthia died on 3 May 1910 and was buried in the Carter Cemetery in Dempsey, Fayette County.50

This Post was Updated on 21 August 2022Missing source citations were added, images were scaled, and some corrections were made to the text and format.

© 2014-2022, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. At the time of this writing (24 August 2014), PPT lists were not available online. The 1792 list was an abstract. In November 2021, the PPT lists for Greenbrier were checked online at FamilySearch. A man with the Ingram surname was found in the county in 1788 and 1789. Ester was first seen in 1790 when the male Ingram disappeared from the lists. His name will not be divulged at this time. 
  2. Virginia Commissioner of the Revenue (Greenbrier County), “Personal property tax lists, 1782-1850” (browse-only images), FamilySearch, microfilm of original records at the Virginia State Library in Richmond, Virginia, Film 2024557, DGS 7849126, Personal property tax lists, 1782-1816, image 218 of 891, 1792, top page, entry 17, Ester Ingram 1 0 0 1. (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSQ2-3SQ3-Y?i=217&cat=777465 : accessed 27 November 2021). 
  3. Jim Talbert, Greenbrier Historical Society Archives and Library, archives@greenbrierhistorical.org, email dated 8 August 2006 to Cathy Meder-Dempsey, confirming the content of the permission slip dated 19 May 1790 and the marriage bond for the marriage of Patience Ingram to David Stay, originals in the possession of the GHS Archive. “Re. The marriage permission slip for David Shay and Rohana Ingram. It was signed by Easter Ingram for “my daughter” and dated May 19, 1790. There is also a permission slip for David signed by David Shay and John King. It contains the bride’s given name which could be Rehana, Tobicna, Pobicna, Robicna and I could see Patience if the “t” were crossed. Greenbrier Marriage Records transcribed by Larry Shuck shows the name as Patience, but has a marriage date of May 23, 1791. There is no husband of Easter named in any of these records.” 
  4. West Virginia Vital Research Records Project (database and images), West Virginia Division of Culture and History citing county records in county courthouses, West Virginia (A collaborative venture between the West Virginia State Archives and the Genealogical Society of Utah to place vital records online via the West Virginia Archives and History Web site accessible at https://archive.wvculture.org/vrr), West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 595040, image 59, Greenbrier County Minister’s Returns, page 136, entry 2, 23 May 1791, David Stay and Patience Ingram, by John McCue. (http://images.wvculture.org/595040/00059.jpg : accessed 17 August 2022). 
  5. GenForum, Ingram Surname Forum, message 4899, Re: Need parents of ELIZABETH INGRAM =m= 1785 WV by Nancy Adkins Adkins dated 4 August 2006 in reply to Cathy Meder-Dempsey (https://www.genealogy.com/forum/surnames/topics/ingram/4899/ accessed 4 August 2006) 
  6. WVCulture.org, West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 595040, image 59, Greenbrier County Minister’s Returns, page 136, entry 27, 20 Dec 1798, Francis Story and Elizabeth Ingram, married by John Alderson. (http://images.wvculture.org/595040/00059.jpg : accessed 17 August 2022). 
  7. “Land Office/Northern Neck Patents & Grants” (index and images from microfilm), Library of Virginia Archives (https://lva-virginia.libguides.com/land-grants), citing Virginia State Land Office, the collection is housed in the Archives at the Library of Virginia, Land Office Grants No. 33, 1795-1796, p. 306 (Reel 99), Land grant Greenbrier 28 November 1795, Ingram, Ester. grantee, 95 acres on a branch of Muddy Creek which is a branch of Greenbrier River and near the land of Richard Humphries, John Viney &c. (https://lva.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/01LVA_INST/altrmk/alma990007752150205756 : accessed 18 December 2012). 
  8. WVCulture.org, West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 595040, image 58, Greenbrier County Minister’s Returns, page 135, entry 27, 26 Nov 1787, William Slaven and Nancy Ingram, married by John Alderson. (http://images.wvculture.org/595040/00058.jpg : accessed 18 August 2022). 
  9. Ibid., West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 595040, image 30, Greenbrier County Minister’s Returns, page 63, entry 26, Parnel Ingram and Eliza Commens, married by J. Kobber. (http://images.wvculture.org/595040/00030.jpg : accessed 18 August 2022). 
  10. Virgil A. Lewis, M.A., State Historian and Archivist; The Soldiery of West Virginia, originally published 1911, reprinted for Clearfield Co., Inc. by Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, Maryland 1991, 1996, 1998; pg. 131. 
  11. West Virginia. County Court (Greenbrier County), “Order books, 1780-1911” browse-only images, FamilySearch, citing microfilm of original records at the Greenbrier County, West Virginia courthouse., Film 1637476, DGS 7617374, Vols. A-C 1780-1797 (C to 521), image 722 of 875, page 224, 3rd entry, 31 March 1795 – John Mathews vs. James Ingram in debt. (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99V1-X8ZK?i=721&cat=83879 : accessed 6 March 2022). 
  12. Ibid., Film 1637476, DGS 7617374, Vols. A-C 1780-1797 (C to 521), image 871 of 875, page 519, 1st entry, 1 April 1797, Jonathan Mathews assee of James Ingram vs. William Gilliland in debt. (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99V1-XDJ3?i=870&cat=83879 : accessed 18 August 2022). 
  13. “Personal property tax lists, 1782-1850,” Film 2024557, DGS 7849126, Personal property tax lists, 1782-1816, image 393 of 891, left page, entry 10, 16 April 1799, James Ingrim 1 0 0 2 tax 0.24. (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSQ2-3S38-P?i=392&cat=777465 : accessed 27 November 2021). 
  14. Greenbrier County Order books, 1780-1911, Film 1637476, DGS 7617374, Vols. C-G 1797-1811 (C from 520), image 188 of 953, page 314, 28 May 1799, The Commonwealth against William Dunn Jr., James Ingram on the jury. (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89V1-S9MM-2?i=187&cat=83879 : accessed 18 August 2022). 
  15. Greenbrier County (West) Virginia Records transcribed by Larry G. Shuck, volume 2: Greenbrier County (West) Virginia personal property tax lists: 1782/3, 1786/8, 1792, 1796, 1799, 1805 & 1815; Iberian Publishing Company, Athens, Georgia; pg. 210] 
  16. Ibid., pg. 257 
  17. Greenbrier County (West Virginia) County Clerk, “Deeds (Greenbrier County, West Virginia), 1780-1901” database with images, FamilySearch, citing microfilm of original records at the Greenbrier County Courthouse in Lewisburg, West Virginia, Film 593545, DGS 7765144, Deeds, v. 3-4 1803-1814, image 326 of 528, pages 169, 28 February 1809, John Conner and wife Mary Conner 120 acres for $1.00 to James Ingram on Meadow River and Sewel on ridge opposite Buffalow Lick in Greenbrier County. (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4X-2C5?i=325&cat=98577 : accessed 18 August 2022). 
  18. WVCulture.org, West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 595040, image 31, Greenbrier County Minister’s Returns, page 64, entry 16, Jas. Ingram and Margaret Kincaid, married by Josiah Osburn. (http://images.wvculture.org/595040/00031.jpg : accessed 18 August 2022). 
  19. J.R. Cole, History of Greenbrier County (published 1917 in Lewisburg, West Virginia) pg. 35 
  20. Virginia Tax List Censuses, (reconstructed 1790, 1800, and 1810 federal censuses using tax list, microfilm images with every name indexes), Binns Genealogy,(http://www.binnsgenealogy.com/VirginiaTaxListCensuses/) citing original records from Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia or Family History Library, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Salt Lake City, Utah, Greenbrier County, Virginia, 1810 Personal Tax List B, page 6, right side, line 2nd to last, James Ingram. 1810 Greenbrier County, Virginia Tax List. (http://www.binnsgenealogy.com/FreeSample/CDR-000484/1810/1810PersonalB/06.pdf : accessed 16 January 2020). 
  21. “Deeds (Greenbrier County, West Virginia), 1780-1901,” Film 593547, DGS 8589064, Deeds, v. 5 1813-1814, image 59-60 of 372, page 94-95, 25 Feb 1812, James Ingram and wife Margaret, 120 acres for $1.00 to Newbury Stockton, conveyed to Ingram by John Conner on ridge leading to Buffaloe Lick (Greenbrier). (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C37T-4SZ2-T?i=58&cat=98577 : accessed 18 August 2022). 
  22. Shuck, Greenbrier County (West) Virginia personal property tax lists: 1782/3, 1786/8, 1792, 1796, 1799, 1805 & 1815, pg. 287. 
  23. 1820 U.S. Federal Census (index and images), Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7734/), citing Fourth Census of the United States, 1820 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C., NARA microfilm publication M33, 142 rolls, NARA Roll: M33_132, image: 154, Virginia, Greenbrier County, Lewisburg, page 176 (crossed out, should be 178), line 14, James Ingram (accessed 22 August 2014). 
  24. WVCulture.org, Kanawha County, Upper District, Register of Deaths, page 191, line 23, died 12 Jul 1900, Mathew Ingram, born 9 Jan 1824. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view2.aspx?FilmNumber=460366&ImageNumber=206 : 27 April 2013). 
  25. WVCulture.org, West Virginia Deaths, 1804-1999, FHL microfilm 584754, image 164, Fayette County Register of Deaths, page 165 (double-page spread), entry 27, 2nd district, Cynthia Tincher, 3 May 1910, age 82 yrs 1 month 8 days, died in Page. (http://images.wvculture.org/584754/00164.jpg : accessed 18 August 2022). Note: age at death calculates to a birth date of 25 March 1829. 
  26. Betty LeMasters, Samuel Carter Cemetery, Dempsey, Fayette County, West Virginia, [on Dempsey Branch (Laurel Creek) behind Doggett Chapel], listing posted to Fayette County (WV) Footprints (obsolete website) 13 May 2005. Tincher, Cynthia; Mar. 25, 1828 – May 3, 1910; w/o John. 
  27. L. Neil Darlington, Cabins of the Loop and Environs of the Southern Half of Fayette County Virginia (Now West Virginia)” (December 1987, McClain Printing Company, Parsons, West Virginia, 1988) pg. 222-223 
  28. “Land Office/Northern Neck Patents & Grants” (index and images from microfilm), Library of Virginia Archives (https://lva-virginia.libguides.com/land-grants), citing Virginia State Land Office, the collection is housed in the Archives at the Library of Virginia, Land Office Grants No. 94, 1842-1843, p. 507 (Reel 160), Robert and Matthew Ingram Land grant 31 August 1843, 120 acres on Loop Creek in Fayette County, West VIrginia. (https://lva.primo.exlibrisgroup.com/permalink/01LVA_INST/altrmk/alma990007752490205756 : accessed 16 February 2002). 
  29. WVCulture.org, West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 521719, image 215, Kanawha County Marriage Records, page 75, entry 27, 4 Aug 1829, Charles Walker and Elizabeth Ingram (http://images.wvculture.org/521719/00215.jpg : accessed 18 August 2022) 
  30. 1830 U.S. Federal Census (index and images), Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/8058/), citing Fifth Census of the United States, 1830 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. NARA microfilm publication M19, 201 rolls, Nara Roll M19_191, FHL Film: 0029670, Virginia, Kanawha, page 197 (double-page spread), line 17, James Ingram (accessed 22 August 2014). 
  31. Fayette County Chamber of Commerce, History of Fayette County, West Virginia 1993 (Fayette County Chamber of Commerce, 310 Oyler Avenue, Oak Hill, WV 25901,1993), pg. 21. Personal copy bought 2000. In April of 1835, an election was held in Fayette Co. (including the area that is now Raleigh Co.) to determine the location of the new Court House and County Seat, James Ingrahm and his son Joshua Ingraham are on the list of voters who voted for Kanawha Falls. James, Jr. could possibly have been deceased at this time. 
  32. Luella Arlene Loving Lowther, First Tidbits of Information on Robert Ingram and Huldah Johnson, e-mail correspondence in May 2000 with Cathy Meder-Dempsey. 
  33. “West Virginia Will Books, 1756-1971,” database with images, FamilySearch, Fayette > Will book, v. 001 1832-1866 > image 23 of 292 > inventory and appraisement of the estate of Melitus J. Landcraft.  (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-C9SQ-9Q?cc=1909099&wc=M6DN-5NG%3A179689901%2C179689902 : 23 October 2018) 
  34. History of Fayette County, West Virginia 1993, pg. 21. 
  35. 1840 U.S. Federal Census (index and images), Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/8057/), citing Sixth Census of the United States, 1840 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C., NARA microfilm publication M704, 580 rolls, NARA Roll: M704_555, FHL Film: 0029685, Virginia, Fayette County, page 3 (double-page spread, left side), line 17, James Ingram (accessed 22 August 2014). 
  36. I cannot prove this family tradition. John was not found in the 1850 census. Several records show his presence in Fayette County in 1851 and 853. 
  37. 1850 U.S. Federal Census (index and images), Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/8054/), citing Seventh Census of the United States, 1850 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C., NARA microfilm publication M432, 1009 rolls, Roll: M432_943, Virginia, Fayette County, sheet 362B, household 419-419, lines 10-15, a laborer in the John Tincher household (accessed 19 December 2012). 
  38. Ibid., Roll: M432_943, Virginia, Fayette County, sheet 366A, household 462-462, lines 4-7, Margaret Ingram (accessed 11 June 2018). The official enumeration day of the 1850 census was 1 June 1850. 
  39. WVCulture.org, West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 584764, image 218, Fayette County Marriages, page 56, entry 9, 9 Jan 1851, John Johnson Darlington and Ruth Ingram, married by John Johnson. (http://images.wvculture.org/584764/00218.jpg : accessed 24 April 2022). 
  40. Ibid., West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 584764, image 218, Fayette County Marriages, page 57, entry 7, 13 Feb 1851, John Ingram and Lucy Jane Skaggs, married by Allen Wood. (http://images.wvculture.org/584764/00218.jpg : accessed 24 April 2022). 
  41. Ibid., West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 584764, image 219, Fayette County Marriages, page 59, entry 2, 23 Mar 1851, John Tincher and Cinthy Ingram, married by John Johnson. (http://images.wvculture.org/584764/00219.jpg : accessed 24 April 2022). 
  42. This is a family tradition. No record transferring Matthew’s share to Robert has been found. The land tax records show Robert and Matthew paying tax on the 120 acres in 1844 and 1845. In 1846 and 1847 the name was written Robert M. Ingram and thereafter, only Robert Ingram was named as the owner who paid tax on the land. 
  43. “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2016,” database with images, FamilySearch, citing digital images of originals housed at the county courthouses in Ohio, Meigs > Marriage records 1852-1862 vol 2 > image 77 of 271 > page 96 (stamped), entry 1, 20 Aug 1854, Matthew Ingram and Sarah Frances Martin, married by R. Wilkinson, M.G., citing Meigs County, Ohio. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-91QN-R8?cc=1614804&wc=Z51G-DP8%3A121348301%2C121390201 : accessed 24 April 2022). 
  44. WVCulture.org, West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 521720, image 27, Register of Marriages, Kanawha County, page 21 (double-page spread), line 86, 12 July 1860, John Ingraham and Delilah Smith, citing near Sissonville. (http://images.wvculture.org/521720/00027.jpg : accessed 24 April 2022). 
  45. 1860 U.S. Federal Census (index and images), Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/7667/), citing Eighth Census of the United States, 1860 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C., NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls, Roll: M653_1344; Family History Library Film: 805344; Virginia, Fayette County, District 4, sheet 422, page 126, household 937-864, line 33, James Ingrum (accessed 22 August 2014). 
  46. “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2016,” Meigs > Marriage records 1862-1866 vol 3 > image 11 of 292 > Record of Marriages of Meigs County , page 16 (stamped), record No. 36, 23 Aug 1862, Isaac E. Lewis and Mahala C. Ingraham. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:939K-PJSF-C9?cc=1614804&wc=ZRHZ-RM9%3A121348301%2C121432201 : accessed 25 April 2022). 
  47. James Simon Ingram, compiler, History of the Ingram Family, includes family groups sheets and census information sent per email by JSI to Cathy Meder-Dempsey in May 2001 (prepared in October 1997). 
  48. WVCulture.org, West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 521720, image 73, Register of Marriages, page 67, line 184, 1 Dec 1869, John Ingram and Mary E. Adkins. (http://images.wvculture.org/521720/00073.jpg : accessed 24 April 2022). 
  49. Ibid., Kanawha County, Upper District, Register of Deaths, page 191, line 23, died 12 Jul 1900, Mathew Ingram, born 9 Jan 1824. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view2.aspx?FilmNumber=460366&ImageNumber=206 : 27 April 2013). 
  50. Ibid., West Virginia Deaths, 1804-1999, FHL microfilm 584754, image 164, Fayette County Register of Deaths, page 165 (double-page spread), entry 27, 2nd district, Cynthia Tincher, 3 May 1910, age 82 yrs 1 month 8 days, died in Page. (http://images.wvculture.org/584754/00164.jpg : accessed 18 August 2022). 

Author: Cathy Meder-Dempsey

When I’m not doing genealogy and blogging, I spend time riding my racing bike with my husband through the wonderful Luxembourg countryside.

16 thoughts on “52 Ancestors: #34 James INGRAM, Where Did You Hide the Key?”

  1. I was fascinated with everything you found and wrote about James Ingram. I wonder if he’s related to the Ingram family of Franklin County, Virginia? Another thing that jumped out at me was a name on the 1793 list of Greenbrier County Rangers. James Kelley is listed as a Private. I know he’s not my ancestor, James Kelley, because James had finished serving in the Rev. War, was married and living in Bedford County at the time…but I was startled when I saw the name because there were other Kelley men (and they spelled “Kelley” with the “Ey”) in Greenbrier County, also supposedly not related to my family…very interesting! You do a fantastic job, Cathy!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I enjoyed this history very much. I am the widow of Richard Henry Ingram, born in Charleston WV, 1/22/55. His father was Omri Cornelius Ingram, born in Fayette county, 12/1912. We visited Ingram Branch once but my husband had no idea how long the family had been there. Thanks for filling in some gaps for me.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Josi, for taking the time to comment. I didn’t know your husband had passed away. My condolences to you and your family. I knew your sister-in-law Sharon Ingram Williams passed away in 2018 but I had not updated my information on Omri’s family. I’m glad to hear you enjoyed reading about the Ingram family.

      Like

    1. The Wood-McGraw couple has hundreds of descendants in the WV area they lived in as well as throughout the US and the world. Several cousins have commented in groups I shared to on Facebook as well as here. Some new to me and others people I am virtual friends with. Thank you, Amy.

      Liked by 1 person

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