52 Ancestors: #7 The Railroad Switchman’s Family

Week 7 (Feb 12-18) – Love. Which ancestor do you love to research? Which ancestor do you feel especially close to? Which ancestor seemed to have a lot of love?

The KREMER-GRISIUS family had a lot of love. Two daughters loved enough have sons without marrying. A daughter loved God and the Catholic Church enough to become a nun. A daughter was killed in the City of Love during World War II in the bombardment of a train. A daughter married and moved to Manosque, a town in the heart of the French Provence. A son died in his 6th month only days after Valentine’s Day. Son Fritz, who loved to fish, married and had two children he dearly loved, one of them was Maisy, the mother of my husband, the love of my life.

The KREMER-GRISIUS Family of Bettendorf and Moestroff (1875-1996) 

marker

1875birth
Nicolas

Nicolas KREMER, son of Anton (Antoine) KREMER and Anna Maria MERKES, was born at one o’clock in the morning on 18 November 1875 in Bettendorf, Canton Diekirch, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. His parents were 40 and 39 at the time of his birth.[1]

1879birth
Catherine

Catherine GRISIUS, daughter of Heinrich GRISIUS and Elisabeth WECKERING, was born at 5 o’clock in the afternoon on 7 September 1879 in Hoscheid, Canton Diekirch, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Her parents were 40 and 29 when she was born.[2]

In 1895 Nicolas was with his brother Peter working as a servant (Dienstknecht) in France. Nicolas had been there a year and a half while his brother Peter had been there five years. By 1900 Nicolas was back in Luxembourg and planning to marry.[3]

An Early Marriage for Nicolas and Catherine

1900marriage
1900 Marriage Record No. 21

Catherine, a 22 years old maid (Dienstmagd), and Nicolas, a 25 years old worker (Arbeiter) must have gotten up very early to get married at 8 o’clock in the morning on Wednesday, 28 November 1900. Banns had been read only once on Sunday the 18th of November in Bettendorf as both the bride and groom had their residence in that town. They brought with them a copy of the birth record from the register of Hoscheid for the bride. Catherine’s parents were from Hoscheid, a village about 17 km from Bettendorf, and Nicolas’ parents were from Bettendorf where the marriage took place. Nicolas’ brother Pierre KREMER, one of the witnesses, lived in Mersch, 26 km from Bettendorf. Another witness was the 63 years old Nicolas KREMER, a first cousin once removed of the groom. The two other witnesses were not related to the bridal couple. The mother of the groom and the parents of the bride did not sign the marriage record and it was noted they they could not write.[4]

What gifts, if any, did the bridal couple receive? What would they need to buy for their life together? Did they need or own a bedroom, living room, or dining room set?

ad4
Ad in the Dec 1, 1900 issue of Luxemburger Wort.[5]
Would they have to buy a matress for their bed? Would the bride bring sheets, duvets, pillows, and blankets to keep them warm in their bed?

ad1
Ad in the Dec 1, 1900 issue of Luxemburger Wort.[5]
Would they have a fancy oven to heat their home?

ad3
Ad in the Dec 1, 1900 issue of Luxemburger Wort.[5]
Would they even have their own home from the begining? Apparently not, as Catherine was seen with her parents-in-law in the 1900 census. This was taken three days after their marriage and Nicolas was seen as not living with his bride and parents. He had been in Oberanven, a town near Luxembourg City, for two days on business. What a way to spend a honeymoon![6][7]

1900census
1900 Luxembourg Census. Persons in the household.[6]
1900census2
1900 Luxembourg Census. Persons absent from household.[7]

 The Children of Catherine and Nicolas KREMER-GRISIUS

1901birth
Elise

Child 1: Elise KREMER was born 26 September 1901 at 11 o’clock in the morning in the Kremer house in Bettendorf. It is very probable that this was the home of her grandfather Anton KREMER was was one of the witnesses on her birth record. Elise’s parents were 25 and 22 at the time. Her father Nicolas, a worker (Arbeiter), was the informant. Elise’s grandfather, also a worker, signed his name Antoine KREMER rather than Anton as his name was written on the record by the second witness Georges MORES, farmer (Ackerer).[8]

1903 birth
Anna

Child 2: Anna KREMER was born 20 November 1903 at 9 o’clock in the evening in the Kremer house in Bettendorf. Her father Nicolas, a railroad official (Eisenbahnbeamter), reported the birth the next day at 9 o’clock in the morning. Her grandfather Anton KREMER, town crier/messenger (Gemeindebote), was one of the witnesses. The other witness, Georges MORES, was the secretary who did the clerical work for the mayor, Michel CONZEMIUS. Anna’s parents were 28 and 25.[9]

1905irth
Franz

Child 3: Fritz KREMER was born 6 March 1905 at 2:30 in the morning in the Kremer house in Bettendorf. His father Nicolas, railroad official (Eisenbahnbeamter), reported the birth the same day at 10 o’clock in the morning. Georges MORES, secretary (Sekretär) took care of the paperwork for the mayor who was listed as Michel CONZEMIUS. The mayor may not have been available as the record was signed by M. ERNZEN. The parents were 29 and 25.[10]

1907birth
Margaretha

Child 4: Margaretha KREMER was born 11 February 1907 at one o’clock in the afternoon in the Kremer house in Bettendorf. Her father Nicolas, railroad official (Eisenbahnbeamter), reported the birth four hours later. Georges MORES, secretary (Sekretär) took care of the paperwork for the mayor Michel CONZEMIUS. As was the case when her first three siblings’ births were reported, the 71 years old grandfather Antoine was a witness. The parents were 31 and 27.[11]

1909birth
Marie

Child 5: Marie KREMER was born 7 December 1909 at 2:30 in the morning in the Kremer house in Bettendorf. Her father Nicolas, railroad official (Eisenbahnbeamter), reported the birth at 10 o’clock the same morning. Georges MORES, secretary (Sekretär) took care of the paperwork for the mayor Michel CONZEMIUS. Grandfather Antoine was a witness. The parents were seen as 33 and 30. In 1996 a civil official annotated the record in the left top margin with the date and place of death and the death record number.[12]

1910birth
Johanna

Child 6: Johanna KREMER was born 2 December 1910 at 3 o’clock in the morning in the Kremer house in Bettendorf. Her father Nicolas, railroad official (Eisenbahnbeamter), reported the birth at 10 o’clock the same morning. Georges MORES, secretary (Sekretär) took care of the paperwork for the mayor Michel CONZEMIUS. Grandfather Antoine was not present this time. Instead Franz GRISIUS, named as an acquaintance, actually the brother of the mother of the newborn child, was the witness. The parents were 35 and 31.[13]

1912birth
Theresia

Child 7: Theresia KREMER was born at 7 o’clock in the evening of 13 July 1912 in Moestroff, the neighboring village to Bettendorf. Her father Nicolas, railroad official (Eisenbahnbeamter), reported the birth at 9 o’clock the next morning in Bettendorf and his 76 years old father Antoine was present as a witness. Georges MORES, secretary (Sekretär) took care of the paperwork for the mayor Michel CONZEMIUS. The parents were 36 and 32. In 1987 a civil official annotated the record in the left margin with the date and place of death and the death record number.[14]

1913birth
Nicolas, birth
1914death
Nicolas, death

Child 8: Nicolas KREMER was born at 11 o’clock in the evening of 14 September 1913 in Moestroff. As with Theresia, the name of the house he was born in is not given. His father Nicolas, railroad official (Eisenbahnbeamter), reported the birth at one o’clock the next afternoon in Bettendorf. Georges MORES, secretary (Sekretär) took care of the paperwork for the mayor Michel CONZEMIUS. The parents were 38 and 35.[15] A little over five months later his father Nicolas had the sad duty of reporting little Nicolas’ death at 7 o’clock in the evening of 20 February 1914, an hour after the death took place. A railroad colleague, Nicolas MULLER from Moestroff, came with the father to report the death.[16]

UPDATE: On 2 May 2015 I found the birth and death record of another child.
Child 9: Théodore KREMER was born 7 April 1916* and died nine months later on 22 January 1917**. Both events took place in Moestroff.
* Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1793-1923 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Bettendorf > Naissances 1896-1923 Mariages 1895-1923 > image 365 of 777. 1916 Birth Record No. 7. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32044-7600-63?cc=1709358&wc=9RTB-2NG:129626601,130150302 : accessed 2 May 2015).
** Ibid, Bettendorf > Décès 1895-1923 > image 315 of 389. 1917 Death Record No. 4. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32048-24224-65?cc=1709358&wc=9RT1-926:129626601,129623802 : accessed 2 May 2015).

 Child 10: Catherine GRISIUS gave birth to a stillborn female child at 3 o’clock in the morning of 19 April 1918 in Moestroff.[17] An hour later she died at the age of 38. Her husband Nicolas KREMER had the responsibility of reporting the deaths of his wife Catherine and their 9th child at 3 o’clock that afternoon. Nicolas’ occupation was a bit different than it had been when he reported the births of his children from 1903-1913. He was now seen as a switchman (Weichensteller). Theodore Doffing, a farmer and acquaintance of Nicolas, accompanied him to the town hall in Bettendorf and served as a witness.[18]

1918deaths
Deaths of Mother and Child

Transportation Between Moestroff and Bettendorf

My husband and I have ridden through Moestroff and Bettendorf many times on our racing bikes. It’s a short distance between the two towns, less than 2 km. The building (below) is the former train station of Moestroff and is now a private home. The bike route follows the path where the railroad tracks used to be.

Below the bike route is a rural road, now strict access only, used to connect the two towns. The main road used today is on the other side of the Sauer River which runs through both towns.

moestroff
Train station in Moestroff. Photo used with permission.

While writing this I wondered if Nicolas walked or rode a bike on the rural road from Moestroff to Bettendorf when he went to register the births of the children born in Moestroff and his wife’s death. Or, since he was a railroad worker, did he take the train from Moestroff to Bettendorf?

bettendorf
Train station in Bettendorf. Photo taken and used with permission.

We took a special trip to Moestroff and Bettendorf this morning to take these photos of the former train stations. The building in Bettendorf is also now a private home. A person who was at home gave us permission to take this picture as well as one of the back side of the building where the railroad tracks used to be. A collections of photos of the stations in Luxembourg can be found on The Railways in and around Luxembourg (D’Eisebunn zu an ëm Lëtzebuerg) and includes some older photos of the stations in Moestroff and Bettendorf.

Life After Catherine’s Death

Nicolas was left with 7 children, 6 daughters between 6 and 17 years of age and a 13 years old son Franz. Nine days later Nicolas once again reported a death, his 81 years old father Anton KREMER.[19]

Elise, Nicolas and Catherine’s oldest daughter, raised her siblings in place of her mother. Her son Nic. was born out of wedlock in 1919 and raised along with her siblings who considered him a brother. Elise never married and died at the age of 40 in 1941.[20]

MRIN14674 1941 Elise Kremer death
Luxemburger Wort[20]
Elise’s sister Anna went to Paris to work and during World War II was killed when the train she was on was bombarded. This is a family story and no record has been found as yet to support it. Paris was listed in Elise’s death notice as one of the residences of a family member. This could mean that Anna died after 7 April 1941 and before the end of World War II in 1945. Another of Elise’s siblings was living in Sfax in Tunisia, most likely Johanna, who went by Jeanne, and was married to Frédéric DE GIORGIO.

World War II brought many changes. In Nicolas’ case it meant that the first name he was given at birth was changed to Nikolaus. I would not have known this if I hadn’t obtained a photocopy of his original birth record from the town hall in Bettendorf in 1995. During World War II Luxembourg was occupied by the Germans and all administrations were headed by them. They went through the birth records of the people living in a town and placed a stamp in the margin changing the name to the German equivalent. Luckily KREMER was German enough for them not to change it. After the war the Luxembourg authorities added their own stamp making the first nul and void.

1875birth
Photocopy of the original birth record found in Bettendorf birth register.
1943stamp
Stamps seen in the left margin of the birth record

Translation (first stamp):
Due to the
regulation of the C.d.Z.*
from 31 January 1941 to change the first
and 
surnames in Luxembourg the
designated person (in this record)

Name: Nikolaus
Certificate of Diekirch District
from 21 December 1942
Diekirch, the 1 March 1943

Registrar: representative
signature of the registrar
Translation (second stamp):
Declared nul and void
in Bettendorf on [date omitted]
The civil officer:
signed J. Pierre Goebel

*C.d.Z. = Chef der Zivilverwaltung or Head of Civil Administration.

Nicolas KREMER died in 1951.[21] The year of death was found on the family gravemarker in the cemetery (Kirfecht) in Moestroff. I have not taken steps to obtain his death record. He left a son, four daughters, three grandsons, a granddaughter, and two great-grandsons.

MRIN04944 1971-01-08 François Kremer obitHis son Franz KREMER married Suzanne PEFFER on 7 January 1931 and died in 1972.[22]

Nicolas’ daughter Margaretha, also known as Gréit, died in 1975 as seen on her birth record.[11] I have not been able to find out if she ever married. She did not have children living in 1987 when her sister Thérèse died.

His daughter Theresia, or Tatta Thérèse, became a nun when she was young, left the order at some time, and worked as a nurse with the same doctor she had worked for as a nun. Tatta Thérèse died on 2 November 1987 leaving two sisters, Jeanne and Marie.[14]

1996obitJeanne was living in Manosque, a town in the heart of the French Provence, at the time that Thérèse died.[23] No trace of her has been found after 1987 when the succession of Thérèse’s estate was settled.

Jeanne must have died before 1996 as she was not mentioned in the obituary her sister Marie, Tatta Marie, as she was known to her niece, nephews, grandnieces and grandnephews. In her obituary at right the surname Schneider is an error and should be Schleider. Tatta Marie never married and had a son.[24]

Sources:
[1] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1793-1923 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Bettendorf > Naissances 1828-1890 Mariages 1800-1816 > image 969 of 1507. 1875 Birth Record No. 68. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-13200-1624-19?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-28S:1346120346 : accessed 02 Apr 2013).
[2] Ibid, Hoscheid > Naissances 1851-1890 Mariages 1800-1890 Décès 1798-1826 > image 282 of 1491. “.” 1879 Birth Record No. 21. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11672-57323-81?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2B6:1412473990 : accessed 01 Apr 2013).
[3] Luxembourg, Volkszählungen 1843-1900 (images), FamilySearch, (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Bettendorf > 1895 > image 305 of 810. Kremer-Merkes household No. 3. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32467-10959-35?cc=2037957&wc=M5GD-FM4:346114101,345878001 : accessed 11 February 2015).
[4] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1793-1923 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Bettendorf > Naissances 1896-1923 Mariages 1895-1923 > image 530 of 777. “.” 1900 Marriage Record No. 21. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32044-7034-74?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-28W:n1332603780 : accessed 01 Apr 2013).
[5] Luxemburger Wort, digitized by the Bibliothèque nationale de Luxembourg, http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu (Verlage der St-Paulus-Druckerei, Luxembourg), 1 December 1900, page 4 (http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu/webclient/DeliveryManager?application=DIRECTLINK&custom_att_2=simple_viewer&pid=1033115&search_terms=#panel:pp|issue:1033115|page:4 : accessed 11 Feb 2015)
[6] Luxembourg, Volkszählungen 1843-1900 (images), FamilySearch, (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Bettendorf > 1900 > image 85 of 793. Kremer-Merkes household with Kremer-Grisius. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32396-11048-31?cc=2037957&wc=M9MJ-1NN : accessed 13 January 2015).
[7] Ibid, Bettendorf > 1900 > image 86 of 793. Kremer-Merkes household with Kremer-Grisius. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32396-10670-43?cc=2037957&wc=M9MJ-1NN : accessed 13 January 2015).
[8] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1793-1923 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Bettendorf > Naissances 1896-1923 Mariages 1895-1923 > image 104 of 777. 1901 Birth Record No. 42. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32044-6214-61?cc=1709358&wc=9RTB-2NG:129626601,130150302 : accessed 13 January 2015).
[9] Ibid, Bettendorf > Naissances 1896-1923 Mariages 1895-1923 >  Image 141 of 777. 1903 Birth Record No. 49. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32044-5949-12?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-28W:n1332603780 : accessed 2 Mar 2013).
[10] Ibid, Bettendorf > Naissances 1896-1923 Mariages 1895-1923 > image 168 of 777. 1905 Birth Record No. 12. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32044-5938-16?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-28W:n1332603780 : accessed 01 Apr 2013).
[11] Ibid, Bettendorf > Naissances 1896-1923 Mariages 1895-1923 > image 206 of 777. 1907 Birth Record No. 6;  includes annotation concerning her death. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32044-6057-34?cc=1709358&wc=9RTB-2NG:129626601,130150302 : accessed 13 January 2015).
[12] Ibid, Bettendorf > Naissances 1896-1923 Mariages 1895-1923 > image 257 of 777. 1909 Birth Record No. 50; includes annotation concerning her death. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32044-5705-62?cc=1709358&wc=9RTB-2NG:129626601,130150302 : accessed 13 January 2015).
[13] Ibid, Bettendorf > Naissances 1896-1923 Mariages 1895-1923 > image 296 of 777. 1910 Birth Record No. 52. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32044-5744-18?cc=1709358&wc=9RTB-2NG:129626601,130150302 : accessed 13 January 2015).
[14] Ibid, Bettendorf > Naissances 1896-1923 Mariages 1895-1923 > image 307 of 777. 1912 Birth Record No. 23; includes annotation concerning her death. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32044-5778-8?cc=1709358&wc=9RTB-2NG:129626601,130150302 : accessed 13 January 2015).
[15] Ibid, Bettendorf > Naissances 1896-1923 Mariages 1895-1923 > image 323 of 777. 1913 Birth Record No. 23. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32044-5960-9?cc=1709358&wc=9RTB-2NG:129626601,130150302 : accessed 13 January 2015).
[16] Ibid, Bettendorf > Décès 1895-1923 > image 275 of 389. 1914 Death Record No. 7. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32048-24390-77?cc=1709358&wc=9RT1-926:129626601,129623802 : accessed 13 January 2015).
[17] Ibid, Bettendorf > Décès 1895-1923 > image 328 of 389. 1918 Stillbirth Kremer No. 8. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32048-23912-78?cc=1709358&wc=9RT1-926:129626601,129623802 : accessed 26 Sep 2014).
[18] Ibid, Bettendorf > Décès 1895-1923 > image 328 of 389. “.” 1918 Death Record No. 9. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32048-23912-78?cc=1709358&wc=9RT1-926:129626601,129623802 : accessed 26 Sep 2014).
[19] Ibid, Bettendorf > Décès 1895-1923 > image 329 of 389. 1918 Death Record No. 11. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32048-24192-81?cc=1709358&wc=9RT1-926:129626601,129623802 : accessed 27 Sep 2014).
[20] Luxemburger Wort, digitized by the Bibliothèque nationale de Luxembourg, http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu (Verlage der St-Paulus-Druckerei, Luxembourg), 7 April 1941, No. 97, page 12, top of column 2. (http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu/webclient/DeliveryManager?application=DIRECTLINK&custom_att_2=simple_viewer&pid=770518&search_terms=elise%20kremer%20moestroff#panel:pp|issue:770518|article:DTL340|query:elise kremer moestroff : accessed 10 Feb 2015).
[21] Moestroff Kierfecht, Moestroff, Luxembourg. KREMER-GRISIUS family gravemarker (photo © 1995 Egon Meder)
[22] Luxemburger Wort, 8 January 1971, clipping
[23] Lucien Schuman, Notarial Act No. 1839 dated 13 November 1987 concerning the succession of the estate of Thérèse Kremer.
[24] Luxemburger Wort, 4 October 1996, clipping

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Nicolas KREMER
Parents: Anton KREMER and Anna Maria MERKES
Spouse: Cathérine GRISIUS
Parents of Spouse: Heinrich “Henri” GRISIUS and Elisabeth WECKERING
Whereabouts: Moestroff, Bettendorf, Diekirch, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: husband’s great-grandparents

  1. Nicolas KREMER and Cathérine GRISIUS
  2. Franz “Fritz” KREMER
  3. Marie Françoise “Maisy” KREMER
  4. Cathy’s husband

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.

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Author: Cathy Meder-Dempsey

As a military brat I've lived in Georgia, France, Idaho, West Virginia, Spain, South Carolina, Texas, and Luxembourg. Married 36 years with two grown children. When I’m not doing genealogy, I spend time riding my racing bike with my husband through the wonderful countryside in Luxembourg and surrounding countries.

14 thoughts on “52 Ancestors: #7 The Railroad Switchman’s Family”

    1. Thank you!! I wondered if I could get this one to fit the theme and when I began writing the first paragraph it flowed right into the present. And yes Karen, we are lucky! When my husband read it, he asks jokingly, “Do you need bonus points?” But I know it made him very happy to be included this way – and it is his family.

      Like

    1. The deaths of the mother and child and the daughter who was killed in Paris do make it a sad story. However I think there must have been many happy times. Their son Fritz turned out to be a man whose open manner and correctness earned him friendship and trust. Thank you Amy. The records and their availability makes for easy research.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Wonderful story. I especially like the details of the records you’ve found. It’s interesting to see so much of history that isn’t common knowledge everywhere. I had no idea the German’s actually changed names! Thanks for making history come alive.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Wanda and you’re welcome. I didn’t learn this in history class either. I’ve run across several of these stamps in the records but since they keep a double record system some won’t be found by the people using FamilySearch. I would never have known about Nicolas being changed to Nikolaus if I hadn’t gone to the town hall for the record.

      Like

  2. Oh Cathy, I also found this a wonderful, moving story! You tell the story so very well, and present the research well on top of it all! I loved your first paragraph especially. So perfect for Valentine’s season! The pictures are wonderful, but more than that, the thought of you and your sweetheart riding into town and getting permission to take these lovely photos, and sharing them with us so immediately, well it is amzing to me! Thanks again for a great read! Helen

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Such a great story, just love all your photos – they so make a story. The records there are great and helpful in story telling. Every story I read I’m always learning. I wish I could visit Luxembourg – from all the research I’ve been doing, I would so love to visit your country.

    Liked by 1 person

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