Slave Name Roll Project: RELEASING Letty, Cyrus, and Nelson

RELEASING: One old Negro woman, 1 Negro woman named Letty, one Negro boy named Cyrus, one Negro boy named Nelson, and a child born to Letty.
In Nicholas County, (West) Virginia, William Bell died before 10 August 1825. He did not leave a will. An appraisement and inventory of his estate were ordered on 10 August 1825 and a list was made on 24 August 1825 by four commissioners.
“West Virginia Will Books, 1756-1971,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-4L57-N?cc=1909099&wc=Q8B7-1PJ%3A179686001%2C179686002 : 22 June 2016), Nicholas > image 23 of 158; county courthouses, West Virginia.
“West Virginia Will Books, 1756-1971,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-4L56-X?cc=1909099&wc=Q8B7-1PJ%3A179686001%2C179686002 : 22 June 2016), Nicholas > image 24 of 158; county courthouses, West Virginia.

On the second page of the inventory and appraisement are four slaves who were held by William Bell.

1 old Negro woman valued at nothing from old age
1 Negro woman aged 30 named Letty valued at 250
1 Negro boy named Syrus 150
1 Negro boy named Nelson. Deformed (value blank)

The estate sale took place on 17 November 1825.

“West Virginia Will Books, 1756-1971,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-4L56-X?cc=1909099&wc=Q8B7-1PJ%3A179686001%2C179686002 : 22 June 2016), Nicholas > image 24 of 158; county courthouses, West Virginia.

The enslaved people of William Bell were not sold at the estate sale and the estate was not settled until 1833.

“West Virginia Will Books, 1756-1971,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-4L59-V?cc=1909099&wc=Q8B7-1PJ%3A179686001%2C179686002 : 22 June 2016), Nicholas > image 51 of 158; county courthouses, West Virginia.
“West Virginia Will Books, 1756-1971,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-4L5R-F?cc=1909099&wc=Q8B7-1PJ%3A179686001%2C179686002 : 22 June 2016), Nicholas > image 52 of 158; county courthouses, West Virginia.

On the second page of the 1833 settlement of the estate two slaves named in the inventory, Letty and Cyrus, were found.

By the sale of Letty and her child under a Trust deed 100.-
By sale of Cyrus under Trust deed 100.-

I checked the 1820 census and found William Bell was over 45 years old, with a woman who was also over 45 years old (wife), and seven other persons (2 females under 10, 1 female 10 thru 15, and 4 females 16 thru 25. Slaves in the household were: 2 males under 14, 1 male 14 thru 25, and 1 female 14 thru 25 (Letty).

By 1830, after William Bell had died, there were 2 females 15 thru 19 and 3 females 20 thru 29 in the household of Mary Bell who was 60 thru 69. I assumed Mary was the wife of William Bell. Further research shows this to be the correct household. In her household were five slaves: 2 males under 10 (Cyrus age 9), 1 male 10 thru 23, 1 female 24 thru 35 (Letty), and 1 female 55 thru 99 (old unnamed woman).

In 1840 Mary Bell was found in the newly formed Braxton County. She had 2 females 30 thru 39 in her household and she was seen as 60 thru 69. She still owned slaves: 2 males under 10, 1 male 10 thru 23 (Cyrus age 19), 1 males 36 thru 54, 1 female 10 thru 23, and 1 female 24 thru 35 (Letty).

In 1842 Elizabeth Bell, a daughter of William Bell, married William Hutchison. He was previously married and had children. In 1850 the Hutchison household included Jane T. Bell age 53, Hutchison’s wife Elizabeth age 50, and his children from the first marriage. On the slave schedule, William Hutchison and Jane Bell are listed one after the other. Jane Bell appears to have Cyrus age 33 and Letty age 52 as well as another male age 54, likely the male seen in her mother’s household in 1840.

Ancestry.com. 1850 U.S. Federal Census – Slave Schedules > Virginia > Braxton

In 1860 Jane Bell was still living in the household of her brother-in-law William and her sister Elizabeth. Although there was an entry for William Hutchison, there was no entry for Jane Bell on the 1860 Slave Schedule. The possible names of the slaves of William Hutchison will be shared in a later post.

Ancestry.com. 1860 U.S. Federal Census – Slave Schedules > Virginia > Braxton > page 1 of 2

In 1866 Hannah J. Hutchison was the informant on the death of her step-mother Elizabeth on 28 February, for Jane T. Bell on 21 March, and for her father William on 16 May.

The last will and testament of Jane T. Bell was located in Braxton County, West Virginia. She mentions Letty and Cyrus.

“West Virginia Will Books, 1756-1971,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-HY21-J?cc=1909099&wc=Q8BW-MZJ%3A179688701%2C179750901 : 21 June 2016), Braxton > Will book, v. 003 1862-1879 > image 52 of 215; county courthouses, West Virginia.

                                               Jane T. Bell’s Will
I, Jane T. Bell of Braxton County, Virginia being of sound mind do make this my last will & testatment. First. I give and bequeath unto my two slaves Letty and Cyrus their freedom if they will accept of it according to the laws of Virginia. And if the said slaves do no make choice of Emancipation my will and desire is that they may have the right to make choice of their masters. 2nd. I give and bequeath unto my sister Elizabeth Hutchison all the real and personal property of every kind that I may have at the time of my decease & all money or bonds that is due me at that time except the two above named slaves. Signed and sealed this first day of November 1858.
In the presence of                                                            Jane T. Bell *Seal*
Nathan Hutchison                                                                 her + mark
Felix Hutchison
Braxton County SS.
Recorders Office October 9th 1866. A writing purporting to be the last will and testament of Jane T. Bell decd was this day proven before the undersigned Recorder of Braxton County by the oaths of Nathan Hutchison & Felix Hutchison the subscribing witnesses thereto who declared on oath that the testator acknowledged this will in their presence and that each of said witnesses subscribed the said will in the presence of the testator. And thereupon the said will is admitted to record.
                                                                Teste. M. H. Morrison Recorder

By 1870, Cyrus and Letty were free persons and using the Bell surname. Although not free at the time Jane wrote her will, they became free people with the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863 and the Thirteenth Amendment in 1865 when slavery was abolished. In 1870 Cyrus was seen with Sarah E. 34 and children Eliza A. 15, Mary J. 12, Margaret E. 6, and Cora 2. Also in his household were John Alexander age 68 and Letty B. Bell age 70.

Year: 1870; Census Place: Clay, Braxton, West Virginia; Roll: M593_1685; Page: 400A; Image: 140850; Family History Library Film: 553184 (Ancestry.com : accesssed 26 March 2017)

Letty‘s 1876 death record shows she died at the age of 84 years 4 months in October 1876. Her parents were unknown and she was born in Augusta County, Virginia. She was a farmer and died of old age. Cyrus Bell was the informant and his relationship is seen as son of the deceased.

By 1880 the family of Cyrus Bell had increased by four with the births of William 1871, Ruskia 1874, Julia 1877, and Alison 1880. Sarah and Cyrus were not legally married until 11 May 1877. Sarah died 6 October 1887. Marriages were found for several daughters, three married men with the surname Johnson. I was not able to find them in 1900 or later. No death record was found for Cyrus who died after the 1900 census.

After finishing this post, I did a quick search for Letty and Cyrus to see if I had overlooked any kind of information already on the internet. I found a page with information on Braxton County African Americans in the Census and African Americans in the Braxton County 1880 Census.

I began this post, intending to share only the transcription of the documents with the names of the slaves. However, I could not leave it there. The genealogist wanted to follow the people. And because I did, I learned Letty was Cyrus’ mother. And this in turn makes me wonder if the older woman mentioned in the inventory and appraisement may have been Letty’s mother.

bestwishescathy1

True's statementFollowing my three part series on the slaves of my 5th grand-father James Sims during Black History Month in February 2015 I made a commitment to write a post on a monthly basis until I’ve RELEASED all of the names of slaves owned by my ancestors or owned by persons I’ve researched who were relatives or neighbors of my ancestors. These posts are part of the Slave Name Roll Project which can be found on Schalene Jennings Dagutis’ blog Tangled Roots and Trees

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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52 Ancestors: #12 A German Family Influenced by the French

My children’s 5th great-grandparents Johann Adam GORGES and Eva Clara RODENS were both born in the 1760s in the small town of Fell. Eva Clara was 14 months older than Johann Adam. Living in such a small town, they must have known each other from a young age. Fell is today part of the municipality of Schweich an der Römischen Weinstraße (Schweich on the Roman wine road) in the district of Trier-Saar in the west of the Rhineland-Palatinate in Germany.

Eva Clara

The first child of the newlyweds Nikolaus RODENS (1744-1795) and Anna SCHUE (d. 1805), Eva Clara was born on 28 November 1764 in Fell. She was baptized the following day in the Catholic church Sankt Martinus in the town of Fell. The parish church is no longer standing today. In it’s place is a church built from 1865 to 1868. The new church was built crosswise on the same spot as the old church.

Eva Clara was the first of ten children. Her siblings were Barbara 1767, Nikolaus 1770, Nikolaus 1774, Philipp 1775, Matthias d. 1776, two stillborn children in 1778 and 1779, Anna 1781, and Maria Margaretha d. 1784.

By the time Eva Clara was 24 years old and ready to marry she had only two siblings still living, her 13 years old brother Philipp and her 7 years old sister Anna.

Johann Adam

Johann Peter GORGES (1718-1784) and Anna Maria HORSCH had four children before their son Johann Adam was born and baptized on 28 January 1766 in Fell. Like all of his siblings, he was baptized in the Sankt Martinus church in Fell.

His older siblings were Anna Maria 1758, Elisabeth 1760, Maria Angela 1762, and Barbara 1763. His younger siblings were Maximin 1767, Johann Peter 1769, and Maria Angela 1771. Johann Adam also had four older half-siblings as his father was previously married and widowed. They were Anna Maria 1752, Johann 1753, Johann Joseph 1755, and Katharina 1757.

Johann Adam was 14 years old when his mother Anna Maria HORSCH died on 17 October 1780. He was 18 when his father Johann Peter GORGES died on 31 January 1784.

Couplehood and Parenthood

Johann Adam GORGES was 23 years old when he married Eva Clara RODENS on 11 February 1789 in Fell. They would make their home in Oberfell (Upper Fell).

Prise de la Bastille
Prise de la Bastille, 14 July 1789 (Jean-Pierre Houël [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons)
The young couple was married five months when the French Revolution erupted on 14 July 1789 with the storming of the Bastille in Paris. Three years later when French troops invaded Germany they were at first pushed back. But the German imperial army was defeated in late 1792 in Valmy. In August 1794, French Republican troops took Trier. All German territories on the left bank of the Rhine River were ceded to France in 1797 at the peace treaties of Basel and Campo Formio making Trier a French city. Control of the Rhineland was secured by France who would occupy the area for twenty years.

During the years France was in control of the Rhineland Johann Adam and Eva Clara raised their family of ten children. The first children born were Nikolaus on 15 March 1790, Barbara on 25 March 1792 and Anton on 12 April 1794.

Only these first three children would know their maternal grandfather Nikolaus RODENS who died two days after the youngest son Anton celebrated his first birthday. Nikolaus was buried on 15 April 1795, a day after his death.

The next two children, Matthias born 26 April 1796 and Ann born 3 July 1798 both died in 1799 within a month of each other. Matthias died on 18 February and Anna on 18 March. There was, however, a more joyful event during the year with the marriage of Eva Clara’s only brother Philipp RODENS to Gertrud HOFFRANZEN.

The French Revolution ended with the coup of 18/19 Brumaire in the Year VIII of the Republican Calendar. This was the 9th to 10th of November 1799 when Napoleon Bonaparte’s dictatorship began.

Unbeknownst to Johann Adam and Eva Clara over a decade of constant warfare was on the horizon but they continued to grow their family with the births of Johann on 21 January 1800, Katharina on 11 September 1801, and Anna on 17 May 1803.

The Napoleonic Wars began 18 May 1803, the day after their 8th child was born. The following year Eva Clara’s only sister Anna married Johann Adam SPIELES.

The family continued to increase with the birth of another son, Matthias on 8 July 1805.

Austerlitz-baron-Pascal
The Battle of Austerlitz, 2 December 1805 (François Gérard [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons)
The children lost their only living grandmother, Anna SCHUE, on 1 December 1805, the day before the Battle of Austerlitz. This historical event brought about the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire and the creation of the Confederation of the Rhine. A year and a half later the last child of Johann Adam and Eva Clara was born on 2 May 1807. He would live only nine months, dying on 21 February 1807.

Did not return!

Seven of the ten children born to Johann Adam and Eva Clara were living when they bade farewell to their oldest brother Nikolaus when he went off to serve in the French army. Little did they know their son Nikolaus would not return. As with many German families who received news of their sons who were fighting in foreign parts, they learned of his death. According to the Extrait Mortuaire (death notice) recorded in the Fell death register for 1812, he died on 27 November 1811 in Dax, France. He was a soldier and a chasseur. This designation is given to certain regiments of French light infantry or light cavalry to denote troops trained for rapid action.

I checked the death records for Dax, Landes, France, and did not find a death record for Nicolas GORGES dying on 27 November 1811. However, on 30 December 1811 Joseph BERNARD and Fabian SIEULANNE, an employee of the military hospital established in Dax, informed civil authorities of the deaths of fifteen men, one of them being Georges NICOLAS of the 20e Régiment de Chasseurs à Chevals. (20th Regiment of Light Cavalry). He was admitted to the hospital at Dax on 15 September 1811 and died on 27 December 1811. Could this be Nikolaus, and his first and last names were switched? There is a discrepancy in the month of death compared to the entry in the Fell death register.

In 1814 Prussian troops took Trier ending the French rule. After Napoleon’s defeat, the Franco-German borders of 1792 were restored during the Paris peace treaties of 1814 and 1815. Trier was proclaimed part of the Kingdom of Prussia in 1815. With the new political situation and taxes on goods crossing the western border, Trier’s economy began to steadily decline.

The End of French Influence

Following the end of the Napoleonic Wars on 13 Sep 1815, the GORGES-RODENS family would soon lose their patriarch. Anton, the now oldest son, was the informant for the death of Johann Adam GORGES who died on 5 May 1816.

Eva Clara was now a widow with six children, the youngest being only nine years old. Over the next half a dozen years she saw four of them marry. Anton married Anna Maria LEHNEN (1799-1864) on 15 February 1817 in Longuich and the religious ceremony took place two days later in Fell. Barbara married Matthias SCHMITT (18200-1828) on 30 January 1823 in Longuich and the religious ceremony took place the same day in Fell. Johann married his first wife Anna Maria GRACH (1798-1832) on 26 February 1824 in Longuich. Anna married Johann ASEM (1801-1853) on 28 February 1824 in Ruwer where the religious ceremony took place the next day.

The oldest daughter Barbara was widowed when she had been married only 5 years. Three months later, on 5 April 1728, her brother Johann GORGES was the informant on her death. Who would raise the little two boys who were four and less than a year old?

The youngest son Matthias married Anna Maria FELTES (1798-1875) on 19 February 1830 in Longuich. And finally, the last of the children to marry was Katharina who married Johann DIER on 3 January 1832 in Trier. The religious ceremony took place two days later at St. Matthias, in Trier.

Johann GORGES first wife Anna Maria GRACH died on 7 November 1832 in Fell. Two months later he was marrying his second wife, Anna Maria BOTZ (1808-1863) on 10 January 1833 in Fell. Johann and Anna Maria were my children’s 4th great-grandparents.

On 22 January 1836 Anton GORGES, the oldest son, was the informant for the death of his mother Eva Clara RODENS. She left five children, all married, whose situations may have become better from 1840 due to the improving economic climate in the area.

bestwishescathy1

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann Adam GORGES
Parents: Johann Peter GORGES and Anna Maria HORSCH
Spouse: Eva Clara RODENS
Parents of Spouse: Nikolaus RODENS and Anna SCHUE
Whereabouts: Fell, Longuich, Trier, Germany
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: children’s 5th great-grandfather

1. Johann Adam GORGES and Eva Clara RODENS
2. Johann GORGES
3. Johann GORGES
4. Margaretha GORGES
5. Catharina “Catherine” “Ketty” “Ged” SCHWARTZ
6. Marcel Mathias MEDER
7. Cathy’s husband
8. Cathy’s children

Sources:

  • Richard Schaffner, Einwohnerbuch der Orte Fell u. Fastrau mit Fellerhof, Fellerburg und den verschiedenen Mühlen im Gemeindebereich 1665-1905, 2008/09
  • Armin Giebel, Ortsfamilienbuch des StA Longuich bis Okt. 1931 (June 2013)
  • Armin Giebel, compiler, Familienbuch Standesamt Ruwer-Waldrach, (Stand: Sept. 2016)
  • Heribert Scholer, Familienbuch Farschweiler 1703-1899 A-Z, 1992
  • Thomas Schmitt and Richard Schaffner, Familienbuch der Pfarrei St. Klemens Ruwer mit den Orten, Ortsteilen. Höfen und Muhlen Mertesdorf (1083-1850), Eitelsback ab 1803, sowie Duisburgerhof, Grünhaus, Karthäuserhof, Koxmühle, Reisenmühle, Grünhäusermühle, Karlsmühle und Schippenmühle 1672-1905 (2007)
  • Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 / Deutschland Geburten und Taufen, 1558-1898, (index), FamilySearch
  • Germany Marriages, 1558-1929 / Deutschland, Heiraten, 1558-1929, (index), FamilySearch

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

A Latin Rule You May Not Have Known

My 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks posts this year center around families in Luxembourg and Germany. Unlike my U.S. research, there are very few Facebook groups I feel I can share my posts with. Rob Deltgen, president of my genealogy society Luxracines, has a Facebook group for his genealogy website Deltgen.com and this is where I’ve been sharing my weekly posts.

I’m seeing more visits to my blog from people in Luxembourg. A couple of these have even commented in the group on my posts. Linda wrote this comment yesterday on my link to 52 Ancestors: #11 The Wollscheid-Barthelmes Family of Kirsch, Germany:

Hi, Cathy. I follow your research now every week and enjoy them a lot. I noticed you sometimes use the first names as they are used in the parish books such as Joannis, Caspari, Jacobi but these are the genitive forms of the names. In Latin, first names decline according to their role in the sentence. So the names in the example would be Joannes, Casparus, and Jacobus.

I had to read this twice before I replied. I may have been one of the best in my class while in school but sometimes I feel really dumb.

Well, Linda, as you can tell I’ve never learned Latin and this is new to me. I wondered why it was not always the same but didn’t think it had something to do with the grammar. Thank you so much for pointing this out to me. Now I may have a lot of correcting to do.

After sleeping on it, I checked online to see what Linda meant by genitive and decline in relation to the Latin language. As genealogists, we are always learning new things. I’m fluent in four languages but write only in English. For the generation I am presently working on, the records are mostly from church registers in Latin or indexed from the same. I thought I could get by without studying Latin. But, as I learned from Linda, it’s important to know at least some of the elementary rules of this dead language.

Latin for Beginners, 1911; Archive.org (https://archive.org/stream/latinforbeginner00doogrich#page/148/mode/2up : accessed 18 March 2017)

This is not a lesson in Latin

Linda’s well-intended comment showed me an error I’ve been making and, perhaps, you have too.

In grammar, genitive (abbreviated gen; also called the possessive case or second case) is the grammatical case that marks a noun as modifying another noun. ~ Wikipedia

Genitive refers to possession and decline or declension are the set of endings of words depending on their use in a sentence.

When I wrote the above sentence in my post yesterday, I included “Jacobus” and “Jacobi” in quotes as these were variations of his name I was seeing in indexed records. If I’d have paid a bit more attention I might have seen a pattern and realized my mistake.

Jacobus was the name seen on his death/burial record:

“Deutschland Tote und Beerdigungen, 1582-1958,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4MS-N59 : 28 November 2014), Jacobus Wolschet, 07 Jan 1826; citing 376 6, reference 376 6; FHL microfilm 469,141.

While Jacobi was found in records in which Jacob was seen as the father.

“Deutschland Heiraten, 1558-1929,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4FC-TYK : 26 December 2014), Nicolaus Schmidt and Maria Anna Wolschett, 17 Jan 1827; citing Longuich, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany; FHL microfilm 469,141.

In the above example, Maria Anna was the daughter of Jacob Wolschett and Catharina Barthelmes. Maria Anna filia Jacobi et Catharinae. Or in the example of Jacob’s death, Jacob’s wife Catharina is seen as Catharinae (possessive). Wikibooks has a Latin lesson I plan to use for further reference.

Of course, I asked Linda’s permission to use her comment and after thanking her she sent this very enlightening comment:

It is sometimes quite useful when you read the parish books to be aware of the genitive, because in Latin all the words are just one after the other. In some cases you will have for example … baptisatus est Joannes Adamus Jacobi MULLER … Now you know that the child’s name is Joannes Adamus, and the father’s name Jacobus (and not child Joannes and father Adamus Jacobus).

If you are seeing several spellings of a name in Latin records or indexed information from Latin records, the difference is likely due to the rules which show who is being named: the child, parent, or spouse.

If you plan on checking out my last post, I’ve already fixed the error. From now on I will know the difference. I’ll also be making corrections in older posts, all thanks to Linda’s informative comments.

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

52 Ancestors: #11 The Wollscheid-Barthelmes Family of Kirsch, Germany

Longuich-Kirsch

Longuich-Kirsch is situated on the Moselle River, one of Germany’s most beautiful river landscapes. No less than nine roads lead from the old Roman road to this place founded around 100 A.D. Later, the village was governed for over 1200 years by the Trier Abbey of St. Maximin.

Longuich and Kirsch, the second being where the WOLLSCHEID-BARTHELMES family lived, are two places of Roman and Celtic origin which have grown together to form a place now known as Longuich-Kirsch. Longuich comes from the Latin longus vicus meaning long village; Kirsch, the German word for cherry, was formerly cressiacum, a Latinized Celtic word. Another interpretation of the name Longuich says it is of Celtic origin and derived from lunc-wich meaning crooked creek. The Mosel River actually curves and bends around the piece of land Longuich-Kirsch lies on.

The two yellow icons on the map above show the location of Kirsch and Longuich in relation with the Kalberger Hof (green icon) featured last week.

The WOLLSCHEID-BARTHELMES family lived in Kirsch before the two places grew together and formed what in German is known as a Doppelort, a double place or location.

Jacob’s Childhood

Johann WOLLSCHEID (1725-1773) married Anna Maria WILLWERT (1728-1789) on 10 January 1747[1] in the Catholic Church St. Michael in Trier, Germany. Trier, or Treves as it is known by the French and English, claims to be the oldest city in Germany.

Johann and Anna Maria had only two known children. Both were born in Tarforst on the outskirts of Trier. Johann Peter was born in 1748[2] and nearly 18 years later his brother Jacob was born on 13 March 1766.[2] I suspect more children were born to the couple. Family books for the towns in the area need to be consulted.

Little Jacob was barely eight years old when his father died on 24 April 1773.[2] His mother died when he was 23 years old on 27 October 1789.[2]

Katharina’s Childhood

Johann BARTHELMES (1728-1802) married Eva BARZEN (1729-1789) before 1758.[3] They had two sons and a daughter in 1758, 1760, and 1762 before their daughter Katharina was born on 12 July 1763 in Kirsch.[3] Her godparents were Peter GEIBEN and Katharina BARTZEN of Kirsch, a maternal aunt. Katharina’s birth was followed by two more sons and a daughter born in 1765, 1769, and 1771.[3] Katharina was 25 years old when her mother died on 13 February 1789.[3]

Jacob and Katharina Marry

Jacob “Jacobus” WOLLSCHEID married Katharina BARTHELMES on 25 January 1797 in Longuich, Rheinland, Germany.[4] Jacob was 30 and Katharina was 33. Their religious ceremony may have taken place in one of two churches. In the Kirsch Chapel, the succursal church of St. Sebastian, built in 1781 on the site of a former church built nearly 200 years before, or the St. Laurentius Parish Church built in 1771, also on the site of a former church. Both churches still stand today in [Zoom in on the yellow icons on map above for the locations of the churches.]

A little more than two years later they started their family with a son Johann Peter who was born on 7 April 1799 in Kirsch and was baptized the next day in Longuich.[4] The father was 33 years old and the mother was going on 36.

The following year their next child, a daughter, was born in Kirsch on Christmas Eve, in a new century. Anna Maria was baptized on Christmas Day 1800 in Longuich.[4]

A year later their second daughter Christina was born in Kirsch on 5 January 1802 and was baptized the next day in Longuich.[4]

Katharina’s father Johann BARTHELMES was about 74 years old when Christina was born. He’d outlived his wife by more than a dozen years. But by the time winter came around that year his death was being reported by his son-in-law Jacob on 15 November 1802.[3]

Seven months later death visited the little family once again. Their youngest, Christina, died on 2 June 1803 in Kirsch at the age of 17 months. She was buried the following day in Longuich.[4]

For two years Johann Peter and Anna Maria were the only children of Jacob and Katharina. Then on 24 November 1805, their last child, a daughter, Katharina was born in Kirsch and baptized the following day in Longuich.[4] Jacob was 39 years old and his wife Katharina was 42 years old.

Jacob’s only known brother Johann Peter WOLLSCHIED died 16 December 1821 in Morscheid. He left a widow and one son. Like his brother Jacob, he had also had three daughters but they all died when still young.

Exactly one year later Jacob’s wife Katharina BARTHELMES died on 16 December 1822 in Kirsch. Jacob followed her three years later on 5 January 1826. He was buried two days later on 7 January 1826.[5] He left a son and two daughters.

The WOLLSCHEID Children

A double wedding took place on 17 January 1827, a year after the death of Jacob WOLLSCHEID. His first daughter Anna Maria married Nicolaus SCHMITT[6] and his youngest daughter Katharina married Caspari FERGER.[7] Both marriages took place at the church in Longuich. Katharina’s civil marriage took place the previous day. A mention of Anna Maria’s civil marriage was not found in the family books which were viewed.

After the girls’ marriages, their brother Johann Peter waited another year before marrying Angela KOCH on 7 February 1828 in Longuich.[8]

Katharina, the youngest of the WOLLSCHEID children, gave birth to six children in ten years. Three months after giving birth to her last child she died at the age of 34 years on 23 December 1839 in Kirsch.[9]

The only son, Johann Peter, died on 16 December 1854 in Longuich.[10] He was the father of seven children, two of whom died young. His wife outlived him by nearly 17 years.

My children’s fourth great-grandmother Anna Maria, also known as Marianna, was the last living WOLLSCHEID child. After living with her husband Nicolaus SCHMITT on the Kalberger Hof and raising a family, she died in Osweiler, Luxembourg, at the home of her son-in-law Johann SCHWARTZ on 3 November 1857.[11]

Two Grandsons Go to America

Jacob and Katharina’s only son Johann Peter had five children who grew to adulthood. The two youngest sons went to America a little more than a decade after their father died. Nicholas was the first to go after requesting permission to emigrate on 18 July 1865. His younger brother Paul applied on 29 May 1867 saying he would be able to live with his brother who was already in America. Paul was underage and had to have permission from three persons from his paternal and three persons from his maternal family. His application to emigrate was approved however, I have found no evidence he went or lived in America.[12]

His older brother Nicholas fought in the Civil War, enlisting in Petersburg, Virginia, with Capt. Nicodemus on Valentine’s Day 1866. He was 24 years old, a 5-foot 4-inch wagon maker with brown eyes, light hair. He was discharged three years later in Winchester, Virginia when his service expired.[13] Less than two weeks later, on 27 February 1869, he married Johanna C. Schroeder,[14] a widow with a six years old daughter. Nicholas, his wife, and step-daughter lived in Bloomery, Hampshire County, West Virginia in 1870. By 1880 they had settled in Dunbar, Fayette County, Pennsylvania. There were no children in their household, the 16 years old step-daughter was married and living in the area. Nicholas died in 1899[15] leaving his widow Johanna who lived with her daughter, son-in-law, and two granddaughters. Johanna died in 1909.[16]

When Nicholas, a German and veteran of the American Civil War, died the connection to America for this family ended. There may be some who would question this as the step-daughter’s death certificate suggests Nicholas Walsche was her father. Her mother is listed as Joana Roth which would have been her first married name and the surname of Ernestine’s father, John P. Roth.

Pennsylvania, Death Certificates, 1906-1964. Ancestry.com : accessed 17 March 2017.

Ernestine’s death certificate shows she was born in Baltimore, Maryland. Her obituary, below, gives White Front, Virginia. In the 1870 to 1940 census listings found for her, she was born in Maryland except in 1940 which has Pennsylvania. It is not the place of her birth which is important. She was born in 1863 in America and Nicholas did not apply to emigrate to America until 1865.

The Daily Courier (Connellsville, Pennsylvania) 22 December 1956; Ancestry.com : accessed 17 March 2017

With this aside on the grandsons of Jacob WOLLSCHEID and Katharina BARTHELMES, I would like to end this post. It was fun getting into the U.S. records and following up on the possibility of there being WOLLSCHEID descendants of this couple still in America but the search was to no avail.

bestwishescathy1

Sources:
[1] Germany Marriages, 1558-1929 / Deutschland, Heiraten, 1558-1929, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 530,205. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4DM-CJD : accessed 12 March 2017), Joannes Wolschie… and Anna Maria Wilwerts, married 10 Jan 1747; citing Waldrach, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany; father of bride Petri Wilwerts.
[2] Armin Giebel, compiler, Familienbuch Standesamt Ruwer-Waldrach, (Stand: Sept. 2016), page 3991, family 20387. Wollscheid-Willwertz family group.
[3] Ibid., page 83, family 310. Barthelmes-Barzen family group.
[4] Ibid., page 3996, family 20406. Wollscheid-Barthelmes family group.
[5] Ibid., page 3994-3995, family 20400. Wollscheid-Dehen family group.
[6] Germany Marriages, 1558-1929, FHL microfilm 469,141. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4FC-TYK : accessed 1 August 2015), Nicolaus Schmidt and Maria Anna Wolschett, married 17 Jan 1827, parents of groom Friderici Schmidt and Elisabethae Plein, parents of bride Jacobi Wolschett and Catharinae Barthelmaes; citing Longuich, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
[7] Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4FC-TY6 : accessed 10 March 2017), Casparus Ferger and Catharina Wolschet, married 17 Jan 1827 in Longuich, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany; parents of groom Matthiae Ferger and Gertrudis Biver; parents of bride Jacobi Wolschet and Catharinae Barthelmaes.
[8] Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4FC-TBT : accessed 10 March 2017), Joannes Wollscheid and Angela Koch, married 07 Feb 1828; parents of groom Jacobi Wollscheid and Cath. Barthelmes; parents of bride Joannis Petri Koch and Barbarae Horsch.
[9] Germany Deaths and Burials, 1582-1958 / Deutschland Tote und Beerdigungen, 1582-1958, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 469,141. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4MS-JPY : 28 November 2014), Catharina Wolscheid Ferger; age 44; died  23 Dec 1839 in Longuich, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany; buried 26 Dec 1839; marital status married; spouse Caspari Ferger.
[10] Germany Deaths and Burials, 1582-1958. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4MS-VJ4 : accessed 15 March 2017), Petrus Wollscheid; died 16 Dec 1854 in Longuich, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany; age 55; marital status married; spouse Angelae Coch.
[11] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Rosport > Décès 1853-1891 > image 52 of 510. 1857 Death Record No. 24. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DYJ3-VZ7?cc=1709358&wc=9RY9-16X%3A130314401%2C130472201 : accessed 13 March 2017).
[12] Armin Giebel, Ortsfamilienbuch des StA Longuich bis Okt. 1931 (June 2013), page 2378-2379, family 11530. Wollscheid-Koch family group.
[13] Register of Enlistments in the U.S. Army, 1798-1914; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M233, 81 rolls); Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780’s-1917, Record Group 94; National Archives, Washington, D.C. Ancestry.com : accessed 15 March 2017
[14] Virginia Marriages, 1785-1940, database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X51K-SYN : accessed 16 March 2017), Jno. P. Wollscheid in entry for …id…olar Wollscheid and Johanna Schraider, 27 Feb 1869; citing Winchester, Frederick, Virginia, reference 106; FHL microfilm 2,048,496.
[15] Find A Grave Memorial# 100851368, Find A Grave (https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=100851368 : accessed 16 March 2017)
[16] Pennsylvania, Death Certificates, 1906-1964, database, Ancestry.com : accessed 17 March 2017.

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

52 Ancestors: #10 The SCHMITT Family of Kalberger Hof

Kalberger Hof

Kalberger Hof is a farm just 1 kilometer northwest of Erlenbach near Hetzerath in Germany. On the map below, it’s location is marked with a little house icon in a green circle. This is about 50 kilometers (31 miles) from Echternach where I live.


The farm was first mentioned in documents in 1409 when Heinrich Muil von der Neuerburg, declared he had signed over to his wife Metzen an annual pension of 50 florins on half of the villages of Zemmer, Gransdorf, and Rodenerden, the estate of Kallberg, and other estates belonging to the Abbey of Echternach. Lease agreements for the years 1533 and 1541 and 1547 document the farm’s ownership and administrators. After the death of Jakob von Rheineck in 1541 the farm went to his son-in-law Johann von Warsberg.

Until the middle of the 17th century, Kalberg consisted of one household. Towards the end of the 17th century, the farm was apparently divided and a second farm, Emmerichs Hof, was established. Three generations of the SCHMITT family leased Kalberger Hof over a period of nearly 100 years.

kalberger-hof-courtesy-of-thomas-eifel
Kalberger Hof, photo courtesy of Thomas Eifel, used with permission.

Philipp SCHMITT, the father of Friedrich (featured later in this post), administered the Kalberger Hof from 1748 until his death. In 1769, Johann SCHMITT, his oldest son, was given the stock of the Kalberger Hof and the Emmerichs Hof to manage for nine years. Philipp died in 1783; his son Johann died six years later. The widow Appolonia MATHES (or MATTES) administered the farm from 1789 until 1796. Her son Friedrich SCHMITT, the then oldest living son, took over the farm in 1796 until his death in 1829. After his death, Kalberger Hof continued to be managed by his widow, Maria Elisabeth PLEIN, and their oldest son. In 1842 Nikolaus SCHMITT and his mother, the widow of Friederich SCHMITT, paid taxes to the parish. The charges were calculated in bushels and pecks, in old fruit dimensions for cereals and potatoes, and in hundredweight and pounds for straw. The level of these charges was calculated from the total tax revenues of individual persons. In 1855 the Kalberger Hof had one residential building and 15 inhabitants. In the years 1845-1848, the present house and the stable were built.

From 1844 to 1917 there is a gap in the list of names of the persons who were managing Kalberger Hof per the research of Thomas Eifel seen under Kalberger Hof on his website Heckenmünster. On 30 July 2011 I received permission from Mr. Eifel to include his article (in German) with source citation on the farm in my database. I would not have been able to write the history of Kalberger Hof during the time the SCHMITT family managed it without his research.

The SCHMITT-PLEIN Family

Philipp SCHMITT and his wife Appolonia MATTES were my children’s 6th great-grandparents. My children descend from the second son Friedrich featured here with his wife and children.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Fridericus “Friederich” SCHMITT
Parents:  Philipp SCHMITT and Appolonia MATTES
Spouse: Maria Elisabeth PLEIN
Parents of spouse: Matthias PLEIN and Margaretha VALERIUS
Whereabouts: Kalberger Hof, Diesburgerhof, Osweiler, Echternach
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: husband’s 4th great-grandparents

2. Fridericus “Friederich” SCHMITT and Maria Elisabeth PLEIN
2. Nicolaus “Nicolas” SCHMITT
3. Catharina SCHMITT
4. Johannes “Johann” “Jean” SCHWARTZ
5. Catharina “Catherine” “Ketty” “Ged” SCHWARTZ
6. Marcel Mathias MEDER
7. husband of Cathy Meder-Dempsey

Friedrich “Fridericus” SCHMITT was born[1],[2],[3],[4],[5] about 19 June 1761 on Kalberger Hof, Burgermeisterei Heidweiler, Kreis Wittlich, Preußen (Germany). The son of Philipp SCHMITT and Appolonia MATTES was baptized[6] the same day in Heidweiler, the closest (parish) town to the farm his parents managed. He died[1],[2],[7],[8] on 5 March 1829 on Kalberger Hof.

Friedrich married[1],[2],[3],[9], [10], [11] Maria Elisabeth PLEIN, daughter of Matthias PLEIN and Margaretha VALERIUS, on 8 June 1790 in Heidweiler. Maria was born[1],[2],[3],[12] on 2 November 1766 in Niersbach (Bernkastel-Wittlich, Germany). She was baptized[13] the same day in Arrenrath. Her godparents were Maria Elis. WEBER and Nik. HEGENER from Niersbach. She died[1],[2],[3],[14] on 22 January 1845 on Kalberger Hof.

Friedrich and Maria had the following children:

  1. Appolonia was born[15] about 8 July 1791 on Kalberger Hof. She was baptized[16] on 8 July 1791 in Heidweiler. She married[15] ,[17] Johann THIELEN on 4 February 1812 in Hetzerath (Wittlich, Germany).
  2. Nicolaus was born about 28 April 1793 on Kalberger Hof. He was baptized[18] on 28 April 1793 in Heidweiler. It is possible this child died before 12 July 1795 when the next son was born and named Nicolaus at baptism.
  3. Nicolaus “Nicolas” was born[2],[15],[19] on 11 July 1795 on Kalberger Hof. He was baptized[18] on 12 July 1795 in Heidweiler. He died[15],[21],[22],[23] on 17 October 1852 on Kalberger Hof. Nicolaus was seen on a tax list in 1842 on Kalberger Hof as seen in the narrative below. He married[15],[19],[24] Anna Maria “Marianna” WOLLSCHEID, daughter of Jacobus “Jacobi” WOLLSCHEID and Catharine BARTHELMES, on 17 January 1827 in Longuich (Trier-Saarburg). Anna was born[19] on 24 December 1800 in Kirsch (Longuich). She was baptized[25] on 25 December 1800 in Longuich. She died[22],[23],[26] on 3 November 1857 in Osweiler (Rosport, Luxembourg). Nicolas and Anna Maria were my children’s 4th great-grandparents.
  4. Anna Margaretha was born[15] about 20 October 1798 on Kalberger Hof. She was baptized[27] on 20 October 1798 in Heidweiler. She married[15] Christophorus “Christof” LOOS (1803-1850), son of Jakob LOHR and Margaretha SCHUSTER, on 2 February 1826 in Salmrohr (Germany).
  5. Catharina was born[15] about 17 May 1801 on Kalberger Hof. She was baptized[28] on 17 May 1801 in Heidweiler. She married[15] Jacob KREMER on 9 July 1830 in Heidweiler.
  6. Anna was born[15] about 12 December 1803 on Kalberger Hof. She was baptized[29] on 12 December 1803 in Heidweiler.
  7. Elisabetha was born[15] about 14 October 1807 on Kalberger Hof. She was baptized[30] on 14 October 1807 in Heidweiler. She married[15] Heinrich BRAND on 28 February 1832 in Dudeldorf.
  8. Maria was born[15] on 25 November 1809 on Kalberger Hof. She died[15] two days later, on 27 November 1809, on Kalberger Hof.

Maria Elisabeth PLEIN died in 1845. Friedrich, who died in 1829, and Maria Elisabeth’s daughters Appolonia, Anna Margaretha, Catharina, and Elisabetha married and left the family farm. Nikolaus, the only known son to have lived to adulthood, remained on the farm until his death in 1852. His widow Anna Maria WOLLSCHEID moved to the Diesburger Hof (Ferschweiler) before January 1855 and then to Osweiler before December 1855 where she lived with her daughter Catharina and son-in-law Johann SCHWARTZ until her death in November 1857.

bestwishescathy1 

Sources:
1          Richard Schaffner, Familienbuch der Pfarrei St. Alexius Arenrath und Niersbach etwa 1658-1905, 2006-2008, page 207, family 1056. Schmitt-Plein family.
2          Armin Giebel, Ortsfamilienbuch des StA Longuich bis Okt. 1931 (June 2013), page 1799, family 8740. Schmitt-Plein family.
3          Albert Schwickert, Familienbuch Heidweiler 1709-1805 Orte: Dodenburg Greverath Münster (heute: Heckenmünster) Heidweiler, 1994, pages 523-524. Book viewed and pages photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013. Mathias Plein and Magaretha Valerius family.
4          Ibid., page 586. Friedrich Schmitz and Maria Elisabeth Plein family; KB 2/2.
5          Ibid., page [unknown]. Philipp Schmitz and Apollonia Mattes entry; church register 2, page 2.
6          Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 / Deutschland Geburten und Taufen, 1558-1898, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 846,155. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NX5H-D9Z : accessed 1 August 2015), Fridericus Schmitz, baptized 19 Jun 1761, father Philippi Schmitz, mother Appollonia; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland, Prussia.
7          Familienbuch Heidweiler, page 586. Friedrich Schmitz and Maria Elisabeth Plein family; Civil register 1829, record 20.
8          Ibid., page [unknown]. Philipp Schmitz and Apollonia Mattes entry; civil register 1829, record 20.
9          Germany Marriages, 1558-1929, FHL microfilm 849,155. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JHVR-KPF : accessed 26 December 2014), Fridericus Schmitz and Elisabetha Plein, 08 Jun 1790; citing Katholisch, Heidweiler, Rheinland, Prussia.
10         Familienbuch Heidweiler, page [unknown]. Philipp Schmitz and Apollonia Mattes entry; church register 2, page 133.
11         Ibid., page 586. Friedrich Schmitz and Maria Elisabeth Plein family; Church Register 2/133.
12         Ibid., page 586. Friedrich Schmitz and Maria Elisabeth Plein family; Arenrath Church Book 3, page 109.
13         Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898, FHL microfilm 849,147. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VH9L-XWV : accessed 1 August 2015), Maria Elisabetha Plein, baptized 02 Nov 1766, father Mathias Plein, mother Margarita; citing Roman Catholic records of Arrenrath, Rheinland, Prussia.
14         Familienbuch Heidweiler, page 586. Friedrich Schmitz and Maria Elisabeth Plein family; Civil Register Heidweiler 3/1845.
15         Ibid., page 586. Friedrich Schmitz and Maria Elisabeth Plein family.
16         Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898, FHL microfilm 585,850. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NKDV-DL6 : accessed 1 August 2015), Apolloniae Schmitz, baptized 8 Jul 1791, father Friderici Schmitz, mother Elisabethae; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland.
17         Germany Marriages 1558-1929, FHL microfilm 584,862. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JHH7-47F : accessed 1 August 2015), Joannem Thielen and Apollonia Schmit, married 04 Feb 1812; citing Katholisch, Hetzerath Wittlich, Rheinland, Prussia.
18         Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898, FHL microfilm 585,850. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N6SN-GP1 : accessed 1 August 2015), Nicolaus Schmit, baptized 28 Apr 1793, father Friderici Schmit, mother Elisabethae; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland.
19         Familienbuch Longuich, page 1812, family 8792. Nikolaus Schmitt and Marianna Wollscheid.
20         Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898, FHL microfilm 846,155. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NTXK-T6X : accessed 1 August 2015), Nicolaus Schmid, baptized 12 Jul 1795, father Friderici Schmid, mother Elisabetha Plein; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland.
21         Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Rosport > Naissances 1889-1890 Mariages 1797-1890 Décès 1797-1853 > image 643 of 1410. 1855 Marriage Record No. 2. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11613-10947-44?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-L6L:n1038283664 : accessed 02 Apr 2013).
22         Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Mariages 1809 > image 1067 of 1462. 1860 Marriage Record No. 10. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11670-167828-84?cc=1709358&wc=9RYS-C68:129623201,129776101 : accessed 28 July 2011).
23         Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Mariages 1809 > image 1154 of 1462. 1866 Marriage Record No. 2. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11670-166074-78?cc=1709358&wc=9RYS-C68:129623201,129776101 : accessed 28 July 2011).
24         Germany Marriages 1558-1929, FHL microfilm 469,141. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4FC-TYK : accessed 1 August 2015), Nicolaus Schmidt and Maria Anna Wolschett, married 17 Jan 1827, parents of groom Friderici Schmidt and Elisabethae Plein, parents of bride Jacobi Wolschett and Catharinae Barthelmaes; citing Longuich, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
25         Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898, FHL microfilm 469,141. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NC1V-N84 : accessed 28 July 2015), Maria Anna Wolschett, baptized 25 Dec 1800, father Jacobi Wolschett, mother Catharinae Barthelmaes; citing Longuich, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
26         Luxembourg Civil Records, Rosport > Décès 1853-1891 > image 52 of 510. 1857 Death Record No. 24. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11627-97505-85?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-L62:1818144340 : accessed 05 Apr 2013).
27         Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898, FHL microfilm 584,863. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N6SR-66X : accessed 1 August 2015), Anna Margaretha Schmitz, baptized 20 Oct 1798, father Friderici Schmitz, mother Elisabethae Plein; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland.
28         Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N6SR-63X : accessed 1 August 2015), Catharina Schmiz, baptized 17 May 1801, father Friderici Schmiz, mother Elisabethae Plein; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland.
29         Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NPN7-Q2L : accessed 1 August 2015), Anna Schmiz, baptized 12 Dec 1803, father Friderici Schmiz, mother Elisabethae Plein; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland.
30         Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NKDG-G3X : accessed 1 August 2015), Elisabetha Schmit, baptized 14 Oct 1807, father Friderici Schmit, mother Elisabethae Plein; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland.

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

 

52 Ancestors: #9 Trierweiler-Hoffmann Family of Olk, Germany

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Nicolas TRIERWEILER
Parents: Johann Gerard “Gerardus” TRIERWEILER and Elisabetha KERSCH
Spouse: Catharina HOFFMANN
Parents of spouse: Carl HOFFMANN and Angela ROSPORT
Whereabouts: Olk, Germany and Girst, Luxembourg
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: husband’s 4th great-grandparents

1. Nicolas TRIERWEILER and Catharina HOFFMANN
2. Anna TRIERWEILER
2. Johann SCHWARTZ
3. Johann SCHWARTZ
4. Catharina “Catherine” “Ketty” “Ged” SCHWARTZ
5. Marcel Mathias MEDER
6. husband of Cathy Meder-Dempsey

 

Nicolas TRIERWEILER was born on 6 April 1764[1] in Olk, a small German village located about 5.5 km (3.4 miles) from Rosport in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Nicolas was the son of Johann Gerard “Gerardus” TRIERWEILER and Elisabetha KERSCH. He had a brother and three sisters as well as five half-siblings from his father’s first marriage to Maria Magdalena “Madeleine” GANZ. It is not known at this time when his parents died.

Nicolas was a farmer (Ackerer) in Olk. The area had good arable fields and numerous streams; the wide valleys were well suited for grazing. The name of the village probably originated from the Roman-Celtic word Olca, a term for fertile farmland.

Nicolas married Catharina HOFFMANN, daughter of Carl HOFFMANN and Angela ROSPORT, on 8 March 1791[1] in Welschbillig, to which Olk belonged.

1764catharina-hoffmannbaptism
1764 Baptismal Record for Catharina Hoffmann[2]
Catharina was born and baptized on 18 January 1764 in Girst, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.[2] Her godparents were Wilhelmus HECKER and Catharina MILBACH of Girst. When I found this baptismal record I was reminded that the information found in the family book compilations are wonderful for finding the families but events and dates have to be checked. The entry in the Family Book for Welschbillig, which includes families for Olk, incorrectly listed her date of birth as 1 August 1764.Catharina’s father died when she was about 16. A death record has not been found. His death has been estimated at before 1780 as this was the year of his widow’s next marriage. Catharina’s mother, Angela ROSPORT married Theodor ADAMS on 26 January 1780 in Rosport.[3] Two years later, Catharina, at the age of 18, became a godmother for her sister Anna Maria’s son Theodor NICOLAI on 20 September 1782 in Girst. Her step-father Theodor ADAMS was the godfather of the child.[4] The record is written in a beautiful handwriting.
1782baptismalrecord
1782 Baptismal Record in which Catharina was the godmother and her step-father was the godfather[4]
Nicolas was 26 and Catharina was 27 when they married. Two and a half months after their marriage Catharina gave birth to their first child. On 30 January 1793, three days after the birth of her second child, Catharina’s mother Angela died.[5]Nicolas and Catharina had the following children:

  1. Matthias was born on 23 May 1791 in Olk.[1] He married Anna (Angela) LUDOVICI before 1815. They had 10 children from 1815 to 1837. Matthias died on 4 May 1843 in Olk. His wife Anna died on 7 February 1856 in Olk.[6]
  2. Peter “Petrus” was born on 27 January 1793 in Olk.[1] He worked as a farmer (Landwirt). Peter married Susanna LUCAS, daughter of Bernardi LUCAS and Odiliae HAMM, on 1 March 1824 in Mesenich. He died on 19 November 1835 in Metzdorf. His widow remarried after his death.[7]
  3. Anna was born on 22 July 1794 in Olk.[1] She married Mathias SCHWARTZ, son of Lorentz “Laurentius” SCHWARTZ (1791-1860) and Magdalena HALER, on 17 January 1820 in Osweiler.[8] She died on 21 March 1853 in Osweiler. Anna and Mathias were my children’s ancestors.[9]
  4. Susanna was born on 19 April 1796 in Olk.[1] She married Matthias KIRSTEN (1801-1846) on 19 October 1825 in the parish of Welschbillig. She died on 3 October 1845 in Ruwer.[10]
  5. Klemens-Christoph was born on 1 November 1797 in Olk.[1] Nothing further is known.
  6. Maria Eva was born on 14 September 1800 in Olk.[1] She married Heinrich MERTES (1792-1859) on 10 February 1836 in Ruwer. Heinrich was a widower with four children. Maria Eva died on 1 October 1845 in Ruwer.[11]
  7. Peter was born on 9 April 1805 in Olk.[1] Nothing further is known.

1820marriagerecordcropped
Bride’s section on the 1820 Marriage Record of Anna TRIERWEILER and Mathias SCHWARTZ.[8]
Nicolas died five years after the birth of their last child on 2 November 1810 in Olk at the age of 46 years.[8] His widow Catharina died on 24 February 1815 in Olk at the age of 53 years.[8] Nicolas and Catharina’s dates of death were documented in their daughter Anna’s marriage record.Most of the information on this family was gleaned from the German Family Books. The Catholic church records for Welschbillig are held by the Bistumsarchiv Trier and have been microfilmed. They are not available for loan and access in Europe is limited to members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Documenting this family will not be as easy as for families who lived in Luxembourg during the same time period.bestwishescathy1Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner, Familienbuch der Pfarrei St. Peter Welschbillig 1800-1900 mit Möhn, Olk, Träg, Helenenberg, Aspelt, Schwarzkreuz und Windmühle, compiled 1998, page 319, family nr. 1488 from Olk. Trierweiler-Hoffmann family group.
[2] Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Rosport > Baptêmes 1740-1779, 1795-1796, confirmations 1740-1765, mariages 1778-1779, 1795-1796, sépultures 1779-1797 > image 27 of 79. 1764 Baptismal Record (right page, 4th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-S92L?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-HZ6%3A1501108227%2C1501108228 : 9 January 2015).
[3] Ibid., Rosport > image 22 of 172. 1780 Marriage Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-S9ZN?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-HZV%3A1501108227%2C1501117286 : accessed 27 February 2017).
[4] Ibid., Rosport > Baptêmes 1778-1793, mariages 1778-1793, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 41 of 172. 1782 Baptismal Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WM-S9QK?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-HZV%3A1501108227%2C1501117286 : accessed 3 March 2017).
[5] Ibid., Rosport > Baptêmes 1778-1793, mariages 1778-1793, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 170 of 172. 1793 Death Record (right page, 4th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-SKF?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-HZV%3A1501108227%2C1501117286 : accessed 27 February 2017).
[6] Family Book Welschbillig, page 320, family Nr. 1490 from Olk. Trierweiler-Ludovici family group.
[7] Heinrich Wagner, Familienbuch Mesenich 1705-1899 (Ortschaften Födlich (1705-ca.1800), Grewenich, Mesenich, Metzdorf und Moersdorf (Luxembourg) (1705-1807)), Mersch 1997 (Association Luxembourgeoise de Généalogie et d’Héraldique), page 319, family nr. 1170. Peter Trierweiler and Susanna Lucas family group.
[8] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Rosport > Naissances, mariages, décès 1800-1815 > image 280 of 385. 1820 Marriage Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11676-83258-61?cc=1709358&wc=9RYS-JWL:130314401,130827901 : accessed 11 April 2013 and 22 July 2015).
[9] Luxembourg Civil Records, Rosport > Décès 1853-1891 > image 4 of 510. 1853 Death Record No. 13. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11627-96341-81?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-L62:1818144340 : accessed 19 May 2011).
[10] Armin Giebel, compiler, Familienbuch Standesamt Ruwer-Waldrach, (Stand: Sept. 2016), family nr. 8268. Matthias Kirsten and Susanna Trierweiler family group.
[11] Ibid., family nr. 11469. Mertes Heinrich and Trierweiler Maria Eva family group.
© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #91 A Series of Brick Wall Photos

The photographs I’m sharing today were taken with a brick wall as the backdrop. None are labeled but in the first, I recognize Florence ROYALTY and her brother-in-law George Wyte LILLIE. I don’t know who the woman in the middle is. There were two copies of this photo in the collection, one had June 14 written across the top but no year.

royaltyflorence-lilliemaybe4picchildren2
George Wyte LILLIE, an unknown woman, and Florence ROYALTY

For comparison here are two photos taken around 1930. Definitely, before 19 November 1932 as this is when Isaac died.

ReeseFlorence
Isaac LILLIE (1872-1932) with his wife Florence ROYALTY (1868-1946)
1920sRaymondIkeRoy
Isaac and Florence’s sons Raymond (1904-1970), on the left, and Roy (1895-1979), on the right, with their uncle George Wyte LILLIE (1874-1943) in the middle.

 

The above two photos were taken in Detroit, Michigan, in front of the apartment building the family was living in. Although the coat with the fur collar worn by Florence and the light colored hat with the dark band worn by George appear to be the same, the second set of photos were most likely not taken on the same day. George in the top photo is wearing a tiny bow tie while in the lower right photo he is wearing a tie. In both pictures, he has a cigar in his hand. Also as the copy of the top photo was labeled June 14 it is very unlikely that the other two photos were not taken in the middle of June since the men are so warmly dressed.

Perhaps the next two photographs could be clues to identify the woman in the middle in the photograph at the top. Could she be the mother of the three children in these photos?

royaltyflorence-lilliemaybe4picchildren1
Three unknown children (sitting)
royaltyflorence-lilliemaybe4picchildren3
Three unknown children (standing)

Using the bricks as a guide I estimated the height of the children. From left to right, the oldest girl is 17-18 bricks=51-54 inches, the young boy is about 12 bricks=36 inches, and the younger girl is 15-16=45-48 inches. This matches with my estimates of their ages being from youngest to oldest, about 2 1/2, 5, and 7-8 years.

I’ve gone through the LILLIE family tree looking for siblings who were born in the 1920s. The only family group I found which would match was the family of Isaac’s youngest brother Robert Wiley LILLIE (1895-1947) with his wife Neele Audrey OWENS (1898-1942) and their children Roberta Neele b. Oct 1921, Marian Gene b. Aug 1924, and Robert Walton b. Jan 1927.

Roberta’s photo was shared in Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #7 Robert Wiley LILLIE (1895-1940).

I found a yearbook photo of Marian in the U.S., School Yearbooks, 1880-2012 database at Ancestry.

U.S. School Yearbooks, 1880-2012, (Ancestry.com : accessed 28 February 2017)

I shared the photos with Robert Walton LILLIE’s daughter Julie back in December hoping to get them into a post at the end of the year. She wrote, “Cathy, I have never seen this picture before, and in my opinion, they don’t look like my Dad and (his) sisters. But, I could be wrong. Let me send to my sister and see if she recognizes it. I will get back to you.” After sharing with her sister she wrote, “My sister didn’t recognize the picture either, nor did she think it was them. But, neither one of us is 100% sure.”

I still think the children could be an older Roberta, her sister Marian, and their little brother Robert. I sent a new request to Julie to take a look at the lady in the middle in the top photo.

robertandmarian
Robert and Marian. Photograph courtesy of family member.

Julie got back to me and sent some photographs including the above for comparison. I believe the children’s blond hair darkened over the years. This would explain the darker hair of the older girl in the photo of the three children. Is she the same person as Roberta seen with the cute blond haircut? Between the time the bottom photo of Robert and Marian was taken and Marian’s picture for the school yearbook, her hair darkened. Alas, Robert and the young boy were not very good studies in either photo. The one above, sent by Julie, shows Robert a bit older than the little boy in the photo with the girls but the cute newsboy cap hides his eyes. In the pictures with the girls, the young boy is looking down, hiding his face.

While we were chatting, Julie told me something I did not know. My research on Robert Sr. and his wife Neele was difficult, to say the least. I never found them together on a census. They were married on 10 April 1920. In 1930 Neele and her oldest daughter Roberta were lodgers in a household. No trace of daughter Marian and husband Robert. I had no idea there was also a son Robert until Julie’s son contacted me.

I have never understood why my Father had to go live with his Uncle Ray and Aunt Clara. I don’t remember my Dad ever explaining it to me, and perhaps he didn’t know for sure. Neele and Robert were married twice and divorced twice. I know my Dad had a rough childhood…..My father seemed to adore his Mother, but not a lot of talk or praise of his Father…..don’t worry about bringing up skeletons, as I am perfectly aware that there are many.

Since we now know Robert and Neele’s marriage had its difficulties, I want you to take another look at the photo at the beginning of this post with the young woman in the middle between George and Florence. Do you notice what I noticed? I have to admit I didn’t see this until I looked at the second copy I have of the same photo which is dated June 14 (without a year).

Is the young woman pregnant? If this was Neele, what happened to the child? Could she have given birth while in Detroit? If this isn’t Neele, would it be possible to find a woman who gave birth sometime after June 14th?

Will someone recognize the children and the young woman in this series of photos taken in front of a brick wall? Are they Neele Audrey Owens Lillie and her children Roberta Neele, Marian Gene, and Robert Walton?

Photos of Neele were shared in Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #79 The Unusual Hairdo (Identified).

These are the last of the photographs from the collection I was gifted by my cousin Joe Rooney who took them off the hands of his cousin Sandra Lillie who saved them from the trash can. I will be taking a week or two off from writing about this collection but will be back with a final post, a synopsis of the family connections made during the process of writing about each of the over 150 photos.

Would you like to re-visit the photos? You can see them on my Pinterest board Old Photographs Saved from Trash Can.

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

A Date of Death for Catherine Barbara NOLL (1768-1859)

It’s National Women’s History Month! What better way to start the month than with a post about my latest genealogy *happy dance* find concerning an ancestress who has been featured in several posts with her husband. (see links at the bottom of this post)

It was a known fact that my 5th great-grandmother Catherine Barbara NOLL was still living at the time of her husband Henry RUPE’s death in late November 1845. It has been assumed by some researchers that Catherine died before the 1850 census as she was not listed. I have always thought this to be an error as her daughters Elizabeth Compton, Barbara Rupe, Mary Roop, and Nancy Roop were also omitted even though they are known to have been living at the time. Many of her son William’s children from his first marriage were also missing.

Catherine and Henry’s son Jacob ROOP was still settling his father’s estate in January 1860 when the Widow’s Dower went to the youngest son Joseph. Could this mean their mother was recently deceased?

Where could the answer be found?

I found the answer to this question in the Chancery Records of Virginia.

The Chancery Records Index (CRI) is a result of archival processing and indexing projects overseen by the Library of Virginia (LVA) and funded, in part, by the Virginia Circuit Court Records Preservation Program (CCRP). Each of Virginia’s circuit courts created chancery records that contain considerable historical and genealogical information.

http://www.virginiamemory.com/collections/chancery/

Yesterday morning, while skimming through my Facebook News Feed, I noticed a post by my friend Ta Lee who I got to know when she recognized one of her enslaved families on my blog. Ta mentioned that new chancery cases are available and she was so excited. When I asked her which counties, she told me, Montgomery. I was a bit disappointed as I have been waiting impatiently for Amherst to come online.

This was the last update I saw on Montgomery: The bulk of this series runs from 1773 through 1913. 05/02/2016- These records are currently closed until they are digitally reformatted. The index remains available for research purposes.

Last year I had gone through the index and noted several cases which looked promising due to the names listed. One of these was John Roop, etc. vs. Jacob Roop, Exr, etc. from 1870. I was not expecting to make the find I made!

Chancery Causes: John Roop, etc. vs. Jacob Roop, Exr, etc.(transcription of the first 4 images of 36)

1870-012chancerycasecover
[http://www.lva.virginia.gov/chancery/case_detail.asp?CFN=121-1870-012 : image 1]
Chancery Causes: John Roop, etc. vs. Jacob Roop, Exr, etc. (286 in corner)
1870-012
Montgomery County
CA estate dispute
T property
Deed
Names: Roope, Compton, Paris, Akers, Faris, Smith, Chandler, Chandlin, Silvers, Roupe
Will: 1845 Henry Roope : Montgomery County

121_1870_012_0002-pdf-p-001
[http://www.lva.virginia.gov/chancery/case_detail.asp?CFN=121-1870-012 : image 2]
To the Hon. Andrew S. Fulton Judge of the County Court of Montgomery
Your orators John Roop and Henry Roop respectfully represent unto your Honor that Henry Roop Sen. departed this life in the year 1845 in the County of Montgomery having made & published his will in due form of law whereto was admitted to probate in the County Court of said County at the December Term in said year.
By his said will the testator appointed his son Jacob Roop his executor who duly qualified as such and entered into bond for the faithful discharge of his duties with Samuel Lucas, William C. Taylor & Joseph Roop as his securities.
A copy of said will is herewith filed and prayed to be taken as a part of this bill.
It will be seen by reference thereto that the testator devised to his widow Catharine Roope one third of his real estate for life & directed his executor his executor (sic) to make sale of the residue upon a credit of one and two years & the proceeds to be divided among his children of whom there were thirteen entitled to distributions.
Your orators further represent that sometime after the qualification of the said executor as aforesaid – he commenced a negotiation with the devisees under said will for the purchase of their interests in two thirds of said real estate which finally resulted in a sale on the part of most of them to him of their interests aforesaid.
Among those who thus sold were your orators. Your orator John Roop sold his interest in said real estate at the sum of $100 and in the personal estate at the sum of fourteen dollars and your orator Henry Roop received for his interest in the real & personal estate the sum of $110. Your

121_1870_012_0003-pdf-p-001
[http://www.lva.virginia.gov/chancery/case_detail.asp?CFN=121-1870-012 : image 3]
his interest in said real estate at the sum of $100 and in the personal estate at the sum of fourteen dollars and your orator Henry Roop received for his interest in the real & personal estate the sum of $110. Your orators ? that the said Jacob Roop effected this purchase from them by representing the title to a portion of the land as defective that much of it was worn out and without timber & that the land sold at public auction would not bring as much as he was willing to give. Your orators having entire confidence in the integrity & judgement of said Jacob Roop made the sale of their interest aforesaid & afterword in June 1851 conveyed the same to him.
Your orators further represent that said Roop held possession of said land until the year 1850 when he made a pretended sale of the same & purchased it in himself at the sum of $8-01 cts per acre. Your orators believe that the time & place of sale was known to but few persons – that there was but little competition and the conduct of said Roop was such as to discourage bidding from the bystanders – Sometime after this, in Oct 1851, the said Jacob Roop made a sort of settlement of his executorial accounts, a copy of which is therewith filed and prayed to be taken as a part of this bill – It will be seen by reference thereto that the testator owed no debts – that the few items of credits claimed by the executor were for charges attending the administrations of said estate & for various sums paid the legatees for their interest as aforesaid – And although the said executor charges himself with 2/3ds of said land at the sum of $8-01ct per acre – yet he has only paid your orators the several sums here in before mentioned – nor has he ever acc?iled in any wise for any portion of the rents & profits of said land between the death of the testator in 1845 & the time of sale in 1850.
Your orators further represent that the said Catharine Roop departed this life in July or August of 1859 – Since which time the said Jacob Roop puts up the extraordinary claim that the sale & purchase aforesaid embraced the one third given to said Catharine Roop. But your orators and that they only conveyed & intended to convey their interests in the said two thirds as herein before stated. But they are advised that this is wholly immaterial in as much as a fiduciary will not be permitted to speculate upon those he represents – that the executor in this case will be held to account for the said two thirds at the price per acre bid by him – and as to the residue of said land he will be required to make sale of the same in the manner directed by the will or to account for its market value – Your orators are informed & so over that the said tracts of land contain 440 acres of land instead of 400 acres as represented to them by the said Jacob Roop for which he will also be held accountable intended consideration of the premises the prayer of your orators is that the said Jacob Roop in his own right & as executor as aforesaid

121_1870_012_0004-pdf-p-001
[http://www.lva.virginia.gov/chancery/case_detail.asp?CFN=121-1870-012 : image 4]
George Roop – James Roop – Barbara Roop – Nancy Roop – James Comptin & Elizabeth his wife late Elizabeth Roop – Polly Roop – John Pharis & Racheal his wife formerly Racheal Rupe – Linch Akers – Wm Silvers & Ruth his wife, Narcissa Akers, Jackson Silvers & Lucinda his wife, Minnis Chandler & Catherine his wife – William Smith administrator of Samuel Roop & Joseph Roop devisees undersaid will, may be made parties defendant to this bill & required to answer the same on oath –
Let the said Jacob Roop answer & say what amount he paid your orators severally for their interest in said estate whether he did not buy in said land at the price aforesaid and let him full & specific answer make to all the allegations in this bill as though the same were herein especially repeated – And may it please your Honor to grant your orators a ?? for the amount due them upon the sale made by said executor herein before mentioned – and also for a sale of the said one third of the real estate in the manner provided for in said will – and grant your orators all such further and general relief as the nature of their case may require and the principles of equity & good conscience dectable?
                                                                                                      Staples & Wade

When did Catherine Barbara Noll die?

Catharine Roop departed this life in July or August of 1859 –

To be continued….

bestwishescathy1

Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ The Early Years in Maryland (1765-1793)

Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ The Years in Rockbridge (1793-1801)

Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ At Home on the Old Henry Roop Place

Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ Family Life in Montgomery County, Virginia

The Last Will and Testament of Henry RUPE 1765-1845

Henry RUPE’s Estate and his Widow Catherine’s Last Days

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Slave Name Roll Project: RELEASING Matt, Egg, Judge, Jinny, Jack, Rachel, Mose, Mary, George, Franky, and Wilson

RELEASING: Matt, Egg, Judge (Jude), Jinny, Jack, Rachel Mose, Mary, George, Franky (Frank), and Wilson

The names listed above were found in the Appraisement Bill of the Estate of James Robinson of Nicholas County, (West) Virginia as well as in his Last Will and Testament.

The estate was appraised on the 23rd day of November 1831 by Samuel Price, Samuel McClung, and R. Kelly.

1831jamesrobinsonappraisementbill1
“West Virginia Will Books, 1756-1971,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-4LPR-7?cc=1909099&wc=Q8B7-1PJ%3A179686001%2C179686002 : 22 June 2016), Nicholas > image 45 of 158; county courthouses, West Virginia.

Included in the appraisement (below) were:

Wilson a negro man $450.-
Frank a negro girl $300 (sic, Franky per will below)
Mary a negro girl $50

1831jamesrobinsonappraisementbill
“West Virginia Will Books, 1756-1971,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-4L5N-2?cc=1909099&wc=Q8B7-1PJ%3A179686001%2C179686002 : 22 June 2016), Nicholas > image 46 of 158; county courthouses, West Virginia.

The personal property of James Robinson was sold on the 24th and 25th of November 1831. The Bill of Sale was presented to the court held for Nicholas County January Term 1832. No slaves were sold.

The Last Will and Testament was presented and proven during the March Term 1832 and April Term 1832.

1828jamesrobinsonwillproved1832part1
“West Virginia Will Books, 1756-1971,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-4LR3-V?cc=1909099&wc=Q8B7-1PJ%3A179686001%2C179686002 : 21 June 2016), Nicholas > image 48 of 158; county courthouses, West Virginia.
James Robinson Will

I James Robinson of the County of Nicholas do hereby make my last will and testament in manner and form following that is to say.
1st I desire the perishable part of my estate be immediately sold after my decease and out of the monies arising therefrom all my just debts and funeral expenses be paid. Should the perishable part of my property prove insufficient for the above purpose then I desire that my executors hereafter names may sell my land that lies between the land of James Reed and David McCay’s survey of five hundred acres on Glade Crick and out the monies arising from the sale of said part of three hundred acres pay and satisfy such of my just debts as remain unpaid out of the sale of the perishable part of my estate.
2dly After the payment of my debts and funeral expenses, I give to my wife Elizabeth Robinson one third part of my estate both real and personal which is to include four negroes to wit my negro man Matt & two black women Egg & Judge her youngest child & Jinny for and during her natural life and after her decease I give the three first mentioned negroes Matt, Egg and Jude to my children herein after mentioned to wit Cynthia Callison, Rebecca Hamilton, Peggy Perkins, Miriam L. Robinson, Agness Robinson and Elizabeth Robinson the three negro’s above mentioned to be sold and the proceeds of their sales to be equally divided among my sid children daughters above named to be enjoyed by them forever. And the last mentioned negro woman Jinny after the decease of my wife Elizabeth Robinson may go to any of my heirs that she the said Jinny may choose to live with.
3dly Whereas I have conveyed to my son John H. Robinson three several parts of land and one negro boy named Jack which is more than his equal part of my estate with my other heirs I therefore or give give no part of my other estate either real or personal to him the said John H. Robinson more than the

1828jamesrobinsonwillproved1832part2
“West Virginia Will Books, 1756-1971,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-4L58-S?cc=1909099&wc=Q8B7-1PJ%3A179686001%2C179686002 : 22 June 2016), Nicholas > image 49 of 158; county courthouses, West Virginia.

three tracts of land & the negro boy Jack before mentioned which I conveyed by deed of gift to him but will the residue of my estate to my other heirs in manner following that is to say.
4thly I give to my daughter Cynthia Callison wife of Isaac Callison the part of land whereon the said Isaac Callison now lives containing two hundred acres and all the property & stock which I before gave her for her share of my estate.
5thly I give to my daughter Rebecca Hamilton wife of John McKee Hamilton one negro girl named Rachel.
6thly I give to my daughter Miriam L. Robinson one negro boy named Mose.
7thly I give to my daughter Peggy Perkins wife of David Perkins one negro girl calld Mary.
8thly I give to my daughter Agness Robinson one negro boy called George.
9thly I give my youngest daughter Robinson one negro girl calld Franky.
10thly I desire that my yellow boy Wilson be hired out and and the hire of said Wilson to be applied by my executors to the benefit of my wife Elizabeth Robinson & my youngest daughter Elizabeth.
11thly I desire that all the rest of my estate both real and personal of what nature and kind so were it may be not herein before particularly disposed of may be equally divided between my six daughters Rebecca, Miriam L., Peggy, Agness & Elizabeth (sic, only 5 names) herein before named which I I (sic) give to them their heirs & forever.
And lastly I do hereby constitute and appoint my friends John Boggs and Thomas Callaghan Executors to this my last will and testament hereby revoking all other wills and testaments heretofore made. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this twenty fifth day of February in the year one thousand eight hundred and twenty eight signed sealed and delivered as and for the last will of the above named James Robinson in presence of us
E. R. Hutchison                                                           James Robinson *Seal*

Samuel Hutchison
At a court held for Nicholas County March Term 1832 The execution of this the last will and testament of James Robinson deceased was duly proved by the oath of E. R. Hutchison a subscribing witness thereto and at the April Term of said Court 1832 it was duly proven by the oath of Saml Hutchison the other subscribing witness thereto and ordered to be recorded accordingly.
Teste
Saml Price *Seal*

Notes for further research

The will was written in 1828, James Robinson died 9 October 1831. In 1830 the census included 3 slaves while in 1820 4 were listed:

1830 U.S. Federal Census
Slaves -Males – 24 thru 35: 1 (Wilson)
Slaves – Females – Under 10: 1 (Mary)
Slaves – Females – 10 thru 23: 1 (Franky)

The appraisement and sale of the estate of the widow Elizabeth Robinson were noted in the same Will Book on pages 73 and 74. No slave names were found.

In 1840 John H. Robinson (Jack) had two slaves, a female under 10 and a female 36 thru 54; Isaac Callison, husband of Cynthia Robinson who received no slave, had no slaves; John Hamilton, husband of Rebecca Robinson (Rachel), had one male slave 10 thru 23; Margaret Perkins, possibly Peggy Robinson (Mary), had no slaves; Miriam (Mose) and Agnes (George) married Rader men who did not have slaves in 1840.

bestwishescathy1

True's statementFollowing my three part series on the slaves of my 5th grand-father James Sims during Black History Month in February 2015 I made a commitment to write a post on a monthly basis until I’ve RELEASED all of the names of slaves owned by my ancestors or owned by persons I’ve researched who were relatives or neighbors of my ancestors. These posts are part of the Slave Name Roll Project which can be found on Schalene Jennings Dagutis’ blog Tangled Roots and Trees

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Using the Back Door at FamilySearch for Missing Records

Almost all of my research for the Luxembourg families in my family tree takes me to FamilySearch. The collections I use the most are for civil records, church records, and census.

The Luxembourg Church Records, 1601-1948 are the last new addition (for Luxembourg) to the FamilySearch site having been added on 9 January 2015. I wrote a post when they went online.

Included in the collection of church records are the Tables des mariages 1700-1798 (index organisée par l’époux/l’épouse), a card index of marriages performed in parishes in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg before 1800.

1790schwartzhaalermarriagecard
An example I used in my post 52 Ancestors: #8 SCHWARTZ-HALER Family of Osweiler

How this neat tool came to be

The Luxembourg Association of Genealogy and Heraldry (ALGH) was founded in 1984 and has its headquarters in the castle of Mersch. It does not have an internet presence. ALGH launched a huge project when the association was still young. A team of volunteers extracted all marriage information from the 156 old parish registers from before 1800 onto index cards.

The project took years to finish. The original aim of the ALGH was to make xerox copies of the index cards by parishes for members to consult in their headquarters making it unnecessary to go to the original.

FamilySearch microfilmed the marriage index cards in 1995 and included them in the church records collection for Luxembourg when they were digitized in 2012 and finally went online in 2015. The cards are in alphabetical order by groom’s and by bride’s surnames for each parish. They are also accessible in alphabetical order by groom’s surname for the entire country in Grand Duché du Luxembourg.

Why did I have to use a back door?

As I’m now working on the paternal 5th great-grandparents of my children in Luxembourg, I’ve gotten into an area which is no longer covered by the civil records kept in the country. Most of these ancestors were born, married, and had children before 1800. These can only be documented by searching through the church records.

Records after 1800 are relatively easy to access as civil records are indexed in the tables décennales, decennial tables produced every ten years since 1802. However, church records are not indexed and very hard to read.

1781marriagewilmescolman
1781 Marriage Record for Gangolphus Wilmes

I check the card index for marriages first as they make it easy to search for marriage records in the church records collection. Most of the time. In the example at the top, for the marriage of the SCHWARTZ-HAALER couple, the volumes and page numbers of the records are notes. Not all persons who filled out these index cards gave this information but the records can still be more easily found as the cards include the date and place of marriage.

However not all ancestors married in the town they lived in, so finding the card is not always easy. Some married in neighboring towns or in the town a bride was from. To be sure I didn’t miss anyone, I checked all persons (this works for grooms only) of a surname in the cards for the entire country.

And this is where I had a problem. The links for marriages of grooms with surnames from BIVER to HEISDORF are missing.
missingsurnamesmarriages
https://familysearch.org/search/image/index?owc=STH8-K6D%3A1501324901%3Fcc%3D2037955

I went to the FamilySearch catalog to find out where they might be found. I refined the search with Luxembourg as the place and church records as the subject. Under Luxembourg Church Records Indexes I found 8 entries including Fichier des actes de mariage avant de 1800 (index cards of marriages before 1800).

collectionoverview
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/760002

Scrolling down to the Film Notes I found the collection is divided into 30 films including the missing ones (outlined in red).

themissingfilms
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/760002

The camera icon is my back door to access the cards for grooms with the surnames BIVER through HEISDORF.

Happy Huntings!

This back door at FamilySearch can be used for any and all of their collections. When you go in through the front door, the name of a collection may not reflect the complete content of a collection. Not all records are indexed and not all browse only records may be showing up in a list as seen in my example above of the missing marriages for Luxembourg. Get into the habit of checking the FamilySearch catalog for the town, county, state, or country you are working on. Happy Huntings!
bestwishescathy1© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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