A 303-Year-Old Marriage Record Found for My 7th Great-Grandparents

Last week I became curious about my “German” ancestors actually being Luxembourgers. I had finally found a map which helped me with the historical boundaries of the country I live in.

My maternal grandfather was born in 1906 in Mettendorf, Germany, and came to live in Luxembourg in July 1914, the month the First World War began. I have avoided seriously researching his line for nearly a quarter of a century. Last year I began writing about his parents, paternal grandparents, maternal grandparents, and 4 sets of great-grandparents.

Now that I have access to the family books of the towns his ancestors lived in at the library of my genealogy society, I am revisiting what I have and what I need to locate. I knew that the towns were just across the border of Luxembourg to Germany but was not aware of exactly when this area belonged to the Duchy of Luxembourg. Surprisingly, this week, I learned the records I have been avoiding researching are actually at my fingertips.

The Church Records for Echternach

While inputting data from the family books I noticed that the compiler of the Ernzen book included annotations concerning the marriage records of certain couples being found in the church records of Echternach. These records are online at FamilySearch.

I spent hours adding birth, marriage, and death records to this German branch of the family. I have not even scratched the surface. I will be busy for weeks, maybe months.

I want to have all information inputted before I do any more in-depth posts on my 4th great-grandparents and each generation back. But I couldn’t wait to share this wonderful discovery!

A 303-Year-Old Marriage Record Found for My 7th Great-Grandparents

Marriage records in Luxembourg have always been my favorite source for information. They were the first and sometimes the only records I obtained for ancestors in this country. Some habits cannot be broken. The first thing I did when I realized the records for the towns of Ernzen and Ferschweiler were located in Echternach for religious events which took place before the end of the French Revolution (1789-1799) was to check for marriages.

echternachchurchcover
Title page of the Echternach church records of marriage from 1706
1713marriagerecordernzen
1713 Marriage Entry in Church Records of Echternach

Dabam Dimissoriales honesti Joannis Adami
Mayers ex Ernzen relicto legitimo filio
Joanni in ordine ad matrimonium contra=
hendu in honesti Adami Dietzen ex
Esseling relicta legitima filia Elisabetha

I gave the certificate to the honorable Johann Adam
Meyers from Ernzen’s surviving legitimate son
Johann in order to contract marriage
to the honorable Adam Dietzen from
Eßlingen’s surviving legitimate daughter Elisabetha

These five lines written in Latin give interesting information. The fathers of the bride and groom were both deceased in 1713. The bride Elisabetha DIETZEN’s father was from Eßlingen while the groom Johann MEYERS’ father was from Ernzen.

Elisabetha and Johann were married on Monday, 27 November 1713. One has to go back to the previous page to see that the marriage took place in November and leaf back to page 22 of the register to see that the year the marriage took place was 1713.

This is, so far, the oldest marriage record I’ve found for the “German” branch of my family tree. A branch which I have disregarded for too long.

Three hundred and three years ago this month my 7th great-grandparents married and their nuptials were recorded in the church records of the very same town my husband and I married in and live today.

Source:
Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Echternach > Mariages, décès 1706-1778 > image 17 of 293. 1713 Marriage Dimissoriale, left page, first entry. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32399-12662-32?cc=2037955 : accessed 12 November 2016).

bestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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52 Ancestors: #23 A June Wedding in 1901

Week 23 (June 4-10) – Wedding: June is time for weddings. Write about a June bride in your family or highlight a favorite wedding photo. Maybe there’s a serial marry-er in the family — that could be a fun post!

A June Wedding in 1901

1901marriageMy great-grandparents Catherine PÖPPELREITER and Johann WILDINGER were married in Ernzen, Germany, on 4 June 1901.[1] Instead of a wedding photograph, my mother has this tag which was attached to a bag of wedding favors, most likely dragées, and given to family and friends in memory of the wedding. Catherine and Johann were featured in my 52 Ancestors: #9 Close to Home and Close to My Heart.

The Wildinger-Pöppelreiter Family (ca. 1909). From left to right: mother Catherine Pöppelreiter, daughter Marie, son Jean-Pierre, and father Johann Wildinger. The little boy in front of Marie and Jean-Pierre is their son Nicolas, my maternal grandfather.

Catherine was the daughter of Mathias PÖPPELREITER and his first wife Magdalena WAGNER. Her marriage is the only one I know of for the children of Mathias PÖPPELREITER and his two wives.

The PÖPPELREITER-WAGNER Family 1868-1884

Mathias PÖPPELREITER was born on 22 June 1843[2] and baptized on 23 June 1843[3] in Mettendorf, Rhineland, Germany. His parents were Theodore PÖPPELREITER and Maria Katharina GROELINGER.[2]

M1962
Werner Naumann, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei Mettendorf Dekanat Neuerburg, Band 1 A-M Band 2 N-Z (compiled in 1992), Band 2, p. 39, family no. M 1962. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
Mathias married first Magdalena WAGNER on 18 November 1868 in Mettendorf.[4] In the Mettendorf Family Book (above) the compiler included the church register (KB) number, page number, and record number for easy access to the marriage record which would be located in the archives of the diocese in Trier.

Magdalena was born 21 Mar 1842[5] in Mettendorf to Johann WAGNER (some records show the surname spelled WAGNER) and Anna Maria KERSCHT. She was baptized on 22 March 1942 in Mettendorf.[6]

Mathias and Magdalena had eight known children in a dozen years.

  • Theodore b. 18 Sep 1870 d. 1 Dec 1879 § [4]
  • Johann “Joannes” b. 23 Jan 1873 [4]
  • Katharina “Catherine” b. 16 September 1874 [4] d. 4 September 1950 [7], [8]
  • Mathias b. 17 March 1876 [4]
  • Gertrude Marie b. 17 March 1876 d. 7 March 1877 § [4]
  • Margaretha b. 27 May 1878 d. 22 October 1893 § [4]
  • Katharina b. 19 January 1880 d. 19 May 1882 § [4]
  • Maria b. 3 May 1882 d. 3 May 1890 § [4]

All of the above children were born in Mettendorf. The place of death of the children who died young (§ = symbol I use for the end of a line in my database) was also Mettendorf. It is not known if sons Johann and Mathias married and had children. Catherine, child #3, is the only child of this union known to have married and have children.

Magdalena died 20 March 1884[4] in Mettendorf leaving Johann 11, Catherine 9, Mathias 8, Margaretha 5 and Maria nearly 2 without a mother.

The PÖPPELREITER-JUTZ Family 1885-aft. 1892

Mathias PÖPPELREITER had been widowed exactly 10 months when he married Katharina JUTZ on 20 January 1885[9] in Mettendorf. Katharina was born 26 January 1847 in Sinspelt, a neighboring village of Mettendorf. Although Katharina was close to 40 years old when Mathias married her, she gave him three children.

  • Regina b. 11 July 1887 d. aft. 17 July 1942 [9]
  • Anna Maria b. 11 July 1889 [9]
  • Georg b. 28 June 1891 d. 5 November 1892 § [9]

M1964
Werner Naumann, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei Mettendorf Dekanat Neuerburg, Band 1 A-M Band 2 N-Z (compiled in 1992), Band 2 p. 39 family no. M 1964. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
As with Mathias’ first family, all of these children were born in Mettendorf. Little Georg died in Mettendorf at the age of 16 months.[9]

Mathias and Katharina’s daughter Regina wrote to her half-sister Catherine’s family in Luxembourg during World War II given them genealogy information on the PÖPPELREITER family. The letter survived the war and was saved by Catherine’s daughter Marie and later passed on to my mother, her godchild. This letter was transcribed and translated in my 52 Ancestors: #9 Close to Home and Close to My Heart.

Where will I find the original records?

Werner Naumann who compiled the Mettendorf Family Book used the church registers (Kirchenbuch = KB) 1 through 13. KB 12 has marriages from 1860 to after 1900 and KB 13 has births and deaths from 1860 to after 1900. A 1999 version of Naumann’s compilation gives the location of the church registers in the front matter of the book. KB 1 through 11 are kept in the Diocese Archives in Trier and KB 12 and 13 were in the archives of the parish in Mettendorf. For the protection of privacy, records are not made available to the public for a certain amount of years from the date of the record. Baptismal records: 120 years; marriage records: 100 years; and death records: 40 years. Complete volumes of the death registers may only be viewed in their entirety 100 years after the last entry made. Information about deaths may be requested on an individual basis per the 40 years rule.

Dates of death for Mathias PÖPPELREITER and his 2nd wife Katharina JUTZ were not listed in the 1992 compilation. They most likely died after 1892 as Mr. Naumann would have only had access to death records up to 1892 when he compiled his book. For the same reason, records of marriages of Mathias’ children were not available to the public. It is only due to the tag saved from their wedding favors and the family book for Ernzen[1] that I have the date of marriage for Mathias and Magdalena’s daughter Catherine.

To find the missing documentation I will have to visit the Mettendorf parish archives and/or the diocese archives in Trier. When I take the trip to the Rhineland Archives in Koblenz later this month with my genealogy society Luxracines, I might be able to view the civil records for this family if someone in my group ordered the BMD records for Mettendorf. I ordered only Ernzen and Ferschweiler and would gladly share time with someone interested in these villages. Wouldn’t it be fun to work with another researcher on the same village? One can always hope and, as they say, two heads are always better than one.

Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner of Kordel, compiler, Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 (compiled in 2000), p. 245-246, family #867. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[2] Werner Naumann, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei Mettendorf Dekanat Neuerburg, Band 1 A-M Band 2 N-Z (compiled in 1992), Band 2, p. 38, family no. M 1959. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[3] “Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898”, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 469,172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NC12-SXT : accessed 2 June 2015), Mathias Poeppelreiter, 23 Jun 1843; citing Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
[4] Mettendorf Family Book, Band 2, p. 39, family no. M 1962. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[5] Mettendorf Family Book, Band 2, p. unknown, family no. M 3013. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[6] Germany Births and Baptisms, FHL microfilm 469,172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NC12-SQ1 : accessed 5 June 2015), Magdalena Wagner, 22 Mar 1842; citing Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
[7] 1950 Death Record No., photocopy of original page in the death register at the records office at the city hall in Echternach obtained 10 July 1996.
[8] Luxembourger Wort, digitized by Bibliothèque nationale de Luxembourg; online http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu/webclient/DeliveryManager?application=DIRECTLINK&custom_att_2=simple_viewer&pid=833934&search_terms=catherine%20wildinger#panel:pp|issue:833934|article:DTL387|query:catherine wildinger
[9] Mettendorf Family Book, Band 2 p. 39 family no. M 1964. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Mathias PÖPPELREITER
Parents: Theodore PÖPPELREITER and Maria Katharina GROELINGER
Spouse: Magdalena WAGNER(*) and Katharina JUTZ
Parents of spouse(*): Johann WAGNER and Anna Maria KERSCHT
Whereabouts: Mettendorf, Rhineland, Germany
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 2nd great-grandparents

1. Mathias PÖPPELREITER and Magdalena WAGNER
2. Catherine PÖPPELREITER
3. Nicolas WILDINGER
4. Living (Mom) WILDINGER
5. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.

52 Ancestors: #22 A New Beginning for my German Genealogy Research

Week 22 (May 28 – June 3) – Commencement: Countless schools will be having their commencement ceremonies around this time. Think not only about school, but also about commencement meaning “a beginning.”

A New Beginning

Nearly two and a half years ago a visit of an exposition by Luxracines at our local mall was a new beginning for my genealogy research. Soon afterwards I joined Luxracines, a genealogy society in Luxembourg, and was making plans for my first field trip, Luxracines on Tour 2013 Part I. The Luxracines on Tour 2013 (Part II) field trip in May 2013 was a great success.

boat
Roman ship on the Mosel River

Following a cruise of the Mosel River on a Roman ship and lunch at a typical German “Gasthaus” we visited Peter Daus’ private library above the Restaurant Daus in the Haus Daus in Wittlich.

daus
Restaurant Daus in Haus Daus in Wittlich, Germany

The library had about 2000 Familienbücher (family books) for towns in Rheinland-Pfalz, Pfalz and Saarland. Ortsfamilienbücher or Familienbücher are compilations of information extracted from civil and parish registers for all families of a town or village and arranged in alphabetical order. Information on occupations, military service and emigration can also be found in these books.

I pulled the books on the villages my ancestors came from and began taking pictures of the covers/title pages and all entries for surnames that matched mine with my Nikon Coolpix (macro and without flash). Although time was short and work space a bit cramped, I took nearly 120 photos – some (below) came out a bit blurry but still useful for citing sources.

ferschcover
Familienbuch Ferschweiler[1]
The WILDINGER-WEIMANN family was the very first family I looked up. I knew Bernard WILDINGER was born in Ferschweiler and found him in Richard Schaffner’s 1999 compilation Familienbuch Ferschweiler.[1]

ferschweiler
Page 249, entries for families no. 1624 and 1625[1]
My second great-grandfather Bernard WILDINGER is listed under family number 1624 with his wife Maria WEIMANN. Next to Bernard’s name the number <1625.3> links him to family number 1625 (his parents and siblings) in the same book (next entry) and as the 3rd child of the couple.

Abbreviations used in family books:
   geboren / born
~    getauft / christened
+     gestorben / born
bgr or ¨    begraben / buried
oo    Ehe / marriage
o-o     außerehelich / extramarital
S    standesamtlich / civil
   kirchlich / religious
?    fraglich / questionable
   vermutlich / presumably
   errechnet / estimated
NN    Name(n) unbekannt / unknown name
P.    Paten / godparents
Q.    Quelle / source
u.    und / and
zw.    zwischen / between
lu    lutherisch / Lutheran
rk    römisch-katholisch / Roman Catholic

ernzen
Familienbuch Ernzen[2]
Not only were Bernard and Maria listed in Ferschweiler[1] but also in Ernzen[2] where they were married and had their children. These entries helped me to write the following story of this family.

The WILDINGER-WEIMANN Family of Ernzen, Germany

Bernard WILDINGER was born on 7 November 1838 in Ferschweiler to Nikolaus WILDINGER und Catharina SCHRAMEN.[1] He was baptized Bernardus on 9 November 1838 in Sankt Lucia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler.[3]

Bernard married Maria WEIMANN on 25 January 1866 in a civil ceremony [Source: St.A. (Standesamtliche=civil) Heirats-Act Nr. 5] in Bollendorf/Ernzen.[2] They were married on 3 February 1866 (Source: Kirchenbuch 4/152/2)[2] in a religious ceremony in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[4]

Maria WEIMANN was born on 18 June 1839 in Ernzen to Hubert WEIMANN and Elisabeth WELTER.[2] She was baptized on 19 June 1839 in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[5] Her godparents were Maria WELTER and Anton PROMMENSCHENKEL, both of Ernzen.[2]

Bernard and Maria had eight known children:

  1. Hubert was born on 23 December 1866 in Ernzen. After Christmas, on St. Stephen’s Day, 26 December 1866 he was baptized in the catholic church. His godparents were Hubert WEIMANN from Ernzen and Kath. SCHRAMEN from Ferschweiler. He died at nine months on 20 September 1867 and was buried two days later in Ernzen.[2]
  2. Peter was born 19 October 1868 in Ernzen.[2] He was baptized on 21 October 1868 in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[6] His godfather was Peter WILDINGER. Peter did not marry and died at the age of 31 years on 11 May 1899 in Ernzen.[2]
  3. Elise was born unknown and died 14 May 1870 in Ernzen.[2]
  4. Peter was born 7 August 1871 in Ernzen. He was baptized 8 August 1871 in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen[7] in the presence of his godparents Peter STEIL and Marg. DEUTSCH. He was deaf and dumb (taubstumm), never married and died in 1952 in Ernzen.[2]
  5. Johann was born on 25 February 1874 in Ernzen. He was baptized in the catholic church in the presence of his godparents Johann WEIMANN and Elis. WILDINGER. He was a mason (Maurer), married Katharina PÖPPELREITER on 16 September 1874 in Mettendorf where the family moved in 1904.[2] Johann and Katharina were my great-grandparents.

    wildinger
    My great-grandfather, Johann “Jean” WILDINGER 1874-1924
  6. Nikolaus was born 3 May 1876 in Ernzen. He was baptized in the catholic church in the presence of his godparents Nik. ROOS and Elis. SCHRAMEN. He died in 1948 in Ernzen.[2]
  7. Anna Maria was born 25 November 1878 in Ernzen and was baptized in the catholic church. She married Michael RAIER, an ironworker (Hüttenarbeiter) from Bollendorf on 3 September 1907.[2]
  8. Bernhard was born on 19 June 1881 in Ernzen. He was baptized in the catholic church in the presence of his godparents Bernard SCHRAMEN and Kath. HANSEN. He married Marg. HANSEN on 30 January 1908. His wife was born 20 May 1888 and died in 1915. Bernhard and his family lived in Ernzen and had six children between 1908-1921.[2]

Bernard WILDINGER was a stonemason (Steinhauer). He died at the age of 55 years in Ernzen on 14 October 1893 in Ernzen.[2] His wife Maria was a widow for 22 years before dying on 2 September 1915 in Ernzen.[2]

The Next Step

Although Mr. Schaffner has facilitated my research of this family this is only the beginning for German families. I still need to obtain the records he used for his compilations. The next step is to visit the Rhineland Archives (Landeshauptarchivs) in Koblenz where I hopefully will be able to access the original or digital copies of the church and civil records.

Thanks to my Luxracines membership I’ll be making the trip to Koblenz, Germany, to visit the archives of Rhineland on June 25th. When I registered to participate on this trip I had to give advance notice of the records I’m interested in seeing – birth, marriage, and death records for Ernzen and Ferschweiler for the years (range) the WILDINGER-WEIMANN and the WILDINGER-SCHRAMEN families lived in those towns.

The original documents ordered by researchers are made available for viewing four times a day. The information from the documents may be copied (transcribed) or the page(s) can be scanned on their in-house scanner and saved to a USB flash drive. The use of digital cameras is not permitted.

I am looking forward to this trip to the Landeshauptarchivs in Koblenz and will definitely be blogging about it!

Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 1 der Pfarrei Sancta Lucia Ferschweiler 1680-1899, mit: Diesburgerhof (ab 1803) und L(a)eisenhof (ab1830) (compiled in 1999), p. 349, family #1624. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[2] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 (compiled in 2000), p. 245-246, family #867. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[3] “Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898”, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 463,565. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NDZ1-H61 : accessed 23 February 2015), Bernardus Wildinger; citing Sankt Lucia Katholisch, Ferschweiler, Rheinland, Prussia.
[4] “Deutschland, Heiraten, 1558-1929,”, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462,714. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JH8P-DXT : accessed 23 February 2015), Bernardus Weldinger and Maria Weimann, 03 Feb 1866; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[5] “Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898”, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462,714. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NFD4-54C : accessed 23 February 2015), Maria Weiman, 19 Jun 1839; citing Sankt Lucia Katholisch, Ferschweiler, Rheinland, Prussia.
[6] Ibid, (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N2CB-2JL : accessed 23 February 2015), Peter Wildinger, 21 Oct 1868; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[7] Ibid, (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NFD4-V9B : accessed 23 February 2015), Petrus Wildinger, 08 Aug 1871; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Bernard WILDINGER
Parents: Nicolas WILDINGER and Catherina SCHRAMEN
Spouse: Maria WEIMANN
Parents of spouse: Hubert WEIMANN and Elisabeth WELTER
Whereabouts: Ferschweiler and Ernzen, Germany
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 2nd great-grandparents

1. Bernard WILDINGER and Maria WEIMANN
2. Johann “Jean” WILDINGER
3. Nicolas WILDINGER
4. Living WILDINGER
5. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.