52 Ancestors: #10 The SCHMITT Family of Kalberger Hof

Kalberger Hof

Kalberger Hof is a farm just 1 kilometer northwest of Erlenbach near Hetzerath in Germany. On the map below, it’s location is marked with a little house icon in a green circle. This is about 50 kilometers (31 miles) from Echternach where I live.


The farm was first mentioned in documents in 1409 when Heinrich Muil von der Neuerburg, declared he had signed over to his wife Metzen an annual pension of 50 florins on half of the villages of Zemmer, Gransdorf, and Rodenerden, the estate of Kallberg, and other estates belonging to the Abbey of Echternach. Lease agreements for the years 1533 and 1541 and 1547 document the farm’s ownership and administrators. After the death of Jakob von Rheineck in 1541 the farm went to his son-in-law Johann von Warsberg.

Until the middle of the 17th century, Kalberg consisted of one household. Towards the end of the 17th century, the farm was apparently divided and a second farm, Emmerichs Hof, was established. Three generations of the SCHMITT family leased Kalberger Hof over a period of nearly 100 years.

kalberger-hof-courtesy-of-thomas-eifel
Kalberger Hof, photo courtesy of Thomas Eifel, used with permission.

Philipp SCHMITT, the father of Friedrich (featured later in this post), administered the Kalberger Hof from 1748 until his death. In 1769, Johann SCHMITT, his oldest son, was given the stock of the Kalberger Hof and the Emmerichs Hof to manage for nine years. Philipp died in 1783; his son Johann died six years later. The widow Appolonia MATHES (or MATTES) administered the farm from 1789 until 1796. Her son Friedrich SCHMITT, the then oldest living son, took over the farm in 1796 until his death in 1829. After his death, Kalberger Hof continued to be managed by his widow, Maria Elisabeth PLEIN, and their oldest son. In 1842 Nikolaus SCHMITT and his mother, the widow of Friederich SCHMITT, paid taxes to the parish. The charges were calculated in bushels and pecks, in old fruit dimensions for cereals and potatoes, and in hundredweight and pounds for straw. The level of these charges was calculated from the total tax revenues of individual persons. In 1855 the Kalberger Hof had one residential building and 15 inhabitants. In the years 1845-1848, the present house and the stable were built.

From 1844 to 1917 there is a gap in the list of names of the persons who were managing Kalberger Hof per the research of Thomas Eifel seen under Kalberger Hof on his website Heckenmünster. On 30 July 2011 I received permission from Mr. Eifel to include his article (in German) with source citation on the farm in my database. I would not have been able to write the history of Kalberger Hof during the time the SCHMITT family managed it without his research.

The SCHMITT-PLEIN Family

Philipp SCHMITT and his wife Appolonia MATTES were my children’s 6th great-grandparents. My children descend from the second son Friedrich featured here with his wife and children.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Fridericus “Friederich” SCHMITT
Parents:  Philipp SCHMITT and Appolonia MATTES
Spouse: Maria Elisabeth PLEIN
Parents of spouse: Matthias PLEIN and Margaretha VALERIUS
Whereabouts: Kalberger Hof, Diesburgerhof, Osweiler, Echternach
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: husband’s 4th great-grandparents

2. Fridericus “Friederich” SCHMITT and Maria Elisabeth PLEIN
2. Nicolaus “Nicolas” SCHMITT
3. Catharina SCHMITT
4. Johannes “Johann” “Jean” SCHWARTZ
5. Catharina “Catherine” “Ketty” “Ged” SCHWARTZ
6. Marcel Mathias MEDER
7. husband of Cathy Meder-Dempsey

Friedrich “Fridericus” SCHMITT was born[1],[2],[3],[4],[5] about 19 June 1761 on Kalberger Hof, Burgermeisterei Heidweiler, Kreis Wittlich, Preußen (Germany). The son of Philipp SCHMITT and Appolonia MATTES was baptized[6] the same day in Heidweiler, the closest (parish) town to the farm his parents managed. He died[1],[2],[7],[8] on 5 March 1829 on Kalberger Hof.

Friedrich married[1],[2],[3],[9], [10], [11] Maria Elisabeth PLEIN, daughter of Matthias PLEIN and Margaretha VALERIUS, on 8 June 1790 in Heidweiler. Maria was born[1],[2],[3],[12] on 2 November 1766 in Niersbach (Bernkastel-Wittlich, Germany). She was baptized[13] the same day in Arrenrath. Her godparents were Maria Elis. WEBER and Nik. HEGENER from Niersbach. She died[1],[2],[3],[14] on 22 January 1845 on Kalberger Hof.

Friedrich and Maria had the following children:

  1. Appolonia was born[15] about 8 July 1791 on Kalberger Hof. She was baptized[16] on 8 July 1791 in Heidweiler. She married[15] ,[17] Johann THIELEN on 4 February 1812 in Hetzerath (Wittlich, Germany).
  2. Nicolaus was born about 28 April 1793 on Kalberger Hof. He was baptized[18] on 28 April 1793 in Heidweiler. It is possible this child died before 12 July 1795 when the next son was born and named Nicolaus at baptism.
  3. Nicolaus “Nicolas” was born[2],[15],[19] on 11 July 1795 on Kalberger Hof. He was baptized[18] on 12 July 1795 in Heidweiler. He died[15],[21],[22],[23] on 17 October 1852 on Kalberger Hof. Nicolaus was seen on a tax list in 1842 on Kalberger Hof as seen in the narrative below. He married[15],[19],[24] Anna Maria “Marianna” WOLLSCHEID, daughter of Jacobus “Jacobi” WOLLSCHEID and Catharine BARTHELMES, on 17 January 1827 in Longuich (Trier-Saarburg). Anna was born[19] on 24 December 1800 in Kirsch (Longuich). She was baptized[25] on 25 December 1800 in Longuich. She died[22],[23],[26] on 3 November 1857 in Osweiler (Rosport, Luxembourg). Nicolas and Anna Maria were my children’s 4th great-grandparents.
  4. Anna Margaretha was born[15] about 20 October 1798 on Kalberger Hof. She was baptized[27] on 20 October 1798 in Heidweiler. She married[15] Christophorus “Christof” LOOS (1803-1850), son of Jakob LOHR and Margaretha SCHUSTER, on 2 February 1826 in Salmrohr (Germany).
  5. Catharina was born[15] about 17 May 1801 on Kalberger Hof. She was baptized[28] on 17 May 1801 in Heidweiler. She married[15] Jacob KREMER on 9 July 1830 in Heidweiler.
  6. Anna was born[15] about 12 December 1803 on Kalberger Hof. She was baptized[29] on 12 December 1803 in Heidweiler.
  7. Elisabetha was born[15] about 14 October 1807 on Kalberger Hof. She was baptized[30] on 14 October 1807 in Heidweiler. She married[15] Heinrich BRAND on 28 February 1832 in Dudeldorf.
  8. Maria was born[15] on 25 November 1809 on Kalberger Hof. She died[15] two days later, on 27 November 1809, on Kalberger Hof.

Maria Elisabeth PLEIN died in 1845. Friedrich, who died in 1829, and Maria Elisabeth’s daughters Appolonia, Anna Margaretha, Catharina, and Elisabetha married and left the family farm. Nikolaus, the only known son to have lived to adulthood, remained on the farm until his death in 1852. His widow Anna Maria WOLLSCHEID moved to the Diesburger Hof (Ferschweiler) before January 1855 and then to Osweiler before December 1855 where she lived with her daughter Catharina and son-in-law Johann SCHWARTZ until her death in November 1857.

bestwishescathy1 

Sources:
1          Richard Schaffner, Familienbuch der Pfarrei St. Alexius Arenrath und Niersbach etwa 1658-1905, 2006-2008, page 207, family 1056. Schmitt-Plein family.
2          Armin Giebel, Ortsfamilienbuch des StA Longuich bis Okt. 1931 (June 2013), page 1799, family 8740. Schmitt-Plein family.
3          Albert Schwickert, Familienbuch Heidweiler 1709-1805 Orte: Dodenburg Greverath Münster (heute: Heckenmünster) Heidweiler, 1994, pages 523-524. Book viewed and pages photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013. Mathias Plein and Magaretha Valerius family.
4          Ibid., page 586. Friedrich Schmitz and Maria Elisabeth Plein family; KB 2/2.
5          Ibid., page [unknown]. Philipp Schmitz and Apollonia Mattes entry; church register 2, page 2.
6          Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 / Deutschland Geburten und Taufen, 1558-1898, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 846,155. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NX5H-D9Z : accessed 1 August 2015), Fridericus Schmitz, baptized 19 Jun 1761, father Philippi Schmitz, mother Appollonia; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland, Prussia.
7          Familienbuch Heidweiler, page 586. Friedrich Schmitz and Maria Elisabeth Plein family; Civil register 1829, record 20.
8          Ibid., page [unknown]. Philipp Schmitz and Apollonia Mattes entry; civil register 1829, record 20.
9          Germany Marriages, 1558-1929, FHL microfilm 849,155. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JHVR-KPF : accessed 26 December 2014), Fridericus Schmitz and Elisabetha Plein, 08 Jun 1790; citing Katholisch, Heidweiler, Rheinland, Prussia.
10         Familienbuch Heidweiler, page [unknown]. Philipp Schmitz and Apollonia Mattes entry; church register 2, page 133.
11         Ibid., page 586. Friedrich Schmitz and Maria Elisabeth Plein family; Church Register 2/133.
12         Ibid., page 586. Friedrich Schmitz and Maria Elisabeth Plein family; Arenrath Church Book 3, page 109.
13         Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898, FHL microfilm 849,147. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VH9L-XWV : accessed 1 August 2015), Maria Elisabetha Plein, baptized 02 Nov 1766, father Mathias Plein, mother Margarita; citing Roman Catholic records of Arrenrath, Rheinland, Prussia.
14         Familienbuch Heidweiler, page 586. Friedrich Schmitz and Maria Elisabeth Plein family; Civil Register Heidweiler 3/1845.
15         Ibid., page 586. Friedrich Schmitz and Maria Elisabeth Plein family.
16         Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898, FHL microfilm 585,850. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NKDV-DL6 : accessed 1 August 2015), Apolloniae Schmitz, baptized 8 Jul 1791, father Friderici Schmitz, mother Elisabethae; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland.
17         Germany Marriages 1558-1929, FHL microfilm 584,862. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JHH7-47F : accessed 1 August 2015), Joannem Thielen and Apollonia Schmit, married 04 Feb 1812; citing Katholisch, Hetzerath Wittlich, Rheinland, Prussia.
18         Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898, FHL microfilm 585,850. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N6SN-GP1 : accessed 1 August 2015), Nicolaus Schmit, baptized 28 Apr 1793, father Friderici Schmit, mother Elisabethae; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland.
19         Familienbuch Longuich, page 1812, family 8792. Nikolaus Schmitt and Marianna Wollscheid.
20         Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898, FHL microfilm 846,155. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NTXK-T6X : accessed 1 August 2015), Nicolaus Schmid, baptized 12 Jul 1795, father Friderici Schmid, mother Elisabetha Plein; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland.
21         Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Rosport > Naissances 1889-1890 Mariages 1797-1890 Décès 1797-1853 > image 643 of 1410. 1855 Marriage Record No. 2. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11613-10947-44?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-L6L:n1038283664 : accessed 02 Apr 2013).
22         Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Mariages 1809 > image 1067 of 1462. 1860 Marriage Record No. 10. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11670-167828-84?cc=1709358&wc=9RYS-C68:129623201,129776101 : accessed 28 July 2011).
23         Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Mariages 1809 > image 1154 of 1462. 1866 Marriage Record No. 2. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11670-166074-78?cc=1709358&wc=9RYS-C68:129623201,129776101 : accessed 28 July 2011).
24         Germany Marriages 1558-1929, FHL microfilm 469,141. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4FC-TYK : accessed 1 August 2015), Nicolaus Schmidt and Maria Anna Wolschett, married 17 Jan 1827, parents of groom Friderici Schmidt and Elisabethae Plein, parents of bride Jacobi Wolschett and Catharinae Barthelmaes; citing Longuich, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
25         Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898, FHL microfilm 469,141. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NC1V-N84 : accessed 28 July 2015), Maria Anna Wolschett, baptized 25 Dec 1800, father Jacobi Wolschett, mother Catharinae Barthelmaes; citing Longuich, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
26         Luxembourg Civil Records, Rosport > Décès 1853-1891 > image 52 of 510. 1857 Death Record No. 24. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11627-97505-85?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-L62:1818144340 : accessed 05 Apr 2013).
27         Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898, FHL microfilm 584,863. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N6SR-66X : accessed 1 August 2015), Anna Margaretha Schmitz, baptized 20 Oct 1798, father Friderici Schmitz, mother Elisabethae Plein; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland.
28         Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N6SR-63X : accessed 1 August 2015), Catharina Schmiz, baptized 17 May 1801, father Friderici Schmiz, mother Elisabethae Plein; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland.
29         Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NPN7-Q2L : accessed 1 August 2015), Anna Schmiz, baptized 12 Dec 1803, father Friderici Schmiz, mother Elisabethae Plein; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland.
30         Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NKDG-G3X : accessed 1 August 2015), Elisabetha Schmit, baptized 14 Oct 1807, father Friderici Schmit, mother Elisabethae Plein; citing Catholic records of Heidweiler, Rheinland.

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

 

52 Ancestors: #9 Trierweiler-Hoffmann Family of Olk, Germany

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Nicolas TRIERWEILER
Parents: Johann Gerard “Gerardus” TRIERWEILER and Elisabetha KERSCH
Spouse: Catharina HOFFMANN
Parents of spouse: Carl HOFFMANN and Angela ROSPORT
Whereabouts: Olk, Germany and Girst, Luxembourg
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: husband’s 4th great-grandparents

1. Nicolas TRIERWEILER and Catharina HOFFMANN
2. Anna TRIERWEILER
2. Johann SCHWARTZ
3. Johann SCHWARTZ
4. Catharina “Catherine” “Ketty” “Ged” SCHWARTZ
5. Marcel Mathias MEDER
6. husband of Cathy Meder-Dempsey

 

Nicolas TRIERWEILER was born on 6 April 1764[1] in Olk, a small German village located about 5.5 km (3.4 miles) from Rosport in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Nicolas was the son of Johann Gerard “Gerardus” TRIERWEILER and Elisabetha KERSCH. He had a brother and three sisters as well as five half-siblings from his father’s first marriage to Maria Magdalena “Madeleine” GANZ. It is not known at this time when his parents died.

Nicolas was a farmer (Ackerer) in Olk. The area had good arable fields and numerous streams; the wide valleys were well suited for grazing. The name of the village probably originated from the Roman-Celtic word Olca, a term for fertile farmland.

Nicolas married Catharina HOFFMANN, daughter of Carl HOFFMANN and Angela ROSPORT, on 8 March 1791[1] in Welschbillig, to which Olk belonged.

1764catharina-hoffmannbaptism
1764 Baptismal Record for Catharina Hoffmann[2]
Catharina was born and baptized on 18 January 1764 in Girst, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.[2] Her godparents were Wilhelmus HECKER and Catharina MILBACH of Girst. When I found this baptismal record I was reminded that the information found in the family book compilations are wonderful for finding the families but events and dates have to be checked. The entry in the Family Book for Welschbillig, which includes families for Olk, incorrectly listed her date of birth as 1 August 1764.Catharina’s father died when she was about 16. A death record has not been found. His death has been estimated at before 1780 as this was the year of his widow’s next marriage. Catharina’s mother, Angela ROSPORT married Theodor ADAMS on 26 January 1780 in Rosport.[3] Two years later, Catharina, at the age of 18, became a godmother for her sister Anna Maria’s son Theodor NICOLAI on 20 September 1782 in Girst. Her step-father Theodor ADAMS was the godfather of the child.[4] The record is written in a beautiful handwriting.
1782baptismalrecord
1782 Baptismal Record in which Catharina was the godmother and her step-father was the godfather[4]
Nicolas was 26 and Catharina was 27 when they married. Two and a half months after their marriage Catharina gave birth to their first child. On 30 January 1793, three days after the birth of her second child, Catharina’s mother Angela died.[5]Nicolas and Catharina had the following children:

  1. Matthias was born on 23 May 1791 in Olk.[1] He married Anna (Angela) LUDOVICI before 1815. They had 10 children from 1815 to 1837. Matthias died on 4 May 1843 in Olk. His wife Anna died on 7 February 1856 in Olk.[6]
  2. Peter “Petrus” was born on 27 January 1793 in Olk.[1] He worked as a farmer (Landwirt). Peter married Susanna LUCAS, daughter of Bernardi LUCAS and Odiliae HAMM, on 1 March 1824 in Mesenich. He died on 19 November 1835 in Metzdorf. His widow remarried after his death.[7]
  3. Anna was born on 22 July 1794 in Olk.[1] She married Mathias SCHWARTZ, son of Lorentz “Laurentius” SCHWARTZ (1791-1860) and Magdalena HALER, on 17 January 1820 in Osweiler.[8] She died on 21 March 1853 in Osweiler. Anna and Mathias were my children’s ancestors.[9]
  4. Susanna was born on 19 April 1796 in Olk.[1] She married Matthias KIRSTEN (1801-1846) on 19 October 1825 in the parish of Welschbillig. She died on 3 October 1845 in Ruwer.[10]
  5. Klemens-Christoph was born on 1 November 1797 in Olk.[1] Nothing further is known.
  6. Maria Eva was born on 14 September 1800 in Olk.[1] She married Heinrich MERTES (1792-1859) on 10 February 1836 in Ruwer. Heinrich was a widower with four children. Maria Eva died on 1 October 1845 in Ruwer.[11]
  7. Peter was born on 9 April 1805 in Olk.[1] Nothing further is known.

1820marriagerecordcropped
Bride’s section on the 1820 Marriage Record of Anna TRIERWEILER and Mathias SCHWARTZ.[8]
Nicolas died five years after the birth of their last child on 2 November 1810 in Olk at the age of 46 years.[8] His widow Catharina died on 24 February 1815 in Olk at the age of 53 years.[8] Nicolas and Catharina’s dates of death were documented in their daughter Anna’s marriage record.Most of the information on this family was gleaned from the German Family Books. The Catholic church records for Welschbillig are held by the Bistumsarchiv Trier and have been microfilmed. They are not available for loan and access in Europe is limited to members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Documenting this family will not be as easy as for families who lived in Luxembourg during the same time period.bestwishescathy1Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner, Familienbuch der Pfarrei St. Peter Welschbillig 1800-1900 mit Möhn, Olk, Träg, Helenenberg, Aspelt, Schwarzkreuz und Windmühle, compiled 1998, page 319, family nr. 1488 from Olk. Trierweiler-Hoffmann family group.
[2] Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Rosport > Baptêmes 1740-1779, 1795-1796, confirmations 1740-1765, mariages 1778-1779, 1795-1796, sépultures 1779-1797 > image 27 of 79. 1764 Baptismal Record (right page, 4th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-S92L?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-HZ6%3A1501108227%2C1501108228 : 9 January 2015).
[3] Ibid., Rosport > image 22 of 172. 1780 Marriage Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-S9ZN?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-HZV%3A1501108227%2C1501117286 : accessed 27 February 2017).
[4] Ibid., Rosport > Baptêmes 1778-1793, mariages 1778-1793, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 41 of 172. 1782 Baptismal Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WM-S9QK?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-HZV%3A1501108227%2C1501117286 : accessed 3 March 2017).
[5] Ibid., Rosport > Baptêmes 1778-1793, mariages 1778-1793, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 170 of 172. 1793 Death Record (right page, 4th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-SKF?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-HZV%3A1501108227%2C1501117286 : accessed 27 February 2017).
[6] Family Book Welschbillig, page 320, family Nr. 1490 from Olk. Trierweiler-Ludovici family group.
[7] Heinrich Wagner, Familienbuch Mesenich 1705-1899 (Ortschaften Födlich (1705-ca.1800), Grewenich, Mesenich, Metzdorf und Moersdorf (Luxembourg) (1705-1807)), Mersch 1997 (Association Luxembourgeoise de Généalogie et d’Héraldique), page 319, family nr. 1170. Peter Trierweiler and Susanna Lucas family group.
[8] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Rosport > Naissances, mariages, décès 1800-1815 > image 280 of 385. 1820 Marriage Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11676-83258-61?cc=1709358&wc=9RYS-JWL:130314401,130827901 : accessed 11 April 2013 and 22 July 2015).
[9] Luxembourg Civil Records, Rosport > Décès 1853-1891 > image 4 of 510. 1853 Death Record No. 13. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11627-96341-81?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-L62:1818144340 : accessed 19 May 2011).
[10] Armin Giebel, compiler, Familienbuch Standesamt Ruwer-Waldrach, (Stand: Sept. 2016), family nr. 8268. Matthias Kirsten and Susanna Trierweiler family group.
[11] Ibid., family nr. 11469. Mertes Heinrich and Trierweiler Maria Eva family group.
© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

52 Ancestors: #3 Michel CLOS and Elisabetha THEWES md. 1770

In 2015 in 52 Ancestors: #27 The Sheep Herder’s Family I wrote about Théodore REIFFER and his wife Elisabetha CLOS. They were my children’s  4th great-grandparents. While Théodore’s parents are still unknown, I found a little bit of information on Elisabetha’s parents and siblings.

My Principal Source is not a Primary Source

Three entries in Richard Schaffner’s Familienbuch Körperich, at first glance, seem to be for three different men named Michael CLOOS, KLOS, or CLOS.

The information in entry #319 came from the Körperich church register book #2. CLOOS or KLOS Michael, son of Johann CLOOS and Anna KLAREN of Dauwelshausen, married Elisabeth THEWES or THIEWES, daughter of Nikolaus THEWES and Gertrud LESSEN from Ammeldingen, on 15 May 1770 in Körperich. At the time of the marriage, the bride was living in Seimerich.[1]

In entry #1153 the marriage of Michael KLOS or CLOS and Elisabeth THIBES or THEVES is estimated at before 1771 (likely due to the birth records found for the couple’s children). Michael resided in Ammeldingen, Gentingen, and Eisenbach while Elisabeth resided in Gentingen. These are likely places referenced in the baptismal records of their children. They had three daughters between 1771 and 1776. The places of birth, dates of birth/baptism, and their godparents’ names and residence are listed. No entry is made for marriages of the daughters which means Mr. Schaffner did not find marriages in Körperich.[2]

In entry #320 Michael CLOS of Eisenbach died on 20 December 1775 at the age of 28 years.[3]

I believe all of the entries are for the same Michael CLOS (and other spelling variations). Although the book is the main source for this family it is not a primary source. To prove my assumption I will have to consult family books of towns in the immediate area for further information. The primary source, the church records mentioned in the Körperich family book, will have to be hunted down as well.

Click on the marker to open a description with information on when which person lived in these places. The farthest distance between two places is about 15 kilometers or less than 10 miles.

The Michel CLOS Story, This is How it Might Have Been

Michel was born about 1747. At the age of about 23 years, he married Elisabeth. They had two daughters within four years.  Michel died shortly before Christmas 1775. Elisabeth was pregnant with their third child. Five months after his death, she gave birth to their third daughter. The only mention of Elisabeth after the birth of her third child is a reference to the grandparents of Susanna REIFFER being deceased at the time of her marriage on 31 January 1833.[4] Elisabeth, Michel’s widow, therefore died before 1833.

There were no further entries in the Körperich FB for the daughters of Michel and Elisabeth. One of the daughters married in Mettendorf in 1790. A second daughter is known to have married before the birth of a child in 1803, however, the marriage record has not been located.

Michel and Elisabeth had the following children.

i. Margaretha was born on 29 November 1771 in Gentingen and baptized the same day in Körperich. Her godparents were Marg. Goebel of Gentingen and Nik. Thebes of Ammeldingen.[2] Note: The godfather was likely the maternal grandfather of the child.

ii. Elisabetha was born and baptized on 9 March 1774 in Körperich. Her godparents were Elis. Klein from Körperich and Michael Windandy (sic, poss. a typo. A Michael Winandy was living in Körperich at the time).[2] She died on 27 December 1829 in Bastendorf.[5] Note: This child was my children’s ancestor, see The Sheep Herder’s Family

iii. Margaretha was born in Körperich and baptized on 24 May 1776 in Körperich. Her godparents were Marg. Clos from Eisenach and Nik. Wonner from Körperich.[2] Note: How was Marg. Clos related to the child? Could she have been a paternal aunt? No date of birth was given in the entry.

Why were the first and third daughter given the same name? Did the first daughter die before 1776? What happened after the birth of the third daughter? Did Elisabeth marry again? Did she move to another area? Where did she raise her daughters?

In 1790 Margaretha, a daughter of Michael and Elisabeth, married in Mettendorf. Was the bride the older 19 years old Margaretha or was she the younger 16 years old Margaretha?

Daughter Margaretha Marries

Margaretha married Everardus WELTER on 14 September 1790 in Mettendorf.[6], [7]

1790marriagewelterkloos
Source: “Deutschland Heiraten, 1558-1929,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JHHG-35Q : 26 December 2014), Everardus Welter and Margaretha Kloos, 14 Sep 1790; citing Katholisch, Mettendorf, Rheinland, Prussia; FHL microfilm 585,923.
1790marriagewelterkloos2
Source: “Deutschland Heiraten, 1558-1929,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4PJ-7QC : 26 December 2014), Everhardus Welter and Margaretha Kloos, 10 Mar 1790; citing Katholisch, Mettendorf, Rheinland, Prussia; FHL microfilm 585,922.

To learn more about the WELTER-KLOOS couple I need to consult the Mettendorf Family Book the next time I visit the Luxracines library. Will the entry for this couple lead to more information for the family of Michel CLOS and Elisabeth THEWES? Will the entry show their daughter Margaretha died before 2 January 1792 when a man named Everardus WELTER married Angela RENSON? Were there more than one person named Everardus WELTER living in Mettendorf at the time?

ac·count·a·bil·i·ty

Janine Adams of the Organize Your Family History blog and members of her newly formed Facebook group, Genealogy Research Loggers, are helping me to create a habit of regularly entering my genealogy research into a research log. I’m using the Research Manager of my genealogy software Ancestral Quest 15. It is a powerful tool which I have not been using effectively. While entering items to the Research Manager, questions were formed (and recorded!) which I hope will help me to keep better track of the many loose ends in the family tree research.

bestwishescathy1Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner, comp., Familienbuch der Pfarrei St. Hubertus Körperich in der Südeifel mit Körperich, Niedersgegen, Obersgegen, Gentingen, Roth an der Our, Seimerich und Scheuerhof (später Neuscheuerhof) 1689-1899 (2002), p. 73 family #319.
[2] Ibid., p. 247 family #1153.
[3] Ibid, p. 73 family #320.
[4] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Diekirch > Naissances 1879-1890 Mariages 1796-

1842 > image 1312 of 1492. 1833 Marriage Record No. 9. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-
11618-99298-93?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2N2:1627336735 : accessed 01 Apr 2013).
[5] Luxembourg Civil Records, Bastendorf > Décès 1828-1862 > image 14 of 305. 1829 Death Record No. 19. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12394-256460-30?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2CM:n117549397 : accessed 04 Apr 2013).
[6] Germany Marriages, 1558-1929 / Deutschland, Heiraten, 1558-1929, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 585,923. Everardus Welter and Margaretha Kloos, 14 Sep 1790; parents of the groom: Michaelis Kloos and

Elisabethae Thewes; parents of the bride: Joachim Welter and Barbarae Roderig; citing Katholisch, Mettendorf, Rheinland, Prussia. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JHHG-35Q : accessed 8 January
2017).
[7] Ibid., FHL microfilm 585,922. Everhardus Welter and Margaretha Kloos, 10 Mar 1790; parents of the groom: Michaelis Kloos and Elisabethae Thewes; parents of the bride: Joachim Welter and Barbarae Roderig; citing Katholisch, Mettendorf, Rheinland, Prussia. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4PJ-7QC : 26 December 2014).

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Adding 3 Generations to the Family Tree

logo_klengI was on duty a week ago Saturday at my genealogy society’s library in Walferdange, Luxembourg. This new library is open to the public on Saturday afternoons from 2 to 5. Three members of the board of Luxracines were present and six visitors dropped in to research and to become familiar with our collections.

As it was not yet too busy, I was able to get some research done while on duty.

  • I opened up my genealogy software (AQ14), went to my maternal grandfather’s pedigree and checked for the closest unknown sets of ancestors. One by one I pulled the family books of the towns they were from and looked up the families.
  • I used Evernote’s Scannable app on my iPhone to scan the images of the pages of the German family books concerning the families I was interested in.
  • I attached the names of 5 sets of NEW ancestors to my family tree, as placeholders. I did not input any further information.
  • To the Research Manager of AQ14, I added a To Do/Research Item for each placeholder person:
    Check the images from the [name of town] family book taken at Luxracines library on 29 Oct 2016
  • I included a red tag for good measure.
  • At home, I sent the images to Evernote. Each image became a note which I titled with the town name, page number, family number(s), surname. The notes were filed in a temporary notebook.

The next step was to begin inputting the information, citing sources, and adding the cropped images to my database. I began with the Familienbuch der Pfarrei Messerich, Dekanat Bitburg, 1720-1900 compiled by Werner Naumann. It covers the towns of Messerich, Birtlingen, Niederstedem, and Oberstedem.

messerich2015Last year I wrote 52 Ancestors: #45 The WAGNER-KERSCHT Family. My third great-grandmother Anna Maria KERSCHT, wife of Johann WAGNER, was the daughter of Mathias KERSCHT (1759-1841), a sheep herder, Schäfer, and Anna EVEN (1766-1828) who were married 26 November 1785 in Messerich in the Eifel. Anna Maria’s parents, my 4th great-grandparents, would be the next logical couple to write about. The Mettendorf FB entry M1158 for them indicated that they had not always lived in Mettendorf. Their first six children had only estimated years of birth indicating the information was not to be found in Mettendorf. Their seventh child, born in 1809, was documented as being born in Mettendorf.

My fourth great-grandmother’s name was seen as Anna EVEN in the Mettendorf FB (Family Book). Since Anna and Mathias married in Messerich this was the logical place to look further for this family line.

To put this in perspective, Nicolas WILDINGER was my maternal grandfather. His line back to Anna is through his mother Catherine PÖPPELREITER, her mother Magdalena WAGNER, her mother Anna Maria KERSCHT, her mother Anna EWEN.

nicolaswildingerpedigreeThe first thing I noticed when I looked up EVEN, the name found in the Mettendorf FB, was that the name was spelled EWEN in the Messerich FB. I had suspected this may be the case as I had found Anna’s parents listed as Gerardus EWEN and Barbara THILIEN on Thomas A. Pick’s Homepage for Eifel Birth and Marriage Data. The data was transcribed from an unknown source and the town of Messerich is seen as Mefserich (clearly a transcription error). This made me question the correctness of Pick’s use of the names EWEN and THILIEN.

In the Messerich FB, Mr. Naumann included the book number, page number, and record number of the church records he viewed. He also mentions other spellings of names or name changes. Although records will have to be obtained as proof, I will, for now, go with the spelling found by Mr. Naumann.

The parents of Anna EWEN (1766-1828) were Gerhard EWEN and Barbara THIL, also seen as THIELEN. Anna had nine siblings born between  1761 and 1780. Not only did I find her parents but also her paternal grandparents, maternal grandfather, and both sets of paternal great-grandparents. The new names in the family tree are seen below in generations 8 and 9 in white.

annamariakerschtpedigreeWhen I finish all of the towns scanned, I will go into AQ14 and re-set the standard ancestral colors so that these new ancestors on my mother’s paternal line will also be pink.

An interesting name change was seen for Anna EWEN’s parents. Her father Remigius was born EUPERS. At the time of his marriage to Margaretha EWEN in 1733 he lost his surname as they lived in the EWEN home and their children were all baptized EWEN. He was known as Remigius EUPERS vulgo EWEN. Vulgo means “alias” or “also known as” and shows his association to the EWEN family and property.

The Mathias KERSCHT and Anna EWEN family group were included in the Messerich FB. However, there are still discrepancies. My Anna Maria KERSCHT is in the Mettendorf FB with birth being circa 1793. She had five siblings born between 1786 and 1794 in Messerich but she was not in the Messerich FB.

When I wrote 52 Ancestors: #45 The WAGNER-KERSCHT Family I discussed my doubts about Anna Maria being born abt. 1793 which would mean she was nearly 50 when her last child, my 2nd great-grandmother Magdalena WAGNER, was born. I didn’t have the WAGNER-KERSCHT family’s entry from the Mettendorf FB when I wrote the post a year ago. At the time the theme of the post was “nur nicht verzweifeln” or don’t despair due to all the missing information. I still don’t have the entry and have added it to the Research Manager as a To Do/Research Item for my next visit to the library.

Messerich, Germany

The first documented mention of the town Messerich, Miezriche, was in the year 1066. In 1852 remains of Roman settlements were found thus proving that the place existed nearly one thousand years before it was first mentioned. In 1473 Messerich had 15 Feuerstellen, or houses which were lived in; in 1525 there were 12; in 1541 there were 14; and in 1624 there were only 5. The Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648), one of the deadliest conflicts in European history, and the Black Death, which repeatedly struck the Nimstal area in 1620-1633, were the cause for the decline in population. Today there are over 400 residents and 100 houses in Messerich.

messerichinrelationtoluxembourg
Map courtesy of maps.google.lu

On the map above Messerich is a bit south of Bitburg. The closest towns to Messerich are Masholder, Birtlingen, Oberstedem, and Bitburg. Echternach, Luxembourg, the town where I live, lies 17.5 km or 10 miles to the south.

luxembourgpartitionsmap_english
By Spanish_Inquisition (LuxembourgPartitionsMap_english.jpg) [GFDL or CC BY-SA 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0], via Wikimedia Commons
Until the end of the 18th century, Messerich belonged to the Bitburg Provost District of the Duchy of Luxembourg. The borders of Luxembourg, before 1659, are seen above as black lines including areas of present-day France, Belgium, and Germany. The area where Messerich lies belonged to the Duchy of Luxembourg until the dark green area went to Prussia in 1815.

Although Messerich today lies in Germany, during the time my ancestors lived there it was part of the Duchy of Luxembourg. Now I am curious to find out which of my other “German” ancestors were actually Luxembourgers.

The entries from the Messerich FB have all been inputted and cited in my family tree. Schankweiler, Mettendorf, Neuerburg/Eifel, Mürlenbach, and Fliessem family books remain to be done. Hopefully I will have finished them by November 26th when it is once again my turn to be on library duty.

bestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Preparations and Afterthoughts on JNGH 2016

logo_klengThe JNGH 2016, an international meeting of friends of genealogy and local history in Leudelange, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, was on my calendar last Sunday.

The day began quite early for me since it’s a 45 minutes drive to Leudelange. I had to be there at 8:30 a.m. to set up my table representing my blog. My husband took the time to drop me off and pick me up in the evening. I was a bit nervous and driving myself would have had me out of my comfort zone.

After hooking up my laptop and second monitor and hanging up my sign and family tree, I had time for Luxracines business. As treasurer of the association, I made the rounds with Christiane, our secretary, to welcome the participants and hand out free breakfast coupons. The coupons for a cup of coffee with a croissant went over well last year and the tradition was continued by Luxracines this year.

Preparations for JNGH 2016

I attended the JNGH 2014 as a visitor and to the JNGH 2015 as a member of Luxracines helping out at their booth. I wrote about this last year in my posodibwlogo2016t Working a Genealogy Stand at JNGH 2015, A First for Me! This year was completely new to me as I had a table all to myself, representing the only genealogy blog written in Luxembourg. If there are others “Made in Luxembourg” I would like to know about them.

visitingcardDuring the summer I designed a logo for my blog and used it on visiting cards I printed up on linen paper. I placed a QR code with a link to my blog on the back of the cards. Genealogy is my hobby, not a business. I didn’t see the necessity of paying for having a logo designed and cards printed up.

I prepared my first slide presentation using LibreOffice Impress, part of the free office suite program. I rarely use MS Word or Excel and haven’t seen the necessity of updating MS Office 2003. A simple presentation on how to start a genealogy blog was all I needed. I included French and German text annotations to the screenshots for creating a blog on WordPress.com. One slide showed how the dashboard looks in English, French, and German using side by side images. Simple explanations of posts, pages, comments, tools, appearance, media, and the menu were given in English. As I said, this was my first slide presentation and there are definitely things which can be improved on it.

distressedNot having any kind of printed material or posters, I transferred my logo to canvas (at right) using a distressed technique I learned about on Delia Creates. I’ve made a few of these since reading her posts in 2010 and have given them away as gifts. Delia posted an updated tutorial for distressed canvas in May 2011.

I had library duty last Wednesday and our president offered to print up a poster-sized family tree for my booth on the library’s plotter. My genealogy program does fan charts – full, half and quarter circles but not those nice family trees everyone envies. A few years ago I made one using Inkscape and Family Tree Art Tutorial by Jessica of Cutesy Crafts. Luckily I hadn’t deleted the file when cleaning up my laptop.

familytreeI like the way it turned out since, at the time, I put a lot of hours into placing all the names on the tree. But if I’d have known it was going to be of used I would have gone in and added a few of the recently found ancestors and framed it with a nice border.

How was my day?

Most visitors were from Luxembourg and the surrounding area. Beginners were seeking help on how to get started with their genealogy research. People who were more advanced in their research visited the stands with family and history books which could be looked through or even bought on the spot.

Christine K. from the National Library of Luxembourg’s stand came over to talk to me. She reads my blog and especially likes my Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can posts. Thank you very much! She found my blog by googling an ancestor’s name.

Julie Ann Jochum comes every year from Iowa to Luxembourg to represent Building Bridges with René Daubenfeld. She speaks only English and while things were a bit quiet she stopped by to talk to me. She had a question about Luxembourg research which probably would have even a more advanced genealogist stumped. Where can I find the birth record of an ancestor born in Spanish Luxembourg with the surname Spaniol? Without the name of a town this would mean searching through church records of all towns in Luxembourg. But where were the borders of Luxembourg when the Spanish had possession of the county? If anyone knows the answer please get in touch. Julie would love to be able to say she has an ancestor from Luxembourg.

leudelange1Several friends also dropped by but there were no visitors interested in blogging. On the way home my husband and I talked about what could be done about this.

People who do not know me may think I speak only English since my blog is in English. We agreed that it might be a good idea to make three slide presentations in English, French, and German. Translating each post on the blog into French and/or German is not doable. To work around this I added translation buttons on the right widget of my blog last year. My husband suggested putting up a sign next year and adding a notice to my blog that I speak Luxembourgish, German, and French.

I’ve been thinking about putting together a few “books” with the content of my blog in pdf form. Perhaps they could be printed and placed on exhibit for people to leaf through. What else could be done to draw more attention to genealogy blogs in Luxembourg?

bestwishescathy1

2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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JNGH 2016 – An International Genealogy Meet

logo_klengThe JNGH 2016, an international meeting for genealogy and local history in Leudelange, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, was on my calendar yesterday. JNGH is the abbreviation for the French version of the event name:

  • Journée Nationale de Généalogie et histoire locale
  • Nationaler Tag der Genealogie und Lokalgeschichte
  • National Day of Genealogy and Local History

JNGH 2016 was organized by my genealogy association, Luxracines, under the patronage of the Ministry of Culture and the commune of Leudelange with the participation of the National Archives of Luxembourg and the National Library of Luxembourg.

Participants: (flyer)

International
Internet Genealogy (recherches en Belgique et France)

Germany
Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Saarländische Familienkunde
GENPLUS_win (BERWE Gisbert)
Verein für Landeskunde im Saarland e. V.
Vereinigung für die Heimatkunde im Landkreis Saarlouis e.V.
Westdeutsche Gesellschaft für Familienkunde e.V. – Trier
Gruppen Familien-und Wappenkunde

Belgium
GENIWAL Généalogie Informatique en Wallonie
Cercle Genealogique SCGD GELUX
SCGD-Namur (GENAM)
WALLONIA asbl Arlon Marche Florenville

France
Ass. généalogique de Hambach-Sarreguemines
Cercle Généalogique du Pays de la Nied
Cercle Généalogique Yutz 3 Frontières
Cercle Généalogique de Longwy

Luxembourg
Archives Nationales de Luxembourg
Bibliothèque Nationale de Luxembourg
Building Bridges (René Daubenfeld and Julie Ann Jochum)
Cercle Culturel et Historique de Leudelange
Comité Alstad
Commune de Leudelange
Claude Bettendroffer
Rob Deltgen (deltgen.com)
Hesper Geschichtsfrënn
Tun Jacoby (carnifex.lu)
Kayser – Vanolst
Luxracines.lu
Cathy Meder-Dempsey (Opening Doors in Brick Walls)
Christiane Oth-Diederich
Jean Thoma

Books (Luxemburgensia and Postcards)
Edouard Jegen
Jeanne Schoellen

Restaurant/Catering
Members of the Jugendhaus Leudelingen cartered to the exhibitors and guests during the day.

Presentations
Gisbert BERWE: Das Genealogie-Programm Gen-Plus (The Genealogy Program Gen-Plus)
John FELLER: Unsere Vor-, Haus- und Familiennamen – Ihre Herkunft und Bedeutung (Origins and Meanings of First, House, and Family Names)
Paul ZIMMER: Latein in den Kirchenbüchern korrekt lesen (Reading Latin Correctly in Church Records)
René DAUBENFELD: Auswanderung nach Amerika (Emigration to America)

The event, free and open to the public, began at 10 a.m. and lasted until 5 p.m. when the Éierewäin was offered to the participants by the commune of Leudelange. Éierewäin, Ehrenwein in German, is honorary wine in English.

ehrenwein1Our president Rob Deltgen giving his speech at the Éierewäin

ehrenwein2Yours truly listening to Rob’s speech.

cateringThe caterers, members of the Jugendhaus Leudelingen

christianeandcathyChristiane and Cathy at their tables

Next year the event may need a new name as “international” better describes the participation.

Tomorrow I’ll share how I prepared for the day.

bestwishescathy1

2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Time Out in the Black Forest

timeoutintheblackforest2

Äuszäit ✿ Time Out ✿ Auszeit

I’ve been blogging weekly and bi-weekly since I started my blog in January 2014. One blogger I follow let her readers know she was taking a Blogpause. Another completely disappeared for several months and returned to blogging by writing a moving post about genealogy addiction. I chose to take some time off and come back with a selection of photographs from the wonderful time we had on our vacation in the Black Forest.

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stblasius2016

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blackforestcollage2016Doesn’t my husband take the best photographs?

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© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Behind the Scenes at Luxracines

Be still my impatient genealogy heart….

logo_klengMy new duties as treasurer and member of the board of Luxracines have kept me busy this summer.

Last year my genealogy association Luxracines bought a very large collection of German family books from Peter Daus of Wittlich, Germany. On 30 September 2015, we moved the library from Wittlich to a temporary storage area in Luxembourg.

Daus BiblioThe permanent location of Luxracines‘ new locale was not yet available. The Commune of Walferdange had agreed to provide a rent-free location which was to be repainted before we could furnish it and move in our new collection of books.

luxracinesfront
Luxracines Club House (Vereinslokal)

The day the keys to our new locale were given to our president Rob Deltgen finally came. We held our first committee meeting there on June 14. There were a few tables and chairs but the rooms were otherwise bare. Plans were made for obtaining estimates and buying equipment, etc.

By mid-July lockers, computers, and bookshelves had been purchased. Locks were put on the doors to the three rooms we are using. A work plan was drawn up for July 19, 22, 26 and 27 to assemble the lockers for the conference room, the bookshelves for the library, and to set up the computers and printer in the computer room.

The conference room (below) will be shared with the ladies who run the child care center located on the first floor. As it is open in the mornings, Luxracines is only allowed to use the locale in the afternoons or when the center is closed.

conferenceroomThe books were transported from temporary storage to the basement of our building. On July 27 over a dozen members, including some spouses, came in to help carry the heavy boxes filled with books from the basement to the 2nd floor. Due to lack of space, all of the books were placed in the bookshelves as they came out of the boxes.

luxracinesentryOn August 3 several members came in to remove black marks on the floor, clean up and get rid of empty boxes, and hang posters on the empty walls of the computer and conference rooms. We wanted to be ready for our first official visitor the next day. Sara Bamberg of the Luxemburger Wort, Luxembourg’s daily newspaper, was coming to do an interview for an article on Luxracines and our new library.

2016-08-09 Peter Daus visitOn August 9 Peter Daus visited (above) and brought along more books and genealogical material he no longer needed (on the table). This particular item (below) caught my eye.

FamilySearch CD-RomAs more donations of books are expected from other members we bought more bookshelves and set them up in the computer room on August 17 (below). This will likely contain mostly Luxemburgensia. This term is used for all books and media published in Luxembourg, written by Luxembourgish authors, and/or about Luxembourg.

computerroombookshelvesOn August 18 Sara Bamberg’s article “Genealogy per Mouse Click” was published in the Luxemburger Wort. It was good advertisement for our club as many new members subscribed in the days following the piece.

2016-08-04 articlePeter Daus visited again on August 20 and 31 bringing more books and two NAS drives for our computer set-up.

2016-08-04 luxracines computer2016-08-27computer On August 27 we began sorting through the books and re-arranging them in the bookshelves.

beginningsortingAn afternoon’s work and we had A-C alphabetized, arranged in 1 1/2 bookshelves, and entered into an Excel document. It was similar to working one of those sliding tiles puzzles.

slidingtiles1On August 31 we continued our work. Two persons sorted out all the books by letters of the alphabetic, our secretary worked on the Excel document inputting the books from German towns beginning with D through H, while I alphabetized the books from D through P.

Things were busy that day as other workers were in the building including a firm that installed alarms, smoke detectors, and fire extinguishers.

luxracinesfireprotectionBy the end of the day, we had four bookshelves completely organized and inventoried and another four bookshelves sorted and ready for inventory.

2016-08-31AtoI2016-08-31JtoP 2016-08-31QtoZOn Saturday afternoon, September 3, we finished sorting of the German family books from R through Z and put some order in the remaining books. In the weeks to come, we will complete the inventory of the family books and begin to work out a system for the rest of the miscellaneous books.

slidingtiles3We will begin the printing unique call numbers for each book for easier access by our patrons as soon as the inventory is completed. And, the sliding tiles puzzle will finally be complete.

The driving force behind this project has been our president Rob Deltgen. Without his leadership, the committee, other members of the club and even spouses of some of the members would not have been as organized as we were to set up the library over the summer months when many people are usually off on vacation.

An official opening is in the planning. Luxracines Club House (Vereinslokal) will open its doors to members and the public on Saturdays from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. during the month of September.

bestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Mettendorf, Germany – The Honor Roll Project

In October 2015, during Family History Month, my husband and I visited several German towns in the Eifel (Rheinland-Pfalz) where my maternal grandfather’s family came from.

In the cemetery of Mettendorf is a large plot with soldiers, most from other towns, who fell in this town. We did not take photographs of all of the markers in this plot although they were similar to this one for an unknown soldier.

mettAlong the left side of this plot were these large stone markers engraved with the names of soldiers from Mettendorf, Niehl and Burg who fell or were missing during World War I and World War II as well as civilian casualties.

mett1

Mettendorf
Matthias Rodens 1892-1914
Matthias Schilt 1888-1914
Peter Thiel 1896-1914
Michel Thielen 1883-1914
Viktor Koos 1891-1915
Matthias Fous 1890-1915
Adam Rech 1889-1915
Fritz Haus 1892-1915
Johann Neises 1891-1916
Matthias Elsen 1890-1916
Simon Keippes 1897-1917
Adam Elsen 1891-1917
Nikolaus Scheilz 1893-1917
Johann Bendel 1889-1917
Christian Thiel 1886-1917
Dominik Elsen 1876-1917
Johann Roden 1876-1917
Paul Weires 1886-1917
Johann Haus 1895-1917
Matthias Stedem 1891-1917
Nikolaus Winter 1895-1918
Michel Hurt 1882-1918
Heinrich Klassen 1893-1918

mett2

Mettendorf
Johann Metz 1900-1918
Johann Neues 1917-1940
Bernhard Barzen 1916-1940
Wilhelm Ackels 1919-1940
Nikolaus Burelbach 1919-1942
Wilhelm Bertrang 1920-1942
Nikolaus Kringen 1921-1942
Nikolaus Kaster 1921-1942
Bernhard Ademes 1922-1942
Johann Manz 1919-1942
Johann Hontheim 1916-1942
Matthias Kohl 1915-1942
Josef Eppers 1919-1942
Jakob Bartzen 1900-1943
Anton Hoffmann 1919-1943
Josef Elsen 1915-1943
Matthias Göbel 1923-1943
Matthias Thielen 1916-1943
Nikolaus Hamper 1923-1943
Johann Robling 1919-1943
Paul Houscht 1921-1943
Hein. Pöppelreiter 1904-1943
Nikolaus Bertrang 1917-1943

mett3

Mettendorf
Valentin Fandel 1901-1944
Michael Hurt 1922-1944
Anton Eskes 1925-1944
August Faulhauer 1904-1944
Jakob Rossler 1915-1944
Peter Fandel 1896-1944
Jakob Schleider 1926-1944
Peter Petisch 1915-1944
Josef Kolbet 1923-1944
Johann Just 1926-1944
Matthias Hoffmann 1907-1944
Maternus Petisch 1913-1944
Johann Schottler 1917-1944
Matthias Ademes 1920-144
Matthias Pott 1915-1944
Leo Ademes 1920-1944
Nikolaus Masselter 1924-1944
Josef Wolsfeld 1907-1945
Joseph Kinnen 1926-1945
Karl Petisch 1926-1945
Karl Göbel 1915-1945
Johann Spoden 1910-1945
Adolf Scheils 1925-1945

mett4

Mettendorf
Nikolaus Kles 1926-1945
Peter Schwind 1927-1945
Karl Barbara 1924-1945
Peter Franken 1918-1945
Heinrich Grün 1915-1945
Josef Houscht 1923-1945
Heinrich Kiemen 1914-1945
Jakob Thielgen 1920-1946
Matthias Trampeet 1915-1946
Franz Kerscht 1919-1947
Wilhelm Arnoldy 1922-1947
Niehl
Paul Streit 1889-1914
Peter Nosbüsch 1879-1914
Lothar Schares 1918-1941
Johann Hoß (Hoss) 1910-1942
Johann Streit 1922-1942
Philipp Heinen 1914-1944
Burg
Johann Jakobs 1893-1916
Peter Zeimetz 1908-1945
Mettendorf vermißt
Philipp Weides 1878-1914

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Mettendorf Vermißte (missing)
Nikolaus Hein 1893-1917
Johann Elsen 1883-1917
Jakob Thielen 1912-1942
Jakob Hammling 1920-1943
Peter Winandy 1920-1943
Jakob Pott 1921-1943
Jakob Petisch 1922-1943
Peter Göbel 1923-1943
Michel Schmitz 1913-1943
Baptist Faulhauer 1911-1943
Peter Beeteang 1916-1943
Dominik Neues 1908-1943
Johann Thelen 1923-1944
Josef Manz 1922-1944
Matthias Fandel 1926-1944
Wilhelm Petey 1912-1944
Paul Kneib 1906-1944
Karl Kinnnen 1921-1944
Nikolaus Ganser 1914-1944
Johann P. Köppchen 1918-1944
Wilhelm Grün 1914-1944
Lorenz Asselborn 1910-1944
Wilh. Pöppelreiter 1919-1944
August Manz 1915-1944

mett6

Mettendorf Vermißte (missing)
Reinhold Eliche 1914-1944
Johann Thiel 1922-1944
Peter Manz 1924-1945
Matthias Schwind 1910-1945
Jakob Weides 1897-1945
Peter Hontheim 1908-1945
Viktor Schmitz 1907-1945
Niehl Vermißte (missing)
Matthias Schares 1910-1943
Josef Streit 1926-1945
Josef Nilles 1906-1945
Mettendorf Zivilgefallene (civilians)
Peter Berens 1898-1944
Maria Metz 1896-1944
Michael Rech 1891-1944
Marg. Grommes 1866-1945
Matthias Bormann 1903-1945
Josef Gangolf 1935-1945
Hubert Schmitz 1878-1945
Jakob Elsen 1888-1945
Burg Zivilgefallene (civilians)
Anna Maria Elsen 1875-1945
Niehl Zivilgefallene (civilians)
Peter Magee 1891-1945

The Honor Roll Project

This post was written in response to Heather Wilkinson Rojo’s post
Would You like to contribute to the Honor Roll Project for Veteran’s Day, 2015?
on her blog Nutfield Genealogy. On her newly created website

The Honor Roll Project, Heather invites everyone to

Just find a military honor roll in your hometown park, or in front of a civil building, or inside on a plaque – Anywhere! Photograph it, transcribe the names and post it to your blog.

© 2016 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

Veterans Memorial in Ferschweiler, Germany

DSC_0025 Ferschweiler edited tinyIn October, during Family History Month, my husband and I visited several German towns in the Eifel (Rheinland-Pfalz) where my maternal grandfather’s family came from.

On the façade of the steeple of the St. Luzia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler is a plaque commemorating the individuals from the town who were missing or died during World War I (1914-1918) and World War II (1939-1945).

Den Gefallenen der Gemeinde Ferschweiler
The fallen of the municipality Ferschweiler

plaque

plaque11914 – 1918
Hastert Nikolaus
Jakobs Peter
Schmitt Christian
Ludwig Johann Peter
Reles Jos. Peter
Lardy Nikolaus
Schmitt Joh. Peter
Schuckart Ignatz
Budler Peter
Hary Peter
Schramen Johann
Frisch Heinr. Albert
Schmitz Peter
Widung Schmitt Johann
Bohr Nikolaus
Heck Jakob
Widung Preisen Johann
Schmitt Fisher Christian
Bechel Johann
Meyer Heinrich
Roos Wilhelm
Plein Dominik
Ries Adam
Oberbillig Peter
Heck Nikolaus

plaque2Vermisste (Missing)
Johanns Anton
Dauwen Johann
Kneweler Nikolaus
Schramen Jakob
Hary Nikolaus
Barg Michel

plaque31939 – 1945
Steichen Konrad
Welter Nikolaus
Gontgen Matthias
Welter Albert
Weins Kurt
Faber Oskar
Lardy Willi
Lardy Pet. Christian
Schmitt Michel
Lardy Johann
Gorges Franz
Hastert Johann
Funk Alfons
Mossal Heinrich
Reuter Alfred
Kneweler Pet. Leo
Ewerhart Ferdinand
Schmitt Vinzens
Welter Ernst
Kaufmann Rudolf
Schuckart Emil
Ahles Theodore
Schilz Jakob
Lardy Rudolf
Rossler Nikolaus
Ewen Ludwig

plaque4Reuter Aloys
Schmitt Otto
Noll Willi
Schmitt Felix
Reuter Peter
Thome Johann
Schuckart Heinrich
Schmitt Peter
Schuhmacher Matthias
Zender Christof
Schommers Franz
Tossing Peter
Schöder Peter
Thies Johann
Urbany Theophil
Hau Nikolaus
Schreiner Nikolaus
Bechel Peter
Schmitz Karl
Horn Christian
Schmitt Willi
Steichen Karl
Reuter Christof
Bechel Theodor
Funk Reinhard
Rossler Gustav
Schilz Johann
Wagner Paul

plaque5

Vermisste (Missing)
Welter Christof
Schmitt Theodor
Molitor Albert
Steffes Johann
Heck Peter
Reuter Reinhard
Wagner Nikolaus
Tossing Emil

Zivilgefallene (civilians)
Leiberts Matthias
Ries Eduard
Heck Matthias
Reles Maria
Frisch Paula
Frisch Josef
Frisch Heinrich
Fischer Katharina
Lenz Josef
Schmitt Bernhard
Duplang Josef

The Honor Roll Project

This post was written in response to Heather Wilkinson Rojo’s post
Would You like to contribute to the Honor Roll Project for Veteran’s Day, 2015?
on her blog Nutfield Genealogy. On her newly created website

The Honor Roll Project, Heather invites everyone to

Just find a military honor roll in your hometown park, or in front of a civil building, or inside on a plaque – Anywhere! Photograph it, transcribe the names and post it to your blog.