52 Ancestors: #43 A Draper and Four Seamstresses

As I’m coming closer to the end of this project of writing about my children’s 5th great-grandparents, I’ve started missing the days when I spent weeks and months working on the all descendants of a brick wall ancestor. The focus on one family a week is taking its toll.

As I write these posts I find myself wanting to go back one generation and then another searching for a common thread which ran through the families. The thrill of adding a new most distant ancestor is still great but I find myself having to set aside the research before I am ready to quit.

With Eva LANSER and Henri CONSBRÜCK, my fourth great-grandparents, I tried to keep from working further however relationships mentioned in records made me seek the answers to questions I had. This led to new ancestor discoveries and several new names in the family tree.

Pedigree of a daughter of Henri CONSBRÜCK and Eva LANSER with the new ancestors found while updating information (my 3rd to 7th great-grandparents).

Eva LANSER (1777-1862)

My fourth great-grandmother Eva LANSER was born and baptized on 13 May 1777 in Echternach. She was the daughter of Sébastian LANSER (1732-1804) and Maria Catharina HASTERT (1743-1808).

1766 Census for the town of Echternach in Luxembourg with the LANSER family.

Eva’s parents were married in 1760 and were found on the 1766 census in Echternach with their second son Henri. Their first son named after the paternal grandfather Johann Adam HASTERT had likely died between the time of his birth in 1762 and the 1766 census. After the census six daughters were born, Eva being the 5th, and then finally two more sons. All of these children grew to adulthood except for one daughter who has not been traced. As with the oldest son Johann Adam, her death may not have been recorded in the church register. I have found this to be the case in some parishes where mostly only adult deaths were recorded. Eva’s father worked as a cloth maker (draper) or drapier. None of his sons followed in his steps.

Vincent van Gogh 0141

On 20 September 1791, a double marriage took place in the LANSER family. The oldest son Henri and his sister Catherine married the HERR siblings, Anne-Marie and Johann. Their children would later be close to Eva’s small family.

Eva’s father Sébastian LANSER died on 13 June 1804. His oldest son Henri was the informant on his death. Henri was working as a messenger or messager. I suspect this may have been military-related as the Napoleonic Wars were going on at this time. With the death of the father Sébastian the family’s livelihood may have been in jeopardy.

Eight months later Eva married Henri CONSBRÜCK, son of Johann CONSBRÜCK and Barbara SCHMIDT, on 10 February 1805 in Echternach.

Henri CONSBRÜCK (1775-1850)

Henri was a cloth maker and I suspect the trade he was proficient in was one of the reasons he and Eva married. Had he been working in Sébastian’s atelier before his death or did he take over the looms only when he married Eva?

Henri CONSBRÜCK was born and baptized on 5 April 1775 in Echternach. He was the oldest of three children born to Johann and Barbara after their marriage in 1773. His sister Anna Maria was born in 1779 and lived only 8 years. He also had a brother Matthias who was born in 1782 and moved away from Echternach to the Trier, Germany, area when he married sometime before 1816.

Eva and Henri’s Marriage Record

Present at the marriage of Eva and Henri were both of their mothers as well as four witnesses who were relatives. Eva’s brother Henri LANSER, her brother-in-law Johann HERR, as well as Bernard and Mathias WAMPACH, both “uncles” of the groom.

The relationship of the last two witnesses is still under investigation. Bernard was married to Maria CONSBRÜCK (daughter of Johann Wilhelm CONSBRÜCK and Anna Maria PROMMENSCHENKEL) however her relationship to Henri has not been established. I suspect the relationship given in the marriage record was not that of an uncle as we define it today. This might be a blessing in disguise as so far no connection has been made between my CONSBRÜCK line and the parents of Maria. Further confusion has been caused by my Henri’s grandfather also being a Johann Wilhelm. His grandfather was about the same age, married about the same time, and lived about as long as the other man with the same name and in the same location.

The years after their marriage

Henri and Eva’s first child Barbara was born on 21 February 1806. Two years later Eva’s mother Maria Catharina HASTERT died on 10 March 1808. Her death was reported by her oldest son Henri LANSER who was still working as a messenger.

Eva was pregnant with twins when her mother died. Bernard and Marguerite were born on 2 September 1808. They survived only seven months. Marguerite died on 5 April 1809 and Bernard less than a week later on 11 April 1809.

Little Barbara was nearly four years old when Anna Maria, my third great-grandmother, was born on 4 February 1810 to Eva and Henri. Anna Maria went by Maria to distinguish her from a sister with the same name who would be born later.

Eva’s younger sister Margaretha LANSER was 31 years old when she married the 25 years old Johann SELM (1786-1846) on 9 June 1811. None of the witnesses to the marriage were relatives.

Henri and Eva’s next child was born on 3 July 1812. She lived five months, dying on 8 December 1812. They named her Odile.

Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815)

War had overshadowed the CONSBRÜCK and LANSER families since before Eva and Henri’s marriage. The wars may not have been raging in Echternach but the people were still affected. Eva’s youngest brother Peter LANSER joined the corps on 27 frimaire in the year XIV or 18 December 1805.

Battle of Borodino 1812
Battle of Borodino 1812
Peter was presumed to be a prisoner of war in Russia as of 11 October 1812. He was in 108e régiment d’infanterie de ligne with his 1C1R Sébastian LANSER (whose godfather in 1784 had been Peter’s father) and several other young men from the Echternach area. The presumption of his being a prisoner of war probably came about when Napoleon’s army was evacuating Moscow in October following the Battle of Borodino on 7 September 1812, the deadliest day of the Napoleonic Wars. The information on Peter’s being in the military and a possible POW came from the Matricules Napoléoniens 1802-1815 database.

Eva’s second youngest brother Nicolas LANSER was 30 years old when he married Catharina Magdalena JOERG (1790-1847) in September 1813. A date is missing on the marriage record however it must have taken place between the 7th and the 20th as these are the dates on the previous and next records.

Two years later another daughter was named Anna Maria and would be known as Anna. She was born on 8 January 1814.

Eva’s brother Peter had returned from Russia and was living in Echternach on 3 February 1815 when he, a former soldier for the French army, died at the age of 29 years (31 years on the death record). The Napoleonic Wars ended later in the year on 13 September 1815.

Years after the wars

Henri was still working as a cloth maker and was likely hoping to have a son to teach the cloth-making trade to. On 31 March 1816, Eva gave him a son they named Jean. He lived only a few days and died on 3 April 1816.

Henri and Eva named their last child, a daughter born on 4 July 1817, Odile. I suspect the name was important to Eva and the LANSER family members as Eva’s maternal grandmother was named Odilia FUNCK (abt. 1715-1778) and the name continued to be used in the family for several more generations.

Eva and Henri’s family was now made up of four daughters. Not having any sons to pass the trade on to, did his daughters help him with the wool weaving as they grew older? What I do know is that all of the daughters worked as seamstresses, maybe even sewing the cloth made by their father.

Ten years after the birth of the last daughter, Eva would be attending several funerals as she lost two brothers and a sister: Henri (63) died on 19 November 1827, Nicolas (45) died on 23 October 1828, and Odile (58) died on 24 December 1828.

Henri’s mother Barbara SCHMIDT, the only living grandparent of the four CONSBRÜCK girls, died on 10 May 1829 at the age of 81. She died in house number 360 in the rue de Luxembourg in Echternach. Henri and Eva also lived in the rue de Luxembourg, however, their house number at that time is not known. Had Barbara been living with her daughter Eva and her family?

Eva’s sister Catherine LANSER died on 15 January 1833 at the age of 60. Her death was reported by her husband Johann HERR.

Sometime before 1835 my third great-grandmother, the daughter known as Maria, went to the city of Metz in France to work. While there she may have met Jean Joseph SCHLOESSER (1807-1841) of Vianden. He was the son of Jean-Népomucène SCHLOESSER and Margaretha TRAUDT. The young couple married in Metz on 17 November 1835. During the next six years, Maria gave birth to four daughters, the only grandchildren of Eva and Henri. Maria’s husband Jean Joseph died in Metz on 25 November 1841. Their oldest daughter likely died before 1843 as she was not found in the census with her three sisters. A death record for Madelaine was not found in Metz or in Echternach. This makes me wonder if she may have died while the family was traveling from Metz back to Echternach.

The extended family in the census

In 1843 Henri was the head of a household with his wife, his daughter Barbara and his three SCHLOESSER granddaughters. His daughters Maria, Odile, and Anna are missing and were likely working someplace other than Echternach. Henri’s occupation on the 1843 census was wool weaver (fileur de laine).

In 1846 he was again seen as a cloth maker (drapier). As in 1843 his daughter Barbara and the grandchildren were with Henri and Eva in 1846. Maria, the mother of the grandchildren, may be in the household but listed as single. It is also possible that the entry is her sister Anna Maria who usually went by Anna. Using their full names on official documents caused problems like this.

In 1847 the entire family group is listed: Henri and Eva with their four daughters and three granddaughters. The two younger daughters Anna Maria (Anna) and Odile are listed as absent and working as servants in France. Henri was now seen as a laborer and his daughters Barbara and Maria did not appear to be working.

In 1849 Henri may have not been well or had given up his cloth making. He was listed as having no occupation. However, his three single daughters are listed as seamstresses. Along with his wife Eva, there were two more young ladies in the household. They were Eva’s nieces Eve and Catherine HERR who were also working as seamstresses. His widowed daughter Maria and her three daughters were living in their own household.

More deaths in the family

Henri CONSBRÜCK died on 22 May 1850 in Echternach at the age of 75. His death was reported by his nephew Johann HERR, the youngest son of Eva’s sister Catherine.

Eva’s only living sibling Margaretha LANSER died on 9 March 1852 at the age of 71. Eva LANSER was now the only person left from her generation. She lived a decade longer.

Shortly before her death all of her daughters and granddaughters were living with her when the census was taken on 3 December 1861. Eva LANSER died three months later on 19 March 1862 at the age of 84 years. Her death was reported by her nephews Peter LANSER and Johann HERR.

The four seamstresses

Eva’s three single daughters Barbara, Anne, and Odile continued to work as seamstresses as did her widowed daughter Maria. The four sisters continued to live and most likely work together in their home in the rue de Luxembourg.

Eight years after the death of their mother Eva, the sisters lost their oldest sibling Barbara. She died on 2 November 1870 at the age of 64. Johann HERR, her cousin, and Heinrich DIESCHBOURG, a neighbor and tailor, were the informants for her death.

The remaining three sisters lived two more decades. Odile, the youngest, died on 17 July 1890 at the age of 73. Two years later Anna died on 2 March 1892 at the age of 78. Both of their deaths were reported by their sister Maria’s son-in-law Dyonisius Johann Peter MAAS.

My third great-grandmother Anna Maria “Maria” CONSBRÜCK was the last of the seamstress sisters. She died on 29 September 1897 at the age of 87 years. Her death was also reported by her son-in-law. Maria born in 1810 left a mystery which took me two decades to solve.

Chiseled in stone: “Veuve Schloesser 1800-1889”

Henri CONSBRÜCK and Eva LANSER came from large families but only one of their daughters married and had children. Of the four grandchildren, three grew to adulthood but only two married. The name Odile was passed on to this generation to my 2nd great-grandmother Odile Lucie SCHLOESSER and to her granddaughter, my grand-aunt, Odile Lucie FOURNELLE.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Henri CONSBRÜCK
Parents: Johann CONSBRÜCK and Barbara SCHMIDT
Spouse: Eva LANSER
Parents of spouse: Sébastian LANSER and Maria Catharina HASTERT
Whereabouts: Echternach, Luxembourg
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 4th great-grandfather

1. Henri CONSBRÜCK
2. Anna Maria “Maria” CONSBRÜCK
3. Odile Lucie SCHLOESSER
4. Jean Joseph FOURNELLE
5. Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE
6. Living WILDINGER
7. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

52 Ancestors: #24 The Heirloom: The FOURNELLE-SCHLOESSER Family (Part II)

Week 24 (June 11-17) – Heirloom: What heirloom do you treasure? Who gave it to you? What heirloom do you wish you had?

Yesterday I wrote about The Heirloom: The 1866 Military Accounts Book and want to continue with the story of my 2nd great-grandfather André FOURNELLE and his family in this second part.

The FOURNELLE-SCHLOESSER Family

andre
My 2nd great-grandfather André FOURNELLE ca. 1900-1909

1838birth
1838 Birth Record No. 17 [1]
André FOURNELLE, my 2nd great-grandfather, was born at 11 o’clock on the morning of 25 August 1838. The following day his father André FOURNELLE (1799-1866), 40 years old and a farmer, went to the records office of Rodange, Canton of Messancy, Province of Luxembourg, at 8 o’clock in the morning to inform the officials of the birth. Marie Catherine PHILIPPART (1801-1843), 38 years old and without an occupation, was the mother of André.[1]

odile
Odile Lucie SCHLOESSER (ca. 1900-1911)

Odile Lucie SCHLOESSER, my 2nd great-grandmother, was born on 16 February 1840 in Metz, Department Moselle, Region Lorraine, France. She was the daughter of Johann Joseph SCHLOESSER (1807-1841) and Anna Maria CONSBRÜCK (1810-1897). Odile’s father was from Vianden (Luxembourg) and her mother from Echternach (Luxembourg). They may have met while working in Metz as this is where they married in 1835. Following her father’s death Odile moved to Echternach with her mother and sisters to live with their CONSBRÜCK family.

It is not known how André and Odile came to meet. Since Echternach is a border town it is possible André was stationed there for a time as a border guard. From his military accounts book, we know he saved a man’s life on 25 June 1866 from drowning in the Sauer River which is the border between Luxembourg and Germany and passes by Echternach.

1867marriage
1867 Marriage Record No. 25 [2]
When André and Odile married on 28 September 1867 in Echternach the groom was a resident of Surré (Syr or Sarre) a village belonging to the commune of Boulaide, a town in northern Luxembourg. André was 29 years old and his parents were both deceased. Odile was 27 years old and her date and place of birth were listed on the marriage record. Her father’s death in Metz was mentioned; her mother was living, present, and consenting to the marriage. The banns had been read in Boulaide and in Echternach on four consecutive Sundays: the 1st, 8th, 15th, and 22nd of September. The four witnesses present, Laurent KIESEL, Mathias Gaspard SPOO, Johann HERR, and Peter LANSER, were cousins of the bride. All persons present signed the marriage record.[2]

1867census
1867 Luxembourg Census [3]
A little over two months later on 3 December 1867 the census was enumerated in the village of Surré in the commune of Boulaide where André and Odile were living as newlyweds in a house known as Hannes. André signed the census slip in the lower right corner.[3]

1869maria
1869 Birth Record No. 3 [4]
On 17 February 1869 André went to the records office of Boulaide to have the birth of his first child recorded. It was 6 in the evening when he met with the mayor Johann Reding to have the birth record filled out. Maria was born only an hour earlier to André’s wife Odile. He must have been anxious to get the formalities taken care of![4]

1871johannjoseph
1871 Birth Record No. 6 [5]
On 20 Feb 1871, two years and 3 days later, André was once again meeting with Johann Reding to register the birth of his son Johann Joseph. The child was born at 6 in the morning to Lucie SCHLOESSER in Surré. Lucie being Odile’s second name. André waited a bit longer than he did following the birth of Maria, until 1 in the afternoon, to go to Boulaide.[5]

1871census
1871 Luxembourg Census [6]
On 1 December 1871 the entire family was auf Besuch (visiting) in Elsaß (Alsace, France) when the census was enumerated in Surré. André’s wife’s name was incorrectly listed as Louise Schneider by Mr. Thilmani who gave the information. Beside André’s name in the second column he noted as the father of the family group and in Alsace. I have not been able to decipher the word before Elsaß.[6]

1875census
1875 Luxembourg Census [7]
In 1875 the family was in Surré. The person who recorded the names used the German spelling. Andreas, Audile, Maria, Joseph FOURNELLE as well as Odile’s sister Anna SCHLOESSER were in the household. In line 4 my great-grandfather Joseph, who was 4 years old, is listed as normally NOT being a member of the household and had been auf Besuch (visiting) for 10 days. I believe the recorder meant for this to be in line 5 for Odile’s sister Anna.[7] She was also listed on the census with her mother in Echternach.[8]

1877birth
1877 Birth Record No. 19 [9]
A year and a half later André and Odile’s third child Marie Josephine was born on 29 May 1877 in Winseler, Wiltz, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Both of the parents are listed as 39 years old although Odile was only 37 years old at the time. The birth record helps to place the family in Winseler in 1877.[9] André was still working as a border guard but we do not know when the family made the move to Winseler or how long they stayed there.

Because of André’s occupation the family may have moved around more than I know of. I did not find them on the control lists for the commune of Winseler in 1880. They were not in Winseler or Echternach in 1890. In 1895 and 1900 they were found in Echternach. This leaves a gap of 16 years between 1877-1895 which I haven’t found records for.

1895census
1895 Luxembourg Census [10]
In 1895 André was living in Echternach with his wife and their three single children. His wife Odile was now using her middle name Lucie. André was now retired from his job as a border guard.[10]

1900census
1900 Luxembourg Census [11]
In 1900 André and Lucie’s oldest daughter Marie was missing from the household. Johann Joseph had married during the year and was living with his wife Catharina FRANTZ in his parents’ household along with his youngest sister Josephine. The home the FOURNELLE family lived in during these years was in the Luxemburger Strasse and known as Mühlenacht or Millenoacht.[11]

1902wedding
Aloyse BAUER and Marie Josephine FOURNELLE wedding portrait (1902)

When Marie Josephine married in 1902 to Aloyse BAUER her brother Johann Joseph and her brother-in-law Émile MONNIER were witnesses.[12] Émile was from Lille, France, and was the husband of the oldest FOURNELLE daughter Marie. Did Marie leave Luxembourg to work in a city in France? Did she meet Émile and marry him in Lille where she raised a family of 4 sons?

marie
Marie MONNIER-FOURNELLE (1869-1952)

article
Luxemburger Wort [13]
André FOURNELLE didn’t sit back and do nothing after his retirement. He had several fruit orchards in Echternach which he cared for after he was pensioned. He entered is prize fruits in the local agricultural exhibition which took place in Echternach on 28 September 1904. André received honorary mentions for his table apples and a second place with a silver medal, for his table pears.[13]

 

1908andre
1908 Death Record No. 68 [14]
On 21 November 1908 at 11 a.m. André was one of four witnesses at the marriage of his niece Maria-Josephine MAAS and her groom Johann MISCHAUX. That evening at 6 p.m. he died at his home. I wrote about this in The Very Last Signature of André FOURNELLE. My great-grandfather Johann Joseph FOURNELLE and Johann MAAS, father of the bride, were the informants on André’s death record.[14]

1911death
1911 Death Record No. 54 [15]
Less than three years later André’s widow  died at nine in the evening at home in Millenoacht. Her son Johann Joseph FOURNELLE and her nephew-in-law Johann MISCHAUX were the informants on her death. Odile SCHLOESSER was the name seen on her death record. She was seventy-one years old.[15]

The prayer cards printed after her death had the name favored by my 2nd great-grandmother Lucie.

1911funeralcard
Prayer Card for Lucie Schloesser

Sources:
[1] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1793-1923 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Pétange > Naissances 1796-1877 > image 442 of 944. 1838 Birth Record No. 17. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12404-68196-32?cc=1709358&wc=M9QN-BM6:1617650175 : accessed 14 Jun 2011).
[2] Ibid., Echternach > Mariages 1809 > image 1179 of 1462. 1867. Marriage Record No. 25. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11670-170986-66?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2VL:n1115540467 : accessed 12 Jan 2013).
[3] Luxembourg, Volkszählungen 1843-1900 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Boulaide > 1867 > image 85 of 254. André Fournelle household. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32382-3499-61?cc=2037957&wc=M9MJ-18C : accessed 29 December 2014).
[4] Luxembourg Civil Records, Boulaide > Naissances 1838-1890 Mariages 1798-1823, 1798-1835 > image 434 of 1498. 1869. Birth Record No. 3. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12330-121132-22?cc=1709358&wc=M9QN-T56:1193074600 : accessed 23 Mar 2010).
[5] Ibid., Boulaide > Naissances 1838-1890 Mariages 1798-1823, 1798-1835 > image 459 of 1498. 1871 Birth Record No. 6. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12330-116084-50?cc=1709358&wc=M9QN-T56:1193074600 : accessed 23 Mar 2010).
[6] Luxembourg Census, Boulaide > 1871 > image 517 of 544. André Fournelle household. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32378-22188-47?cc=2037957&wc=M5GM-FMC:346039301,345869501 : accessed 14 June 2015). See also images 515 and 516 for front matter.
[7] Ibid., Boulaide > 1875 > image 465 of 539. André Fournelle household. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32378-15565-49?cc=2037957&wc=M9MJ-1D3 : accessed 5 February 2015). See also images 464 and 466 for front and back matter.
[8] Ibid., Echternach > 1875 (n 774) > image 557 of 582. Maria Consbrück, veuve Schloesser household.(https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32378-38082-39?cc=2037957&wc=M9MV-MCW:953316563 : accessed 01 Mar 2013). See also images 556 and 558 for front and back matter.
[9] Luxembourg Civil Records, Winseler > Naissances 1797-1881 > image 778 of 831. 1877 Birth Record No. 19. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12346-212348-12?cc=1709358&wc=9RYQ-N3D:130596701,130692901 : accessed 12 June 2015).
[10] Luxembourg Census, Echternach > 1895 > image 895 of 1611. André Fournelle household. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32393-6414-73?cc=2037957&wc=M5G8-W3K:345970601,345878001 : accessed 11 June 2015). See also images 894 and 896 for front and back matter.
[11] Ibid., Echternach > 1900 > image 362 of 1660. André Fournelle household. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32397-16708-34?cc=2037957&wc=M9S1-MY1:1893305075 : accessed 15 January 2015). See also images 361 and 363 for front and back matter.
[12] Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Naissances 1903-1923 Mariages 1895-1905 > image 536 of 604. 1902 Marriage Record No. 14. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32040-9966-3?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2V1:n702239153 : accessed 20 Jan 2013).
[13] Luxembourger Wort, digitized by Bibliothèque nationale de Luxembourg; online (http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu/BnlViewer/view/index.html?lang=en#panel:pp|issue:1057913|article:DTL62|query:fournelle%20echternach : accessed 15 June 2015)
[14] Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Mariages 1906-1923 Décès 1895-1912 > image 584 of 675. 1908 Death Record 68. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32043-12126-76?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2VR:n1397300048 : accessed 11 Jan 2013).
[15] Ibid., Echternach > Mariages 1906-1923 Décès 1895-1912 > image 644 of 675. 1911 Death Record No. 54. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32043-11951-69?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2VR : accessed 12 March 2015).

Genealogy Sketch

Name: André FOURNELLE
Parents: André FOURNELLE and Marie Catharine PHILIPPART
Spouse: Odile Lucie SCHLOESSER
Children: Marie, Jean Joseph, and Marie Joséphine
Whereabouts: Rodange, Esch-sur-Alzette, Boulaide, Strasbourg, Echternach
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 2nd great-grandfather

1. André FOURNELLE
2. Jean Joseph FOURNELLE
3. Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE
4. Living (Mom) WILDINGER
5. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.