Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #55 Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE 1895-1979

With Memorial Weekend soon coming up I would like to share these old photographs over several days, although not daily, until Memorial Day. You are probably wondering why I am featuring a veteran when Memorial Day is for those who lost their lives while serving in the military, particularly in battle or of wounds sustained in battle. Being the daughter of a man who died while on active duty and the sister of men who are retired from the military, I know the difference between Memorial Day and Veterans Day. However I feel much more attention is given to the day at the end of May than the day in November which marks the end of World War I. So why wait until then to share these photos Roy LILLIE was so proud of?

I know very little about the time Samuel Royalty LILLIE served as a private in the U.S. Army during the Great War, World War I as we call it today. He enlisted on 31 August 1918 and was released on 19 December 1918 following the end of the war on 11 November 1918. He had this portrait taken at Morrison Photo in Chicago perhaps soon after enlistment.

RoyLillieage23Another copy of this photograph without the frame.

roylillieage23fullMore about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #54 Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE 1895-1979

With Memorial Weekend soon coming up I would like to share these old photographs over several days, although not daily, until Memorial Day. Many men and women lost their lives while serving in the military and Memorial Day is when they are remembered. Roy LILLIE was not one of these men, he served in the U.S. military and was a veteran.

On 5 June 1917 when the World War I Draft Registration Card was filled out Samuel Royalty LILLIE was 22 and still working for his father on the home farm in Jefferson Precinct, Pope County, Illinois.

A year later in 1918 at the age of 23 Roy had his picture taken standing in full uniform in Metropolis, Massac County, Illinois. The tall, slender man with grey eyes and dark hair, as he was described on the WWI draft card,  was quite handsome in his uniform. He’d enlisted as a private in the U.S. Army on 31 Aug 1918.

roylilliestandinguniformMore about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #53 Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE 1895-1979

With Memorial Weekend soon coming up I would like to share these old photographs over several days, although not daily, until Memorial Day.

We begin with a very young Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE, son of Isaac Spencer “Ike” LILLIE and Florence ROYALTY. He was born 30 May 1895 in Azotus, Pope County, Illinois. In 1900 he was living with his parents and older brother Reese Gentry LILLIE in Jefferson Precinct in Pope County. His father owned the farm he worked. By 1910 the family had increased with the births of Raymond, Ruth and Ruby. Roy (14) and his brother Reese (17) were laborers on the home farm. Both of the boys could read and write but only Roy attended school after 1 September 1909.

This photograph was likely taken in the early 1910s soon after Roy finished school.

youngroylillieca1915Other photographs of Samuel Royalty LILLIE:
#53 Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE 1895-1979 (young Roy)
#54 Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE 1895-1979 (in uniform)
#55 Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE 1895-1979
(portrait with hat)
#56 Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE 1895-1979 (in uniform with rifle)
#57 Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE 1895-1979 (barber staff)
#58 Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE 1895-1979 (Liberty trucks)
#59 Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE 1895-1979 (in New Orleans)
#61 Bartender and Owner of Brazell’s Bar in Detroit (1939)
#62 Samuel Roy LILLIE and his Retirement Plaque (1960)
#63 Taking a Walk in Detroit (1930s)

#64 Brother and Sister in 1950

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #40 It’s a Girl!

Florence Cecil ROYALTY (1909-1997)

Mrs. Florence Lilly (sic) of Bay City, Pope County, Illinois, received this postcard written on 8 August 1909.

1909florencececilroyaltysmOn the front is a photograph of baby Cecil ROYALTY. One would think with this name the baby would be a boy however this young lady was named after her mother Fern CECIL (1889-1978).

1909florencececilroyaltybacksmOn the back of the postcard is the following text:

Our grand daughter
Cecil Royaltey
Born Feb. 4th 1909
Shawnee Okla.
Will Royaltey babe.
sent by Grand Father
C. A. Royaltey
Purcell Okla.

The grandfather C. A. Royaltey who sent the card was Chester Ashley ROYALTEY (1856-1917), the brother of Florence ROYALTY (1868-1946), wife of Isaac Spencer “Ike” LILLIE (1872-1932).

Further research on baby Cecil showed the date of birth given on the card is not quite correct. She was born 4 January 1909. Cecil, being the first grandchild, may have been the reason the excited grandfather Chester made the mistake. Did he have several copies of the photograph he was sending to family and friends? Did he not pay close enough attention while writing the same text on each postcard?

On the census in 1910 and 1920 she was seen as Cecil, in 1930 as Florence C., and in 1940 as Florence. She likely got the name Florence from her grand-aunt Florence LILLIE née ROYALTY who received the photo from her brother Chester, the grandfather. The SSDI and SSN application (both index-only) have Cecil with her married name(s) EILBECK and TOLLES but not with the first or middle name Florence. The 1972 obituary of her first husband Arthur Blake EILBECK does not mention children and the widow is named as “Cecil (née Royalty).”

1972obit
Historical Newspapers, Birth, Marriage, & Death Announcements, 1851-2003. New York Times 1972 (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 January 2016)

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #39 The Two Cora B.’s of Pope County, Illinois

I am in a quandary. Although many of these photographs have writing on the back which helps with identification, I’m not sure about the identification giving as both persons are the same gender and age. Does the person on the left have her name written on the left on the back of the photograph or on the right? Are there rules for this and were they followed?

Which Cora is which?

2016-01-21 blog edited smallThis is the dilemma I’m facing with this photograph taken by Riley & Cook of Paducah, Kentucky. I was amazed at how small the original photograph is. The photo is mounted on a 2.75 inch square cardboard frame with the name of the photographer debossed in the lower left corner. Both ladies are wearing matching flower corsages in their hair. The lady on the right has a corsage which looks like a bouquet with the stems pinned on her shoulder and the flowers draping down. I would like to date it at 1898 for reasons seen below.

2corasI believe the lady on the left is identified as Cora B. GOLIGHTLY. Below her name is written “married Mr. COLVIN” which suggests GOLIGHTLY was her maiden name. The lady on the right would be Cora DAVIS. Azotus, written below the names, is the name of the cemetery in which Cora B. GOLIGHTLY’s parents Calvin W. GOLIGHTLY and Sarah K. METCALF are buried. No where have I found it is a town name in Illinois.

2corasbackI thought Cora DAVIS may have been another name for Cora GOLIGHTLY, before or after her marriage to Mr. COLVIN, due to the brace or curly bracket, until I searched Pope County for Cora DAVIS.

Cora B. RUSHING (1881-1964) married Peter DAVIS (1878-1939) and both are buried in IOOF Cemetery, Golconda, Pope County, Illinois. I didn’t find a marriage record for them. On Find A Grave their date of marriage is listed as 19 April 1898 in Pope County. I was able to confirm this date using the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, 1763-1900 on the Illinois State Archives site. Cora was born after the 1880 census and married before the 1900 census which means she was not found on a census with her parents. I have not found any source which lists the names of her parents.

Could this photograph have been taken on her wedding day? Was Cora B. GOLIGHTLY her maid of honor? Both ladies were born in 1881 and lived in Pope County, Illinois, while growing up. Were they best friends or related to each other?

Cora B. GOLIGHTLY (1881-1984) married Charles Owen COLVIN (1872-1943) about 1928 when she was 46 years old and following her widowed father’s death in 1926. I hadn’t been able to locate the couple in the 1930 census until I tried wild cards and found the surname spelled Calvin. On this census Cora was seen as age 48 married at age 46. Her brother Hiram GOLIGHTLY was in the household and helped make the positive identification. Cora and Charles don’t appear to have had children together.

And now dear reader please tell me, which Cora is on the left and which on the right in the photograph?

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

Husband-to-be Too Busy To Get Marriage License

First Woman to Buy Marriage License in
Davison County, South Dakota in 1918

While looking into the identity of one of the unknown persons in the collection of Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can, I searched for Ray POYER who had been identified as an Iowa Doughboy.

bride+groomI was surprised to find this article about the first woman to buy a marriage license in the county of Davison in South Dakota.

shegetsmarriagelicense
1919-02-05 Iowa City Citizen

 SHE GETS MARRIAGE LICENSE
South Dakota Bride-to-Be Buys Document,
Pays $1 for It, Then Hunts Up the Judge
Mitchell, S. D. – Cupid and woman suffrage have apparently formed a corporation here, Miss Marie Gipper, twenty-two years old, strode into the offices of the clerk of courts of Davison county one morning recently and planked a dollar on the desk to pay for the first marriage license that has ever been bought in this county by a woman. After she had procured the license she went out and found the municipal judge.
While obtaining the license Miss Gipper explained that her husband-to-be was “too busy to get the license.”
The apparent object of the purchase was inscribed on the clerk’s record as Ray Poyer, also of Mitchell.

SDlicense
“South Dakota, Marriages, 1905-2013,” Ancestry.com, citing South Dakota Department of Health, Pierre, SD. Certificate no. 65786
Name:
Ray Poyer
Gender: Male
Age: 34
Birth Year: abt 1884
Residence Post Office: Mitchell
Residence Place: Davison
Marriage Date: 18 Nov 1918
Marriage Place: Davison, South Dakota, USA
Certificate: 65786
Registration Number: 2636
Spouse: Marie Gipper

The marriage record does not indicate who paid for the marriage license. The newspaper article makes this an out of the ordinary marriage. South Dakota gave women the right to vote on 5 November 1918 and less than two weeks later Marie strode into the offices of the clerk of courts….planked a dollar on the desk to pay for the first marriage license….bought in the county by a woman.

Further searches show Marie GIPPER was born in Iowa and Ray Hagerty POYER was born in Illinois.

About 1918 when the World War I draft registration card was filled out Ray, who was 34 years old, had his permanent residence in Ancona, Livingston County, Illinois, but was living and working in Davison County, South Dakota.

Marie was a waitress in a restaurant and Ray was a teamster for an ice company in 1920. They later moved to Livingston County, Illinois, where Marie worked as a waitress and later as a cook. When Ray died in 1939 his marital status was seen as divorced. Perhaps Marie liked being an independent woman!

Various searches did not prove or disprove the Iowa Doughboy was the husband-to-be who was too busy to get the license for his marriage.

© 2016 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #24 Unidentified Children

This is a spin-off of my 52 Ancestors: #14 Albert Spencer LILLIE (1848-1913) ~ Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can blogpost in which I featured a few photos from a collection of old photographs my 4C1R Joe Rooney shared with me. I asked Joe about using the photos and he kindly wrote, Please use them at your will.  I feel it is keeping it in the family and don’t need credit.  If anything, I appreciate your evaluations, identifications and detective work.  I’m hopeful you and yours enjoy them.  On a blog, in a book, above a cloud.”

#24 Unidentified Children

childrenunidentifiedBarefoot little girl in nightgown with sibling in a babydoll carriage

These children were not identified on the back of this ca. 1900-1910 photograph. The photographer was L. A. Williams of Vienna, Illinois.

Lewis A. Williams was born 31 October 1849 in Tennessee. He married Eva W. [–?–] about 1876; per census, they did not have children. He worked as a wheelright in 1880 in Galatin, Saline County, IL; photographer in 1900 in Vienna, Johnson County, IL; proprietor of a studio in 1910 in Vienna; and as a bookkeeper in 1920 in Carrier Mills, Saline County, IL. He died 13 October 1920 in Carrier Mills.

Any guesses on who these children may have been or they could be identified?

Links to previous posts in this series may be found in Old Photographs

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

Joe Rooney kindly gave me permission to use these photographs on my blog.

Joe ROONEY wrote on 15 February 2015: This collection of photographs was scanned at 300 dpi color by me. The original photos were sent by Sandra Lillie about ten years ago after she found them cleaning out a relative’s garage in Southern Illinois, finding no other takers (suckers). She believes they were a collection by L Vance Lillie. Many of the pictures seemed to be removed from frames or were in albums evidenced by fading characteristics and may have been from other’s collections. I scanned the reverse if there was laboratory advertising or writing. Some of the authors’ identification may be figured out of the handwriting matches. I did not scan the reverse of photos where there was only a three digit number that I believe to be sequence numbers on a roll of film. I didn’t spot any obvious helpful commonalities.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #23 Frances “Fannie” WELLS 1892-1975

This is a spin-off of my 52 Ancestors: #14 Albert Spencer LILLIE (1848-1913) ~ Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can blogpost in which I featured a few photos from a collection of old photographs my 4C1R Joe Rooney shared with me. I asked Joe about using the photos and he kindly wrote, Please use them at your will.  I feel it is keeping it in the family and don’t need credit.  If anything, I appreciate your evaluations, identifications and detective work.  I’m hopeful you and yours enjoy them.  On a blog, in a book, above a cloud.”

#23 Frances “Fannie” WELLS 1892-1975

Frances “Fannie” WELLS was the daughter of  Charles Thomas “Tom” WELLS and Mathilda “Tillie” ROYALTY. Her mother Tillie was the sister of Florence ROYALTY who collected most of these wonderful old photographs. Florence and Fannie appear to have had a special relationship as Florence saved many photographs of Fannie from the time she was a little girl until she was married and had her own little ones.

frances
Tillie, Tom, and Frances ca. 1895
Frances1
Frances ca. 1895
Frances2
Frances (right) with cousin Mabel Sutherland ca. 1900

Mabel SUTHERLAND was the daughter of John A. SUTHERLAND and Susan Catherine “Kate” WELLS, the sister of Tom WELLS.

Frances3
Frances ca. 1915
Frances4
Frances with her husband Lee Martin Ross 1915
frances6
Clifford Lee Ross, Frances’ first born. 1917
frances7
Back of above photo. For Aunt Florence.
Frances5
Lee and Frances with their sons Clifford (b. 1917) and Frederick (b. ca. 1918) ca. 1918

Links to previous posts in this series may be found in Old Photographs

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

Joe Rooney kindly gave me permission to use these photographs on my blog.

Joe ROONEY wrote on 15 February 2015: This collection of photographs was scanned at 300 dpi color by me. The original photos were sent by Sandra Lillie about ten years ago after she found them cleaning out a relative’s garage in Southern Illinois, finding no other takers (suckers). She believes they were a collection by L Vance Lillie. Many of the pictures seemed to be removed from frames or were in albums evidenced by fading characteristics and may have been from other’s collections. I scanned the reverse if there was laboratory advertising or writing. Some of the authors’ identification may be figured out of the handwriting matches. I did not scan the reverse of photos where there was only a three digit number that I believe to be sequence numbers on a roll of film. I didn’t spot any obvious helpful commonalities.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #22 Charles Edgar WELLS 1886-1973

This is a spin-off of my 52 Ancestors: #14 Albert Spencer LILLIE (1848-1913) ~ Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can blogpost in which I featured a few photos from a collection of old photographs my 4C1R Joe Rooney shared with me. I asked Joe about using the photos and he kindly wrote, Please use them at your will.  I feel it is keeping it in the family and don’t need credit.  If anything, I appreciate your evaluations, identifications and detective work.  I’m hopeful you and yours enjoy them.  On a blog, in a book, above a cloud.”

#22 Charles Edgar WELLS 1886-1973

Charles Edgar WELLS was born in Brownfield, Pope County, Illinois, on 26 November 1886. He was the son of Charles Thomas “Tom” WELLS and Mathilda J. “Tillie” ROYALTY.

charlesedgarwells1The photograph above was taken before the WELLS family moved to San Luis Obispo County, California. The quality of the digital image is not high enough to zoom in on the items pinned to his lapel.

Update (one day after post): Cousin Joe kindly sent me this closeup of the medals pinned to his lapel. Still not legible but maybe someone will recognize them.

lapelCharles married Suda LOCKE shortly before Christmas Day in 1913 in Los Angeles County, California. This places the move from Illinois to California in the 1910-1913 timeframe as the family was in Johnson County, Illinois, for the 1910 census.

charlesedgarwells2Charles was a teacher on 5 June 1917 when the World War I Draft Registration Card was filled out and was still working in education in 1942 when the World War II Draft Registration Card was filled out.

Charles died 18 May 1973 in San Luis Obispo County, California. He was survived by his wife and children and his sister, Frances “Fannie” WELLS, widow of Lee Martin ROSS.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

Links to previous posts in this series may be found in Old Photographs

Joe Rooney kindly gave me permission to use these photographs on my blog.

Joe ROONEY wrote on 15 February 2015: This collection of photographs was scanned at 300 dpi color by me. The original photos were sent by Sandra Lillie about ten years ago after she found them cleaning out a relative’s garage in Southern Illinois, finding no other takers (suckers). She believes they were a collection by L Vance Lillie. Many of the pictures seemed to be removed from frames or were in albums evidenced by fading characteristics and may have been from other’s collections. I scanned the reverse if there was laboratory advertising or writing. Some of the authors’ identification may be figured out of the handwriting matches. I did not scan the reverse of photos where there was only a three digit number that I believe to be sequence numbers on a roll of film. I didn’t spot any obvious helpful commonalities.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #20 Alnie W. ROYALTY

Over the summer I took a break from posting these old photographs. Many more remain to be shared. I plan on doing at least one a week, on Thursdays.

This is a spin-off of my 52 Ancestors: #14 Albert Spencer LILLIE (1848-1913) ~ Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can blogpost in which I featured a few photos from a collection of old photographs my 4C1R Joe Rooney shared with me. I asked Joe about using the photos and he kindly wrote, Please use them at your will.  I feel it is keeping it in the family and don’t need credit.  If anything, I appreciate your evaluations, identifications and detective work.  I’m hopeful you and yours enjoy them.  On a blog, in a book, above a cloud.”

#20 Alnie W. ROYALTY

Alnie W. ROYALTY was born 10 February 1888 in Allen Springs, Pope County, Illinois, to Charles W. ROYALTY and Lizzie M. WALTER.

Tintype portrait of Alnie in a dress

1888Alnie
Alnie W. ROYALTY ca. 1888-89.

A piece of paper reading “Alnie Royaltey” was tapped to the reverse side of this photo.

Tintype portrait of Alnie at about the age of 5 or 6

When a little boy was too old to wear a dress he was “breeched.” In this photograph Alnie, about 5 or 6, too old to be wearing a dress, is wearing trousers with high laced up boots.

1893Alnie
Alnie W. ROYALTY ca. 1893

A piece of paper reading “Alnie Royalty Charlie son” was tapped to the reverse side of this photo.

Alnie with his parents ca. 1895

charlesfamily
Lizzie M. WALTER with husband Charles W. ROYALTY and son Alnie

Links to previous posts in this series may be found in Old Photographs

Joe Rooney kindly gave me permission to use these photographs on my blog.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

Joe ROONEY wrote on 15 February 2015: This collection of photographs was scanned at 300 dpi color by me. The original photos were sent by Sandra Lillie about ten years ago after she found them cleaning out a relative’s garage in Southern Illinois, finding no other takers (suckers). She believes they were a collection by L Vance Lillie. Many of the pictures seemed to be removed from frames or were in albums evidenced by fading characteristics and may have been from other’s collections. I scanned the reverse if there was laboratory advertising or writing. Some of the authors’ identification may be figured out of the handwriting matches. I did not scan the reverse of photos where there was only a three digit number that I believe to be sequence numbers on a roll of film. I didn’t spot any obvious helpful commonalities.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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