Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #68 Portrait of a Man with Beard

In the collection my cousin Joe Rooney sent to me there were two copies of the photograph I am sharing today of a bearded man. It took me a while to identify him. Bear with me while I work through this.

UNKGlassRoyaltyGBLTillie Rooney collectiontinyThe photographer Theodore C. Marceau per Wikipedia “pioneered the creation of a national chain of photographic studios in the United States in the 1880s.” I found an interesting biography of the photographer Marceau on Broadway Photographs. He lived in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1885-1886 and first went into a partnership with another photographer named Bellsmith around this time. Cabinet cards found online for the the studio in Cincinnati had Marceau Bellsmith as the photographer’s logo. I believe this photograph was one of Marceau’s early works and likely taken around 1885 before he partnered with Bellsmith.

The bearded man in this photograph was not a very young man and yet not old. The beard does not show any graying. The thinning of his hair would suggest he might have been in his 30s or 40s.

The backs of the photographs read:

Theo C. Marceau
The Leading Fotografer
Successor to Van Loo
148 West Fourth St.
Cincinnati

Also on the backs are dedications. The first reads, “To Uncle Sam – R.G.L.”

UNKPortraitmanbeardback Rooney collectionThe second, “To cousin Tillie R.G.L.” and a number “77030R” which could be for ordering duplicates.

UNKGlassRoyaltyGBLTillieback Rooney collectionBoth dedications were written by the same person, likely an adult. But who was R.G.L.?

Uncle Sam and cousin Tillie are a perfect fit for Samuel L. ROYALTY (1829-1902) and his daughter Mathilda J. “Tillie” (Royalty) WELLS (1859-1939). My problem is I don’t have a niece or nephew for Samuel with the initials R.G.L. The dedication on the back of the cabinet card to Uncle Sam would have to have been written before his death in 1902.

I slowly went through all the digital images of the fronts and backs of all photographs in the collection searching for the same handwriting. There are 250 items in the digital file.

carrieback2carrieback

These are the backs of two identical photographs of Caroline “Carrie” ENOCH, daughter of Ellen ROYALTY, oldest sister of Samuel L. ROYALTY. Sam’s niece and Tilly’s cousin.

When I shared Carrie’s portrait I had little information on her and was unable to locate her in any census after 1870. The backs of her photos suggested a marriage to a LANGLEY or LANGSTON. After writing about her photograph last November my cousin Joe posted several comments about her having been married at least three times. This led to the census enumerations in 1900, 1910, 1920 with her 2nd husband and in 1930 with her 3rd husband. I have not gone back to check on the 1940. All three of her marriages took place  in Hamilton County, Ohio:

Robert G. LANGSDALE 1851-1920

Carrie’s first husband’s initials were R.G.L. Here is a biographical sketch from the History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana, 1885.

1885historyofdearbornandohiocountiesp808-809R. G. LANGSDALE, M.D., a popular druggist and pharmacist, Rising Sun, is a native of Kentucky, born in 1851. He was educated at Moore’s Hill College, and for seven years was engaged in teaching “the young idea how to shoot.” In 1879 he entered the Ohio Medical College, of Cincinnati, and took a thorough course in the study of medicine, graduating March 4, 1881. He then sold out his interest in the drug business at Florence, Ind., and located in the same year in Rising Sun. In January, 1882, he purchased a stock of drugs of B.F. Buchanan, and, since that date, has done a good business in the drug line, keeping a full stock of goods peculiar to the trade. Dr. Langsdale began the study of medicine with Drs. Fairhurst & Mantle, of Vincennes, Ind., and later, with Dr. J.M.W. Langsdale, of Florence, Ind.  He now confines his professional services to city practice exclusively. In the fall of 1885 Dr. LANGSDALE was married to Miss Carrie Enochs, one of the most prepossessing young ladies of Rising Sun.
[Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana, 1885 online https://archive.org/stream/historyofdearbor00chic#page/n5/mode/2up]

Carrie and Robert’s marriage did not last. Carrie remarried in 1900 and Robert in 1906. Neither had children.

Before you leave, please take a moment to scroll back up to the top and meet Dr. Robert G. Langsdale.

RGLsignature
bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #67 John ROYALTY (b. bef. 1803-d. bef. 1850)

This photograph was printed by D. K. Walton in Rising Sun, Indiana. The photographer Daniel K. Walton was born about 1852 and was first seen with the occupation of photographer on the 1880 census at the age of 28.

MRIN38282 RoyaltyJohnCould this be a reproduction of a photograph taken in the 1840s? The stand up collar touching the cheek and the large wraparound bow tie suggest this period. The back of the photograph identifies the man as John ROYALTY.

MRIN38282 RoyaltyJohnbackJohn ROYALTY married Sarah LUNDERMON (1796-1870) on 3 February 1824 in Spencer County, Kentucky. They were the parents of Ellen ROYALTY (1824-1903), Hester Ann ROYALTY (1827-1910s), and Samuel L. ROYALTY (1829-1902). They named their only son after his maternal grandfather Samuel LUNDERMON. While writing this it dawned on me that Samuel L. ROYALTY’s middle name may have been Lundermon.

John and his little family may have lived in Washington County, Kentucky in 1830. A census record was found in the county which “fits” and includes an additional older woman. If this is the correct family group, John would have been a bit younger than his wife. The family hasn’t been found in the 1840 census and John may have died before 1850. His wife Sarah was found in the 1850, 1860, and 1870 census, years in which the status of a person was not included, and may have been widowed as John was not present.

If John ROYALTY named his first son after his father-in-law, were his daughters named after his mother-in-law and mother?

Getting back to the photograph, John’s oldest daughter Ellen lived in Rising Sun, Ohio County, Indiana, at the same time as the photographer D. K. Walton. Could she have had an earlier photo of her father reproduced?

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #36 Otterbein E. PADDACK 1874-1942

Otterbein E. PADDACK (1874-1942) was the son of Charles Rollin PADDACK (1839-1923) and his first wife Mary R. McCREARY (1837-1895). Charles was the son of Tristam PADDOCK and Charlotte PALMER. Otterbein and his father spelled their surname with an a instead of an o.

Otterbein, born 7 June 1874, was photographed in the late 1870s in a below the knee length dress/coat with lacy ruffles at the sleeve openings and neck. It looks like he may be wearing calf length pants under the dress/coat also with ruffles at the leg openings or where they are tucked into boots. He has a handkerchief in one hand.

Otterbein Paddock ca. 1878On his World War I draft card his physical description was blue eyes, black hair, tall and medium build. One can “see” the blue eyes in this tinplate which was labeled with his name on the back.

Otterbein Paddock ca. 1878 backI found a photo of Otterbein with his second wife, and two children online. It is a postcard view of Otterbein Paddack’s Grocery at 2800 S. Walnut in May 1916. The postcard shows Otterbein, his wife Elizabeth, and children. It was mailed to Otterbein’s father, Rev. C. R. Paddack, of Liberty, Indiana.

I wondered about the spelling of the surname when I wrote 52 Ancestors: #51 Nice. How I Opened the Door in Cousin Joe’s Brick Wall and quoted the first part of a genealogical sketch on Rev. Charles R. PADDACK and his ancestry. In the postcard view of Otterbein’s grocery store, one can see the spelling of the name in the window. Census records for Otterbein and his father Charles show they used the spelling of PADDACK instead of PADDOCK.

Mr. Paddack married first, November 25, 1866, Miss Mary B. McCreary, daughter of John and Mary T. (Williams) McCreary, who was born in Center township. She died March 10, 1895. Their children were: Markwood, Otterbein and Lawrence Dillon, the last named dying in infancy. Mr. Paddack married secondly, on March 27, 1898, Cassandra Elina Lee, daughter of Isaac K. and Anna C. (Glidewell) Lee, a native of Salt Creek township, Franklin county.

[Source: transcribed 16 December 2015 by Cathy Meder-Dempsey from Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana Volume II, The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago, 1899, pg. 912-915 online https://archive.org/stream/biographicalgenefu02lewi#page/n445/mode/2up/search/Paddack]

Included in the book was this photograph of Charles R. PADDACK and his second wife Cassandra.

Charles R Paddack and wife Casandra ca. 1898[Source: Biographical and Genealogical History of Wayne, Fayette, Union and Franklin Counties, Indiana Volume II, The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago, 1899, pg. 912-915 online https://archive.org/stream/biographicalgenefu02lewi#page/n445/mode/2up/search/Paddack]

This was the last of the PADDOCK/PADDACK photographs.

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #35 John M. PADDOCK Family in 1889

This young family includes Sarah M. PADDOCK‘s son John M. PADDOCK, born out of wedlock, his oldest three daughters, her granddaughters, and his wife.johnmpaddockfamIn 1889 John M. PADDOCK (1851-1925) and his wife Nannie C. JOHNSON (1863-1930)  were photographed with their first three children – Jennie (1883-1928), Essie Pearl (1885-1959), and Nellie (1888-?). Don’t the girls look just like their mother?

John and Nannie’s family lived in Center Township, Union County, Indiana, and continued to grow with the births of Fannie in 1891, Clarence Floyd in 1894, Alma B. in 1897, Lawrence in 1900 and Vernon in 1903.

Huddleston was known to have had his business in New Castle, Henry County, Indiana.

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #34 An Incorrectly Labeled Picture

Stepmother’s brother
John Paddock

Taken June 2 /85
John Paddock
brother of
Joanna Paddock
who was Florence
Lillie’s stepmother

MRIN38277 PaddockJohnfamily3back Rooney CollectionAfter evaluating the information found on the back of this photograph I found it not reliable.

John M. PADDOCK born in 1851 was a nephew and not a brother of Johanna PADDOCK. He was raised in his grandparents’ household which is probably why Florence may have thought of him as an uncle. In 1880 he was seen as the grandson of Charlotte PADDOCK née PALMER, mother of Johanna. In 1910 he was seen as the son of Sarah BRACEY née PADDOCK, sister of Johanna PADDOCK who was the stepmother of Florence ROYALTY who married Isaac Spencer “Ike” LILLIE.

After separating the wheat from the chaff, I was left with the date 2 June 1885 when the photo was taken. This was written in a different hand. The date helped to identify the persons in this photo. I eliminated John M. PADDOCK as being in the photograph as he would have been 34 in 1885 and had been married only about two years. He was by then the father of a little girl and his wife was expecting her second child.

The lady here looks like a younger Sarah M. PADDOCK to me. By 1885 she was married over 15 years to her first husband Job HARRIS and had a son, Arthur HARRIS, who was born in May 1870 and would be 15 at the time the photo was taken.

1885sarah sarahJobHarrisArthurSarahtinyJob HARRIS (1819-1892) with wife Sarah PADDOCK (1835-1919) and their son Arthur HARRIS (1870-bef. 1940)

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #33 Sarah M. PADDOCK 1835-1919

Sarah M. PADDOCK (1835-1919) was the daughter of Tristam PADDOCK and Charlotte PALMER. She was the sister of Mary, Ellen and Phebe, and Johanna, the wife of Samuel L. ROYALTY featured in earlier posts.

Sarah was the unwed mother of John M. PADDOCK (1851-1925) who lived with his grandparents in 1860, 1870, and 1880 in Union County, Indiana. Sarah married Job HARRIS (no record found) and was enumerated in his household in 1870 in Randolph County, Indiana, with their son Elisha B. born in May 1870 per census. This son was seen as Arthur HARRIS on the 1880 census and when he married in 1892. The HARRIS family may have been photographed in 1885 and will be discussed in a future post. Sarah remarried in 1894 to Elisha BRACEY. Was it only a coincidence she named a son Elisha B. in 1870 and married a man named Elisha BRACEY in 1894?

She had her picture taken (early 1890s) about the same time as her sisters Ellen and Phebe. She wore a dress similar to theirs, only the ruffled collar with a bow was different from the lacy collar seen in Ellen and Phebe’s portraits.

SarahPaddocktinyMore about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #32 Ellen and Phebe PADDOCK

Ellen (1837-1901) and Phebe (1827-1899) PADDOCK of Union County, Indiana, were daughters of Tristam PADDOCK and Charlotte PALMER. They weren’t twins even though they dressed alike when having their picture taken. Ellen, ten years younger than Phebe, was the taller of the two and had a higher forehead. They were the sister of Mary A. PADDOCK featured last week.

ellenphebeWhen they were young, most likely in the early 1860s, they were photographed together by Beaver & Mendenhall in Liberty, Indiana.

Ellen was born in 1837 and died in 1901.

Later in life, perhaps in the early 1890s, Ellen (left) and Phebe (right), wearing matching outfits, were photographed by Huddleston in New Castle, Indiana.

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #31 Mary Paddock 1826-1855

Mary A. PADDOCK was one of five known daughters of Tristam PADDOCK (1793-ca. 1870) and Charlotte PALMER (1797-aft. 1870) of Union County, Indiana. She died before the age of 30 and most likely never married. Mary’s sister Johanna PADDOCK, at the age of 35 years, married the widowed Samuel L. ROYALTY in 1874.

MaryThis tintype is identified on the back as Mary PADDOCK.

MRIN38276 PaddockMaryback Rooney Collection

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #14 Joanna PALMER (1833-ca. 1871)

This is a spin-off of my 52 Ancestors: #14 Albert Spencer LILLIE (1848-1913) ~ Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can blogpost in which I featured a few photos from a collection of old photographs my 4C1R Joe Rooney shared with me. I asked Joe about using the photos and he kindly wrote, Please use them at your will.  I feel it is keeping it in the family and don’t need credit.  If anything, I appreciate your evaluations, identifications and detective work.  I’m hopeful you and yours enjoy them.  On a blog, in a book, above a cloud.”

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

Links to previous posts in this series may be found in Old Photographs

#14  Joanna PALMER (1833-ca. 1871)

grandmaroyalty
Grandmother Royalty ca. 1865-1870

To date this photograph I tried to describe the clothing worn by this lady and compared it with the fashions of the times.

  • a small bonnet placed on the back of the head with wide ribbon strings
  • hair parted in the center and pulled back, no crimps or waves
  • plain white collar with edges done in blanket stitch scallops
  • brooch
  • dropped shoulders with armholes at armpit height and wide sleeves
  • bishop sleeves as opposed to the bell sleeves seen until 1863
  • black lacy demi gloves
  • fitted bodice, no apparent buttons, and pleated skirt on dress
  • reticule or small bag hanging from the middle of her lower arm (right on photo)
  • dark colored taffeta dress

Would you agree this is a Civil War period photograph or post Civil War?

Joanna PALMER married Samuel L. ROYALTY on 5 April 1856 in Ohio County, Indiana. Between 1863-1866 she moved with her family to Pope County, Illinois. She was the mother of Florence ROYALTY, wife of Isaac Spencer LILLIE. No date of death has been found for her. A gravemarker photo on Find A Grave does not include the date of death. The Find A Grave Memorial #49752399 has 1871 as her year of death but a baby born 19 January 1874 and died 27 June 1874 is seen as her child. Did she die about the same time as this child? Her husband Samuel remarried on 10 November 1874.

granmaroyaltyback
Back of photograph: “Grandmother Royalty”

Joe Rooney kindly gave me permission to use these photographs on my blog.

Joe ROONEY wrote on 15 February 2015: This collection of photographs was scanned at 300 dpi color by me. The original photos were sent by Sandra Lillie about ten years ago after she found them cleaning out a relative’s garage in Southern Illinois, finding no other takers (suckers). She believes they were a collection by L Vance Lillie. Many of the pictures seemed to be removed from frames or were in albums evidenced by fading characteristics and may have been from other’s collections. I scanned the reverse if there was laboratory advertising or writing. Some of the authors’ identification may be figured out of the handwriting matches. I did not scan the reverse of photos where there was only a three digit number that I believe to be sequence numbers on a roll of film. I didn’t spot any obvious helpful commonalities.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #13 Samuel L. ROYALTY (1829-1902)

This is a spin-off of my 52 Ancestors: #14 Albert Spencer LILLIE (1848-1913) ~ Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can blogpost in which I featured a few photos from a collection of old photographs my 4C1R Joe Rooney shared with me. I asked Joe about using the photos and he kindly wrote, Please use them at your will.  I feel it is keeping it in the family and don’t need credit.  If anything, I appreciate your evaluations, identifications and detective work.  I’m hopeful you and yours enjoy them.  On a blog, in a book, above a cloud.”

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

Links to previous posts in this series may be found in Old Photographs

#13 Samuel L. ROYALTY (1829-1902)

How would you date this photograph?

samI’ve tried ignoring what I know about the person and concentrated on what he is wearing. Stand up collar with a wide gap on shirt, a neckcloth tied with what looks like a barrel knot, jacket with peaked lapels (as opposed to notched) without a buttonhole, and a vest with lapels. With his hair over the ears and no facial hair he looks to be in his 20s. Could this have been taken in the 1850s? Does the fashion fit the period?

This man has been identified as Samuel L. ROYALTY however the persons whose hands this photograph has passed through were unsure. Was this Samuel or his son Quincy?

backThere were several photos of Sam’s sons John Quincy ROYALTY and Charles W. ROYALTY in this collection but none of his oldest son Chester Ashley ROYALTEY. I’ve compared Quincy and Charles’ photos with this one and they are not the same men and the fashion trends are different. These will be shared in  later posts.

Samuel L. ROYALTY was the father of Florence ROYALTY and father-in-law of Isaac Spencer LILLIE. He was born in Kentucky in 1829. His mother was in Ohio County, Indiana, in 1850 with two of his married sisters. I have not located him in 1850. He married Joanna PALMER on 5 Apr 1856 in Ohio County, Indiana. They were in Randolph township when the 1860 census was enumerated. Samuel was in Rising Star, Indiana, at the time of the Civil War Draft Registration in 1863. Four of his children were born in Indiana. By 1866 he was living in Pope County, Illinois, where four more children were born. His wife died before 10 November 1874 when he married Johanna PADDOCK. He lived in Pope County until his death in 1902.

If this photograph was taken in the 1850s what was Samuel doing in Springfield, Missouri? Could this explain why he wasn’t found in the 1850 census?

I searched further for Samuel’s son Chester Ashley ROYALTEY (this son’s line changed the spelling of the name) for whom I don’t have any photographs. Imagine my surprise when I found him in Springfield, Greene County, Missouri, in 1900. Chester did a lot of moving around and lived in Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. Is it only a coincidence Samuel had his photograph taken in Springfield when he was young and his son Chester was there in 1900?

Joe Rooney kindly gave me permission to use these photographs on my blog.

Joe ROONEY wrote on 15 February 2015: This collection of photographs was scanned at 300 dpi color by me. The original photos were sent by Sandra Lillie about ten years ago after she found them cleaning out a relative’s garage in Southern Illinois, finding no other takers (suckers). She believes they were a collection by L Vance Lillie. Many of the pictures seemed to be removed from frames or were in albums evidenced by fading characteristics and may have been from other’s collections. I scanned the reverse if there was laboratory advertising or writing. Some of the authors’ identification may be figured out of the handwriting matches. I did not scan the reverse of photos where there was only a three digit number that I believe to be sequence numbers on a roll of film. I didn’t spot any obvious helpful commonalities.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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