Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #91 A Series of Brick Wall Photos

The photographs I’m sharing today were taken with a brick wall as the backdrop. None are labeled but in the first, I recognize Florence ROYALTY and her brother-in-law George Wyte LILLIE. I don’t know who the woman in the middle is. There were two copies of this photo in the collection, one had June 14 written across the top but no year.

royaltyflorence-lilliemaybe4picchildren2
George Wyte LILLIE, an unknown woman, and Florence ROYALTY

For comparison here are two photos taken around 1930. Definitely, before 19 November 1932 as this is when Isaac died.

ReeseFlorence
Isaac LILLIE (1872-1932) with his wife Florence ROYALTY (1868-1946)
1920sRaymondIkeRoy
Isaac and Florence’s sons Raymond (1904-1970), on the left, and Roy (1895-1979), on the right, with their uncle George Wyte LILLIE (1874-1943) in the middle.

 

The above two photos were taken in Detroit, Michigan, in front of the apartment building the family was living in. Although the coat with the fur collar worn by Florence and the light colored hat with the dark band worn by George appear to be the same, the second set of photos were most likely not taken on the same day. George in the top photo is wearing a tiny bow tie while in the lower right photo he is wearing a tie. In both pictures, he has a cigar in his hand. Also as the copy of the top photo was labeled June 14 it is very unlikely that the other two photos were not taken in the middle of June since the men are so warmly dressed.

Perhaps the next two photographs could be clues to identify the woman in the middle in the photograph at the top. Could she be the mother of the three children in these photos?

royaltyflorence-lilliemaybe4picchildren1
Three unknown children (sitting)
royaltyflorence-lilliemaybe4picchildren3
Three unknown children (standing)

Using the bricks as a guide I estimated the height of the children. From left to right, the oldest girl is 17-18 bricks=51-54 inches, the young boy is about 12 bricks=36 inches, and the younger girl is 15-16=45-48 inches. This matches with my estimates of their ages being from youngest to oldest, about 2 1/2, 5, and 7-8 years.

I’ve gone through the LILLIE family tree looking for siblings who were born in the 1920s. The only family group I found which would match was the family of Isaac’s youngest brother Robert Wiley LILLIE (1895-1947) with his wife Neele Audrey OWENS (1898-1942) and their children Roberta Neele b. Oct 1921, Marian Gene b. Aug 1924, and Robert Walton b. Jan 1927.

Roberta’s photo was shared in Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #7 Robert Wiley LILLIE (1895-1940).

I found a yearbook photo of Marian in the U.S., School Yearbooks, 1880-2012 database at Ancestry.

U.S. School Yearbooks, 1880-2012, (Ancestry.com : accessed 28 February 2017)

I shared the photos with Robert Walton LILLIE’s daughter Julie back in December hoping to get them into a post at the end of the year. She wrote, “Cathy, I have never seen this picture before, and in my opinion, they don’t look like my Dad and (his) sisters. But, I could be wrong. Let me send to my sister and see if she recognizes it. I will get back to you.” After sharing with her sister she wrote, “My sister didn’t recognize the picture either, nor did she think it was them. But, neither one of us is 100% sure.”

I still think the children could be an older Roberta, her sister Marian, and their little brother Robert. I sent a new request to Julie to take a look at the lady in the middle in the top photo.

robertandmarian
Robert and Marian. Photograph courtesy of family member.

Julie got back to me and sent some photographs including the above for comparison. I believe the children’s blond hair darkened over the years. This would explain the darker hair of the older girl in the photo of the three children. Is she the same person as Roberta seen with the cute blond haircut? Between the time the bottom photo of Robert and Marian was taken and Marian’s picture for the school yearbook, her hair darkened. Alas, Robert and the young boy were not very good studies in either photo. The one above, sent by Julie, shows Robert a bit older than the little boy in the photo with the girls but the cute newsboy cap hides his eyes. In the pictures with the girls, the young boy is looking down, hiding his face.

While we were chatting, Julie told me something I did not know. My research on Robert Sr. and his wife Neele was difficult, to say the least. I never found them together on a census. They were married on 10 April 1920. In 1930 Neele and her oldest daughter Roberta were lodgers in a household. No trace of daughter Marian and husband Robert. I had no idea there was also a son Robert until Julie’s son contacted me.

I have never understood why my Father had to go live with his Uncle Ray and Aunt Clara. I don’t remember my Dad ever explaining it to me, and perhaps he didn’t know for sure. Neele and Robert were married twice and divorced twice. I know my Dad had a rough childhood…..My father seemed to adore his Mother, but not a lot of talk or praise of his Father…..don’t worry about bringing up skeletons, as I am perfectly aware that there are many.

Since we now know Robert and Neele’s marriage had its difficulties, I want you to take another look at the photo at the beginning of this post with the young woman in the middle between George and Florence. Do you notice what I noticed? I have to admit I didn’t see this until I looked at the second copy I have of the same photo which is dated June 14 (without a year).

Is the young woman pregnant? If this was Neele, what happened to the child? Could she have given birth while in Detroit? If this isn’t Neele, would it be possible to find a woman who gave birth sometime after June 14th?

Will someone recognize the children and the young woman in this series of photos taken in front of a brick wall? Are they Neele Audrey Owens Lillie and her children Roberta Neele, Marian Gene, and Robert Walton?

Photos of Neele were shared in Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #79 The Unusual Hairdo (Identified).

These are the last of the photographs from the collection I was gifted by my cousin Joe Rooney who took them off the hands of his cousin Sandra Lillie who saved them from the trash can. I will be taking a week or two off from writing about this collection but will be back with a final post, a synopsis of the family connections made during the process of writing about each of the over 150 photos.

Would you like to re-visit the photos? You can see them on my Pinterest board Old Photographs Saved from Trash Can.

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #83 William F. HOLT Family of Brookport, Illinois

While doing these posts I’ve opened several doors in Joe’s brick walls. Joe is my 4th cousin once removed through my 4th great-grandparents Landon S. GOWING and Sally CRISP of Amherst and Nelson County, Virginia.

In the beginning, I was only concentrating on getting the identified photos posted with a little family history. Along the way, I’ve been able to identify some of the unknowns.

Although I’ve learned about old photographs and the fashion of the period, I’m still a beginner and nowhere near possessing the expertise others have when working with vintage photography. This proficiency is lacking when it comes to the photo I am featuring today.

I’ve been avoiding doing this one as it was labeled as an unknown family and I don’t know how to classify it.

wfholtfamilyThe original is 4 1/3 by 5 1/2 inches including a border of about 1/2 an inch. It is unique and not similar in format to any of the other photos in the collection. It has been mounted onto a piece of glass. The image is facing the glass like a photo in a picture frame. The glass is larger than the photo and a green border has been painted on the back side where the glass overlaps the photo. The brush strokes can be seen along the edge of the back of the photo which is gray with very light writing on it.

wfholtfamilybackAt first glance, I did not see there was writing on it, it is that faint. I tried holding it at an angle by a window (natural light), using a lighted magnifier, and taking a picture of it. I was able to make out some letters and two words. W. F. Holt and Brookport.

HOLT is one of the surnames which has been mentioned a few times in this series. Thelma HOLT was the wife (they later divorced) of Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE and the mother of Lynn Vance LILLIE. Thelma’s parents were from Brookport, Massac County, Illinois.

Her parents were William F. HOLT (1871-1934) and Edith S. WYMER (1874-1948). They had a daughter Lula M. HOLT (1895-1963) and a son Leonard Herman HOLT (1897-1947), both born before Thelma whose birthday was 30 June 1901. This fits perfectly with the family group in this picture. A man and a woman, a young girl about 6 or 7 years old, a young boy about 4 years old, and a baby.

While researching this photograph I learned that wicker chairs first appeared in the 1890s as studio props and continued to be used for several decades. In this photograph, the father is sitting on what looks like a wicker chair or stool. His wife is also sitting and holding a baby. The two children are standing.

I suspect the photo was taken in late 1901. The baby on the mother’s lap is wearing what looks like a voluminous christening gown which completely hides her size and makes it difficult to estimate her age.

The young girl, standing behind her parents, wears a center part. Her hair is French braided from the crown to the nape of the neck and then hangs in two regular braids down her back. The mother’s hair is combed back from her face and likely pinned up in a bun at the nape. Both mother and daughter are wearing similar blouses with large collars adorned with a gathered ruffle which reaches to the shoulder seam, perhaps made by the mother from the same pattern. The mother is wearing a dark floor-length skirt. One of her pointed shoe tips is peeking out from under the skirt.

The young boy has a side part like his father and is wearing a darling suit, similar to the sailor suits children were wearing at the time. The large lapels are embroidered as are the cuffs of the jacket and a row of buttons is on both sides. He is wearing knee pants, knee-high socks, and boots laced up above the ankle. Around his neck, he has a floppy bow tie while his father, who is wearing a three-piece suit without leg cuffs, does not have any kind of tie. The lapels of the man’s jacket have shiny inserts. A watch chain hangs from the vest buttons and is likely tucked into the vest pocket hidden by his jacket. A tiny light circular adornment is on the collar of his vest. His white shirt is buttoned up to the pointed collar. The toe caps of his lace up boots are dull, likely from daily use.

I believe the identification on the back fits the William F. HOLT family of Brookport, Illinois, and the fashion fits for late 1901. One question remains. Does this method of mounting a photo on a piece of glass and adding a painted border have a name or could it have been a homemade preservation attempt by a person who formerly owned the photograph?

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #49 Splitty’s Band

The third son of Isaac Spencer “Ike” LILLIE and Florence ROYALTY, Raymond Egbert LILLIE (1904-1970) was featured last week in #48 Raymond Egbert “Splitty” LILLIE (1904-1970) and earlier with his brother Roy and Uncle George in #45 Three LILLIE Men.

Splitty’s Band may be a bit misleading as a title. This group photo, of a band, has “Raymond E. Lillie” written on the back. Which of the band members Raymond was is not listed nor who the other members of the troupe were. This is not dated and the location isn’t noted. Is it in Pope County, Illinois, where Raymond grew up, or in Detroit, Michigan, were he was seen in 1930 and 1940, or perhaps in Massac County, Illinois, where his father died? Raymond worked for the railroad and may have gotten around a lot.

RaymondELilliebandMy guess is front row, kneeling, second from right. Or standing far right? Anyone else what to take a guess? For comparison here is a head shot without hat from one of the photos of Raymond in 1930 shared in the previous post.

raymondwithouthat1930More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #47 Thelma HOLT 1901-1984

The daughter-in-law of Isaac Spencer “Ike” LILLIE and Florence ROYALTY, Thelma HOLT (1901-1984) was the wife of Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE (1895-1979). She was a bit partial to pearl necklaces or at least it seems so from the two photographs of her.

Thelma Holt LILLIE 19301930ThelmaHolttiny

Thelma’s parents were William F. HOLT (1871-1938) and Edith S. WYMER (1874-1948).

Thelma and Roy were married before 1920 and had a son Lynn Vance LILLIE (1920-1993). Although  divorced before 1930 Thelma and Roy are buried beside each other in Pell Cemetery, Brookport, Massac County, Illinois. Their son Vance lies on one side of Thelma and Roy on the other.

Thelma Holt LILLIE with friends in late 1950s

ThelmaHoltLilliewithotherstinyFrom left to right: Thelma Farmer, Flora Lemley, Barney Robinett, Thelma Holt Lillie, Goldie Faughn, Ruby Garrett, Harry Faughn, Mabel Gillett.

Is this from a school reunion? Quick searches of the census show Thelma’s friends grew up in Massac County, Illinois, and were all about the same age, born between 1899 and 1902. They do not appear to be related to her although more research would need to be done to prove or disprove this.

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #39 The Two Cora B.’s of Pope County, Illinois

I am in a quandary. Although many of these photographs have writing on the back which helps with identification, I’m not sure about the identification giving as both persons are the same gender and age. Does the person on the left have her name written on the left on the back of the photograph or on the right? Are there rules for this and were they followed?

Which Cora is which?

2016-01-21 blog edited smallThis is the dilemma I’m facing with this photograph taken by Riley & Cook of Paducah, Kentucky. I was amazed at how small the original photograph is. The photo is mounted on a 2.75 inch square cardboard frame with the name of the photographer debossed in the lower left corner. Both ladies are wearing matching flower corsages in their hair. The lady on the right has a corsage which looks like a bouquet with the stems pinned on her shoulder and the flowers draping down. I would like to date it at 1898 for reasons seen below.

2corasI believe the lady on the left is identified as Cora B. GOLIGHTLY. Below her name is written “married Mr. COLVIN” which suggests GOLIGHTLY was her maiden name. The lady on the right would be Cora DAVIS. Azotus, written below the names, is the name of the cemetery in which Cora B. GOLIGHTLY’s parents Calvin W. GOLIGHTLY and Sarah K. METCALF are buried. No where have I found it is a town name in Illinois.

2corasbackI thought Cora DAVIS may have been another name for Cora GOLIGHTLY, before or after her marriage to Mr. COLVIN, due to the brace or curly bracket, until I searched Pope County for Cora DAVIS.

Cora B. RUSHING (1881-1964) married Peter DAVIS (1878-1939) and both are buried in IOOF Cemetery, Golconda, Pope County, Illinois. I didn’t find a marriage record for them. On Find A Grave their date of marriage is listed as 19 April 1898 in Pope County. I was able to confirm this date using the Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, 1763-1900 on the Illinois State Archives site. Cora was born after the 1880 census and married before the 1900 census which means she was not found on a census with her parents. I have not found any source which lists the names of her parents.

Could this photograph have been taken on her wedding day? Was Cora B. GOLIGHTLY her maid of honor? Both ladies were born in 1881 and lived in Pope County, Illinois, while growing up. Were they best friends or related to each other?

Cora B. GOLIGHTLY (1881-1984) married Charles Owen COLVIN (1872-1943) about 1928 when she was 46 years old and following her widowed father’s death in 1926. I hadn’t been able to locate the couple in the 1930 census until I tried wild cards and found the surname spelled Calvin. On this census Cora was seen as age 48 married at age 46. Her brother Hiram GOLIGHTLY was in the household and helped make the positive identification. Cora and Charles don’t appear to have had children together.

And now dear reader please tell me, which Cora is on the left and which on the right in the photograph?

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #38 Dr. James A. CROW Family

YoungerCrowfamilytinyYoungerCrowfamilybacktinyAbout 1890-1891 the young family of Dr. James A. CROW and his wife Anna Mae HODGE posed for a photograph with their young son William Jacob HODGE in Golconda, Pope County, Illinois, at the Alt studio.

James of Massac County and Anna of Pope County, married about 1889. Their first child Willie was born on 28 January 1890 in Kentucky.

James and Anna had two daughters before the 1900 census. Flora A. was born in Illinois on 6 May 1893 and Ruth K. in Kentucky on 28 August 1895. In 1900 the family was living in Pope County. Their third daughter Ruby Harriet was born on 15 September 1902 and died in Pope County on 30 January 1904.

About 1909 Anna wrote on the back of a photograph of herself with her husband and two daughters:

CrowfamilybacktinyFrom left to right
Jim, Flora, Anna & Ruth
Hello how are you all? I have wanted
to write every (sic) since I was down but put
it off. How is the baby and Ruthie, bless her
heart. How I wish I could see you all. How do
you like this weather. I don’t like it very much.
What are you going to do Christmas.
Come up! Let me hear from you real soon.

Yours, Anna Crow

Flora would have been 16 and Ruth 14.

CrowfamilytinyThe photograph is not dated and Anna did not write the name of the person she was writing the note to. From the text I believe it was taken most likely in 1909 and was for Florence ROYALTY. My only doubt comes from Anna’s writing, “since I was down” and “come up.” Florence lived in the Jefferson District of Pope County and Anna lived southwest of her in Benton, Massac County. Did she mean it literally as in coming to a higher place from a lower place? Or did Anna consider Pope County as “down home?”

Anna M. HODGE and Florence ROYALTY were born about six months apart in 1868 and most likely on adjacent land. In 1870 when Anna was 2 years old she was enumerated with her parents William Stewart HODGE (real estate valued at $2000) and Harriet TAYLOR in HH#153-153 in Township 13 Range 6, Pope County, IL. Florence who was also 2 years old was enumerated with her parents Samuel L. ROYALTY (real estate valued at $2000) and Joanna PALMER in HH#151-151. Living in HH#152-152 was George HODGE (real estate valued $0), a farmhand without land.

Samuel’s mother Sarah ROYALTY née LUNDERMON and Johanna PADDOCK, who four years later would marry the widowed Samuel, were living with the HODGE family. Samuel L. ROYALTY came from Indiana to Pope County after the Civil War and before 1866.  His mother may have come with his family to Illinois while his sisters remained in Indiana. Johanna PADDOCK, an “old maid” and first cousin of Samuel’s wife Joanna PALMER, also came to Illinois from Indiana in the 1860s.

Anna’s sister Julia (1858-1924) married Florence’s oldest brother Chester Ashley ROYALTEY (1856-1917). Anna and Florence were neighbors, went to school together and may have been best friends growing up. They both named their daughters Ruth and Ruby. The baby mentioned in the note was Joe ROONEY‘s mother Ruby Pernecia LILLIE who was born in April 1909.

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #4 Mary, Daniel, and Lillie SMILEY

This is a spin-off of my 52 Ancestors: #14 Albert Spencer LILLIE (1848-1913) ~ Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can blogpost in which I featured a few photos from a collection of old photographs my 4C1R Joe Rooney shared with me. I asked Joe about using the photos and he kindly wrote, Please use them at your will.  I feel it is keeping it in the family and don’t need credit.  If anything, I appreciate your evaluations, identifications and detective work.  I’m hopeful you and yours enjoy them.  On a blog, in a book, above a cloud.”

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

The collection of photographs scanned by Joe Rooney does not include a photograph of Albert Spencer LILLIE’s wife Pernecia Elizabeth GLASS (1852-1899). Pernecia was the daughter of Green B. GLASS (1820-1897) and his wife Rebecca NICHOLS (1824-1875). There are several photographs labelled with the surname GLASS. The following have been featured:

#2 Green B. GLASS (1820-1897) father of
#3 Green Berry Lyon GLASS (1864-1935) brother, brother-in-law and uncle of

#4 Mary Jane GLASS (1854-1930), Daniel Young SMILEY (1849-1935), and Pernecia Lillie SMILEY (1887-1931)

Albert Spencer LILLIE’s wife Pernecia Elizabeth GLASS had several sisters and one brother who died young. Mary Jane GLASS (1854-1930) was her only sibling to marry and have children. Mary Jane married Daniel Young SMILEY (1849-1935) about 1871.

glass5Mary and Dan had 8 children, 6 of whom were living in 1900 and 1910. They named their second daughter Pernecia Lillie SMILEY (1887-1931) after her aunt Pernecia LILLIE, wife of Albert. Of Mary and Dan’s children only this daughter, who went by Lillie, had a photo in this collection.

glass7Joe Rooney has kindly given me permission to feature these photographs on my blog.

Joe ROONEY wrote on 15 February 2015: This collection of photographs was scanned at 300 dpi color by me. The original photos were sent by Sandra Lillie about ten years ago after she found them cleaning out a relative’s garage in Southern Illinois, finding no other takers (suckers). She believes they were a collection by L Vance Lillie. Many of the pictures seemed to be removed from frames or were in albums evidenced by fading characteristics and may have been from other’s collections. I scanned the reverse if there was laboratory advertising or writing. Some of the authors’ identification may be figured out of the handwriting matches. I did not scan the reverse of photos where there was only a three digit number that I believe to be sequence numbers on a roll of film. I didn’t spot any obvious helpful commonalities.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #3 Green Berry Lyon GLASS (1864-1933)

This is a spin-off of my 52 Ancestors: #14 Albert Spencer LILLIE (1848-1913) ~ Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can blogpost in which I featured a few photos from a collection of old photographs my 4C1R Joe Rooney shared with me. I asked Joe about using the photos and he kindly wrote, Please use them at your will.  I feel it is keeping it in the family and don’t need credit.  If anything, I appreciate your evaluations, identifications and detective work.  I’m hopeful you and yours enjoy them.  On a blog, in a book, above a cloud.”

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

The collection of photographs scanned by Joe Rooney does not include a photograph of Albert Spencer LILLIE’s wife Pernecia Elizabeth GLASS (1852-1899). Pernecia was the daughter of Green B. GLASS (1820-1897) and his wife Rebecca NICHOLS (1824-1875). There are several photographs labelled with the surname GLASS.

#2 Green B. GLASS (1820-1897) was the father of

Green Berry Lyon GLASS (1864-1933)

Albert Spencer LILLIE’s wife Pernecia Elizabeth GLASS had several sisters and one brother who died young. Her brother Green Berry Lyon GLASS was married twice but did not have children. Find A Grave

glass3

Joe Rooney has kindly given me permission to feature these photographs on my blog.

Joe ROONEY wrote on 15 February 2015: This collection of photographs was scanned at 300 dpi color by me. The original photos were sent by Sandra Lillie about ten years ago after she found them cleaning out a relative’s garage in Southern Illinois, finding no other takers (suckers). She believes they were a collection by L Vance Lillie. Many of the pictures seemed to be removed from frames or were in albums evidenced by fading characteristics and may have been from other’s collections. I scanned the reverse if there was laboratory advertising or writing. Some of the authors’ identification may be figured out of the handwriting matches. I did not scan the reverse of photos where there was only a three digit number that I believe to be sequence numbers on a roll of film. I didn’t spot any obvious helpful commonalities.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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