Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #84 Unknown Couple abt. 1894

This photograph of an unidentified couple measures 6 1/2″ x 4 1/4″. The rich soft tones of the image are marred by a stain on the right side of the picture. At first, I thought a top layer had been scratched off of the photo. The original shows this is actually a piece of paper stuck to the picture. Very likely another photograph stuck to this one when the water damage happened.

unkcoupleoriginalscanThe front includes the photographer’s name and location in golden artistic print common around 1882-1900. The rounded corner and single line border dates this cabinet card to the 1889–1896 period. The photo was glued to a light cream colored heavy card stock and there is no writing or printing on the back.

The collar of the man’s shirt is a low band without an actual collar. His tie has a large knot and is tucked to the side as was the style in the late 19th century. His hair is cut short and neat.

The woman’s dress has a high neckline with lace, leg-of-mutton sleeves, and a wide cape-like collar bordered with black venitian lace similar to that around the neck. A pin is attached to the middle of the high neck of her blouse. Her face is framed in tiny ringlets instead of bangs while the rest of her hair appears to be put up in a bun at the back of her head.

unkcouple
Auto adjusted.

O. H. Talbott who had his business in Girard, Kansas, worked as a photographer from 1894 (or perhaps earlier) until just before 1910. No information was found for a photographer of this name. To place his occupation in Girard during a certain time period I had to draw up a short biographical sketch from information found in census records and his children’s records.

  • Othniel Henry Talbott was born in 1853 in Indiana.
  • In 1860 he was in the household of Lorenzo Dow Talbott and Elizabeth Allen, likely their oldest child, in Greencastle Ward 5, Putnam County, Indiana.
  • Sometime after 1862 and before 1866 the family moved to Iowa. In 1870 they were living in Yellow Springs, Des Moines County, Iowa.
  • In 1880 Othniel was 26 years old, single, living with his parents in Mediapolis, Des Moines County, and working as a blacksmith.
  • In 1885 when the Iowa state census was taken, he still working as a blacksmith and living in his parents’ household.
  • A change in profession and residence took place during the nine years period between 1885 and 1894.
  • Othniel married Genelia Richie about 1892 and their first child, a son, was born in January 1893 in Fairbury, Jefferson County, Nebraska.
  • In January 1894, O.H. Talbott was running advertisements in The Girard Press for his photography business.
  • In August 1894 O.H. Talbott went to Muskogee in the Indian Territory while his wife and child visited in Paola, Linn County, Kansas per a snippet in The Girard Press of August 23, 1894.
  • He must not have remained long as in 1895 they were in Paola and his parents and one of his brothers living in his household. Othniel was working as a photographer per the 1895 census.
  • In November 1897, when their 2nd son was born, the couple was still living in Paola.
  • In 1900 they were in Eldorado Springs, Cedar County, Missouri, where Othniel was working as a photographer.
  • A third son was born in September 1904 in Eldorado Springs where Othniel H. Talbott applied for a patent on 5 June 1908 for a photographic-plate holder.
  • In 1910 they were back in Potosi in Linn County, Kansas, where he was working his own mortgaged farm.
  • The 1915 state census showed Othniel, a farmer, and his wife with their two youngest sons in Potosi.
  • By 1920 the couple and their youngest son moved to Gates, Campbell County, Wyoming where land was acquired and farmed. He was still farming in 1930.
  • Othniel died in 1938 at the age of 85 and was buried in Basin. He had likely retired from farming and moved there between 1930 and his death in 1938.
  • In 1940 his widow was living in Basin, Big Horn County, Wyoming, with their son youngest son, daughter-in-law, and granddaughter.
  • His wife who was 19 years younger, died in 1954 and was buried beside him.

Since this sketch points to O.H. Talbott doing business in Girard, Kansas, in January 1894 and until August of the same year, I wonder if his business in the town may not have gotten off to a good start. Paola is 73 miles north of Girard and I do not believe Othniel would have commuted to work. It is more than likely his business in Girard was short lived and this photograph may be one of very few, if any, which survives.

youngoliveThere is another photograph in this collection which was taken in Girard at Bell’s Studio in the early 1880s. It was featured in Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #18 Olive ROYALTY 1871-1949 and shows a young Olive (right) and another girl who was only identified as Irene (left). How Olive came to be in Girard to have her portrait taken with Irene is unknown. Could Olive’s friend Irene be a younger version of this young woman with the man? When comparing the two photographs the difference in the color of the eyes stands out. Could the soft tones of the photo taken by Talbott cause the young woman’s eyes to appear lighter? Can a resemblance be found between the young woman and Irene?

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #83 William F. HOLT Family of Brookport, Illinois

While doing these posts I’ve opened several doors in Joe’s brick walls. Joe is my 4th cousin once removed through my 4th great-grandparents Landon S. GOWING and Sally CRISP of Amherst and Nelson County, Virginia.

In the beginning, I was only concentrating on getting the identified photos posted with a little family history. Along the way, I’ve been able to identify some of the unknowns.

Although I’ve learned about old photographs and the fashion of the period, I’m still a beginner and nowhere near possessing the expertise others have when working with vintage photography. This proficiency is lacking when it comes to the photo I am featuring today.

I’ve been avoiding doing this one as it was labeled as an unknown family and I don’t know how to classify it.

wfholtfamilyThe original is 4 1/3 by 5 1/2 inches including a border of about 1/2 an inch. It is unique and not similar in format to any of the other photos in the collection. It has been mounted onto a piece of glass. The image is facing the glass like a photo in a picture frame. The glass is larger than the photo and a green border has been painted on the back side where the glass overlaps the photo. The brush strokes can be seen along the edge of the back of the photo which is gray with very light writing on it.

wfholtfamilybackAt first glance, I did not see there was writing on it, it is that faint. I tried holding it at an angle by a window (natural light), using a lighted magnifier, and taking a picture of it. I was able to make out some letters and two words. W. F. Holt and Brookport.

HOLT is one of the surnames which has been mentioned a few times in this series. Thelma HOLT was the wife (they later divorced) of Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE and the mother of Lynn Vance LILLIE. Thelma’s parents were from Brookport, Massac County, Illinois.

Her parents were William F. HOLT (1871-1934) and Edith S. WYMER (1874-1948). They had a daughter Lula M. HOLT (1895-1963) and a son Leonard Herman HOLT (1897-1947), both born before Thelma whose birthday was 30 June 1901. This fits perfectly with the family group in this picture. A man and a woman, a young girl about 6 or 7 years old, a young boy about 4 years old, and a baby.

While researching this photograph I learned that wicker chairs first appeared in the 1890s as studio props and continued to be used for several decades. In this photograph, the father is sitting on what looks like a wicker chair or stool. His wife is also sitting and holding a baby. The two children are standing.

I suspect the photo was taken in late 1901. The baby on the mother’s lap is wearing what looks like a voluminous christening gown which completely hides her size and makes it difficult to estimate her age.

The young girl, standing behind her parents, wears a center part. Her hair is French braided from the crown to the nape of the neck and then hangs in two regular braids down her back. The mother’s hair is combed back from her face and likely pinned up in a bun at the nape. Both mother and daughter are wearing similar blouses with large collars adorned with a gathered ruffle which reaches to the shoulder seam, perhaps made by the mother from the same pattern. The mother is wearing a dark floor-length skirt. One of her pointed shoe tips is peeking out from under the skirt.

The young boy has a side part like his father and is wearing a darling suit, similar to the sailor suits children were wearing at the time. The large lapels are embroidered as are the cuffs of the jacket and a row of buttons is on both sides. He is wearing knee pants, knee-high socks, and boots laced up above the ankle. Around his neck, he has a floppy bow tie while his father, who is wearing a three-piece suit without leg cuffs, does not have any kind of tie. The lapels of the man’s jacket have shiny inserts. A watch chain hangs from the vest buttons and is likely tucked into the vest pocket hidden by his jacket. A tiny light circular adornment is on the collar of his vest. His white shirt is buttoned up to the pointed collar. The toe caps of his lace up boots are dull, likely from daily use.

I believe the identification on the back fits the William F. HOLT family of Brookport, Illinois, and the fashion fits for late 1901. One question remains. Does this method of mounting a photo on a piece of glass and adding a painted border have a name or could it have been a homemade preservation attempt by a person who formerly owned the photograph?

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #82 A Young Florence ROYALTY?

I nearly missed this photograph, it is so tiny. It was first scanned by my cousin Joe along with an envelope in which I found it. Stamp size, it measures 1 1/8 by 1 3/8 inches.

unkportraityounggirlenvThe young girl looks to be in her early teens. Her hair is tied back at the nape of her neck with a large bow, likely out of the same material as her dress. Her eyes are very light colored, possibly blue. Her dress or blouse may be white or a light color and has a high collar. The extra fabric on the top part of the bodice appears to have vertical pleats sewn down and then left open in the bosom area. The sleeves are a bit puffy in the upper arms; the lower arms are not seen in the photo. Were they bishop sleeves or gigot sleeves?

unknownblueeyedgirlwithbow
Non-identified photograph of a young girl in her teens.

Could this photograph have been taken in the middle or late 1880s?

ca-1910ruthjoannalillie
Ruth Joanna LILLIE ca. 1909.

The dress looks very much like the one Ruth Joanna LILLIE was wearing in this framed portrait. Was the original dress saved and made to fit Ruth or is she wearing a reproduction of the dress? Ruth was the oldest daughter of Florence ROYALTY and Isaac Spencer LILLIE.

Could the young woman be Florence ROYALTY (1868-1946)? We’ve seen photographs of Florence at different ages but none in her teens.

mrin21898-royaltyflorence6yrs
Florence at age 5 or 6 years with light colored hair.
isaac-and-florence-lillie-rooney-collection
Florence, with her husband Ike, is in her late thirties and her hair has become darker.

Another possibility would be Florence’s sister Mathilda J. “Tillie” ROYALTY (1859-1939) who also had light colored eyes. Their sister Olive ROYALTY had dark colored eyes which eliminate her. Tillie was 9 years older than Florence which means the photograph would have to have been taken earlier, perhaps in the late 1870s or early 1880s.

tomtilliefannietom+tillietillieolder

 

 

 

 

Larger images of these photographs may be viewed in the post on Tillie.

Am I correct in dating this photograph in the middle to the late 1880s? Does this young girl resemble Florence ROYALTY as a little girl and as a married woman? Or could she be Florence’s sister Tillie? Or will she remain unidentified?

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #81 Lake & Grotto

Mixed in with the photographs and postcards of this collection was this illustration titled Lake & Grotto. From the digital copy, it looks like a postcard. The back was not scanned. I was unable to find a geographical location for this lake.

unkdrawinglakegrottosceneSince cousin Joe sent me the entire collection, I can easily study the actual photo or postcard. In this case, this is not a postcard. It is printed on paper which is a bit heavier than normal copy paper and has a gloss or shine to it. It is flimsier than parchment paper.

I’ve come to realize that I should have been sharing the size of the items. This print is 4 1/2 inches wide and 3 inches high. The size and feel remind me of antique Catholic holy cards. There is no writing or printed matter on the back of this print.

Two women with parasols are sitting across from a man in a boat on the lake and two pelicans are standing on the bank of the lake. In the background, on a rise, is an eight-sided pavilion. To the right is a smaller half hidden pavilion and to the left a long building partially hidden behind a cluster of trees.

Any guesses on whether this is a drawing of a fictional place or a place which actually exists somewhere?

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #80 A White Swan

Why did Florence ROYALTY save this photograph of a big white bird?

royaltyquincywhiteswan
Photographed by Cumings of Golconda, Illinois. (no information was found for this photographer)

A Trumpeter swan or a Tundra swan? There are two species of swans in North America with black bills. Since there is no color in the photo one cannot see if this is a trumpeter with a red border on the lower mandible or a tundra with yellow marking on the lore. But then a tundra swan can also have the red marking and some tundra swans don’t have the yellow teardrop spot near the eye. A tundra’s eye is usually distinct from the bill while a trumpeter’s eye is not but the quality of the photo makes it hard to tell. Trumpeters have longer necks in proportion to their bodies than tundras. Distinguishing the trumpeter from the tundra is not easy even when the two are swimming or standing and they can be compared. These characteristics can be used in the field to identify one or the other but from this photograph, it would be a “wild” guess.

“In the 19th and early 20th centuries, the trumpeter swan was hunted heavily, for game or meat, for the soft swanskins used in powder puffs, and for their quills and feathers.” [Source: Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trumpeter_swan]. Extinction of the trumpeter seemed imminent by 1933 when fewer than 70 were known to exist. In the 1950s several thousand trumpeters were discovered in Alaska. The population has been restored to over 46,000 birds in 2010.

royaltyquincywhiteswanbackQuincy ROYALTY
killed this white swan
in a lake in New Mexico
& had it stuffed & mounted
in a glass case.

He sold it to a lawyer
when he left there for $20.

John Quincy ROYALTY (1866-1918), Florence’s brother, was the man who killed the swan. Quincy was in New Mexico from before 1898 until 1903, during the time that the swan was heavily hunted. In 1898 while in Albuquerque, New Mexico, he enlisted in Company E, First Territorial U.S. Volunteer Infantry, and served during the Spanish War until mustered out at Albany, Georgia, in 1899. After a visit to his old home in Pope County, Illinois, he returned to the West. In 1900 he was once again in Albuquerque, living in the household of his brother-in-law John R. BOSWELL and his youngest sister Olive ROYALTY, and working as a watchman for the railroad. By 1903 he had moved to California. This would have been when he sold the stuffed swan for $20.

But there is still one inconsistency. If Quincy killed the swan in New Mexico and sold it to a lawyer before he left there, then when and where did Mr. Cumings of Golconda, Illinois, photograph the swan?

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #79 The Unusual Hairdo (Identified)

I’ve been working on the Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can series for a little over a year and a half. In the beginning, they weren’t posted on a regular basis. Since October 2015, I’ve been doing them once a week on Thursdays.

unkyounggirlbuttonfrontLast week, as usual, I posted the link for the Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #79 An Unusual Hairdo post to my Facebook page and shared on my timeline. Less than two hours later the unidentified young lady with the hairdo that has fascinated me since I first saw the photograph had a possible identification.

Julie, who has been a Facebook friend for only three months, wrote,

Cathy, this picture looks so familiar. She looks very much like the pictures I have seen of my Father’s Mother, Neele Owens Lillie. What do you think Scot (her son) and Jeanne (her sister)?

I wrote about Neele in April 2015 in a post on her husband, Neele, and their daughter Roberta. Up until Julie’s son Scot got in touch with me last August, all my research pointed to their having only two daughters. When Scot got in touch, I learned they also had a son, Robert Walton LILLIE. This son, Robert, was Julie and Jeanne’s father. (Scot is my 5th cousin and Julie and Jeanne are my 4th cousins once removed.)

Cathy: Julie, this is the only photo I have of Neele. Taken from the side, it is hard to tell. Would love input from others.

mrin38267-lillieneeleowens-rooney-collectionJeanne: I’m almost certain that is Nelle

Cathy: Jeanne, do you mean at the top with the strange hairdo or the one I posted as the only photo I have of Neele?

Jeanne: the top one. I have the other one but I have seen that one too. My Dad must of had it because that’s the only place I could have seen it. I’m pretty sure.

Julie’s daughter then posted this photo for comparison:

neele-owens-lillie-courtesy-of-familyNeele Audrey Owens LILLIE (1898-1942)
Robert Walton Lillie’s mother, grandmother of Julie (written on back)
Photo courtesy of the family

Jeanne: I went home to look at a picture of my grandmother and no wonder I recognized it. I have it in a frame!!!

Julie (posted the photo below to my timeline): Cathy, it is 100%. My sister found the picture in her dresser. This just gives me chills.

neele-owens-lillie-photo-in-frame-courtesy-of-family-18-nov-2016Neele Audrey Owens LILLIE (1898-1942)
Photo courtesy of the family

The lady with the unusual hairdo has been identified thanks to her granddaughters and great-granddaughter. This is what sharing genealogy is all about. Who says collateral lines are not important to our family history?

Happy Thanksgiving!

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #79 An Unusual Hairdo

unkyounggirlbuttonfrontUPDATE: Identified as Neele (Owens) LILLIE (1898-1942)

The unidentified young lady’s hairdo has fascinated me since I first saw this photograph. At first glance, I thought she was wearing some kind of hat sassily pulled down over her brow. At second glance, I saw her hair styled in a French roll or twist bun coiffed on the top of her head and stretched down over her forehead.

She is wearing a white blouse with sleeves attached to armholes that extend below the natural shoulder line. Tiny buttons along the collar and down the front are buttoned through rouleau button loops. The collar appears to be convertible. When worn open as in the picture, lapels are formed with the buttons and button loops extending along the edge. In the open neckline, she is  wearing a fine chain necklace with a pendant.

There is no writing on the back or front of the photograph. Nothing to identify the lady or the photographer.

Any takers on dating the photograph of this unidentified young lady with the strange hairdo?

UPDATE (17 Nov 2016): My 4th cousins once removed, Julie and Jeanne, granddaughters of Robert Wiley LILLIE and Neele OWENS have identified her as their grandmother Neele. I’ve removed the photo of Carrie Enoch that I included for comparison.

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #78 Fannie WELLS ca. 1910

Frances “Fannie” WELLS (1892-1975) was the daughter of  Charles Thomas “Tom” WELLS (1859-1934) and Mathilda “Tillie” ROYALTY (1859-1939). Her mother Tillie was the sister of Florence ROYALTY (1868-1946) who collected most of these wonderful old photographs. Fannie’s parents lived in Pope County, Illinois when she and her older brother Charles Edgar (1886-1973) were born.

Florence and Fannie appear to have had a special relationship. Florence saved many photographs of Fannie from the time she was a little girl until she was married and had little ones of her own.

franceswellscollagewatermarked A collage of the photos from this post:
Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #23 Frances “Fannie” WELLS 1892-1975.

While sorting through the digital copies of the collection, I’ve been moving the used images into a new folder so that I have a better overview of all unused photos. Originally there were more than 25o images in the folder. I am now down to a little less than two dozen.

In the unused file, I found this picture of Frances which has not been shared. The digital copies of the front and back of the photograph were originally labeled WielFrances and WielFrancesback. 

1910-ca-wellsfrances-rooney-collectionThe young woman in this picture was photographed from the waist up. Fannie has her hair up and is wearing a blouse with skirt combination or an afternoon dress. Her blouse is high collared with a bow tied in the middle front. The rounded chest inset has a ruffle from shoulder to shoulder. The sleeves are a bit wide at the shoulder level. Were they more tight fitting below the elbow? When she married about 1915 she was no longer wearing her hair up and her face was fuller (see collage). I believe this picture may have been taken about 1910 when she was 18 or perhaps a bit earlier.

The writing on the back was misinterpreted when the digital copies were labeled. At the time, connections between all of the people in this collection were not known and names were not familiar.

1910-ca-wellsfrancesback-rooney-collectionWritten on the back of the photo in pen is Frances Well Ross sent to. Written in pencil in a more childish handwriting, maybe by young Fannie, Aunt Florence. Since Wells is missing the s at the end and Ross was Fannie’s married name, I believe the ballpoint pen writing was added later so that anyone viewing it would not think this was “Aunt Florence.”

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #77 Isaac and Florence LILLIE

Last week I shared a photograph of Isaac Spencer LILLIE (1872-1932) and his wife Florence ROYALTY (1868-1946) with their sons Reese Gentry LILLIE (1892-1965) and Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE (1895-1979) taken in the late 1890s or early 1900s (before 1904).

Sometime after the photo was taken Isaac grew a mustache.

isaac-and-florence-lillie-rooney-collectionThis picture was taken by Frank A. Gregory in Metropolis, Massac County, Illinois. Isaac and Florence appear to be about the same age as in the family portrait featured last week.

isaac-and-florence-lillie-with-hats-rooney-collectionThey donned their hats in this photograph taken during the same sitting.

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #76 The LILLIE Family Portrait

Isaac Spencer LILLIE (1872-1932) and his wife Florence ROYALTY (1868-1946) have been mentioned often in this series. This is because the entire collection appears to center around their family.

lillieikefloreeseroy
Isaac Spencer LILLIE and his wife Florence ROYALTY with their two oldest sons.

When did Florence’s interest in collecting photographs begin? Around 1874 when the first known photograph, a tintype, was taken of Florence at the age of 5 or 6 years? Or the very late 1890s or very early 1900s (before 1904) when she sat with her husband and two oldest sons, Reese and Roy, to have this family portrait made?

The four Lillie family members are wearing the same clothes in this family portrait as in the pictures below.

ikeflorandreese Ikeandroy floroyandikeCould those pictures, labeled penny pictures by an unknown person, have been proofs taken in preparation for the family portrait?

I purposely did not name the sons under the family portrait. The reason being that the dark haired boy between Isaac and Florence appears taller than the light haired boy on the left of Florence.

In the series of photos, someone added the names of the boys. Reese, born in 1892, was two and a half years older than Roy, born in 1895. In the pictures where the boys are with their father, “Reese” appears to be smaller than “Roy.” Could Roy have been so much taller than Reese or was he standing on a stool in the group photo? Or are the photos labeled incorrectly?

In 1917 when the boys registered for the World War I draft, Reese was described as medium, slender, blue eyes, and light hair. Roy was described as tall, medium, gray eyes, and dark brown hair.

reesewwicardroywwicardFrom the descriptions, I believe we can assume Roy is the boy between Isaac and Florence and Reese is the boy on the right of Florence.

The photos of Reese (above) are the only ones in the collection. Roy’s pictures were more numerous as can be seen in the links shared in post #64 Brother and Sister in 1950.

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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