85 Years Ago Today: My Maternal Grandparents Were Married

At 7 o’clock on the evening of 26 July 1935, Mathias SCHAFFNER, mayor of Echternach (Luxembourg), married Nicolas WILDINGER and Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE. The groom was 28 years old and a plumber; the bride was 26 years old and without an occupation.

Nicolas’ mother, Catharina PÖPPELREITER, and Marcelle’s father, Johann Joseph FOURNELLE, were present and agreeable to the marriage.

Johann WILDINGER, the father of the groom,  and Catharina FRANTZ, the mother of the bride, were both deceased at the time of the marriage.

The religious marriage ceremony took place the following day in St. Willibrod Basilica in Echternach in the strictest privacy per an announcement sent out by the parents of the bridal couple. Their only child, my mother, was born ten months later and cannot have been the reason for the church ceremony being performed in privacy.

The marriage lasted only six years. It ended on 24 October 1941 when Nicolas died of tuberculosis. Although Marcelle had at least one suitor who offered marriage, she never remarried. She died in 2005 in her 96th year.

I previously wrote about Nicolas and Marcelle in 2015: 52 Ancestors: #4 The Plumber/Tinsmith and the Seamstress.

© 2020, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Update: Cupid has been having a busy time…

During the FREE ACCESS weekend of Newspaper.com, I found this article and wrote about it in my last post.

Clipping courtesy of Newspaper.com

Cupid has been having a busy time of it the past eight months in the family of Mrs. Nick Poppelreiter, who resides on a hundred-acre farm in the southern part of Downer’s Grove township. One year ago a family of six children, four sons and two daughters, made their home with their other. One by one they married until only one son was left, Peter Poppelreiter, and during the past week he, too, led his affinity to the altar, making six marriages inside of eight months, or an average of one marriage every forty days.1

I shared the post in the private Poppelreiter Family group on Facebook. Many US descendants of the PÖPPELREITERs of Mürlenbach, Germany, are members of the group as well as Werner LICHTER, my distant PÖPPELREITER cousin who reached out to me after reading my post 52 Ancestors: #36 Bubelreiter, Boppelreuter, Peppelreuter, Pöppelreiter.

Jennifer Spirik, an administrator of the group, quickly caught a mistake I’d made in the post.

She wrote:

Great post! I do have a question. For John A. Poppelreiter you have his wife listed as Gussie Jane Wilson. I have him being married to Elizabeth Seiler. I have no marriage source only that there are two census records on which John is listed with wife Elizabeth. Do you have anything at all to prove this? I certainly don’t want to have my tree incorrect. 

I had mentioned in my post that the marriage date was found on the FamilySearch Family Tree and not sourced. I followed the link I’d saved and found the marriage date was for Elizabeth SEILER. I corrected the error without mentioning the update as Jennifer had caught it within minutes of my posting. Here is the corrected paragraph:

John Aloysius POPPELREITER (1883-1955) married Elizabeth M. SEILER (1881-1958) on 18 June 1902. The marriage date was found on the FamilySearch Family Tree and not sourced. In 1910 the couple is listed as having been married 7 years.

John did not marry Gussie until sometime between 1930 and 1940. This second marriage has not been documented. John, for some reason, dropped the POPPEL from his name and went by John A. REITER from the time of the 1940 census until his death. To further confuse researchers, he had a son who used POPPELREITER and then changed his name to POTTER. Both of these men’s Social Security Applications (per index) indicate the different names they used.2

Some discussions went on in the group about the marriage dates and where the information was found. Several members were looking through their information and sharing.

Today, Carlene Marie Mogavero, another member of the Poppelreiter Family group, shared an image and wrote:

The following is a single page from the church books of St. Alphonsus in Lemont. I’m calling it the Alphonsus Poppelreiter Marriage Extravaganza!

St. Alphonsus marriage register 1902-1903 page 183 courtesy of FamilySearch

Five of the six marriages of the POPPELREITER siblings were recorded on one page! 

The religious marriages that took place on 18 June 1902 (John to Elisabeth M. SEILER), 3 September 1902 (Mary Elizabeth to Charles Paul FINLEY), 1 October 1902 (Katherine Magdalena to Peter Jensen RICKEN), 14 January 1903 (Peter N. to Mary Louise SEILER), and 10 February 1903 (Frank to Margaret HEINZ) are listed above.3

Only William Henry who married Mary P. ZINK on 2 September 1902 was missing as they married in Barton County, Kansas.

The Alphonsus Poppelreiter Marriage Extravaganza! also solves the problem I had concerning who was the last to marry. The marriage records clearly show Frank was the last of the six to marry and not Peter as the writer reported in the article. 

I’d like to thank the members of the Poppelreiter Family group for inviting me to join them, for taking the time to read my posts on the family, and for jumping in and helping with the corrections.

© 2020, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. Newspapers.com, database with images, Palatine Enterprise (Palatine, Illinois), Saturday, February 28, 1903, Page 1. (https://www.newspapers.com/image/81730064 : accessed 16 February 2020). 
  2. “U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index, 1936-2007,” (index only), Ancestry, citing original data: Social Security Applications and Claims. 
  3. “Illinois, Chicago, Catholic Church Records, 1833-1925,” database with images, FamilySearch, St. Alphonsus Parish (Lemont) > Baptisms, marriages, deaths, communions, confirmations 1879-1912 > image 96 of 142. Page 183 with entries for five Poppelreiter marriages that took place in 1902 and 1903. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DY27-FMC?cc=1452409&wc=M66L-6WL%3A39668701%2C39688101 : accessed 22 February 2020). 

Cupid has been having a busy time…

Over the years I’ve often used newspapers to add to the stories of my ancestors as well as their collateral lines. I didn’t drop everything because Newspapers.com was offering FREE ACCESS to all papers over the weekend. However, I did do a few quick searches for one unusual surname.

Recently, while searching for PÖPPELREITER immigrants in the US, I bookmarked the search result for Matthew Peppelrite in the Newspapers.com Obituary Index, 1800s-current on Ancestry. At the time, I was seeing an offer for a 7-day free trial but didn’t want to activate it just for the one article I needed. I decided to start a list of things to look up later.

With the FREE ACCESS over the weekend, I downloaded the article and continued to search for POPPELREITER in the newspapers.

I’d like to share this very interesting article which led me to further research the family of my 2C4R.

Cupid has been having a busy time…

Clipping courtesy of Newspaper.com

Cupid has been having a busy time of it the past eight months in the family of Mrs. Nick Poppelreiter, who resides on a hundred-acre farm in the southern part of Downer’s Grove township. One year ago a family of six children, four sons and two daughters, made their home with their other. One by one they married until only one son was left, Peter Poppelreiter, and during the past week he, too, led his affinity to the altar, making six marriages inside of eight months, or an average of one marriage every forty days.1

Nicolaus “Nick” POPPELREITER (1833-1893) was my second cousin four times removed. Our common ancestor was my 5th great-grandfather Peter BUBELREITER (1741-1793). Nick descends through Peter’s son Wilhelmus b. 1763 while I descend through Peter’s son Johann b. 1782. The sons were half-brothers from two marriages.

In 1857 following the death of his mother Anna HAU (1794-1857), Nick and his father Mathias (1798-1870) traveled on the British bark Alberti from Antwerp, Belgium, to New York arriving on 3 June 1857.2 They were the only survivors of the family as three other children had died in infancy.3

In 1860 Nick and Mathias were living in Lemont, Cook County, Illinois.4 Two households away was a young Cathr. STUMP born in Germany and working as a servant. Two months later on 3 September 1860, Nick and Catherine married at Saint Dennis Catholic Church in Lockport, Will County, Illinois.5

Catherine “Kate” STUMPS likely arrived in America on the same ship as her future husband. She was listed with her family just before Mathias and Nikolaus POPPELREITER on the passenger list.6 Families who were related and/or from the same town usually emigrated together. I haven’t followed the STUMPS family. Descendants of Nick and Kate may likely have a better idea of the possibility of Kate being the same person as seen on the passenger list. Also, there is a chance that Nick and Kate were close or distant cousins as Nick’s maternal grandmother was a STUMPS.

Nick and Kate were the parents of ten children, all born in Illinois between 1862 and 1887. It is believed that three of these children died soon after the 1880 census of diphtheria leaving a family of seven children: five boys and two girls.

Nick died on 28 November 18937 at the age of 60 years, leaving his widow Kate with the seven children. The youngest son had turned 6 on the first of the month and the oldest son turned 29 the day after his father’s death.

Six marriages inside of eight months!

I was able to document four of the six marriages mentioned in the newspaper article.

John Aloysius POPPELREITER (1883-1955) married Elizabeth M. SEILER (1881-1958) on 18 June 1902. The marriage date was found on the FamilySearch Family Tree and not sourced. In 1910 the couple is listed as having been married 7 years.

William Henry POPPELREITER (1876-1963) married Mary P. ZINK (1875-1909) on 2 September 1902 in Barton, Kansas. I found a tiny mention in the newspapers that they applied for a marriage license in August 1902 but nothing to support the date.8

Mary Elizabeth POPPELREITER (1879-1969) married Charles Paul FINLEY (1876-1956) on 3 September 1902 in Lemont, Cook County, Illinois.9

Katherine Magdalena POPPELREITER (1880-1969) married Peter Jensen RICKEN (1880-1948) on 1 October 1902 in Lemont, Cook County, Illinois.10

Peter N. POPPELREITER (1872-1905) married Louise Mary SEILER (1884-1944) on 14 January 1903 in Lemont, Cook County, Illinois per trees on Ancestry. I was not able to find proof for this date.

Frank POPPELREITER (1864-1956) married Margaret HEINZ on 10 February 1903 in Lemont, Cook County, Illinois.11

From the first marriage in June 1902 to the last marriage in February 1903, we can count eight months as noted in the article. However, who was the last to marry? Frank as seen in the list above or Peter as stated in the article?  The article published in the February 28 issue of the newspaper clearly states Peter married during the past week. This would be after February 10 when Frank married. The January 14th date for Peter is questionable. I would estimate between February 10-28 until proof of the marriage can be found.

There is also an omission in the article. There were seven living children at the time. The youngest son Simon Lawrence POPPELREITER (1887-1980) was too young to marry and was not mentioned. My initial read-through led to my questioning whether Simon was actually a child of Nick and Kate. In the end, I reckoned the writer of the article deliberately omitted the fact that there was still another child living at home.

What interesting articles did you find during the weekend of FREE ACCESS on Newspapers.com?

© 2020, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. Newspapers.com, database with images, Palatine Enterprise (Palatine, Illinois), Saturday, February 28, 1903, Page 1. (https://www.newspapers.com/image/81730064 : accessed 16 February 2020). 
  2. “New York, Passenger and Crew Lists (including Castle Garden and Ellis Island), 1820-1957,” database with images, Ancestry, citing records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36, National Archives at Washington, D.C., Microfilm Serial M237, Microfilm Roll 174, List Number 618, Arrival: New York, New York, Year: 1857, British bark Alberti, page 3, lines 43+44, Mathias Poppelreiter (58) and Nicolas (24). (https://www.ancestry.com/ : accessed 21 December 2019). 
  3. Heinrich Theodore Weber (+) / Thomas J. Schmitt, compilers, Familienbuch der katholischen Pfarrei St. Lucia in Mürlenbach 1803-1899 (Westdeutsche Gesellschaft für Familienkunde e.V., Bd. 177, Köln 2003), pg. 287-289, Family #1221, Poppelreiter-Hau. Note: The scanned pages I have in my possession may be from an earlier version of the book as page numbers do not correspond with the page numbers in the book from 2003. 
  4. 1860 U.S. Federal Census, (index and images), Ancestry, citing Eighth Census of the United States, 1860 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C., NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls, Roll: M653_170, History Library Film: 803170, Illinois, Cook County, Lemont, page 376, lines 39-40, HH#2918-2708, Matus Poppelreiter household. (https://www.ancestry.com/ : accessed 21 December 2019). 
  5.  “Will County, Illinois, Saint Dennis Catholic Church Vital Records, 1852-1951,” database with images, Ancestry.com, Roll Number: 8. 1860 Poppelreiter-Stumps marriage (right page, 2nd to last entry).(https://www.ancestry.com/ : accessed 21 December 2019. 
  6. “New York, Passenger and Crew Lists 1820-1957,” Microfilm Serial: M237, Microfilm Roll 174, List Number: 618, Arrival: New York, New York, Year: 1857, British bark Alberti, sheet 2, line 36-40 and sheet 3, line 41-42, Stumps family. (https://www.ancestry.com/ : accessed 21 December 2019). 
  7. Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed 21 December 2019), memorial page for Nicholas Poppelreiter (16 Nov 1833–28 Nov 1893), Find A Grave Memorial no. 51941849, citing Saint Alphonsus Catholic Cemetery, Lemont, Cook County, Illinois, USA; Maintained by moisom (contributor 47143156). 
  8. Newspapers.com, The Barton County Democrat (Great Bend, Kansas), Friday, August 15, 1902, page 1, column 5. (https://www.newspapers.com/image/161577086 : accessed 15 February 2020). 
  9. “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871–1920,” index, FamilySearch, citing Illinois Department of Public Health records, Division of Vital Records, Springfield, Illinois. Mary E. Poppelreiter, 23, married Charles P. Finley, 25, on 03 Sep 1902 in Chicago, Cook, Illinois. 
  10. Ibid., Katherine M. Poppelreiter, 21, married Peter J. Ricken, 22, on 1 Oct 1902 in Lemont, Cook, Illinois. 
  11. Ibid., Frank Poppelrester, 31, married Margaret Heinz, 30, on 10 Feb 1903 in Lemont, Cook, Illinois. 

P.S. About Pöppelreiter and Cousin Bait

Why do we blog about our genealogy research and our ancestors? For me, it began with wanting to tell their stories, one post at a time. As I’m coming to the end of my fourth year blogging, I’m amazed at the number of distant cousins who have found my blog.

As genealogy bloggers, we can’t just sit back and wait for our posts to bait a new cousin. We also need to actively search for and contact cousins who may help us with our research.

Sculpture by Katarzyna Kot-Bach in Wasserbillig, Luxembourg

In my post, Surprising Discovery Made While Researching the Schramen-Schmitt Family I wrote about the Ferschweiler Family Book having information about the emigration of the SCHRAMEN a.k.a. SCHROMEN family to America. Werner Lichter, the compiler of Familienbuch der Gemeinden Eisenach und Gilzem 1550-1900 as well as works on emigration, was cited as the source for the name of the ship they traveled on and the year they went.

I contacted Aaron, a SCHROMEN descendant who has his family tree on Ancestry. Although the information in the FB Ferschweiler seemed to be a match, we needed more information to prove Aaron and I descend from the same ancestor. Best bet would be to go to the original source.

Sculpture by Katarzyna Kot-Bach in Wasserbillig, Luxembourg

Werner Lichter had recently commented in a Luxembourg genealogy group so I knew he was on Facebook. I sent him a message asking for help and a friend request just in case he didn’t notice the message.

Werner accepted my friend request about the same time I took my latest 100 km bike ride. We chatted about riding, the weather, that his great-grandfather lived in Echternach for a while, and that he has a PÖPPELREITER connection. Yes, to the family I wrote about yesterday.

Sculpture by Katarzyna Kot-Bach in Wasserbillig, Luxembourg

I’d gotten in touch with Werner to help Aaron trace his immigrant back to Germany. By reaching out to both of them I ended up with not one but two new cousins. Aaron is my 4C1R through Michael SCHRAMEN and Elisabetha SCHMITT. Werner and I are 5th cousins as we descend from Johann PÖPPELREITER and Margaret BOMMES.

When was the last time you reached to a cousin or a cousin reached out to you?

Whenever we rode by the fisher sculpture I had to think of cousin bait and how I could work it into a post. Special thanks to my husband for doing the photoshoot with me.

bestwishescathy1

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

52 Ancestors: #36 Bubelreiter, Boppelreuter, Peppelreuter, Pöppelreiter

What is the most interesting or unusual name in your family tree? Do you have one like PÖPPELREITER? It’s the maiden name of one of my two great-grandmothers named Catherine. For the three generations back to her great-grandfather (my fourth great-grandfather) Johann PÖPPELREITER, the name mostly remained the same. However, during his lifetime it was spelled several different ways, evolving from BUBELREITER to BOPPELREUTER to PEPPELREUTER to PÖPPELREITER.

Some people with this name emigrated from Mürlenbach, Germany, to America and the name lost the umlaut (the double dots over the vowel) and became POPPELREITER. The ones I have found were a father and son who came to America before 1860 and another family group who came in 1893. Further research is needed to prove their connection to my line which also comes out of Mürlenbach.

Johann PÖPPELREITER

My fourth great-grandfather Johann PÖPPELREITER was the son of Peter BUBELREITER (abt. 1741-1793) and Gertrud LAMBERTI or BOSEN (abt. 1738?-1807). He was born and baptized on 15 February 1782 in Mürlenbach.[1] The extracted information from his baptismal record does not include his mother’s maiden name. She was seen as LAMBERTI when Johann’s brother Mathias married.[2] Later when she died her surname was given as BOSEN.[3] His father Peter may have been married twice, Gertrud being his second wife. His surname was spelled with B’s instead of P’s.

Johann’s father Peter was a Köhler or charcoal maker.[4] I believe this craft was passed down through the family as several PÖPPELREITER men during his time had the same occupation.

Charcoal kiln or pile photographed in Germany

Charcoal burning is perhaps one of the oldest forms of forest use. The coal plates were roundish pinnacles with a diameter of 6 to 8 meters. During the construction of the kilns, split logs of one to two meters length were set up in several levels into a hemispherical structure and covered with branches, sod, and soil to make it as airtight as possible. After firing, it took two to three weeks for all of the wood to become coal. From a fathom of wood (about three cubic meters) 600 kg of coal could be produced. With the same calorific value, the charcoal was much lighter and smaller than the wood.

Johann married Margaret BOMMES

Johann was 31 years old, could not write, and was living auf der Glasshütte near Utscheid when he married Margaret BOMMES, daughter of Johann BOMMES and Anna Maria Luzia THIELEN, on 28 October 1813 in Utscheid.[5] Margaret was born on 13 July 1791 in Grimbach and was baptized the same day in Neuerburg.[5]

It is quite possible Johann learned the Köhler trade from his father and left Mürlenbach to work in Utscheid auf der Glashütte (glassworks) where charcoal was produced. Johann and Margaret’s first two children were born auf der Glashütte near Utscheid. Lucia PÖPPELREITER was born in 1813[6] and her brother Wilhelm was born in September 1814.[6]

Sometime after the birth of their second child, the little family moved to Brimingen were their son Wilhelm died on 28 June 1815. Less than a month after his death Margaret gave birth to her next child, Nicolas on 23 July 1815 in Brimingen.[7]

A year and two days later my third great-grandfather Theodore PÖPPELREITER was born on 25 July 1816 in Brimingen and was christened the same day in Baustert.[8]

In the following two years, the family moved again to Mettendorf where their next four children were born. Catherine (the elder) was born on 27 December 1818[9], Barbara on 29 September 1821[6], and Matthias on 8 August 1824[6]. Matthias lived only one day. The fourth child born in Mettendorf, and the baby of the family, was Catherine (the younger) who was born on 21 October 1825.[6] The practice of giving the same name to more than one living child is confusing and the reason I distinguish between them with elder and younger.

Johann PÖPPELREITER died on 6 June 1827 in Mettendorf and was buried the following day.[10] He was 45 years old. He left a wife and six children aged between less than two years and 14 years.

The oldest daughter Lucia died on 23 February 1837 in Mettendorf at the age of 24 years. She had not married. Nothing is known of the next oldest child and oldest son Nicolas who would have been 21 years by this time.

Theodore PÖPPELREITER, my 3rd great-grandfather, was the youngest son. He was working as a servant in Nusbaum when he married Maria Katharina GROELINGER, daughter of Johann GROELINGER and Anna Maria Benedikta MERGEN, on 20 January 1842 in Mettendorf.[11] Maria Katharina was born on 2 June 1814 in Holsthum and was working as a servant in Mettendorf.[12] She was my 3rd great-grandmother. Theodore and Maria Katharina’s story: The PÖPPELREITER-GROELINGER Family

Catherine PÖPPELREITER (the elder), now the oldest daughter of the widowed Margaret BOMMES, was 26 years old when she gave birth to a natural child, a son Theodore, born on 31 August 1844. For new readers, a natural child’s father’s name is not known or given. After his birth, Catherine married the widower Johann WAGNER (b. 1804) on 30 January 1847 in Baustert.[13]

The youngest daughter also named Catherine married Nicolas BLEY, son of André “Andreas” BLEY and Hélène Charlotte MAY, on 13 July 1848 in Echternach.[14] Nicolas was born on 17 November 1813 in Ettelbrück.

Following the marriages of Theodore and the two daughters named Catherine, Margaret BOMMES was likely left only with her daughter Barbara living at home as mention earlier, nothing is known of the oldest son Nicolas. On 19 January 1850 twenty-eight-year-old Barbara married Peter SCHNEIDER in Oberweis. Peter, a shoemaker, was born on 23 August 1814 and was seven years older than Barbara.[15]

Johann WAGNER, the husband of the elder Catherine, died on 22 December 1856 in Mülbach (not to be confused with Mürlenbach). They had been married less than ten years. Catherine was left with four children, her son Theodore PÖPPELREITER and two sons and a daughter she had with Johann.

Margaret BOMMES, the widow of Johann PÖPPELREITER, died on 5 February 1860 in Mettendorf. She was 68 years old. She left a son and three daughters.

Following the death of her mother, the elder Catherine lost her two youngest children. Her daughter Anna Maria died at the age of 10 in 1862 and her son Peter died at the age of 11 in 1867. Six years later her son Nicholas WAGNER went to America and she was left only with her son Theodore PÖPPELREITER. He had married the previous year in Baustert and lived in Mülbach where she was living.

My third great-grandparents lived in Mettendorf all of their married life as far as I can tell. However, for some reason, my third great-grandmother Maria Katharina GROELINGER, the wife of my Theodore PÖPPELREITER (not Theodore, son of the elder Catherine), died on 27 January 1877 in Schankweiler.

Catherine PÖPPELREITER (the elder) died on 5 March 1883 in Mülbach. She was buried on 8 March 1883 in Mettendorf. Her son Theodore likely took care of the burial arrangements as her only other living son Nicholas was living in Aurora, Kane County, Illinois with his four children and wife who was expecting their fifth child in less than two months.

Barbara PÖPPELREITER died on 24 March 1886 in Oberweis. She and her deceased husband Peter SCHNEIDER who died on 1 May 1882 were the parents of three children. A daughter died at the age of 5 years. Nothing is known of Maria born in 1858 or Michael born in 1861.

Theodore PÖPPELREITER, my 3rd great-grandfather, died on 2 May 1891 in Mettendorf. He left two sons who are known to have continued the PÖPPELREITER line.

Courtesy of Solange Coussement of Bollendorf from her Old Postcards website http://www.oldpostcardsluxembourg.com/index.html. Used with permission.

Nicolas BLEY, the husband of the younger Catherine, died on 27 October 1894 in the street called Mussgasse (above) in Echternach.[16] The houses in this street are built against the old wall of the town as can be seen by the tower in the background.

Catherine PÖPPELREITER, the youngest and only living PÖPPELREITER child of Johann and Maria Katharina, died on 18 November 1908 in Echternach.[17] She had given birth to ten children, five of whom died young. Two of her children married in the 1880s. Her oldest son André never married and was a professor at the Athénées Royaux (similar to middle and high school) of Arlon and of Ghent as well as the University of Ghent in Belgium. He died at the age of 87 in Ghent.

Catherine (the younger) would not be the only Pöppelreiter to live and die in Echternach. In July 1914 my great-grandparents Catherine PÖPPELREITER and Johann WILDINGER moved from Mettendorf to Echternach with their three children. Their story is Close to Home and Close to My Heart.

Please come back tomorrow for a little P.S.

bestwishescathy1

Sources:
[1] Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 / Deutschland Geburten und Taufen, 1558-1898, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 475030. Joannes Boppelreuter, male, christened 15 Feb 1782 in Mürlenbach, Rheinland, Preussen, Germany; father Peter Boppelreuter; mother Gertrudis. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NZMV-2L9 : accessed 27 OCtber 2017).
[2] Germany Marriages, 1558-1929 / Deutschland, Heiraten, 1558-1929, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 546087. Mathiam Poppelreuter and Anna Maria Servatius married 10 Jun 1808 in Mürlenbach, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany; father of groom Petri Poppelreuter; mother of groom Gertrudis Lamberti; father of bride Mathiae Servatius; mother of bride Catharinae Linden. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4J4-VP8 : accessed 30 October 2017).
[3] Germany Deaths and Burials, 1582-1958 / Deutschland Tote und Beerdigungen, 1582-1958, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 546087. Gertrudis Bosen Poppelreuter, female, age 69, widowed; died 25 Sep 1807 and buried 26 Sep 1807 in Mürlenbach, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany; Spouse’s Name Petri Poppelreuter.
(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J43D-8L4 : accessed 27 October 2017).
[4] Heinrich Theodore Weber (+) / Thomas J. Schmitt, Familienbuch der katholischen Pfarrei St. Lucia in Mürlenbach 1803-1899 (Westdeutsche Gesellschaft für Familienkunde e.V., Bd. 177, Köln 2003), pg. 302, Family #1226. Poppelreiter-Lamberti.
[5] M.E. Hubsch, Heribert Ambros, K.G. Oehms, Familienbuch der katholischen Pfarrei Sankt Nikolaus mit ihrem Filialen Neuerburg/Eifel 1700 bis 1899 (Westdeutsche Gesellschaft für Familienkunde e.V., Köln 2007), page 155, family number 271. Johann BOMMES and Anna Maria Luzia THIELEN, SCHOMERS.
[6] Werner Naumann, comp., Familienbuch der Pfarrei Mettendorf Dekanat Neuerburg, Band 1 A-M Band 2 N-Z (compiled in 1992), p. 38, Family # M1958. Pöppelreiter-Bommes.
[7] Werner Naumann, comp., Familienbuch der Pfarrei St. Maximin Baustert (bei Bitburg, Eifel) mit Brimingen, Feilsdorf, Hisel, Hütterscheid, Mülbach, Olsdorf, Family No. Br 830. Poppelreuter-Bommes.
[8] Germany Births and Baptisms, Theodorus Poppelreuter, christened 25 Jul 1816, parents Joannis Poppelreuter and Margarethae Bommes; citing Roemisch-Katholische, Baustert, Rheinland, Prussia.(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NPNR-SZG : accessed 4 November 2015).
[9] Ibid., Catharina Pepelerreuter, female, christened 28 Dec 1818 in Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany; father Joannis Pepelerreuter; mother Margarita Bommes. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NJ74-SHC : accessed 1 November 2017).
[10] Germany Deaths and Burials, Joannes Peppelreuter, male, age 42, burial 7 Jun 1827, born abt 1785, married, spouse Margarita Bommes; citing v. 2 p.227. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4Z3-KL5 : accessed 27 October 2017).
[11] Germany Marriages, Theodorus Poeppelreiter; spouse Maria Catharina Groelinger; md. 20 Jan 1842 in Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany; father Joannis Poeppelreiter; mother Margaretha Bommes; spouse’s father Joannis Groelinger; spouse’s mother Maria Mergen; citing Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4LQ-4ZL : accessed 27 October 2017).
[12] Werner Neumann, Familienbuch der ehemaligen Pfarrei Schankweiler mit dem Pfarrort Schankweiler und den Filialen Holsthum und Peffingen, p. 60, Family # H370. Groelinger-Mergen.
[13] Familienbuch Baustert, Family No. 1225. Wagner-Poppelreiter.
[14] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Echternach > Mariages 1809 > image 873 of 1462. 1848 Marriage Record No. 20. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11670-175616-83?cc=1709358 : accessed 4 November 2015).
[15] Alois Schleder, comp., Familienbuch der Pfarrei St. Remegius Oberweis Dekanat Bitburg 1744-1899, 1999 (Westdeutsche Gesellschaft für Familienkunde e.V. (WGfF), Sitz Köln), pg. 132, Family #467. Schneider-Pöppelreiter.
[16] Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Naissances, mariages, décès 1894-1894 > image 17 of 23. 1894 Death Record No. 50. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12050-133644-0?cc=1709358 : accessed 12 January 2015).
[17] 21. Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Mariages 1906-1923 Décès 1895-1912 > image 584 of 675. 1908 Death Record No. 66. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32043-12126-76?cc=1709358&wc=9RTB-6YZ:129623201,130153902 : accessed 12 January 2015).

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Adding 3 Generations to the Family Tree

logo_klengI was on duty a week ago Saturday at my genealogy society’s library in Walferdange, Luxembourg. This new library is open to the public on Saturday afternoons from 2 to 5. Three members of the board of Luxracines were present and six visitors dropped in to research and to become familiar with our collections.

As it was not yet too busy, I was able to get some research done while on duty.

  • I opened up my genealogy software (AQ14), went to my maternal grandfather’s pedigree and checked for the closest unknown sets of ancestors. One by one I pulled the family books of the towns they were from and looked up the families.
  • I used Evernote’s Scannable app on my iPhone to scan the images of the pages of the German family books concerning the families I was interested in.
  • I attached the names of 5 sets of NEW ancestors to my family tree, as placeholders. I did not input any further information.
  • To the Research Manager of AQ14, I added a To Do/Research Item for each placeholder person:
    Check the images from the [name of town] family book taken at Luxracines library on 29 Oct 2016
  • I included a red tag for good measure.
  • At home, I sent the images to Evernote. Each image became a note which I titled with the town name, page number, family number(s), surname. The notes were filed in a temporary notebook.

The next step was to begin inputting the information, citing sources, and adding the cropped images to my database. I began with the Familienbuch der Pfarrei Messerich, Dekanat Bitburg, 1720-1900 compiled by Werner Naumann. It covers the towns of Messerich, Birtlingen, Niederstedem, and Oberstedem.

messerich2015Last year I wrote 52 Ancestors: #45 The WAGNER-KERSCHT Family. My third great-grandmother Anna Maria KERSCHT, wife of Johann WAGNER, was the daughter of Mathias KERSCHT (1759-1841), a sheep herder, Schäfer, and Anna EVEN (1766-1828) who were married 26 November 1785 in Messerich in the Eifel. Anna Maria’s parents, my 4th great-grandparents, would be the next logical couple to write about. The Mettendorf FB entry M1158 for them indicated that they had not always lived in Mettendorf. Their first six children had only estimated years of birth indicating the information was not to be found in Mettendorf. Their seventh child, born in 1809, was documented as being born in Mettendorf.

My fourth great-grandmother’s name was seen as Anna EVEN in the Mettendorf FB (Family Book). Since Anna and Mathias married in Messerich this was the logical place to look further for this family line.

To put this in perspective, Nicolas WILDINGER was my maternal grandfather. His line back to Anna is through his mother Catherine PÖPPELREITER, her mother Magdalena WAGNER, her mother Anna Maria KERSCHT, her mother Anna EWEN.

nicolaswildingerpedigreeThe first thing I noticed when I looked up EVEN, the name found in the Mettendorf FB, was that the name was spelled EWEN in the Messerich FB. I had suspected this may be the case as I had found Anna’s parents listed as Gerardus EWEN and Barbara THILIEN on Thomas A. Pick’s Homepage for Eifel Birth and Marriage Data. The data was transcribed from an unknown source and the town of Messerich is seen as Mefserich (clearly a transcription error). This made me question the correctness of Pick’s use of the names EWEN and THILIEN.

In the Messerich FB, Mr. Naumann included the book number, page number, and record number of the church records he viewed. He also mentions other spellings of names or name changes. Although records will have to be obtained as proof, I will, for now, go with the spelling found by Mr. Naumann.

The parents of Anna EWEN (1766-1828) were Gerhard EWEN and Barbara THIL, also seen as THIELEN. Anna had nine siblings born between  1761 and 1780. Not only did I find her parents but also her paternal grandparents, maternal grandfather, and both sets of paternal great-grandparents. The new names in the family tree are seen below in generations 8 and 9 in white.

annamariakerschtpedigreeWhen I finish all of the towns scanned, I will go into AQ14 and re-set the standard ancestral colors so that these new ancestors on my mother’s paternal line will also be pink.

An interesting name change was seen for Anna EWEN’s parents. Her father Remigius was born EUPERS. At the time of his marriage to Margaretha EWEN in 1733 he lost his surname as they lived in the EWEN home and their children were all baptized EWEN. He was known as Remigius EUPERS vulgo EWEN. Vulgo means “alias” or “also known as” and shows his association to the EWEN family and property.

The Mathias KERSCHT and Anna EWEN family group were included in the Messerich FB. However, there are still discrepancies. My Anna Maria KERSCHT is in the Mettendorf FB with birth being circa 1793. She had five siblings born between 1786 and 1794 in Messerich but she was not in the Messerich FB.

When I wrote 52 Ancestors: #45 The WAGNER-KERSCHT Family I discussed my doubts about Anna Maria being born abt. 1793 which would mean she was nearly 50 when her last child, my 2nd great-grandmother Magdalena WAGNER, was born. I didn’t have the WAGNER-KERSCHT family’s entry from the Mettendorf FB when I wrote the post a year ago. At the time the theme of the post was “nur nicht verzweifeln” or don’t despair due to all the missing information. I still don’t have the entry and have added it to the Research Manager as a To Do/Research Item for my next visit to the library.

Messerich, Germany

The first documented mention of the town Messerich, Miezriche, was in the year 1066. In 1852 remains of Roman settlements were found thus proving that the place existed nearly one thousand years before it was first mentioned. In 1473 Messerich had 15 Feuerstellen, or houses which were lived in; in 1525 there were 12; in 1541 there were 14; and in 1624 there were only 5. The Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648), one of the deadliest conflicts in European history, and the Black Death, which repeatedly struck the Nimstal area in 1620-1633, were the cause for the decline in population. Today there are over 400 residents and 100 houses in Messerich.

messerichinrelationtoluxembourg
Map courtesy of maps.google.lu

On the map above Messerich is a bit south of Bitburg. The closest towns to Messerich are Masholder, Birtlingen, Oberstedem, and Bitburg. Echternach, Luxembourg, the town where I live, lies 17.5 km or 10 miles to the south.

luxembourgpartitionsmap_english
By Spanish_Inquisition (LuxembourgPartitionsMap_english.jpg) [GFDL or CC BY-SA 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0], via Wikimedia Commons
Until the end of the 18th century, Messerich belonged to the Bitburg Provost District of the Duchy of Luxembourg. The borders of Luxembourg, before 1659, are seen above as black lines including areas of present-day France, Belgium, and Germany. The area where Messerich lies belonged to the Duchy of Luxembourg until the dark green area went to Prussia in 1815.

Although Messerich today lies in Germany, during the time my ancestors lived there it was part of the Duchy of Luxembourg. Now I am curious to find out which of my other “German” ancestors were actually Luxembourgers.

The entries from the Messerich FB have all been inputted and cited in my family tree. Schankweiler, Mettendorf, Neuerburg/Eifel, Mürlenbach, and Fliessem family books remain to be done. Hopefully I will have finished them by November 26th when it is once again my turn to be on library duty.

bestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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52 Ancestors: #45 The WAGNER-KERSCHT Family

Week 45 (November 5-11) – Free. (Pick your own theme!)

I picked “nur nicht verzweifeln” or don’t despair: I had a rough time getting this written with correct source citations. I came to realize there are still avenues open to me for researching the German families. This is the last German family group in this generation. The next four sets of 3rd great-grandparents will take me back to the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Whew!

The WAGNER-KERSCHT family lived in Mettendorf, Germany, and included father Johann “Joannes” WAGNER, mother Anna Maria KERSCHT, and four children, two of whom were known to have continued the line.

1789map
The towns this family lived in in relation to Echternach, where I live.
Cropped from a larger map from 1789. Courtesy of
http://wiki-commons.genealogy.net/Datei:Rheinprovinz-1789-00-Uebersicht-kl.djvu

Johann “Joannes” WAGNER

Johann “Joannes” WAGNER, my third great-grandfather, was born about 1804[1] in Fließem, north of Bitburg in the Eifel (Germany). He was the son of Mathias WAGNER and Anna Katharina SCHACMOTTE. The names of his parents were found on the indexed 1830 marriage record (no images).[16] The 1858 burial record found in the FamilySearch database included his age at death which was used to compute his estimated year of birth. Thomas A. Pick, compiler, Homepage for Eifel Birth and Marriage Data lists Johann’s mother’s name as Maria Catharina SCHUMACHER. Johann’s parents and siblings are at this time a brick wall.

Anna Maria KERSCHT

messerich

My third great-grandmother Anna Maria KERSCHT was the daughter of Mathias KERSCHT (1759-1841), a sheep herder, Schäfer, and Anna EVEN (1766-1828) who were married 26 November 1785 in Messerich in the Eifel.[2] Anna Maria was the second child of eight children born to Mathias and Anna according to information given in the OFB Mettendorf (Ortsfamilienbuch – Family Book Mettendorf). I suspect she was more likely their fifth child. Note: When I took the photo, below, it was the first time I was actually seeing a family book and did not know how to go from one family group to the next. I should have gone to families M1493, M3013, and M1535 to get more information on the daughters in the family. I did not miss getting a photo of the sons under M1160, M1161, S1162 as these were on the same and next page.

M1158
Werner Naumann, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei Mettendorf Dekanat Neuerburg, Band 1 A-M Band 2 N-Z (compiled in 1992), p. 291, Family # M1158. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013]. Kerscht-Even.
From information found in the sources cited below this is how I see the order of the births of the children of Mathias and Anna:

  • Child 1: Anne KERSCHT (1788-1843) born 4 October 1788 in Messerich.[2][3]
  • Child 2: Catharina KERSCHT (1791-1851) born 14 December 1791 in Messerich.[2][3]
  • Child 3: Matthias KERSCHT (1794-1876) born 19 April 1794 in Messerich.[2][3][4]
  • Child 4: Christophorus KERSCHT (1799- ) born 19 June 1799 in Mettendorf.[2][5]
  • Child 5: Anna Maria KERSCHT born in Mettendorf. My line.
  • Child 6: Anna Catharina KERSCHT (1806-1824) born abt. 1806 in Mettendorf.[2], [6]
  • Child 7: Heinrich “Henricus” KERSCHT (1809-1809) born 8 August 1809, he lived only 10 days dying on 18 August 1809 in Mettendorf and was buried the next day on 19 August 1809.[2], [7]
  • Child 8: Joannes KERSCHT (1811- ) born 18 February 1811 in Mettendorf.[2], [8]

You will notice the first three children born between 1788 and 1794 were born in Messerich per Pick’s Data.[3] Anna Maria was born in Mettendorf.[2] The family must have moved from Messerich to Mettendorf after the birth of son Mathias in 1794. Anna Maria’s year of birth is estimated at about 1793 in the OFB Mettendorf under the information for her parents.[2] I did not get the M3013 entry for Anna Maria and her husband from the book and will have to rectify this as soon as it is possible to access the OFB. As you will see later her last child was born in 1842. She would have been nearly 50 years old if she was born abt. 1793 and 11 years older than her husband. I find this quite hard to believe.

mettendorftiny

When Mathias and Anna were expecting their seventh child their oldest daughter Anne married Henricus LUDWIG on 23 January 1809 in Mettendorf.[9]

In the year their eighth child was born their second daughter Catharina married Joannes Friedericus LOCHEMES on 19 September 1811 in Mettendorf.[10] Two months later she had a daughter, who lived only two weeks.[11] Catharina also married Theodore LOCHEMES. This would have been in 1818 or earlier. What happened to her first husband and was he a brother of her second husband? These are questions I cannot answer at this time.

Six years after Catharina’s first marriage her brother Mathias, the oldest son of Mathias and Anna, married Angela ACHEN on 21 January 1818 in Mettendorf.[12]

Another six years later the second oldest son Christophorus married Elisabetha MERTES on 23 February 1824 in Sülm near Bitburg.[13] 

Three months later their 18 years old daughter Anna Catharina died on 22 May 1824 in Mettendorf and was buried the next day.[14]

Four years later the mother of this family, Anna EVEN died and was buried on 15 November 1828 in Mettendorf.[15]

Johann and Anna Maria Marry

Johann “Joannes” WAGNER married Anna Maria KERSCHT on 22 February 1830 in Mettendorf.[16] The bride’s father Mathias was very likely present at the marriage. As nothing is known of the groom’s parents, whether they were living or deceased, I cannot say they were present or not. At the time of the marriage the bride may have already been expecting her first child.

Let us consider what her age may have been at the time of marriage. If she was born about 1793 she would have been about 37 while her husband Johann was only about 26. Could there have been a 10 years difference in their ages?

On 20 August 1830 Anna Maria gave birth to her first child, a daughter Margaret. She was baptized the same day.[17] On 12 February 1832 Margaret was about 18 months and became the sister of a brother Friedericus who was baptized the same day.[18] The next child of Johann and Anna Maria was born a little more than 3 years later on 6 July 1835. This daughter, Catharina, was baptized the next day.[19]

Six years later Anna Maria’s youngest brother Joannes KERSCHT (also spelled the surname KIRSCHT) married Elisabetha ROTH on 7 January 1841 in Nusbaum in the Eifel.

A little over a month after the marriage of her youngest brother, Anna Maria’s father Mathias KERSCHT died in Mettendorf on 11 February 1841.[20]

Johann and Anna Maria’s fourth and last child Magdalena was born on 21 March 1842 and baptized the next day.[21] If Anna Maria was born about 1793 she would have been about 49 years old when my great-great-grandmother Magdalena WAGNER was born. Could this be correct? I think a trip to the Standesamt Körperich, where the civil records for Mettendorf are held, may give me the answer to this question.

koerperichtinyAnna Maria’s two oldest sisters died. Anne on 8 January 1843[22] and Catharina on 9 December 1851.[23] Catharina’s burial record shows her age as 65 which calculates to her birth being abt. 1786. This is five years older than she actually was and shows the burial records index is not always reliable. Does this mean Anna Maria’s age at death on her burial record (below) may also have been incorrect? 

Johann and Anna Maria’s only son Friedericus WAGNER married Catherine SCHMITZ on 9 March 1857 in Mettendorf.[24] The young couple named their first child born on 17 May 1858 in Mettendorf, Joannes,[11] after Friedericus’ father. Johann “Joannes” WAGNER, the grandfather, died less than a month later on 15 June 1858 and was buried on 17 June 1858 in Mettendorf.¨[25]

Johann and Anna Maria’s youngest daughter, my 2nd great-grandmother, Magdalena WAGNER married my 2nd great-grandfather Mathias PÖPPELREITER (1843-1891) on 18 November 1868 in Mettendorf.[26]

The oldest daughter Margaret WAGNER died on 19 July 1871 in Mettendorf.[27] She never married and did not have any known children.

Johann and Anna Maria’s only son Friedericus was widowed between 1871-1873 and remarried on 11 January 1873 to Marie THELEN.[27] She gave him three children in three years.

Friedericus’ second wife was pregnant with their third child when his mother Anna Maria KERSCHT died on 21 July 1876 in Mettendorf.[27] Anna Maria left two children, Magdalena, my 2nd great-grandmother who died nearly eight years later on 20 March 1884[26] and Friedericus who died after 1899.[27] It is not know if her daughter Catharina born in 1835 lived to marry.

Sources:
[1] Germany Deaths and Burials, 1582-1958 / Deutschland Tote und Beerdigungen, 1582-1958, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 469172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4Z3-P8Q : accessed 5 November 2015), Joannes Wagner, birth 1804, burial 17 Jun 1858, spouse’s name Anna Maria Kirscht; citing v.3 p.264, reference v.3 p.264;.
[2] Werner Naumann, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei Mettendorf Dekanat Neuerburg, Band 1 A-M Band 2 N-Z (compiled in 1992), p. 291, Family # M1158. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013]. Kerscht-Even.
[3] Thomas A. Pick, compiler; Homepage for Eifel Birth and Marriage Data; (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~pick/ : accessed 5 November 2015) citing Messerich.
[4] Family Book Mettendorf, p. 291-292, Family # M1160. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013]. Kerst-Achen
[5] Ibid., p. 292, Family # M1161. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013]. Kerscht-Mertes.
[6] Germany Deaths and Burials, (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4Z3-KHW : accessed 5 November 2015), Anna Catharina, age 18, burial 23 May 1824, parents Mathias Kerst and  Anna Even; citing v.2 p.210, reference v.2 p.210.
[7] Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4Z3-JLY : accessed 5 November 2015), Henricus, age 0, burial 19 Aug 1809, parents Mathias Kerscht and Anna Even; citing v.1 p.56, reference v.1 p.56.
[8] Familienbuch Mettendorf, p. 292, Family # M1162. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013]. Kerscht-Roth.
[9] Germany Marriages, 1558-1929 / Deutschland, Heiraten, 1558-1929, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 469172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4LQ-SZ6 : accessed 8 November 2015), Henricus Ludewig and Anna Kerscht, 23 Jan 1809, parents of groom Nicolaus Ludewig and Elisabetha Thyves, parents of bride Mathias Kerscht and Anna Even; citing Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
[10] Germany Marriages, FHL microfilm 469172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4LQ-SYW : accessed 6 November 2015), Joannes Fridericus Lochemes and Catharina Kerscht, 19 Sep 1811, parents of groom Leonardus Lochemes and Maria Elisabetha Mueller, parents of bride Mathias Kerscht and Anna Even; citing Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
[11] Thomas A. Pick, compiler; Homepage for Eifel Birth and Marriage Data; (http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~pick/ : accessed 5 November 2015) citing Mettendorf.
[12] Germany Marriages, FHL microfilm 469172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4LQ-3LV : accessed 8 November 2015), Mathias Kerst and Angela Achen, 21 Jan 1818, parents of groom Mathias Kerst and Anna Even, parents of bride Michaelis Achen and Anna Maria Kaufmann; citing Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
[13] Germany Marriages, FHL microfilm 556878. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4JW-JQW : accessed 8 November 2015), Christophorus Kirst and Elisabetha Mertes, 23 Feb 1824, parents of groom Mathiae Kirst and Annae Even, parents of bride Nicolai Mertes and Elisabethae Kruetten; citing Suelm, Rheinland, Preussen, Germany.
[14] Germany Deaths and Burials, (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4Z3-KHW : accessed 5 November 2015), Anna Catharina, age 18, burial 23 May 1824, parents Mathias Kerst and  Anna Even; citing v.2 p.210, reference v.2 p.210.
[15] Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4Z3-KT1 : accessed 5 November 2015), Anna Even, age 60, burial 15 Nov 1828, spouse Mathias Kirsch; citing v.2 p.234, reference v.2 p.234.
[16] Germany Marriages, (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4LQ-7MQ : accessed 5 November 2015), Joannes Wagner and Anna Maria Kirsch, married 22 Feb 1830, parents of groom Mathias Wagner and Maria Catharina Schaemotte, parents of bride Mathias Kirsch and Anna Even; citing Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
[17] Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 / Deutschland Geburten und Taufen, 1558-1898, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 469172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NC1K-YJH : accessed 5 November 2015), Margaretha Wagner, 20 Aug 1830, parents Joannis Wagner and Maria Kirscht; citing Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
[18] Ibid., FHL microfilm 469172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NC1K-BZQ : accessed 5 June 2015), Fridericus Wagner, 12 Feb 1832; citing Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
[19] Ibid., FHL microfilm 469,172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NJ74-3X7 : accessed 5 June 2015), Catharina Wagner, 07 Jul 1835; citing Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
[20] Germany Deaths and Burials, FHL microfilm 469172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4Z3-L6K : accessed 5 November 2015), Mathias Kerscht,  age 88, burial 11 Feb 1841, spouse Anna Even; citing v.3 p.185, reference v.3 p.185.
[21] Germany Births and Baptisms, FHL microfilm 469172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NC12-SQ1 : accessed 5 June 2015), Magdalena Wagner, 22 Mar 1842; citing Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
[22] Germany Deaths and Burials, FHL microfilm 469172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4Z3-LL5 : accessed 5 November 2015), Anna Kerscht, age 54, burial 08 Jan 1843, spouse Henricus Ludwigh; citing v.3 p.197, reference v.3 p.197.
[23] Ibid., FHL microfilm 469172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4Z3-G5T : accessed 6 November 2015), Catharina Kirscht, age 65, 09 Dec 1851, spouse Theodorus Lochemes; citing v.3 p.244, reference v.3 p.244.
[24] Germany Marriages, FHL microfilm 469172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4LQ-CVD : accessed 5 November 2015), Fridericus Wagner and Catharina Schmitt, 09 Mar 1857; citing Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
[25] Germany Deaths and Burials, FHL microfilm 469172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4Z3-P8Q : accessed 5 November 2015), Joannes Wagner, birth 1804, burial 17 Jun 1858, spouse’s name Anna Maria Kirscht; citing v.3 p.264, reference v.3 p.264;.
[26] Familienbuch Mettendorf, p. 39, Family # M1962. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013]. Pöppelreiter-Wagner.
[27] Alwin Banz, compiler, Stammbaum: Familie Banz, password-protected site (http://www.genealogie-eifel.de : accessed 5 November 2015).

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann “Joannes” WAGNER
Parents: Mathias WAGNER and Anna Katharina SCHACMOTTE
Spouse: Anna Maria KERSCHT
Parents of Spouse: Mathias KERSCHT and Anna EVEN
Whereabouts: Fließem, Messerich, Mettendorf (Germany)
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 3rd great-grandfather

1. Johann “Joannes” WAGNER
2. Magdalena WAGNER
3. Katharina “Catherine” PÖPPELREITER
4. Nicolas WILDINGER
5. Living WILDINGER
6. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.

52 Ancestors: #44 The PÖPPELREITER-GROELINGER Family

Week 44 (October 29 – November 4) – Frightening: Do you have an ancestor who did something frightening or lived through a scary event? Do you have your own ghost story in the family? Now is the perfect time to share!

mettendorf3tinyNo ghost stories in this family from Mettendorf, Germany. In October we visited the Mettendorf cemetery looking for PÖPPELREITER graves and found all of the graves wonderfully cared for in preparation for All Saints Day, the day after Halloween.

What is frightening to me is I don’t have a single document for this family group. All information is from indexed (without images) records at FamilySearch, research done by other genealogists and published in the family books of the towns they lived in, from information found on Alwin Banz’s website (password protected since accessing, request for access to confirm source is pending), and from Thomas A. Pick’s Homepage for Eifel Birth and Marriage Data. As a substitute I have plenty of photos of the area we visited last month.

Theodore PÖPPELREITER of Mettendorf

mettendorftinyMy third great-grandfather Theodore PÖPPELREITER was born on 25 July 1816 in Brimingen and baptized in the Roman Catholic church in the neighboring village of Baustert.[1] He was the son of Johann “Joannes” PÖPPELREITER (1782-1827) and Margaret BOMMES (1791-1860) married on 28 October 1813 in Utscheid near Mettendorf.[2] This unusual surname was also spelled PEPPELREITER, PEPPELREUTER, and PEPELREUTER. Theodore had seven siblings.

  • Lucia (1813-1837) born in 1813 in Glashütte near Utscheid in the Eifel.[2] Lucia died 23 February 1837 in Mettendorf.[3][4] She did not marry.
  • Wilhelm (1814-1815) born in September 1814 in Glashütte.[2] He died 28 June 1815 in Brimingen near Mettendorf.[2]
  • Nicolas (1815- ) born 23 July 1815 in Brimingen.[2] No known marriage or date of death.
  • Theodore born 25 July 1816 in Brimingen[2] and was baptized in Baustert the same day.[1] This is my line.
  • Catherine (1818- ) born 27 December 1818 in Mettendorf.[5] She had an illegitimate son in 1844 who continued the PÖPPELREITER name.
  • Barbara (1821-1886) born on 29 September 1821 in Mettendorf.[3][5] Barbara married Johann Peter SCHNEIDER on 19 January 1850 in Oberweis in the Eifel. She died 24 March 1886 in Oberweis.
  • Matthias (1824-1824) born 8 August 1824 in Mettendorf and died 9 August 1824 in Mettendorf.[3][5]
  • Catherine (1825-1908) born 21 October 1825 in Mettendorf.[3][5] She married Nicolas BLEY (1813-1894) on 13 July 1848 in Echternach, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.[6] Catherine died on 18 November 1908 in Echternach.[7]

Theodore’s father Johann “Joannes” PÖPPELREITER died on 6 June 1827 in Mettendorf[3] leaving his widow Margaretha with six children between the ages of 2 and 14. My great-great-grandfather Theodore was not yet 11 years old.

mettendorf2tinyAt the age of 25 Theodore PÖPPELREITER married his two years older bride Maria Katharina GROELINGER on 20 January 1842 in Mettendorf.[8] He was a sevant, or Dienstknecht, in Nusbaum and she was a servant, or Dienstmagd, in Mettendorf.[2]

Maria Katharina GROELINGER of Holsthum

On the road from Ferschweiler down to Holsthum we found this lookout point.

holsthum2holsthum3holsthum4holsthum1Johann “Joannes” GROELINGER (1766-1840) married Anna Maria Benedikta MERGEN (1769-1829) on 24 March 1798 in Schwankweiler.[9] They were both born in Holsthum where they raised their family of eleven children. Nine of their children married.

  • Peter (1799-1861) born 10 January 1799 in Holsthum.[9] Peter married Margaretha PROST on 1 March 1829 in Biersdorf. He died on 26 November 1861 in Biersdorf.
  • Theodor (1800-1871) born 17 November 1800 in Holsthum.[9] Theodor married Margarethe WALLENBORN (1807-1881) on 25 June 1831 in Biersdorf. He died on 8 October 1871 in Schwankweiler.
  • Maria (1803-1841) born 14 October 1803 in Holsthum.[9] Maria married Ludwig GERMAN before 1827. She died 30 March 1841 in Menningen in the  Eifel.
  • Maria Catherina (1804- ) born 28 February 1804 in Holsthum.[9]
  • Susanna (1807-1875) born 1 August 1807 in Holsthum.[9] Susanna married Johann JÜNGELS (1805-1862) on 23 October 1843 in Wißmannsdorf in the Eifel. She died 2 January 1875 and was buried two days later in Wißmannsdorf.
  • Magdalena (1809- ) born 20 August 1809 in Holsthum.[9] Magdalena married Johann PHILIPP (1815-1853) on 19 January 1839 in Schwankweiler.
  • Elizabeth (1812-1894) born 17 April 1812 in Holsthum.[9] Elizabeth married Mathias SCHMITZ (1810-1879) on 13 January 1845 in Altscheid. She died 12 October 1894 in Koosbüsch and was buried three days later in Wißmannsdorf.
  • Maria Katharina born 2 June 1814 in Holsthum.[9] This is my line.
  • Wilhelm (1817- ) born 3 February 1817 in Holsthum.[9]
  • Johann (1818-1896) born 18 August 1818 in Holsthum.[9] Johann married Catharina BURES on 5 January 1850 in Biersdorf. He died 26 August 1896 in Biersdorf and was buried there on 29 Aug 1896.
  • Gerardus (1821- ) born 2 May 1821 in Schankweiler.[9] He may have used a different spelling for the surname: GRELINGER.

Maria Katharina’s mother Anna Maria Benedikta MERGEN died 6 February 1829 in Holsthum.[9] Her father Johann “Joannes” GROELINGER died on 11 December 1840 in Biersdorf.[9] They did not live long enough to see their daughter Maria Katharina marry Theodore PÖPPELREITER in 1842.[8]

Children of Theodore and Maria Katharina

Theodore and Maria Katharina raised their family in Mettendorf. They had five known children, one of whom died before her first birthday. The two oldest sons married and continued the line. It is unknown if the third son, also named Mathias, and the youngest daughter married.

  • Ch 1: Mathias (1843-1891) born 22 June 1843 and baptized 23 June 1843, both in Mettendorf.[8] His date of death unknown and after 1891.
  • Ch 2: Johann “Joannes” (1847- ) born 13 December 1847 and baptized 14 December 1847, both in Mettendorf.[8] His date of death unknown and after 1891.
  • Ch 3: Mathias (1850- ) born 19 January 1850 and baptized 19 January 1850, both in Mettendorf.[8] His date of death unknown.
  • Ch 4: Katharina (1852-1853) born and baptized 10 April 1852, both in Mettendorf. She died 16 February 1853 in Mettendorf.[8]
  • Ch 5: Katharina (1854- ) born 18 September 1854 in Mettendorf.[8] Her date of death unknown.

Theodore’s mother Margaret BOMMES died on 5 February 1860 in Mettendorf.[3] At the tim eof her death her grandchildren through her son Theodore were between the ages of 5 and 16.

The oldest son in the family, Mathias PÖPPELREITER married Magdalena WAGNER (1842-1884) on 18 November 1868 in Mettendorf.[10] They gave Theodore and Maria Katharina five grandchildren (Theodore 1870, Johann 1873, Katharina 1874, and twins Mathias and Gertrude Marie 1876) before Maria Katharina GROELINGER died on 27 January 1877 in Schankweiler.[9]

gravemarkerWhen we walked through the cemetery of Mettendorf we found the family grave of the grandson Mathias. From the engravings on the marker he married a lady named Antoinette and they had at least four sons who are buried with him: Mathias b. 1906, Maternus b. 1911, Jakob b. 1916, and Wilhelm b. 1919. Maria (1921-2012) could have been a daughter or daughter-in-law through Jakob or Maternus.

After the mother’s death, the second son Johann “Joannes” PÖPPELREITER married Margaretha COLBET (1849- ) on 23 January 1878 in Mettendorf.[11]

In 1884 the oldest son Mathias was widowed with five children, the youngest not yet two years old. He remarried on 20 January 1885, his parents’ 43rd wedding anniversary, in Mettendorf to Katharina JUTZ (1847-?).[12]

Six years later the father of this family, Theodore PÖPPELREITER, died on 2 May 1891 in Mettendorf.[8]

Sources:
[1] Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 / Deutschland Geburten und Taufen, 1558-1898, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 531308. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NPNR-SZG : accessed 4 November 2015), Theodorus Poppelreuter, baptized 25 Jul 1816, parents Joannis Poppelreuter and Margarethae Bommes; citing Roemisch-Katholische, Baustert, Rheinland, Prussia.
[2] Alwin Banz’s website
[3] Werner Naumann, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei Mettendorf Dekanat Neuerburg, Band 1 A-M Band 2 N-Z (compiled in 1992), p. 38, Family # M1958. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013]. Pöppelreiter-Bommes.
[4] Germany Deaths and Burials, 1582-1958 / Deutschland Tote und Beerdigungen, 1582-1958, (index), <FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 469172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4Z3-LMC : accessed 4 November 2015), Lucia Poeppelreiter, died 23 Feb 1837, age 24, parents Joannis Poeppelreiter and Margaretha Bommes; citing v.3 p.164, reference v.3 p.164.
[5] Thomas A. Pick, compiler, Homepage for Eifel Birth and Marriage Data, online http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~pick/. Catherine, born 27 Dec 1818, parents Joannes Poppelreiter and Margaret Bommes, citing Mettendorf as place of birth.
[6] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Echternach > Mariages 1809 > image 873 of 1462. 1848 Marriage Record No. 20. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11670-175616-83?cc=1709358 : accessed 4 November 2015).
[7] Ibid., Echternach > Mariages 1906-1923 Décès 1895-1912 > image 584 of 675. 1908 Death Record No. 66. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32043-12126-76?cc=1709358&wc=9RTB-6YZ:129623201,130153902 : accessed 12 January 2015).
[8] Familienbuch Mettendorf, p. 38, Family # M1959. Pöppelreiter-Groelinger.
[9] Familienbuch Schankweiler, p. 60, Family # H370. Archiv Peter Daus; accessed 5 May 2013. Groelinger-Mergen.
[10] Familienbuch Mettendorf, p. 39, Family # M1962. Pöppelreiter-Wagner.
[11] Familienbuch Mettendorf, p.. 39, Family # M1963. Pöppelreiter-Colbet.
[12] Familienbuch Mettendorf, p. 39, Family #  M1964. Pöppelreiter-Jutz.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Theodore PÖPPELREITER
Parents: Johann “Joannes” PÖPPELREITER and Margaret BOMMES
Spouse: Maria Katharina GROELINGER
Parents of Spouse: Johann “Joannes” GROELINGER and Anna Maria Benedikta MERGEN
Whereabouts: Mettendorf and Holsthum in the Eifel, Rheinland, Germany
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 3rd great-grandfather

1. Theodore PÖPPELREITER
2. Mathias PÖPPELREITER
3. Katharina “Catherine” PÖPPELREITER
4. Nicolas WILDINGER
5. Living WILDINGER
6. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.

52 Ancestors: #23 A June Wedding in 1901

Week 23 (June 4-10) – Wedding: June is time for weddings. Write about a June bride in your family or highlight a favorite wedding photo. Maybe there’s a serial marry-er in the family — that could be a fun post!

A June Wedding in 1901

1901marriageMy great-grandparents Catherine PÖPPELREITER and Johann WILDINGER were married in Ernzen, Germany, on 4 June 1901.[1] Instead of a wedding photograph, my mother has this tag which was attached to a bag of wedding favors, most likely dragées, and given to family and friends in memory of the wedding. Catherine and Johann were featured in my 52 Ancestors: #9 Close to Home and Close to My Heart.

The Wildinger-Pöppelreiter Family (ca. 1909). From left to right: mother Catherine Pöppelreiter, daughter Marie, son Jean-Pierre, and father Johann Wildinger. The little boy in front of Marie and Jean-Pierre is their son Nicolas, my maternal grandfather.

Catherine was the daughter of Mathias PÖPPELREITER and his first wife Magdalena WAGNER. Her marriage is the only one I know of for the children of Mathias PÖPPELREITER and his two wives.

The PÖPPELREITER-WAGNER Family 1868-1884

Mathias PÖPPELREITER was born on 22 June 1843[2] and baptized on 23 June 1843[3] in Mettendorf, Rhineland, Germany. His parents were Theodore PÖPPELREITER and Maria Katharina GROELINGER.[2]

M1962
Werner Naumann, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei Mettendorf Dekanat Neuerburg, Band 1 A-M Band 2 N-Z (compiled in 1992), Band 2, p. 39, family no. M 1962. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
Mathias married first Magdalena WAGNER on 18 November 1868 in Mettendorf.[4] In the Mettendorf Family Book (above) the compiler included the church register (KB) number, page number, and record number for easy access to the marriage record which would be located in the archives of the diocese in Trier.

Magdalena was born 21 Mar 1842[5] in Mettendorf to Johann WAGNER (some records show the surname spelled WAGNER) and Anna Maria KERSCHT. She was baptized on 22 March 1942 in Mettendorf.[6]

Mathias and Magdalena had eight known children in a dozen years.

  • Theodore b. 18 Sep 1870 d. 1 Dec 1879 § [4]
  • Johann “Joannes” b. 23 Jan 1873 [4]
  • Katharina “Catherine” b. 16 September 1874 [4] d. 4 September 1950 [7], [8]
  • Mathias b. 17 March 1876 [4]
  • Gertrude Marie b. 17 March 1876 d. 7 March 1877 § [4]
  • Margaretha b. 27 May 1878 d. 22 October 1893 § [4]
  • Katharina b. 19 January 1880 d. 19 May 1882 § [4]
  • Maria b. 3 May 1882 d. 3 May 1890 § [4]

All of the above children were born in Mettendorf. The place of death of the children who died young (§ = symbol I use for the end of a line in my database) was also Mettendorf. It is not known if sons Johann and Mathias married and had children. Catherine, child #3, is the only child of this union known to have married and have children.

Magdalena died 20 March 1884[4] in Mettendorf leaving Johann 11, Catherine 9, Mathias 8, Margaretha 5 and Maria nearly 2 without a mother.

The PÖPPELREITER-JUTZ Family 1885-aft. 1892

Mathias PÖPPELREITER had been widowed exactly 10 months when he married Katharina JUTZ on 20 January 1885[9] in Mettendorf. Katharina was born 26 January 1847 in Sinspelt, a neighboring village of Mettendorf. Although Katharina was close to 40 years old when Mathias married her, she gave him three children.

  • Regina b. 11 July 1887 d. aft. 17 July 1942 [9]
  • Anna Maria b. 11 July 1889 [9]
  • Georg b. 28 June 1891 d. 5 November 1892 § [9]

M1964
Werner Naumann, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei Mettendorf Dekanat Neuerburg, Band 1 A-M Band 2 N-Z (compiled in 1992), Band 2 p. 39 family no. M 1964. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
As with Mathias’ first family, all of these children were born in Mettendorf. Little Georg died in Mettendorf at the age of 16 months.[9]

Mathias and Katharina’s daughter Regina wrote to her half-sister Catherine’s family in Luxembourg during World War II given them genealogy information on the PÖPPELREITER family. The letter survived the war and was saved by Catherine’s daughter Marie and later passed on to my mother, her godchild. This letter was transcribed and translated in my 52 Ancestors: #9 Close to Home and Close to My Heart.

Where will I find the original records?

Werner Naumann who compiled the Mettendorf Family Book used the church registers (Kirchenbuch = KB) 1 through 13. KB 12 has marriages from 1860 to after 1900 and KB 13 has births and deaths from 1860 to after 1900. A 1999 version of Naumann’s compilation gives the location of the church registers in the front matter of the book. KB 1 through 11 are kept in the Diocese Archives in Trier and KB 12 and 13 were in the archives of the parish in Mettendorf. For the protection of privacy, records are not made available to the public for a certain amount of years from the date of the record. Baptismal records: 120 years; marriage records: 100 years; and death records: 40 years. Complete volumes of the death registers may only be viewed in their entirety 100 years after the last entry made. Information about deaths may be requested on an individual basis per the 40 years rule.

Dates of death for Mathias PÖPPELREITER and his 2nd wife Katharina JUTZ were not listed in the 1992 compilation. They most likely died after 1892 as Mr. Naumann would have only had access to death records up to 1892 when he compiled his book. For the same reason, records of marriages of Mathias’ children were not available to the public. It is only due to the tag saved from their wedding favors and the family book for Ernzen[1] that I have the date of marriage for Mathias and Magdalena’s daughter Catherine.

To find the missing documentation I will have to visit the Mettendorf parish archives and/or the diocese archives in Trier. When I take the trip to the Rhineland Archives in Koblenz later this month with my genealogy society Luxracines, I might be able to view the civil records for this family if someone in my group ordered the BMD records for Mettendorf. I ordered only Ernzen and Ferschweiler and would gladly share time with someone interested in these villages. Wouldn’t it be fun to work with another researcher on the same village? One can always hope and, as they say, two heads are always better than one.

Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner of Kordel, compiler, Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 (compiled in 2000), p. 245-246, family #867. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[2] Werner Naumann, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei Mettendorf Dekanat Neuerburg, Band 1 A-M Band 2 N-Z (compiled in 1992), Band 2, p. 38, family no. M 1959. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[3] “Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898”, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 469,172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NC12-SXT : accessed 2 June 2015), Mathias Poeppelreiter, 23 Jun 1843; citing Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
[4] Mettendorf Family Book, Band 2, p. 39, family no. M 1962. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[5] Mettendorf Family Book, Band 2, p. unknown, family no. M 3013. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[6] Germany Births and Baptisms, FHL microfilm 469,172. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NC12-SQ1 : accessed 5 June 2015), Magdalena Wagner, 22 Mar 1842; citing Mettendorf, Rheinland, Preußen, Germany.
[7] 1950 Death Record No., photocopy of original page in the death register at the records office at the city hall in Echternach obtained 10 July 1996.
[8] Luxembourger Wort, digitized by Bibliothèque nationale de Luxembourg; online http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu/webclient/DeliveryManager?application=DIRECTLINK&custom_att_2=simple_viewer&pid=833934&search_terms=catherine%20wildinger#panel:pp|issue:833934|article:DTL387|query:catherine wildinger
[9] Mettendorf Family Book, Band 2 p. 39 family no. M 1964. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Mathias PÖPPELREITER
Parents: Theodore PÖPPELREITER and Maria Katharina GROELINGER
Spouse: Magdalena WAGNER(*) and Katharina JUTZ
Parents of spouse(*): Johann WAGNER and Anna Maria KERSCHT
Whereabouts: Mettendorf, Rhineland, Germany
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 2nd great-grandparents

1. Mathias PÖPPELREITER and Magdalena WAGNER
2. Catherine PÖPPELREITER
3. Nicolas WILDINGER
4. Living (Mom) WILDINGER
5. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.

52 Ancestors: #22 A New Beginning for my German Genealogy Research

Week 22 (May 28 – June 3) – Commencement: Countless schools will be having their commencement ceremonies around this time. Think not only about school, but also about commencement meaning “a beginning.”

A New Beginning

Nearly two and a half years ago a visit of an exposition by Luxracines at our local mall was a new beginning for my genealogy research. Soon afterwards I joined Luxracines, a genealogy society in Luxembourg, and was making plans for my first field trip, Luxracines on Tour 2013 Part I. The Luxracines on Tour 2013 (Part II) field trip in May 2013 was a great success.

boat
Roman ship on the Mosel River

Following a cruise of the Mosel River on a Roman ship and lunch at a typical German “Gasthaus” we visited Peter Daus’ private library above the Restaurant Daus in the Haus Daus in Wittlich.

daus
Restaurant Daus in Haus Daus in Wittlich, Germany

The library had about 2000 Familienbücher (family books) for towns in Rheinland-Pfalz, Pfalz and Saarland. Ortsfamilienbücher or Familienbücher are compilations of information extracted from civil and parish registers for all families of a town or village and arranged in alphabetical order. Information on occupations, military service and emigration can also be found in these books.

I pulled the books on the villages my ancestors came from and began taking pictures of the covers/title pages and all entries for surnames that matched mine with my Nikon Coolpix (macro and without flash). Although time was short and work space a bit cramped, I took nearly 120 photos – some (below) came out a bit blurry but still useful for citing sources.

ferschcover
Familienbuch Ferschweiler[1]
The WILDINGER-WEIMANN family was the very first family I looked up. I knew Bernard WILDINGER was born in Ferschweiler and found him in Richard Schaffner’s 1999 compilation Familienbuch Ferschweiler.[1]

ferschweiler
Page 249, entries for families no. 1624 and 1625[1]
My second great-grandfather Bernard WILDINGER is listed under family number 1624 with his wife Maria WEIMANN. Next to Bernard’s name the number <1625.3> links him to family number 1625 (his parents and siblings) in the same book (next entry) and as the 3rd child of the couple.

Abbreviations used in family books:
   geboren / born
~    getauft / christened
+     gestorben / born
bgr or ¨    begraben / buried
oo    Ehe / marriage
o-o     außerehelich / extramarital
S    standesamtlich / civil
   kirchlich / religious
?    fraglich / questionable
   vermutlich / presumably
   errechnet / estimated
NN    Name(n) unbekannt / unknown name
P.    Paten / godparents
Q.    Quelle / source
u.    und / and
zw.    zwischen / between
lu    lutherisch / Lutheran
rk    römisch-katholisch / Roman Catholic

ernzen
Familienbuch Ernzen[2]
Not only were Bernard and Maria listed in Ferschweiler[1] but also in Ernzen[2] where they were married and had their children. These entries helped me to write the following story of this family.

The WILDINGER-WEIMANN Family of Ernzen, Germany

Bernard WILDINGER was born on 7 November 1838 in Ferschweiler to Nikolaus WILDINGER und Catharina SCHRAMEN.[1] He was baptized Bernardus on 9 November 1838 in Sankt Lucia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler.[3]

Bernard married Maria WEIMANN on 25 January 1866 in a civil ceremony [Source: St.A. (Standesamtliche=civil) Heirats-Act Nr. 5] in Bollendorf/Ernzen.[2] They were married on 3 February 1866 (Source: Kirchenbuch 4/152/2)[2] in a religious ceremony in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[4]

Maria WEIMANN was born on 18 June 1839 in Ernzen to Hubert WEIMANN and Elisabeth WELTER.[2] She was baptized on 19 June 1839 in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[5] Her godparents were Maria WELTER and Anton PROMMENSCHENKEL, both of Ernzen.[2]

Bernard and Maria had eight known children:

  1. Hubert was born on 23 December 1866 in Ernzen. After Christmas, on St. Stephen’s Day, 26 December 1866 he was baptized in the catholic church. His godparents were Hubert WEIMANN from Ernzen and Kath. SCHRAMEN from Ferschweiler. He died at nine months on 20 September 1867 and was buried two days later in Ernzen.[2]
  2. Peter was born 19 October 1868 in Ernzen.[2] He was baptized on 21 October 1868 in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[6] His godfather was Peter WILDINGER. Peter did not marry and died at the age of 31 years on 11 May 1899 in Ernzen.[2]
  3. Elise was born unknown and died 14 May 1870 in Ernzen.[2]
  4. Peter was born 7 August 1871 in Ernzen. He was baptized 8 August 1871 in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen[7] in the presence of his godparents Peter STEIL and Marg. DEUTSCH. He was deaf and dumb (taubstumm), never married and died in 1952 in Ernzen.[2]
  5. Johann was born on 25 February 1874 in Ernzen. He was baptized in the catholic church in the presence of his godparents Johann WEIMANN and Elis. WILDINGER. He was a mason (Maurer), married Katharina PÖPPELREITER on 16 September 1874 in Mettendorf where the family moved in 1904.[2] Johann and Katharina were my great-grandparents.

    wildinger
    My great-grandfather, Johann “Jean” WILDINGER 1874-1924
  6. Nikolaus was born 3 May 1876 in Ernzen. He was baptized in the catholic church in the presence of his godparents Nik. ROOS and Elis. SCHRAMEN. He died in 1948 in Ernzen.[2]
  7. Anna Maria was born 25 November 1878 in Ernzen and was baptized in the catholic church. She married Michael RAIER, an ironworker (Hüttenarbeiter) from Bollendorf on 3 September 1907.[2]
  8. Bernhard was born on 19 June 1881 in Ernzen. He was baptized in the catholic church in the presence of his godparents Bernard SCHRAMEN and Kath. HANSEN. He married Marg. HANSEN on 30 January 1908. His wife was born 20 May 1888 and died in 1915. Bernhard and his family lived in Ernzen and had six children between 1908-1921.[2]

Bernard WILDINGER was a stonemason (Steinhauer). He died at the age of 55 years in Ernzen on 14 October 1893 in Ernzen.[2] His wife Maria was a widow for 22 years before dying on 2 September 1915 in Ernzen.[2]

The Next Step

Although Mr. Schaffner has facilitated my research of this family this is only the beginning for German families. I still need to obtain the records he used for his compilations. The next step is to visit the Rhineland Archives (Landeshauptarchivs) in Koblenz where I hopefully will be able to access the original or digital copies of the church and civil records.

Thanks to my Luxracines membership I’ll be making the trip to Koblenz, Germany, to visit the archives of Rhineland on June 25th. When I registered to participate on this trip I had to give advance notice of the records I’m interested in seeing – birth, marriage, and death records for Ernzen and Ferschweiler for the years (range) the WILDINGER-WEIMANN and the WILDINGER-SCHRAMEN families lived in those towns.

The original documents ordered by researchers are made available for viewing four times a day. The information from the documents may be copied (transcribed) or the page(s) can be scanned on their in-house scanner and saved to a USB flash drive. The use of digital cameras is not permitted.

I am looking forward to this trip to the Landeshauptarchivs in Koblenz and will definitely be blogging about it!

Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 1 der Pfarrei Sancta Lucia Ferschweiler 1680-1899, mit: Diesburgerhof (ab 1803) und L(a)eisenhof (ab1830) (compiled in 1999), p. 349, family #1624. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[2] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 (compiled in 2000), p. 245-246, family #867. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[3] “Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898”, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 463,565. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NDZ1-H61 : accessed 23 February 2015), Bernardus Wildinger; citing Sankt Lucia Katholisch, Ferschweiler, Rheinland, Prussia.
[4] “Deutschland, Heiraten, 1558-1929,”, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462,714. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JH8P-DXT : accessed 23 February 2015), Bernardus Weldinger and Maria Weimann, 03 Feb 1866; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[5] “Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898”, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462,714. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NFD4-54C : accessed 23 February 2015), Maria Weiman, 19 Jun 1839; citing Sankt Lucia Katholisch, Ferschweiler, Rheinland, Prussia.
[6] Ibid, (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N2CB-2JL : accessed 23 February 2015), Peter Wildinger, 21 Oct 1868; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[7] Ibid, (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NFD4-V9B : accessed 23 February 2015), Petrus Wildinger, 08 Aug 1871; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Bernard WILDINGER
Parents: Nicolas WILDINGER and Catherina SCHRAMEN
Spouse: Maria WEIMANN
Parents of spouse: Hubert WEIMANN and Elisabeth WELTER
Whereabouts: Ferschweiler and Ernzen, Germany
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 2nd great-grandparents

1. Bernard WILDINGER and Maria WEIMANN
2. Johann “Jean” WILDINGER
3. Nicolas WILDINGER
4. Living WILDINGER
5. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.