The Ancestors: Isaac WISEMAN (1738-1818) and Elizabeth DAVIS (1738-1807)

This was a hard piece to write. A month ago, after spending weeks gathering and reviewing all the information I had on these ancestors, I began writing this post. While drafting the post I kept finding other things to do. I went back and forth considering how I should write it. I’m now at the point that I just want to get it out of the way by publishing it as is.

Isaac WISEMAN (1738-1818) and Elizabeth DAVIS (1738-1807) were my 5th great-grandparents and the parents of my 4th great-grandmother Rachel WISEMAN (1769-bet. 1821-1824) who married Frederick HONAKER (1757-1824).

When I was new to genealogy research, I trusted the information I found and did not challenge it. As I began to do my own research, I questioned work done by others. In some cases, I made an effort to prove or disprove their research. I’m especially fond of working on my female lines but the WISEMAN family has always been put on the back burner.

For the WISEMAN line, I  attempted to locate evidence of the parents, siblings, husband, and children of my 4th great-grandmother Rachel WISEMAN and wrote about my findings in my 2014 post 52 Ancestors: #33 Rachel WISEMAN 1769-bet. 1821-1824.

The post was written during my first year of blogging. I didn’t include source citations. Links to online documents were used throughout the post but I doubt many readers clicked on them to view the records.  When I revisited my post and research I added 28 citations to make it easier for the reader or researcher to review the sources. [Did I mention the other things I’ve been doing?] 

Rachel’s story includes the names of all of her siblings as well as their spouses’ names and their dates of marriage. I’ve pondered how to write about Rachel’s parents Isaac and Elizabeth. Should I start from scratch or should I build on what has already been published?

Taking the middle road

I’ve decided to take the middle road which led me to work done by dedicated historians and genealogists of the WISEMAN family.

The Wiseman Family Association was first organized in 1908 by Dr. B. W. S. WISEMAN, compiler and author of a WISEMAN genealogy.1 Benjamin Winfield Scott WISEMAN was a great-grandson of Isaac WISEMAN 1738 through his son Samuel (1771-1861). WISEMAN descendants and members of the association have continued to update the WISEMAN family tree originally created from information in B.W.S.’s book. Their website was initiated on 22 August 2003 and appears to have been last updated in 2017, likely before Ancestry took down the RootsWeb site. I don’t know if more recent additions to the family tree are available online.

B.W.S. WISEMAN, in his 1908 publication, acknowledged the work of his second cousin C.M.L. WISEMAN who published in 1902. B.W.S. gives a more detailed genealogy of most of the sons of Isaac WISEMAN 1738. Neither of the authors had any biographical information on the four daughters of Isaac other than their married names.

Charles Milton Lewis WISEMAN of the 1902 publication was a great-grandson of Isaac WISEMAN 1738 through his son Rev. John WISEMAN (1760-1842). He wrote the following:

Brief Sketch of the Wiseman Family

My grandfather, Rev. John Wiseman was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, before the War of the Revolution; indeed, was old enough and served in that war, and was in the memorable winter quarters at Valley Forge with Washington. His father, Isaac Wiseman, moved from Berks county, Pennsylvania, with a large family of sons and daughters to Rockingham county, Virginia, soon after the war, and there my grandfather married Sarah Green, one of another large family. From that county they moved to Monroe county, Virginia, where my father, Philip S. Wiseman, was born. Of the descendants of Isaac Wiseman and James Green some few remained in Virginia, others moved to Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Arkansas and Louisiana. The greater number moved to Ohio and Kentucky. The descendants of Isaac Wiseman alone must exceed 1,000 persons in number. The names of father’s uncles were William, Joseph, Isaac, Abner, Jacob and Samuel. Samuel died near New Salem at 90 years of age; Jacob and Abner in Kentucky, William and Joseph in Virginia, and Isaac near Gallipolis, Ohio. One of his aunts married a Blanton, who moved to Kentucky, and one a Honiker, who died in Virginia. I have been in the graveyard in Virginia, near Union, Monroe county, where Isaac Wiseman and wife are buried, and where father’s sister and brother are buried, and I have also been in the church near by, where they all attended Methodist church, and where my grandfather often preached. It is a lovely spot, with a hight range of mountains in full view for more than twenty miles.2

A bit further into the sketch of his family, C.M.L. wrote:

Rev. John Wiseman was commissioned a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the year 1785, by the first American Bishop of that church, Francis Asbury. The commission, in the Bishop’s own writing, is in the possession of the late Judge Wiseman’s widow at New Salem.3

I used the document he mentioned as the background of the featured image of this post. Immediately following this statement, the author listed names and dates for his line down from Isaac beginning with this list of the children of Isaac WISEMAN 1738:

FAMILY RECORD OF ISAAC WISEMAN, OF VIRGINIA.

Joseph Wiseman, born March 29th 1759.
John Wiseman, born August 18th, 1760.
Sarah Wiseman, born July 17th, 1762.
Isaac Wiseman, born June 19th, 1764.
Jacob Wiseman, born January 12th, 1767.
Rachael Wiseman, born March 1st, 1769.
Samuel Wiseman, born February 15th, 1771.
Abner Wiseman, born 1772.
Betsey Wiseman, born 1774.
Peggy Wiseman, born 1777.
William Wiseman, born 1779.

Rachael is my 4th great-grandmother and all the rest are my 4th great-grand uncles and 4th great-grand aunts. Does a WISEMAN family Bible still exist today with the dates found in this derivative source?

The many men named Isaac WISEMAN

According to Robert N. WISEMAN, a historian of the Wiseman Family Association, the Isaac WISEMAN situation gets a bit confusing when it comes to how Isaac WISEMAN’s name is seen in family genealogies. Shortly after B.W.S. published his book in 1908 he discovered that Isaac WISEMAN (1738-1818) who he considered “Isaac I” had a father whose name was also Isaac. [I believe I’ve found how he made the discovery and will discuss this in a moment.] The Wiseman Family Association decided to dub the father “Isaac Sr.”4 One of Robert’s lines goes through Isaac Sr., Isaac I, Isaac II, Isaac III.

Personally, I believe it would be more helpful to consider the men by the year they were born as no records are to be found with the suffixes I, II, or III. I’ve opted to refer to my 5th great-grandfather as Isaac WISEMAN 1738 instead of Isaac I. His father will be considered Isaac the elder or Isaac Sr. as no year of birth is known.

As noted previously, historians of the Wiseman Family Association have been researching the family and sharing their information. The research notes and part of The Story of a Wiseman by Robert Dean WISEMAN (1933-2015) can be found here: Bob Wiseman Research. He included different steps taken to gather information and prove events as well as marking unproven or questionable information as such. Mr. Wiseman and the researchers he worked with spent years putting the information together. It would take a lifetime to check and follow-up on the research.

Many entries on tax lists for Berks County for Isaac Wiseman are listed by year and township in Bob’s research. I recently found the Tax Lists, 1752-1856 for Berks County, Pennsylvania are available online at FamilySearch. They are not indexed and browse-only. With the years and townships given in Robert D. Wiseman’s research notes, I may be able to locate some of these. A to-do item for a later date as it should be thorough and not restricted to locating the records already found. What if something important to the timeline has been missed?

Isaac WISEMAN (1738-1818) and Elizabeth DAVIS (1738-1807)

Isaac’s oldest son Joseph (1759-1836) applied for a pension in 1832 for his service during the Revolutionary War.5 He stated he “was born in the year 1759 in the County of Berks and State of Pennsylvania, as he has read the record of it in his Father’s bible, from which he recorded it in his own bible which is now in his possession.” After his death in 1836 and his widow’s death in 1842, his son Samuel applied for pension money on behalf of himself and his surviving siblings in 1847. He submitted his father’s family record with the dates of birth and date for my 5th great-grandparents Elizabeth DAVIS and Isaac WISEMAN.

In Joseph’s hand, as copied from his father Isaac’s Bible, “Elisabeth Wiseman daughter to Samuel Davis was born August 26th 1738 and Decst (deceased) July 19th 1807.

Pages of Joseph Wiseman’s family Bible found in his Revolutionary War Pension Application file.

Also, “Isaac Wiseman son to Isaac and Marey Wiseman was born August 18, 1738 and Decest (deceased) May the 3 in 1818.

Pages of Joseph Wiseman’s family Bible found in his Revolutionary War Pension Application file.

The above images are only two of the five images from the family Bible included in the file. The pension file also includes correspondence dated 1911 from B.W.S. WISEMAN requesting copies of the entire file. As Joseph’s family record gives the names of the parents of Elizabeth and Isaac, I believe this is the source that led to B.W.S.’s discovery that Isaac WISEMAN 1738’s father was also an Isaac.

Samuel DAVIS, father-in-law of Isaac 1738

Only the name of Elizabeth’s father is known from the family record submitted by his grandson Samuel (son of Joseph). Even with the maiden name, a marriage record of Isaac WISEMAN and Elizabeth DAVIS has not been found. It is assumed they married before the birth of their oldest child in 1759.

Isaac and Mary WISEMAN, parents of Isaac 1738

The maiden name of Isaac 1738’s mother Mary is unproven although some genealogists report it to be MARSHALL. While writing this, I have pruned the tree, removing John MARSHALL as the father of Mary and now showing her name as Mary _____.

Isaac 1738’s father Isaac, according to an old family traditional story, was born aboard a ship en route to America. Two dates are often noted: 1699 and about 1706. The first – 1699 – is from the theory that the father of Isaac the elder came over with William Penn on the Canterbury Merchant in 1699. No known passenger list exists for the ship. The second – about 1706 – is from the theory that Isaac the elder was the son of Thomas WISEMAN first seen in Germantown, Philadelphia County in 1706 when he purchased land from Matthias Van Bebber. Professional genealogists were hired by the Wiseman Family Association to obtain records but neither theory has been proven.

Isaac WISEMAN, the father of Isaac 1738, left Berks County around 1768 and was first seen on a tax list in Rowan County, North Carolina, in 1772.6 He bought land in Rowan County in 1778 and left it to his heirs in his will in 1779.7,8 His widow Mary left a will written 28 December 1790 and proven 10 November 17919,10 as well as an inventory dated February 1792.11 Although Isaac and Mary named some of their children in their wills, they did not mention Isaac.

The daughters of Isaac WISEMAN 1738 and Elizabeth DAVIS

Isaac and Elizabeth were the parents of eleven children born between 1759 and 1779. Much is known of their seven sons’ lines as they were looked into by the great-grandsons. Neither of the authors of the early genealogies of the WISEMAN family knew much of the four daughters.

From the brief sketch of the WISEMAN family it is knows that the family was in Berks County, Pennsylvania, and then moved to Rockbridge County, Virginia. Sarah, the oldest, married in Rockbridge County, Virginia, in 1782 where she and her husband James BARLEY raised their children.12

The next oldest daughter, Rachel also married in Rockbridge County. She married Frederick HONAKER in 1795.13 It was a second marriage for Frederick and Rachel brought a 10-year-old daughter into the marriage. Rachel and Frederick went with her parents and siblings to Greenbrier County around 1797-1798. They settled in the area that would become Monroe County in 1799. Rachel and Frederick raised their family in Monroe and are buried in the Rehoboth Church Cemetery where her parents are also said to be buried.

Elizabeth married John BLANTON in 1798 in Greenbrier County.14 They went to Kentucky where her brothers Abner and Jacob had also gone.

The youngest daughter Margaret, also known as Peggy, married Bartholomew RAMSEY in 1799 in Monroe County.15,16 They raised their family in Nicholas County and Fayette County when it was formed in 1831.

Now that I know where the information found in so many family trees is coming from, I have a better feel of what I can work on to leave a documented history of my 5th great-grandparents Isaac WISEMAN 1738 and Elizabeth DAVIS.

It would be awesome if someone reading this post would reach out to me with more information, especially on Elizabeth DAVIS during Women’s History Month.

© 2020, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. Dr. Benjamin Winfield Scott Wiseman, Wiseman genealogy and biography, digital images of original, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/library/books/records/item/163120-wiseman-genealogy-and-biography : accessed 12 February 2020), FL52150_TN-1474326, digitized by the Genealogical Society of Utah, 2008 [originally published: Culver, Indiana, 1910] 
  2. C. M. L. Wiseman, The Wiseman Family and the Old Church at New Salem : a brief sketch, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/library/books/records/item/57919-the-wiseman-family-and-the-old-church-at-new-salem-a-brief-sketch : accessed 12 February 2020), FL1103481_TN-76231, digitized by FamilySearch International, 2013, [originally published: Columbus, Ohio : Fred J. Heer, 1902], p. 7-8. 
  3. Ibid., p. 23-24. 
  4. Robert N. Wiseman, Senior Historian of the Wiseman Family Association, comment posted 3 February 2020 in the Nicholas County WV Genealogy group on Facebook and personal message conversation between Robert and Cathy on 24-25 February 2020. 
  5. “Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, 1800-1900,” database and images, Ancestry.com, citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm publication M804, 2,670 rolls. Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, Record Group 15; National Archives, Washington, D.C. Images of the papers in the Revolutionary War file of Joseph Wiseman including images of family bible pages with the names and dates of birth and death of his parents. 
  6. Bob Wiseman Research
  7. “North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998,” index and images, Ancestry, North Carolina County, District and Probate Courts, Wills and estate papers (Rowan County), 1663-1978, North Carolina, Rowan County, Original wills, Verble, Daniel – Zimmerman, Christian, file of Isaac Wiseman. (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 June 2019). 
  8. Ibid., North Carolina, Rowan County, Wills, Vol A-F, 1757-1807, Isaac Wiseman, page 184. (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 June 2019). 
  9. “North Carolina, Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998,” North Carolina, Rowan County, Original wills, Verble, Daniel – Zimmerman, Christian, file of Mary Wiseman. (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 June 2019). 
  10. “North Carolina Probate Records, 1735-1970,” Rowan > Wills, 1781-1791, Vol. B > image 94+95 of 230, Will of Mary Wiseman, pages 179-181. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S7WF-3Q9C-79?cc=1867501&wc=32LR-7M3%3A169928201%2C170967101 : accessed 6 March 2020). 
  11. “North Carolina Estate Files, 1663-1979,” database with images, FamilySearch, citing State Archives, Raleigh., Rowan County > W > Wiseman, Mary (1792) > image 2 of 3. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9PPC-9MZF?cc=1911121&wc=Q6W1-9GT%3A184173301%2C183410401%2C198415701 : accessed 6 March 2020). 
  12. Dodd,Jordan,  Virginia, Marriages, 1660-1800, [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1997. Original data: Electronic transcription of marriage records held by the individual counties in Virginia. 
  13. Ibid. 
  14. West Virginia Vital Research Records Project (database and images), West Virginia Division of Culture and History (A collaborative venture between the West Virginia State Archives and the Genealogical Society of Utah to place vital records online via the West Virginia Archives and History Web site accessible at http://www.wvculture.org/vrr), West Virginia, Greenbrier, Jno. Blanton and Eliza. 1797/9 (1798), left page, last entry. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=10970066&Type=Marriage : accessed 12 August 2014). 
  15. Ibid., Monroe County, 1799, Margaret Wiseman and Bartholomey Ramsey. 1799 Marriage Bond. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11370451&Type=Marriage : accessed 12 August 2014). 
  16. Ibid., Monroe County, 22 October 1799, Margaret Wiseman and Bartholomey Ramsey. 1799 Marriage Record. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11369649&Type=Marriage : accessed 12 August 2014). 

In Memory of Sgt. Warren Earl Zickafoose (1922-1945) of Fayette County, West Virginia

Warren Earl ZICKAFOOSE was born 24 February 1922 in Nallen, Fayette County, West Virginia, to Joseph Elmer ZICKAFOOSE and Eva Myrtle HEDRICK. He was the fourth of eight children.

Warren Earl ZICKAFOOSE; World War II Young American Patriots, 1941-1945; Ancestry.com : accessed 28 April 2017

After graduating from Nuttall High School, Warren was an employee of Ford, Bacon, and Davis in Dunbar. On 7 March 1942, he married Pauline Alice RAMSEY, daughter of Jarrett Theodore RAMSEY and Louie Ann CAVENDISH, in Russell, Greenup County, Kentucky.

On 29 December 1942 he entered the U.S. Army and received his training at Camp Hood, Texas; Camp Carson, Colorado; Camp Gruber, Oklahoma; Camp Livingston, Louisiana; and had desert training in California.

Three weeks after he entered the U.S. Army his wife Pauline gave birth to a baby girl.

Sgt. ZICKAFOOSE was attached to Company C of the 811th Tank Destroyer Battalion and was sent to Europe in August 1944 arriving at Cherbourg, France, on 15 September 1944.

Damaged Sherman tank in the museum at The Mardasson Memorial in Bastogne, Belgium.

The battalion moved to Luxembourg in November and participated in the Battle of the Bulge in December. Sgt. ZICKAFOOSE received the Purple Heart Medal for wounds received in action in December 1944.

Into January 1945 the 811th was widely scattered as it was attached to many divisions. In February and March, they supported operations against the Siegfriedstellung (Siegfried Line).

In late March the 811th Tank Destroyer Battalion 811th Tank Destroyer Battalion advanced to the Rhine River crossing it on 30 March.

Every day of World War II, a 3 1/4 by 7-inch Morning Report was issued. These are the events recorded for the first few days of April 1945.

1 April 1945:
Station: WH 2384 Melgerhausen Germany
Organization: C 811th TD Bn (Battalion) FA (Field Artillery) TD (Tank Destroyer)
No change (in personnel)
Record of Events: Left WH Schwarzenborn, Germany enroute to Wh 2384 Melgerhause, Germany. Arrived destination.
4 officers were present for duty.
118 enlisted men were present for duty and 6 were absent.
Clem J. HUX WOJG USA (Warrant Office Junior Grade)

2 April 1945:
Station: WH 2290 Grexhagen, Germany (Guxhagen)
Organization: C 811th TD Bn FA TD
No change (in personnel)
Record of Events: Left WH 2384 Melgerhausen, Germany enroute to WH 2290 Grexhagen Guxhagen, Germany. Arrived destination.
4 officers were present for duty.
118 enlisted men were present for duty and 6 were absent.
Clem J. HUX WOJG USA

3 April 1945:
Station: WH 2290 Guxhagen, Germany
Organization: C 811th TD Bn FA TD
Three men were absent from duty due to sickness: Tec 5 Howard C. Kerns (SN 35692008); Tec 4 Thomas J. Donnelly (SN 32288320), and Pfc Johnny P. Garcia (SN 39286737). All were transferred to Evac Hospital. The first two were non-battle casualties in the line of duty. The third was non-battle casualty, not in the line of duty [acute alcholism (sic)].
4 officers were present for duty.
115 enlisted men were present for duty and 6 were absent.
Clem J. HUX WOJG USA

In early April the 811th Tank Destroyer Battalion supported the 80th Infantry Division when Kassel was captured. Sgt. Warren Earl ZICKAFOOSE was killed in action on 3 April 1945 only a day before Kassel was captured.

4 April 1945:
Station: WH 2699 Crumbach, Germany
Organization: C 811th TD Bn FA TD
Cpl Ernest A. Corrado (SN 35765502) was reduced to Pvt per Special CMO # 1 Headquarters 811th Tank Destroyer effective 31 March 1945.
Record of Events: Left WH 2290 Guxhagen, Germany enroute to WH 2699 Crumbach, Germany. Arrived destination. Distance traveled 6 miles.
4 officers were present for duty.
115 enlisted men were present for duty and 6 were absent.
Clem J. HUX WOJG USA

5 April 1945:
Station: WH 2699 Crumbach, Germany
Organization: C 811th TD Bn FA TD
Pfc Harold W. McNatt (SN 3941540) was promoted to Cpl effective 5 April 1945. Pvt Finis Craft (SN 35426452) was promoted to Tec 5 effective 5 April 1945. Pvt. Thomas J. Heitzman (SN 67134753) change in duty effective 5 April 1945. Pvt. Robert L. Sansbury (SN 35817099) change in duty effective 5 April 1945.
Pvt. Carl W. Rhoades (SN 35240303) and Tec 5 Robert L. Tidwell, both enlisted men, were lightly wounded in action, battle casualties in line of duty on 3 April 1945. The 305th Medical Battalion transferred him to Evac Hospital. He was dropped from assignment effective 27 March 1945.
Pvt. Alex M. Sandler (SN 39422544) was Lightly Injured in Action, battle casualty in line of duty on 3 April 1945. The 305th Med Bn transferred him to Evac Hospital. He was dropped from assignment effective 27 March 1945.
Sgt. Warren E. Zickafoose (SN 35645379) was Killed in Action, battle casualty in line of duty on 3 April 1945.
Record of Events: All casualties occurred in Germany.
4 officers were present for duty.
111 enlisted men were present for duty and 6 were absent.
Clem J. HUX WOJG USA

Mrs. Pauline ZICKAFOOSE was informed by the war department of the death of her husband, Sgt. ZICKAFOOSE in May 1945. She remarried two years later.

Sunday Register (Raleigh Register, Beckley, West Virginia); May 13, 1945 (Ancestry.com)

Sgt. ZICKAFOOSE’s body was returned to American soil in 1948. He was buried in End of the Trail Cemetery in Clintonville on Sunday, 19 December 1948. The service was held by Rev. M. J. Painter and Rev. John Bragg. Military rites were conducted by the Ansted American Legion Post at the grave.

His father applied for a military marker in a month later, on 18 January 1949.

(Ancestry.com : accessed 28 April 2017)
(Ancestry.com : accessed 28 April 2017)

Sgt. Warren Earl ZICKAFOOSE’s name is engraved on the West Virginia Veterans Memorial. As well as the Purple Heart Medal, he received three Battle Stars, a Silver Star (posthumous), and the Presidential Unit Citation.

UPDATE (31 May 2017): More information from the MilitaryTimes Hall of Valor about the Silver Star Medal Sgt. Warren Earl ZICKAFOOSE received posthumously.

Silver Star medal
SILVER STAR Medal

General Orders: Headquarters, 80th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 131 (May 20, 1945)
Action Date: April 4, 1945 (sic, April 3, 1945)
Battalion: 811th Tank Destroyer Battalion
Division: 80th Infantry Division

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Warren E. Zickafoose (ASN: 35645379), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the 811th Tank Destroyer Battalion, 80th Infantry Division in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States on 4 April 1945 in Germany. On that date, while supporting infantry troops in holding Vollmarshausen, Germany, Sergeant Zickafoose, a gun commander of a tank destroyer, observed four enemy tanks approaching the town. Realizing that he was outnumbered he nevertheless elected to move into a firing position to prevent the enemy from overrunning the infantry. By taking up an advantageous position he repelled the attack, although his destroyer received a direct hit which mortally wounded him. The courage, aggressive leadership, and supreme devotion to duty as displayed by Sergeant Zickafoose was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

Warren Earl ZICKAFOOSE was my 4th cousin 2 times removed through our common ancestor, James SIMS (1754-1845) and my 5th cousin 1 time removed through our common ancestors, (the same) James SIMS and his first wife Phebe. His daughter, who is still living, is my aunt by marriage and her four sons are my first cousins.

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

52 Ancestors: #40 Landon S. GOWING Discovered a Fountain of Youth

52ancestors“The challenge: have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor.”

The last quarter begins with entry #40 in Amy Johnson Crow’s Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.

52 Ancestors: #40 Landon S. GOWING Discovered a Fountain of Youth

signature
Signature of Landon S. Gowing on document dated 28 November 1814. Chancery Records online at Library of Virginia: http://www.lva.virginia.gov/chancery/case_detail.asp?CFN=125-1836-012

Landon S. Gowing, my 4th great-grandfather, was the son, likely the second, of Philip GOING and Judith POTTER. There are no actual documents that come right out and say this but I’m quite sure I’m on the right tract.

Philip GOING was born about 1745 or earlier as he was taxable in Goochland County, Virginia, in 1767 and 1769. [1]

The Reverend William Douglas served as a minister of the Church of England in St. James Northam Parish, Goochland County, Virginia, from 1750-1777. In 1756 he began keeping a register book in which he recorded marriages, baptisms, and burials he performed. On page 87 of his register is an entry for the “first” child of Philip GOING and his wife Judith POTTER, a daughter named Molly born 4 March 1770 and baptized 27 May 1770. In the same reference book there is a list of marriages which were not recorded by Rev. Douglas however were “indicated” by entries in the Birth Registry. The date given beside the names of the couple, unless otherwise specified, is the birth date of first child shown in Douglas’ register. Several researchers, who overlooked the notation at the top of the list of marriages, have mistakenly used Molly’s date of birth as her parents’ date of marriage.[2]

It is my belief that Philip GOING and Judith POTTER were married before 1770, most likely not in the same parish as their daughter was baptized.

signaturegoing
December 10, 1785, Amherst, Against assessment bill. Early Virginia Religious Petitions; American Memory Home; The Library of Congress [accessed 6 Oct 2014 online http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/ampage?collId=relpet&fileName=200%5D/254/254page.db&recNum=6&itemLink=P%3Frelpet%3A1%3A.%2Ftemp%2F~ammem_NaOS%3A%3A
It may have been during the years of the American Revolutionary War (19 April 1775-14 January 1784) that Philip moved his family to Amherst County, Virginia. His signature was found on a 1785 petition circulated in Virginia during the Revolutionary War. An image of this document can be found on the website of the Library of Congress. It is part of the “American Memory” Collection of Early Virginia Religious Petitions.

Philip GOING was also found on the tax lists of Amherst County from 1782 until 1807[3].  Amherst was formed in 1761 therefore the GOING family must have moved there from Goochland. By 1807 Nelson County was formed from about half of Amherst County. Philip is then seen on the 1810 and 1820 census of the new county. This time he didn’t move his family as he was living in the area of Amherst that became Nelson County.

tax
Amherst County, Virginia, Personal Property Tax List 1782-1822; Library of Virginia microfilm reels 18 and 19; online http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Amherst.htm

In the earliest tax lists Philip was the only GOING in Amherst until 1793 and 1794 when his son William is mentioned as being the second male over 16 in the household. This would suggest that William was his oldest son. The 1795 to 1798 lists continue to show 2 males over 16 in the household however the name of the second male is not listed. William is not seen again in the tax lists until 1800 which may be an indication of his having left the area for a period of time. Landon, the next son to show up on the tax lists, may be the second male in the 1795 to 1798 households.

1790census
1790 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Amherst [online https://archive.org/stream/headsoffamiliesa00nort#page/48/mode/2up/search/going : accesed 3 OCt 2014]
Aaron appears in 1799-1800 while Samuel appears in 1801 until 1807. No further record of Aaron has been found. As no other GOING/GOWEN/GOWING families were in the area at the time I believe that William, Landon, Aaron, and Samuel are bothers and sons of Philip.

Marriages of females by the same surname during the time period were found for Polly and Milley.

  • Polly GOING married Joseph HARVEY on 18 December 1802 in Amherst County, Virginia. SW (Security/Witness): Philip GOING. Married by John Young.
  • Milley GOWING married Elijah FITZGERALD on 25 March 1806 in Amherst County, Virginia. SW: Saml. GOING (GOWING) and Saml. GARLAND.

This brings the total to 4 sons and 3 daughters, still 4 short of the total white persons (13) seen in the household of Philip GOING in the 1790 census at right.

1799tax
1799 Personal Property Tax List A > VA > Amherst [online http://www.binnsgenealogy.com/VirginiaTaxListCensuses/Amherst/1799PersonalA/06.jpg : accessed 3 Oct 2014]
1799 Personal Property Tax List A
Amherst County, Virginia
Landon Going 1000
Philip Going 1002

My fourth great-grandfather Landon S. GOWING was first seen on a Personal Property Tax List in 1798 therefore I estimate his year of birth at about 1777. This estimate works for the 1820 and 1830 census but Landon stopped growing older once he reached 60! In 1830 and 1840 he was enumerated in the 50-60 age group and in 1850 he was still 60 years old! Did he find a fountain of youth?

Landon S. GOWING married Sally CRISP on 17 January 1803 in Amherst County, Virginia. Philip GOING and Samuel GARLAND were witnesses. The marriage was performed by Wm. CRAWFORD. Landon’s absence in the 1805 to 1807 Amherst tax lists and the 1810 census make me wonder if he may have left the area for a while. His father Philip was the only GOING in the area in 1810. William and Samuel were also missing in 1810 and 1820 and did not show up again in Nelson until 1830. Perhaps Landon went “somewhere” without his wife? I find it strange that Landon and Sally were married about seven years before their first child Emmeline was born, possibly just prior to the 1810 census enumeration. As Landon was not a head of household could he have been in his father’s household in 1810?

1810censusgoing
1810 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Nelson [ancestry.com]
Following the 1810 census two more daughters were born: Martha C. “Martissa” GOWING about 1812 [in Nelson County per 1911 death certificate of a daughter] and my 3rd great-grandmother Clementine M. GOWING about 1814. Before the 1820 census was enumerated Landon went bond on the marriage of his sister-in-law Betsy CRISP to Thomas HARRISON on 10 April 1820.

1820censusgowing
1820 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Nelson [ancestry.com]
1820 U.S. Federal Census
Nelson County, Virginia
Landon S. Gowing
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
Free White Persons – Males – 26 thru 44: 1 (Landon)
Free White Persons – Females – Under 10: 2 (Clementine and Martissa)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 15: 1 (Emmeline)
Free White Persons – Females – 45 and over : 1 (Sally)
Number of Persons – Engaged in Agriculture: 1
Free White Persons – Under 16: 3
Free White Persons – Over 25: 2
Total Free White Persons: 5
Total All Persons – White, Slaves, Colored, Other: 5
Note: No sons listed. Sally and Landon were married 17 yrs at the time of census.

Towards the end of the 1820s Landon’s daughters were courting and marrying:

  • Emmeline GOWING married William Dison LAWHORNE (1811-1880) on 16 June 1828 in Amherst County, Virginia
  • Clementine M. GOWING married Seaton Y. DEMPSEY (1803-1880) on 3 January 1829 in Amherst County, Virginia
1829marriage
1829 Marriage Bond (photocopy courtesy of Geraldine Dempsey Workman)

Landon went bond with Seaton Y. DEMPSEY and signed the 1829 document (above). The signature here is the same as the one seen in the 1814 chancery records (at top).

1830censusgowing
1830 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Amherst [ancestry.com]
In 1830 Landon, his middle daughter Martissa and his wife Sally were living in Amherst County near his son-in-law Seaton Y. DEMPSEY. Landon was in the 50 & under 60, Martissa in the 15 & under 20, and Sally was in the 60 & under 70 age group. As in 1820 the listing is consistent in showing that Sally was older than Landon.

Landon and Sally’s middle daughter Martha C. “Martissa” GOWING married Wyatt F. LILLY (1811-aft. 1880) on 29 May 1833 in Amherst County, Virginia. They moved to Caldwell County, Kentucky, after the births of their three oldest sons and before the 1840 census.

Several batches of chancery records were found concerning the estate of Landon’s father-in-law William CRISP. In one batch it appears that Landon’s wife Sally died before October 1838 [125_1839_006_0019].

In 1840 Landon has a younger woman with three children in his household. His daughters are all accounted for, being with their husbands in their respective households. Did Landon marry again? No marriage record was found and I suspect that the woman was living with him.

1840censusgoing
1840 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Nelson [ancestry.com]
1840 U.S. Federal Census
Nelson County, Virginia
Name: Landon Going
Free White Persons – Males – Under 5: 1 (poss. son)
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 14: 1 (poss. Celia’s son Shelton Preston Ramsey)
Free White Persons – Males – 50 thru 59: 1 (Landon)
Free White Persons – Females – Under 5: 1 (poss. Celia’s daughter Sophia Ramsey)
Free White Persons – Females – 40 thru 49: 1 (poss. Celia seen in 1850)
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 1
Free White Persons – Under 20: 3
Free White Persons – 20 thru 49: 1
Total Free White Persons: 5
Total All Persons – Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 5

1850censusgoing1
1850 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Nelson [ancestry.com]
1850 U.S. Federal Census
Nelson County, Virginia
Sheet 267A
HH #702-702
Landon Going M 60 Virginia (sic, age should be abt. 73)
Celia Going F 50 Virginia
Sophia Going F 17 (sic) Virginia

Landon must have stopped drinking and bathing in his fountain of youth as he aged rapidly between 1850 and 1853. Wayne B. Smith wrote in an e-mail dated 19 August 2003, “In the book Amherst County in the Revolution, Landon Gowing is mentioned in the pension application of John Massey. Landon is listed as 87 years old, the application is dated 1853.” His source[4].

1853Landon1
A page from the Revolutionary War package of John Massey and his wife Susannah Wright [accessed 8 Sep 2007 on HeritageQuest]
On 8 Sep 2007 I located the Revolutionary War papers of John MASSEY, husband of Susannah WRIGHT. In these papers Landon S. GOWING gives affidavit that children named are children of John Massey, deceased, who was a Cornett in the United States service in the Revolutionary War. Sophy RAMSEY was a witness to the document at left. Sophy was also a witness to the declaration made by Thomas MASSEY, son of John and Susannah.

Landon S. GOWING was not enumerated in the 1860 census which leads to the conclusion that he died after making the above declaration on 24 September 1853 and before 1860. His daughters were living at the time of the 1880 census and most likely all died during the two decades before 1900.

What happened to the woman living with Landon in 1840 and 1850? Was Sophy RAMSEY who witnessed his declaration the same person as Sophia GOING seen with him in 1850? Could she have been his daughter?

The 1850 census shed a little more light on the woman with Landon in 1840 but questions remained. I pulled some tricks to identify “Celia.” In 1850 John F. CAMDEN was Landon’s neighbor. I checked for him in 1860 and found him living next door to Celia RAMSEY. This got the ball rolling!

1860censusramsey
1860 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Nelson [ancestry.com]
1860 U.S. Federal Census
Nelson County, Virginia
Massies Mill
Celia Ramsey 71 F 0 20 b. Nelson Co., VA cannot read & write

ramseyAt RootsWeb’s WorldConnect Project I found Lilly Martin’s gedcom file with this note (left). From this I know that Celia RAMSEY had two children out of wedlock: 1. Shelton Preston Ramsey born in 1830 and 2. Sophy (Sophia) Ramsey born in 1837. This is documented in her family bible.

To wrap things up, Sophia RAMSEY married James N. BRYANT in 1854, her mother Celia RAMSEY died in May 1870. Sophia’s age in the 1860 and 1870 census indicates that the bible entry of 1837 as her year of birth is reliable. The question remains, was Landon her father?

Sources:
[1] Goochland County List of Tithables 1767-1780, Library of Virginia microfilm nos. 83, frames 18, 52, 109; transcription accessed 4 Oct 2014 online http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/goochcolonial.htm
[2] William Douglas, The Douglas Register, Genealogical Publishing Co. 1966, originally published in Richmond in 1929; pgs. 106, 141, 201; accessed 4 Oct 2014 online http://books.google.lu/books?id=U_xpc2k0N8kC&hl=de&source=gbs_navlinks_s
[3] Amherst County Personal Property Tax List 1782-1822; Library of Virginia microfilm reels 18 and 19; online http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Amherst.htm
[4] Lenora Higginbotham Sweeny, Amherst County, Virginia In the Revolution: Including Extracts from the “”Lost Order Book”” 1773-1782, Southern Historical Press, 1998

© 2014 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52 Ancestors: #33 Rachel WISEMAN 1769-bet. 1821-1824

“The challenge: have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor.”

This is entry #33 in Amy Johnson Crow’s Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.

#33 Rachel WISEMAN 1769-bet. 1821-1824

My 4th great-grandmother Rachel WISEMAN was born on 1 March 1769 in Berks County, Pennsylvania. She was the 6th child of Isaac WISEMAN (1738-1818) and Elizabeth DAVIS (1738-1807).

Isaac WISEMAN and Elizabeth DAVIS, both born in August 1738 in Berks County, were married about 1758, most likely in that county. They were the parents of 11 known children all born in Berks County, Pennsylvania:1

  1. Joseph (1759-1836) born 29 Mar 1759
  2. John (1760-1842) born 18 Aug 1760
  3. Sarah (1762-aft. 1841) born 17 Jul 1762
  4. Isaac (1764-1852) born 19 Jun 1764
  5. Jacob (1767-1839) born 12 Jan 1767
  6. Rachel (1769-bef. 1824) born 1 Mar 1769
  7. Samuel (1771-1861) born 15 Feb 1771
  8. Abner (1772-1830) born abt. 1772
  9. Elizabeth (1774-1830s) born abt. 1774
  10. Margaret (1777-1869) born abt. 1777
  11. William (1779-1842) born 6 May 1779

WISEMAN Family and the American Revolutionary War

Rachel was six when the American Revolutionary War began on 19 April 1775. By this time Isaac and Elizabeth had nine children aged between 1 and 16.

In August 1776 Rachel’s oldest brother Joseph WISEMAN was drafted in the first militia that went out of Berks County. This was only the beginning as can be seen in the declaration of service given by Joseph D. WISEMAN in 1832 at the age of 73 to obtain his Revolutionary War pension.1 His pension file includes the family records that his son Samuel submitted in 1847 when he applied for pension money on behalf of himself and his siblings as their parents were both deceased. These papers show the dates of birth and death of Rachel’s parents Isaac WISEMAN and Elizabeth DAVIS.

Wiseman1
Elisabeth Wiseman daughter to Samuel Davis was born August 26th, 1838 and died July 19th, 1807.
Wiseman3
Isaac Wiseman son to Isaac and Nancy Wiseman was born August 18, 1738 and died May the 3 in 1818.

WISEMAN Family Moves from Pennsylvania to Virginia

Family tradition is that Isaac and his brood, both married and single, left Berks County, Pennsylvania, and went up the Shenandoah Valley to Rockingham County, Virginia. In his declaration, Joseph states that he lived in Rockingham County, Virginia, about 10 years before moving in 1794 to Greenbrier County [the area which would later be Monroe County, West Virginia].

By the end of the war on 14 January 1784, the family had increased to 11 children, the oldest son Joseph and the oldest daughter Sarah were married. The marriage record for Sarah shows that she married on 3 November 1782 in Rockingham County. This would suggest that the WISEMANs made their move in 1782 [or earlier] and Joseph may have followed them only after he married his second wife.

Marriages of the WISEMAN siblings

1782 – Sib 1: Joseph D. WISEMAN married(1) Susannah MANLY abt. 1782 in Berks County, Pennsylvania

1782 – Sib 3: Sarah WISEMAN married James BARLEY on 3 November 1782 in Rockingham County, Virginia2

1785 – Sib 1: Joseph D. WISEMAN married(2) Elizabeth BATEMAN on 10 February 1785 in Robeson (Rabbesin) Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania3 (location confirmed by son Samuel)

1786 – Sib 2: John WISEMAN married Sarah GREEN on 10 May 1786 in Rockingham County, Virginia4

1790 – Sib 4: Isaac WISEMAN married Mary Magdalene ARMENTROUT on 9 August 1790 in Rockingham County, Virginia [record not located]

???? – Sib 5: Jacob WISEMAN married Rachael _____. She is listed as his wife in his will in 1839 and seen in the 1840 census as the head of household.

1795 -Rachel WISEMAN married Frederick HONAKER on 28 September 1795 in Rockingham County, Virginia5 (marriage bond recorded in Shenandoah County)

1797 – Sib 7: Samuel WISEMAN married Polly BOWYER on 10 May 1797 in Rockingham County, Virginia6

1798 – Sib 9: Elizabeth WISEMAN married John BLANTON on 9 August 1798 in Greenbrier County, (West) Virginia7

1799 – Sib 10: Margaret WISEMAN married Bartholomew RAMSEY on 21 October 1799 in Monroe County, (West) Virginia8, 9

1800 – Sib 8: Abner WISEMAN married Isabel BLANTON on 18 February 1800 in Monroe County, (West) Virginia10, 11

1801 – Sib 11: William WISEMAN married Polly RAMSEY on 22 Oct 1801 in Monroe County, (West) Virginia12, 13

1804 – Sib 11: William WISEMAN married Phebe KILBURN on 31 January 1804 in Monroe County, (West) Virginia [record not located]

Rachel WISEMAN Marries Frederick HONAKER

As seen above the marriage of Rachel WISEMAN and Frederick HONAKER took place in 1795 in Rockingham County and the marriage bond was recorded in Shenandoah County as follows:

Know all men, by their presents, that we Frederick Conickor and Isaac Wiseman are held and firmly bound unto his Excellency Robert Brooke, Esquire, Governor of Virginia, and his Successors, in the sum of one hundred fifty dollars to the payment whereof, well and truly to be made, we do bind ourselves, our heirs, and each of our joint and several heirs, executors and administrators, jointly and severally firmly by their presence, felled with our feats, and dated the 24th day of September 1795 in the 24th year of the Commonwealth. The condition of the above Obligation is such, that whereas there is a Marriage suddenly to be solomized between the above bound Frederick Coniker and Rachel Wiseman, daughter of Isaac Wiseman of Rockingham County; if therefore there shall be no lawful cause to object of said Marriage, then this obligation be void, otherwise to remain in full force and virtue.
Witness: M. Gambill. Signed Frederick Honaker, Isaac Wiseman
[Source: Honaker Family Newsletter]

Rachel and Frederick Had 8 Known Children

  • Ch 1: Isaac Morgan (1796-1885) born Bet.1796-1799
  • Ch 2: Elizabeth “Betsy” (1797- ) born Bet. 1797-1800
  • Ch 3: Margaret “Peggy” (1798-1879) born Abt 1798
  • Ch 4: Rachel (1804-1860) born Abt 1804
  • Ch 5: Sarah (1805-1862) born Bet. 1805-1806
  • Ch 6: Anna (1806-1873) born 10 Sep 1806
  • Ch 7: Letty (1810-1825) born Aft 1810
  • Ch 8: Frederick Styrus (1810-1836) born Aft 1810

As Rachel lived with her husband Frederick in Monroe County, (West) Virginia, following their marriage until her death, her children were most likely all born in that county. Estimated years of birth were calculated after analysis of the pre-1850 censuses for children who did not live to be seen in 1850 and later censuses.

Many changes took place in Rachel’s life. She gave Frederick six children before her mother Elizabeth DAVIS died on 19 July 1807. Rachel had two more children following the 1810 census. Her father Isaac WISEMAN died 3 May 1818. Isaac and Elizabeth spent the rest of their days in Monroe County and were buried in the Old Rehoboth Churchyard near Union, the county seat. Three of their children, Abner, Jacob and Elizabeth who married John Blanton went to Kentucky; Samuel, John, and Isaac II went to Ohio; Sarah who married James Barley remained in Rockingham County, Virginia; Joseph, William, and Margaret, who married Bartholomew Ramsey, and Rachel, who married Frederick Honaker, stayed in West Virginia.

Following the 1820 census Rachel saw her oldest son Isaac Morgan HONAKER marry Rebecca Ann SAMS (1799-1860) on 28 October 1820 in Monroe County.14, 15

The next two marriages in the HONAKER house were those of Betsy and Peggy. As we do not know the exact date of Rachel’s death, she may or may not have seen these daughters marrying.

Elizabeth “Betsy” HONAKER married William SANDERS (1795- ) on 17 January 1822 in Monroe County, (West) Virginia.16 Betsy’s half-brother John HONAKER went bond with William SANDERS on 15 January 1822 in Monroe.17

Margaret “Peggy” HONAKER married Alexander CAMPBELL (1798-1881) on 30 Oct 1823 in Monroe County, (West) Virginia.18 Peggy’s brother Isaac HONAKER went bond with Alexander CAMPBELL on the 20 October 1823.19

Rachel was the first of the WISEMAN children to pass away. She died between 1 April 1821 and December 1824 in Monroe County. She predeceased her husband Frederick HONAKER who died about December 1824 in Monroe County. Three of Rachel’s daughters married within the year following Frederick’s death:

Rachel HONAKER married Elijah WOOD (1806-1885) on 4 January 1825 in Nicholas County, (West) Virginia.20

Sarah HONAKER married Thomas J. REYNOLDS (1785- ) on 3 March 1825 in Monroe County, (West) Virginia.21 Thomas went bond with Dudley G. Reade.22

Anna HONAKER married Owen DUFFY (1800-1867) on 1 Sep 1825 in Monroe County, (West) Virginia [bond]23

The Burial Place of Rachel’s Parents

The log structure that was named Rehoboth was constructed in 1786 on land donated by Edward KEENAN and in 1788 the first American Methodist bishop, Francis ASBURY, preached the dedication service. In 1796 he ordained Frederick’s brother-in-law John WISEMAN as a Methodist minister. Nearly 50 years after Frederick HONAKER joined his parents-in-law in the grounds surrounding Old Rehoboth, a new meeting house was constructed. The old log relic lay abandoned for another half-century until it was restored in 1927. Another 30 years later a shed was constructed to further preserve the structure.

Robert N. Wiseman, the Senior Historian of the Wiseman Family Association, gave me permission to use this photo of the church taken in 1934 before the “shed” was added.

MRIN13888 Rehoboth courtesy of Robert N. Wiseman
Old Rehoboth Methodist Church, near Union, WV — Oldest existing Protestant church west of the Alleghany Mountains. Left to right: Cousin Ambrose SLAGLE, Uncle Ernest Newton WISEMAN, Grandpa John Newton WISEMAN. Their ancestors Isaac WISEMAN I and Elizabeth (Davis) WISEMAN (my 4th great grandparents) are buried near the right back corner of the church. Submitted by : Robert Newton Wiseman, Wiseman Family Association. Photo courtesy of Robet N. Wiseman, used with permission.

And this is what the building looked like 70 years later when Irene Warner and her husband took her parents to visit the cemetery and meeting house.

Old Rehoboth Meeting House near Union, Monroe County, West Virginia. Courtesy of Irene (Rose) Warner (Find A Grave Contributor #46586932)

After giving me permission to use her photos Irene sent more with this explanation: “I have attached pictures of the inside of the church.  It was so special to get to see this old building in its original shape – very small inside; but it had a balcony…..[in this picture at the bottom and on the balcony are what] look like flat boards or similar; unfortunately, cameras didn’t do 3-dimensional pictures.  They are pictures of the LOG seats – a log was split in half; a person sat on the inside part of the seat, the bark was at the bottom; there are “peg legs” on the logs.  I’ll bet there weren’t too many long sermons in that church….don’t know how anyone could sit very long on a seat that hard…..”

Old Rehoboth Meeting House near Union, Monroe County, West Virginia. Courtesy of Irene (Rose) Warner (Find A Grave Contributor #46586932)
Balcony in Old Rehoboth Meeting House near Union, Monroe County, West Virginia. Courtesy of Irene (Rose) Warner (Find A Grave Contributor #46586932)
Outside walls of Old Rehoboth Meeting House near Union, Monroe County, West Virginia. Courtesy of Irene (Rose) Warner (Find A Grave Contributor #46586932)

A New Discovery – What Do You Think?

Working my way back on my paternal line has me looking at things that I haven’t worked on in a long time. In the case of the HONAKER and WISEMAN lines I never really went in and checked on all the census and vital records for collateral lines. Both families have associations with historians who are keeping track of these families and updating as new information is uncovered. The list of Rachel’s siblings grew and then shrunk as I checked and checked for supporting records while writing.

I thought I’d found another child for Rachel’s parents but she turned out to be a granddaughter.

When Rachel WISEMAN married Frederick HONAKER on 28 September 1795 Rachel brought Edith, her 10 years old daughter, into the marriage.

Supporting documentation? I don’t have three sources for every event but I’d say, “Yes!”

1803marriage

On 23 May 1803, in Monroe County, Frederick HONAKER went bond with Seth BOGGESS for the marriage of Edith WISEMAN to Seth.24 [bond at left] Edith and Seth were married on 9 June 1803 in Monroe by John WISEMAN.25 [marriage register, 4th entry on left page] I did not find a permission slip from her parents.

After finding the marriage I searched for the couple/family in the census, found them in 1820 and 1830, and then hit a dead end. As a last resort, I searched the internet for possible queries about the couple. An old GenForum posting26 helped me locate the death record of Edith BOGGESS. I had been so focused on trying to locate the entire family in the census that I didn’t check for her death record.

On 5 February 1857 in Monroe County Edith BOGGESS died of cancer at the age of 72 years and 1 day. She was the daughter of Rachel WISEMAN (no father listed) and the consort of Seth BOGGESS. The informant was Wm SMITH, a relative.27

Further research shows that William SMITH was a son-in-law, husband of Edith’s daughter Elizabeth.28 Per Edith’s death record she was born in Monroe and the date of birth can be calculated to 4 February 1785. The place of birth is not reliable as Monroe wasn’t formed until 1799. Her birth would have taken place about the time that the WISEMAN family came down the Shenandoah Valley to Rockingham. At this time, the only Rachel WISEMAN in the area who would have been old enough to have a child was Isaac and Elizabeth’s daughter Rachel who would turn 16 on 1 March 1785.

Was my 4th great-grandmother Rachel WISEMAN the mother of an illegitimate daughter? Please leave a comment telling me what you think.

© 20142020, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. “Southern Campaigns Revolutionary War Pension Statements & Rosters,” <i>RevWarApps.org</i> (online database http://www.revwarapps.org/), Pension Application of Joseph Wiseman (R11741) Elizabeth Wiseman NC PA, transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris, revised 3 March 2015. (http://www.revwarapps.org/r11741.pdf : accessed 12 February 2020). 
  2. Dodd, Jordan. Virginia, Marriages, 1660-1800 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1997. Original data: Electronic transcription of marriage records held by the individual counties in Virginia. 
  3. Pennsylvania Church Records – Adams, Berks, and Lancaster Counties, 1729-1881 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2004. Original data: Extracted from microfilmed transcriptions of the original church records. The microfilmed records are located at the Family History Library. 
  4. Dodd, Jordan. Virginia, Marriages, 1660-1800 
  5. Dodd, Jordan. Virginia, Marriages, 1660-1800 
  6. Dodd, Jordan. Virginia, Marriages, 1660-1800 
  7. West Virginia Vital Research Records Project (database and images), West Virginia Division of Culture and History (A collaborative venture between the West Virginia State Archives and the Genealogical Society of Utah to place vital records online via the West Virginia Archives and History Web site accessible at http://www.wvculture.org/vrr), Virginia, Greenbrier County, Jno. Blanton and Eliza. 1797/9 (1798), left page, last entry. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=10970066&Type=Marriage : accessed 12 August 2014). 
  8. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 1799, Margaret Wiseman and Bartholomey Ramsey. 1799 Marriage Bond. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11370451&Type=Marriage : accessed 12 August 2014). 
  9. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 22 October 1799, Margaret Wiseman and Bartholomey Ramsey. 1799 Marriage Record. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11369649&Type=Marriage : accessed 12 August 2014). 
  10. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 1800, Abner Wiseman and Isabel Blanton. 1800 Marriage Bond. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11370442&Type=Marriage : accessed ). 
  11. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 18 Feb 1800, Abner Wiseman and Isabel Blanton. “.” 1800 Marriage Record. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11369683&Type=Marriage : accessed ). 
  12. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 1801, William Wiseman and Mary Ramsey. 1801 Marriage Bond. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11371152&Type=Marriage : accessed 12 August 2014). 
  13. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 22 Oct 1801, William Wiseman and Mary Ramsey. 1801 Marriage Record (right page, 3rd entry). (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11369569&Type=Marriage : accessed 12 August 2014). 
  14. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 28 Oct 1820, Isaac Honicker and Rebecca Sams marriage, Isaac Honicker and Saml Sams went bond. 1820 Marriage Bond. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11371523&Type=Marriage : accessed 17 August 2014). 
  15. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 31 Oct 1820, Isaac Honicker and Rebecca Sams. 1820 Marriage Record. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11370138&Type=Marriage : accessed 17 August 2014). 
  16. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 17 Jan 1822, Betsy Honicker and Wm Sanders. 1822 Marriage Record. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11369959&Type=Marriage : accessed 11 August 2014). 
  17. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 15 Jan 1822, Betsy Honicker and William Sanders marriage, William Sanders and John Honicker went bond. 1822 Marriage Bond. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11371626&Type=Marriage : accessed 11 August 2014). 
  18. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 30 Oct 1823, Margaret Honicker and Alexander Campbell, married by: James Christy. 1823 Marriage Record. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11370005&Type=Marriage : accessed 17 August 2014). 
  19. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 20 Oct 1823, Alexander Campbell and Margaret Honiker. 1823 Marriage Bond. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11372163&Type=Marriage : accessed 17 August 2014). 
  20. Ibid., Virginia, Nicholas County, 4 Jan 1825, Elijah Wood and Rachel Hanneker, married by Jno Campbell. 1825 Marriage Record (6th entry). (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11433176&Type=Marriage : accessed 25 April 2013). 
  21. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 3 Mar 1825, Thomas Reynold and Sally Honeker. 1825 Marriage Record. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11370009&Type=Marriage : accessed 17 August 2014). 
  22. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 3 March 1825, Thomas J Reynolds and Sally Honiker, Thomas J. Reynolds and Dudley G. Reade went bond. 1825 Marriage Bond. http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11372213&Type=Marriage : accessed 12 February 2020). 
  23. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 1 Sep 1825, Owen Duffy and Ann Honiker, Owen Duff and Will Spotswood went bond. 1825 Marriage Bond. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11372061&Type=Marriage : accessed 17 August 2014). 
  24. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 23 May 1803 (27th year of the Commonwealth), Seth Boggess and Edith Wiseman, Seth Boggess and Frederick Honaker went bond. “.” 1803 Marriage Bond. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11371115&Type=Marriage : accessed 12 August 2014. 
  25. Ibid., Virginia, Monroe County, 9 June 1803, Seth Boggess and Edith Wiseman married by Joseph Wiseman. 1803 Marriage Record. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11369603&Type=Marriage : accessed 12 February 2020). 
  26. GenForum, Genealogy.com, Patricia Boggess, “Re: Edith Wiseman b. 1780 PA or VA,” Wiseman surname forum, 10 January 2001, message 824. (https://www.genealogy.com/forum/surnames/topics/wiseman/824/ : accessed 17 August 2014). 
  27. WVCulture.org death records, Virginia, Monroe County, 1857 register, page 13, line 6. Edith Bogess, born abt. 1785, died 5 Feb 1857 in Wolf Creek, Monroe, Virginia, age at death 72 years 1 day, cause of death cancer, white, married, mother’s name Rachel Wiseman, spouse’s name Seth Bogess. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=4730989&Type=Death : accessed 17 August 2014). 
  28.   WVCulture.org marriage records, Virginia, Monroe County, 1832, William Smith and Elizabeth Boggess, William Smith and Seth Bogges went bond. 1832 Marriage Bond. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=11372736&Type=Marriage : accessed 12 February 2020). 

52 Ancestors: #7 Rebecca Jane CLONCH 1888-1950

Time is flying by while I’m researching and writing about my paternal ancestors. This is my entry for Week 7 of Amy Johnson Crow’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge.

52 Ancestors: #7 Rebecca Jane CLONCH 1888-1950

This week I’m doing the fourth and last of my paternal great-grandparents. Rebecca Jane CLONCH was a daughter, sister, wife, mother, midwife, avid gardener, and an inspiration to her husband Walter Farmer ROOP who wrote poetry about her after her death in 1950. She was Grandma Roop to her grandchildren and Aunt Becky to her nieces and nephews.

A Tribute to Rebecca

Walter Farmer ROOP loved his wife so much that he wrote at least five poems for her in 1950 following her death: “The Letters You Loved and Kept”, “That Darling Pal of Mine”, “Admiration”, “My Garden: Gethsemane”, and an unnamed poem which begins with “Dear heart, since you have gone to rest I only think of you”.

The first poem, seen below, tells of the letters, written by her husband, that she loved and kept. Walter placed the letters, tied with a blue ribbon, on her breast as she lay in her casket.

After reading the poem one can only imagine the wonderful things Walter wrote about in the letters Rebecca took with her to her grave.

Born 6 January 1888 as seen on her grave marker?

Rebecca Jane CLONCH was born Friday, 6 January 1888 in Mason County, West Virginia, to Alexander “Alex” CLONCH (1842-1910) and Tabitha Ann “Tobitha” COOLEY (1861-1913).1 She was the fifth of nine children of this marriage and the ninth of thirteen children for Alex who had previous relationships. [to be discussed in 52 Ancestors #14]

Roop burial plots in Mt. Olive Cemetery. From left, Lacy Shelton Roop, Baby Piercie Roop, Walter Farmer Roop, and Rebecca Clonch Roop. The photo was taken summer of 1954.

Lack of records complicate matters

Unfortunately, a birth record has not been found for Rebecca to prove the date and place of birth seen on her death record and the grave marker. She has not been found in the 1900 and 1910 census. In the 1900 census, the only census to show month and year of birth, she would be with her parents and siblings. We know:

  • where her siblings were born but not all can be confirmed with birth records
  • that the family lived in Arbuckle, Mason County, West Virginia, when the father Alex applied for his Civil War Pension in April 1887
  • Alex was in Arbuckle when he was enumerated on the 1890 Veteran Schedule
  • the family was living in Bell Creek, Clay County, West Virginia, in 1893-1894, when two children were born
  • Alex was living in Dixie, Fayette County, West Virginia, in 1898, when he filled out Civil War papers [I’ve contacted the researcher who obtained copies of the Civil War records and shared the information with Ralph Hayes, a Clonch researcher. She has offered to dig out her genealogy files and help me if she can. I will discuss this further in 52 Ancestors #14]

And the records found are problematic

A closer look at Rebecca’s siblings has turned up another problem. Let’s take a look at her, her parents, and siblings:

Parents: Alexander CLONCH married 19 August 1880 Gallipolis, Gallia County, Ohio, Tabitha Ann “Tobitha” COOLEY.2

Sibling 1: Timothy CLONCH (1881-bef. 1898) birth 20 December 1881 Arbuckle District, Mason County, West Virginia3 Alex did not mention him in his Civil War papers, therefore, it has been assumed that he died bef. 1898.

Sibling 2: Lorena Ellen CLONCH (1883-1961) birth 10 March 1883 Arbuckle District, Mason County, West Virginia.4 Alex declared 10 March 1882 on his Civil War papers.

Sibling 3: Frances “Fanny” CLONCH (1885-1943) birth 30 April 1885 Mason County, West Virginia NO BIRTH RECORD FOUND. Alex declared 30 April 1884 on his Civil War papers.

Sibling 4: Bertha CLONCH (1887-bef. 1898) birth 9 December 1887 Arbuckle District, Mason County, West Virginia.5 Alex did not mention her in his Civil War papers, therefore, it has been assumed that she died bef. 1898.

Rebecca Jane CLONCH (1888-1950) birth 6 January 1888 NO BIRTH RECORD FOUND. Alex declared 6 January 1886 on his Civil War papers.

Sibling 6: Sarah Ann “Sallie” CLONCH (1890-1979) Birth 20 June 1890 Mason County, West Virginia NO BIRTH RECORD FOUND; Alex declared 20 June 1890 on his Civil War papers

Sibling 7: Harrison Sanders CLONCH (1893-1970) birth 11 February 1893 Beech Hill, Mason County, West Virginia.6 Alex declared 11 February 189_ (illegible) on his Civil War papers.

Sibling 8: (unnamed) CLONCH (1894-1894) birth 6 October 1894 Clay County, West Virginia [entry 32];7 died 13 October 1894 Clay County, West Virginia.8 [entry 13]

Sibling 9: Ida Bell CLONCH (1896-1981) Birth 5 March 1896 Smithers Creek, Fayette County, West Virginia.9 [line 63] Alex declared 5 March 1896 on his Civil War papers.

[Alex’s Civil War papers: Department of the Interior Bureau of Pensions, 15 January 1898, reply dated 4 June 1898. Alexander Clonch of Dixie, WV, provided information]

Can you see the problem I’m having? Rebecca was born a month after her sister Bertha if we believe her husband Walter F. ROOP who was the informant on her death record. That doesn’t work for me. Let’s look at her marriage record. Rebecca Jane CLONCH married 12 July 1903 in Fayette County, WV, Walter Farmer ROOP.10 She was 16 years old, born in Fayette County (sic), which would mean that she was born in 1887 and not 1888 as seen on her death record. Her father wrote 16 January 1886 however he had her two older sisters Lorena and Frances each born a year earlier than they actually were. Could Rebecca have been born in 1887?

The 1940s: Walter Farmer Roop and wife Rebecca Jane Clonch shopping in Charleston, the capital of West Virginia

Early years of married life

Let’s get on with the story. Rebecca and Walter had their first child, Lacy Shelton Roop (1904-1937) on 7 Feb 1904 in Pond Gap, Kanawha County, West Virginia.11 A little over a year later the second child Piercie Clay Roop (1905-1905) joined the family for a short seven weeks. He is buried in the Clonch Family Cemetery, Mount Olive, with the dates: 15 March 1905-5 May 1905.12 My grandmother Myrtle Hazel ROOP (1906-1997) was born on 26 March 1906 when the family was living in Belva.13 We see the family moving around in the northwestern corner of Fayette County as two more sons are born: James Henry Roop (1908-1957) on 11 February 1908 in Marting and Walter Gordon Roop (1910-1984) on 9 March 1910 in Mount Olive. Birth records for James and Walter have not been found.14,15

Rebecca and Walter’s family was growing when the 1910 census was enumerated on the 15th of April 1910. As mentioned before neither Rebecca and her young family nor her parents were enumerated. It should have been the last census that Alex CLONCH would have been seen on as he died 9 June 1910 and was buried in the Clonch Family Cemetery, Mount Olive.16

Rebecca gave birth to her second daughter Edith Estelle “Edie” Roop (1913-2003) on 9 June 1913 in Marting.17 Six months later her mother Tabitha Ann “Tobitha” COOLEY died on 16 December 1913 and was buried next to her husband Alex in the Clonch Family Cemetery.18

Antique Chiming Mantel Clock ca. 1914

A treasure that Rebecca’s daughter Edith shared with her family was this antique chiming mantel clock. Edith’s grandson Robert wrote, “The clock is one that my mother says she remembers seeing on the mantle when she ‘visited Grandma Roop.’ It still runs. My mom had it cleaned years ago but just doesn’t wind it up….the ‘tick-tock tick-tock’ she says it’s too loud. I told her after a day or two she wouldn’t even notice it. As I recall it does chime too. Scratched on the back, about an inch high, is ‘1914’. On top of the clock is the [winding] key and the pendulum weight.”

Rebecca has her last child at age 31 or was she 32?

U.S. Federal Census,1920 > WV > Fayette > Falls > ED 11 Sheet 14A

World War I (1914-1918) came and went before Rebecca gave birth to her last child Alfred Lee Roop (1919-1981) on 22 August 1919 in Jodie where the family had finally settled.19 By 1920 the complete family was at last seen in a census: father, mother, and their six living children.20

Walter Farmer Roop and Rebecca Jane Clonch with youngest son Alfred Lee Roop ca. 1921

Rebecca becomes a mother-in-law and grandmother at 35 (or 36?)

Myrtle Hazel ROOP was the first of Rebecca’s children to marry on 20 January 1923 in  Fayetteville, Fayette County, West Virginia, to Fred Rothwell DEMPSEY (1899-1975).21 Rebecca, a midwife, was present at the births of all of Myrtle’s children, her grandchildren: Thelma 1923, Lois 1925, Leona 1927, Doyle 1931, and Fred 1935 in Jodie, as well as, Leland 1941 and Lloyd 1944 in Victor.

Rebecca Jane Clonch, Walter Farmer Roop and Edith Estelle Roop ca. 1924

Edith Estelle “Edie” Roop, seen above with her parent, was the next of the Roop children to marry. She married James David Ramsey (1907-2001) on 23 December 1929 in Fayetteville.22

By 1930 Rebecca’s older boys were working and only her youngest Alfred was still going to school.23

U.S. Federal Census, 1930 > WV > Fayette > Falls > ED 5 Sheet 6B

Three of Rebecca’s sons married in the 1930′s: Walter Gordon married 18 July 1931 Ica Laurel CARR (1913-1993);24 Lacy Shelton ROOP married 28 March 1932 Lulu Irene HAYS (1915-1992);25 and Alfred Lee ROOP married 15 May 1937 Lorena Lea ELSWICK (1918-1992).26

Rebecca’s oldest son Lacy Shelton ROOP was killed on 8 July 1937 in Sprague, Raleigh County.27 “He was crushed by a giant lump of slate 18 feet long which broke loose from the mine roof. He had finished his day’s work and was starting the gathering motor to take his load of coal to the tipple.”28

On the 1940 census, we see Rebecca and her husband on their own. From the same, we learn that Rebecca had six years of education.29

U.S. Federal Census, 1940 > WV > Fayette > Falls > ED 10-5 Sheet 19B
Rebecca Clonch Roop was an avid gardener. Courtesy of Roop family member
“Grandma Roop” Rebecca Jane Clonch Roop ca. the late 1940s.

Rebecca Jane CLONCH died the evening of 3 February 1950 at her home in Belva. Her cause of death was arterial thrombosis due to arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular and renal disease.30 Surviving were her husband W. F. Roop; two daughters, Mrs. Fred Dempsey of Victor and Mrs. Edith Ramsey of Russellville; three sons, James, Gordon, and Alfred Roop, all of Jodie; three sisters, Mrs. Sallie Krise of Belva, Mrs. Ida Auxier of Marting and Mrs. Lorena Tomshack of Glen Easton; one brother, Harrison Clonch of Belva; one half brother Joe Clonch of Marting, twenty-five grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Rev. Benton Simpson officiated at the service held on Sunday afternoon in Bell Cree Community Church. She was laid to rest in the Clonch Family Cemetery in Mount Olive.

Postscript: A couple of great-grandchildren and a grandson shared the following memories shortly after this post was published.

Becky, a great-granddaughter, wrote:

“I was indeed named after her but I don’t know a whole lot about her. My mother adored her; I think she first taught my mom how to crochet and do needlework, which my mother enjoyed all her life. She always related one story about her. She said that she took me to see Great Grandma Roop when I was about 6 weeks old. She was on her deathbed at that time. As Grandma Roop was holding me, she said to me “Just don’t let them call you Becky.” Which of course, I have always been called by family. That remark makes me wonder if she liked her nickname. I think she died as a result of a blood clot (in the leg I think) which resulted from a fall.”

Linda, a great-granddaughter, and wife of Larry, a grandson, wrote:

“Larry was very sickly when he was small, as his mother had had measles before he was born. He had to have an operation on his ear when he was 6 or 7 (he is not sure how old he was). He was told to eat a lot of iron rich foods as he was anemic. His Grandma saved all the cream from her milk for him, because he needed to gain weight. She pampered him by making him fishhooks out for straight pins and taking him to the little creek to fish! She saved her wooden thread spools and made him little wheeled cars to play with.

Larry remembers them talking about going to Summersville in a model T and having to stay the night and make the return trip the next day.

Granddaddy called his beloved wife ‘Jack’. He loved her deeply and she was the perfect companion. She kept chickens and sold the eggs to get household money. She sewed her clothing, and I know of at least one instance when she decided she wanted a cabinet for her kitchen and she gathered the materials and built it herself!

Larry remembers going to their home and a grand table set with dishes Grandma had prepared. She cooked a giant breakfast, a feast at lunch time and covered the leftovers with a tablecloth for the evening meal. Granddaddy would go to the table in the evening saying he was getting a ‘Jack bite’.

I am lucky enough to be in possession of one of her cookbooks, which contains handwritten recipes. She was a remarkable lady and one that I truly wish I could have known.”

This Post Was Updated on 13 February 2022: Missing source citations were added, images were watermarked, and some corrections were made to the text and format.

© 2014-2022, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. West Virginia Vital Research Records Project (database and images), West Virginia Division of Culture and History citing county records in county courthouses, West Virginia (A collaborative venture between the West Virginia State Archives and the Genealogical Society of Utah to place vital records online via the West Virginia Archives and History Web site accessible at https://archive.wvculture.org/vrr), West Virginia Deaths, 1804-1999, FHL microfilm 1984143, image 1997, Certificate of Death, State File No. 1965, Rebecca Clonch Roop, 3 February 1950, citing Belva, Nicholas County, West Virginia. (http://images.wvculture.org/1984143/0001997.gif : accessed 2 February 2022). 
  2. “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2016” (index and images), FamilySearch (citing digital images of originals housed at the county courthouses in Ohio), Marriage records (Gallia County, Ohio), 1803-1955 ; index, 1803-1950 > Marriages, v. 5 1878-1884 > image 132 of 352 > page 193 > no. 576 > Alexander Clonch and Tabitha Cooley, 19 August 1880. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9RMD-SV3N?cc=1614804&wc=M94Q-V7T%3A390869322 : accessed 18 December 2013). 
  3. WVculture.org, West Virginia Births, 1853-1930, FHL microfilm 1855008, image 449, West Virginia, Mason County, Register of Births 1881, line 7, 20 Dec 1881, Timothy Clonch, citing Arbuckle District, Mason County, West Virginia. (http://images.wvculture.org/1855008/00449.jpg : accessed 1 February 2022). 
  4. Ibid., West Virginia Births, 1853-1930, FHL microfilm 1855008, image 462, West Virginia, Mason County, Register of Births 1883, page 560-561 (stamped), line 10, 10 Mar 1883, Rena E. Clonch, citing Arbuckle District, Mason County, West Virginia. (http://images.wvculture.org/1855008/00462.jpg : accessed 4 February 2022). 
  5. Ibid., West Virginia Births, 1853-1930, FHL microfilm 1855008, image 496, West Virginia, Mason County, Register of Births 1887, page 676-675 (stamped), line 14, Bertha Clonch, 9 Dec 1887, citing Arbuckle District, Mason County, West Virginia. “.” http://images.wvculture.org/1855008/00496.jpg : accessed 4 February 2022. 
  6. Ibid., West Virginia Births, 1853-1930, FHL microfilm 567453, image 225, West Virginia, Clay County Register of Births 1893, line 25, H. S. Clonch, 11 February 1893, citing Mason County, West Virginia. (http://images.wvculture.org/567453/00225.jpg : accessed 5 February 2022). 
  7. Ibid., West Virginia Births, 1853-1930, FHL microfilm 567453, image 236, West Virginia, Clay County Register of Births 1894, line 32, 6 Oct 1894, unnamed female child, citing Bell Creek, Clay County, West Virginia. (http://images.wvculture.org/567453/00236.jpg : accessed 5 February 2022). 
  8. Ibid., West Virginia Deaths, 1804-1999, FHL microfilm 567453, image 242, West Virginia, Clay County Register of Death, line 13, unnamed female Clonch, 13 October 1894, citing Clay County, West Virginia. (http://images.wvculture.org/567453/00242.jpg : accessed 5 February 2022). 
  9. Ibid., West Virginia Births, 1853-1930, FHL microfilm 584762, image 37, West Virginia, Fayette County Register of Births, page 57-58 (stamped), line 63, 5 Mar 1896, Ida B. Clonch, citing Smithers Creek, Fayette County, West Virginia. (http://images.wvculture.org/584762/00037.jpg : accessed 5 February 2022). 
  10. Ibid., West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 58476, image 366, Fayette County, West Virginia, Register of Marriages, 1903, line 5, 12 July 1903, Walter F. Roop, Rebecca J. Clonch, citing Fayette County, West Virginia. (http://images.wvculture.org/584765/00366.jpg : accessed 2 February 2022). 
  11. Ibid., West Virginia Births, 1853-1930, FHL microfilm 521731, Kanawha, West Virginia, Register of Births 1904, page 40, line 37, Lacy S. Roop, 22 Feb 1904; citing Pond Gap, Kanawha County, West Virginia. (http://images.wvculture.org/521731/00046.jpg : accessed 15 January 2022). 
  12. Clonch Family Cemetery, Mount Olive, Fayette County, West Virginia (photos of gravemarkers taken by Heather Manley-Duncan), gravemarker of Piercie Clay Roop 14 March 1905-6 May 1905 photographed 31 May 2014. Note: The middle name and dates of birth and death were not known before viewing the photograph of this gravemarker. 
  13. WVCulture.org, West Virginia Births, 1853-1930, FHL microfilm 1992812, Delayed Certificate of Birth 7454, Myrtle Hazel Roop, 26 Mar 1906; citing Belva, Fayette, West Virginia. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=3448835&Type=Birth : accessed 7 March 2013). 
  14. Ibid., West Virginia Deaths, 1804-1999, FHL microfilm 2074135, Raleigh, West Virginia 1957 Certificate of Death 8106, James Henry Roop, 03 Jun 1957 citing Beckley, Raleigh County, West Virginia. (http://archive.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=1613279&Type=Death : accessed 15 January 2022). Includes date of birth: 11 February 1908. 
  15. “U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942,” (index and images), Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/1002/), The National Archives At St. Louis; St. Louis, Missouri; WWII Draft Cards (Fourth Registration) Record Group Number 147, National Archives and Records Administration, NAI: 2658141, West Virginia, Fayette County, Local Board 3, Walter Gordon Roop, Serial No. 2596. (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 2 Feb 2022). 
  16. “United States Veterans Administration Pension Payment Cards, 1907-1933,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:939K-FWSS-26?cc=1832324&wc=M9WY-MC3%3A881461769 : accessed 5 February 2022), > image 579 of 681; citing NARA microfilm publication M850 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.). 
  17. “U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014” (index only), Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/3693/), citing Social Security Administration; Washington D.C., USA. Original data <i>Social Security Death Index, Master File</i>, SS #236-24-2765 issued in West Virginia; Edith R. Ramsey; born 09 Jun 1913; died 25 Oct 2003 (V); last residence Brooksville, Hernando County, Florida 34601. 
  18. Clonch Family Cemetery (photos by Heather Manley-Duncan), gravemarker of Alex Clonch Mar 2, 1842 – June 3, 1910 and Tobitha Cooley His Wife Feb 11, 1861 – Dec. 16, 1913 photographed 31 May 2014. 
  19. WVCulture.org, West Virginia Births, 1853-1930, FHL microfilm 584755, Fayette, West Virginia, Register of Births 1919, page 298 (stamped), line 21, Alfred Lee Roop, 22 Aug 1919; citing Jodie, Fayette, County, West Virginia. (http://images.wvculture.org/584755/00485.jpg : accessed 15 January 2022). 
  20. 1920 U.S. Federal Census (index and images), Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/6061/), citing Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C., NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls, Roll: T625_1947; Falls, Fayette, West Virginia; Enumeration District: 11; Page: 14A; line 15-22; HH #239-247; Walter F. Roop household (accessed 9 Feb 2014). 
  21. WVCulture.org, West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 494264, Fayette, West Virginia, Register of Marriage, 1923, page 39, line 4, Fred R. Dempsey and Myrtle Roop, 20 Jan 1923, citing Fayetteville, Fayette County, West Virginia. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view2.aspx?FilmNumber=494264&ImageNumber=168 : accessed 14 November 2010). 
  22. Ibid., West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 494264, Fayette, West Virginia, Register of Marriages 1929-1930, page 151 (stamped), line 16, 23 Dec 1929, James Ramsey and Edith Roop, citing Fayetteville, Fayette County, West Virginia. (http://images.wvculture.org/494264/00417.jpg : accessed 15 January 2022). 
  23. 1930 U.S. Federal Census (index and images), <i>Ancestry</i> (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/6224/), citing Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C., NARA microfilm publication T626, 2,667 rolls, FHL microfilm: 2342265, West Virginia, Fayette County, Falls, enumeration district 5, sheet 6B, lines 61-64, household 42-107-110, Walter F. Roop (accessed 16 July 2002). 
  24. WVCulture.org, West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 494264, Fayette, West Virginia, Register of Marriages 1929-1930, page 152 (stamped), line 32, 18 Jul 1931, Gordon Roop and Ica Carr, citing Fayetteville, Fayette County, West Virginia. (http://images.wvculture.org/494264/00418.jpg : accessed 15 January 2022). 
  25. Ibid., West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 580561, Wood, West Virginia, Marriage License 574 (stamped), 28 March 1932, Lacy Shelton Roop and Irene Lula Hays, citing Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. (http://images.wvculture.org/580561/00604.jpg : accessed 15 January 2022). 
  26. Ibid., West Virginia Marriages, 1780-1970, FHL microfilm 494265, Fayette, West Virginia, Register of Marriage 1937, page 147 (stamped), line 17, 15 May 1937, Alfred Roop and Lorena Elswick, citing Fayetteville, Fayette County, West Virginia. (http://images.wvculture.org/494265/00288.jpg : accessed 15 January 2022). 
  27. Ibid., West Virginia Deaths, 1804-1999, FHL microfilm 1983278, Raleigh, West Virginia, Certificate of Death 10987, Lacy Roop, 08 Jul 1937, citing Sprague, Raleigh County, West Virginia. (http://archive.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view2.aspx?FilmNumber=1983278&ImageNumber=2024 : accessed 10 January 2022). 
  28. The Raleigh Register (Beckley, Raleigh County, West Virginia), Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/51917/), database created from microfilm copies of the Beckley, West Virginia, newspaper, Friday 9 July 1937, page 12, “Sprague Miner Is Killed By Fall Of Slate”. (https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/51917/images/News-WE-RA_RE.1937_07_09-0012 : accessed 5 February 2022). 
  29. 1940 U.S. Federal Census (index and images), Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/2442/), citing Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D. C., NARA microfilm publication T647, 4,643 rolls, Roll: m-t0627-04401, West Virginia, Fayette County, Falls, enumeration district 10-5, sheet 19B, lines 60-61, household #368, Walter F. Roop (accessed 31 March 2012). 
  30. WVculture.org, West Virginia Deaths, 1804-1999, FHL microfilm 1984143, image 1997, Certificate of Death, State File No. 1965, Rebecca Clonch Roop, 3 February 1950, citing Belva, Nicholas County, West Virginia. (http://images.wvculture.org/1984143/0001997.gif : accessed 2 February 2022).