Slave Name Roll Project: RELEASING Nell, Hannah, and Harry

Following my three part series on the slaves of my 5th grand-father James Sims during Black History Month in February 2015 I made a commitment to write a post on a monthly basis until I’ve RELEASED all of the names of slaves owned by my ancestors.

✻ ✻ ✻ ✻ ✻

The Slave Name Roll Project page can be found on
Schalene Jennings Dagutis’ blog Tangled Roots and Trees

✻ ✻ ✻ ✻ ✻

While researching my Rupp emigrant who came to America in 1752 I found the names of several slaves owned by his grandson Adam Shower in 1833. How did Adam come to own slaves?

His father Johannes Schauer, also known as John Shower(s), made his last will and testament on 2 June 1802. It was sworn to in open court on 21 March 1810 in Baltimore County, Maryland.

Releasing the names of Nell, Hannah, and Harry

NellandHannahslaves
Last Will and Testament of John Showers (includes 2 slaves): “Maryland Register of Wills Records, 1629-1999,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-24150-7145-67?cc=1803986 : accessed 8 March 2016), Baltimore > Wills 1805-1811 vol 8 > image 266 and 267 of 279; Hall of Records, Annapolis.

I also will and bequeath to my said wife two Negroes, namely Nell and Hannah.

In the inventory of the estate of John Shower of Baltimore County, Maryland, dated 31 March 1810 the following slaves were named:

HarryandHannahslaves
Inventory of John Shower (includes 2 slaves): “Maryland Register of Wills Records, 1629-1999,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-24282-1624-18?cc=1803986 : accessed 9 March 2016), Baltimore > Inventories 1809-1811 vol 26 > image 198 of 337; Hall of Records, Annapolis.

1 negro boy named Harry about 7 years old 145.00
1 negro woman named Hannah abt. 17 yrs. old 200.00

Nell and Hannah were given to John’s wife per his will. No further information was given to identify them. In the inventory we see Harry and Hannah. Is Hannah the same person in the 1802 will and the 1810 inventory? She would have been 9 years old at the time the will was written. Harry being only 7 in 1810 was not yet born in 1802. Was Nell the mother of Hannah and Harry? Did Nell die between 1803-1810, perhaps after the birth of Harry?

In 1810 Mary Shower, the widow of John Shower and daughter of my immigrant ancestor Johann Jacob Rupp (aka Jacob Rupe), was found in the census with only one slave in her household. The slave was under 25 years of age. Was this Hannah age 17?

In 1833 Mary Shower died intestate. The inventory of her estate included one slave:

slavehannah
1833 Inventory of the estate of Mary Shower, Book 42 pages 353-355: “Maryland Register of Wills Records, 1629-1999,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-24259-44475-46?cc=1803986 : accessed 9 March 2016), Baltimore > Inventories 1833-1834 vol 42 > image 194 and 195 of 321; Hall of Records, Annapolis.

One negro woman named Hannah about 35 years old, a slave for life 125.00

Hannah may be the same person in the 1802 will of John Shower, the 1810 inventory of John Shower, and the 1833 inventory of Mary Shower. There is however a slight difference in age. Hannah was born about 1793 per the 1810 inventory and about 1798 per the 1833 inventory.

Questions remain: What happened to Nell after the 1802 will was written, to Harry after the 1810 inventory, and to Hannah after the 1833 inventory?

True's statementbestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Slave Name Roll Project: RELEASING Joseph, Jane, Sal, Pat, Isaac, Daniel, Ann, William, Elias

Following my three part series on the slaves of my 5th grand-father James Sims during Black History Month in February 2015 I made a commitment to write a post on a monthly basis until I’ve RELEASED all of the names of slaves owned by my ancestors.

April slipped by without my posting the names of these people I found while researching my Rupp emigrant who came to America in 1752. Johann Jacob Rupp did not own slaves nor did his youngest son, my 5th great-grandfather Henry Rupe. However while doing research on his other children I found his oldest daughter Anna Maria, also known as Mary, married Johannes Schauer, also known as John Shower, and had five children. Their son Adam Shower of Baltimore County, Maryland, died intestate in 1833. His inventory shows he owned nine slaves.

Joseph, Jane, Sal, Pat, Isaac, Daniel, Ann, William, and Elias.

slavesofadamshower
Inventory Book 42 pgs. 348-353 (images 192-194) “Maryland Register of Wills Records, 1629-1999,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-24259-41440-74?cc=1803986 accessed 1 May 2016), Baltimore > Inventories 1833-1834 vol 42 > images 192, 193, 194 of 321; Hall of Records, Annapolis.

One negro man named Joseph about 48 years old, a slave for life $40.00
One negro girl named Jane about 8 years old, a slave for life $65.00
One negro girl named Sal about 5 years old, a slave for life $45.00
One negro woman named Pat about 36 years old, a slave for life $125.00
One negro boy named Isaac about 18 years old, a slave for life $300.00
One negro boy named Daniel about 17 years old, a slave for life $300.00
One negro girl named Ann about 13 years old, a slave for life $180.00
One negro boy named William about 11 years old, a slave for life $155.00
One negro boy named Elias about 3 years of, a slave for life $50.00True's statementbestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Where I Found the Land Records of my RUPE Ancestors in Maryland

So much like a never-ending detective story, Cathy, you think the mystery is going to be solved … only to be continued 😀

Janice Webster Brown of Cow Hampshire, New Hampshire’s History Blog wrote this comment in the Genealogy Bloggers group on Facebook about my most recent post Proof of Patriotic Service During the Revolutionary War for Jacob RUPE in the series on my 6th great-grandfather. I was flattered by this compliment which makes the research and writing more rewarding.

To help solve some of the mystery in Jacob RUPE’s history I turned to MDLandRec, a digital image retrieval system for land records and indices for Maryland counties. The service is currently being provided at no charge to individuals who apply for a user name and password.

Our kids always make fun of us for reading the directions before we set up any kind of electronics in our home. I admit I didn’t do this for the Maryland Land Records site. I stumbled a bit before I found my way around. I should have taken some time to look at their Help guides.

My advice is to take a look at the guides, don’t do what I did. It would have saved me some time as I was under the false impression, after my first login, that the land record instruments were only available and/or searchable for 1964-2016. I was going to give up on the site however all searches for information on earlier land records in Maryland pointed to the site. Also, the Wiki on FamilySearch Maryland Land and Property was very helpful in confirming the older records are on the site.

Getting back to the MDLandRec site, for early records you need to click on Active Indices (see p. 24 of 38 in the other MD counties guide). There are likely many different scenarios for searching for specific land records due to what is available for each county. I’d like to give an example using my Jacob RUPE and one of his land records I was searching for.

Jacob RUPE bought Rhineharts Folly in Baltimore County in 1770 from Frederick Rhinehart. This was a “known,” not a fact until I could prove it, found in Theron A. Rupe’s narrative “From Oberhoffen to America” as mentioned in my posts, Rhineharts Folly in Pipe Creek Hundred, Baltimore County, Maryland and Proof of Patriotic Service During the Revolutionary War for Jacob RUPE.

For this time period and county, MDLandRec has a Grantee Index 1653-1849, Grantor Index 1655-1849, and an Index for 1659-1800. There is also a Tract Index 1798-1851.

Since I knew the names of both the grantor and grantee as well as the tract name I could use any of the first three indices. The Tract Index begins in 1798, too late for the 1770 deed I was searching for. The Tract Index would prove helpful in tracking future owners of Rhineharts Folly but first things first. To use the grantee and grantor indices you need to know the meaning of the two.

If you work with land records, you have to keep these straight. Grantors sell; grantees buy. Or, put another way, the grantor is the sell-or and the grantee is the buy-ee. (Yes, it’s silly, but it helps keep them straight!)
~ Amy Johnson Crow in her post 5 Misspelled, Misused Genealogy Words… and How to Get Them Right

Since my 6th great-grandfather Jacob RUPE was the grantee or buyer I checked the Grantee Index:

1770granteeindexrupe
An Archives of Maryland Online Publication https://mdlandrec.net/

With the information found on the index (No., Folio, and letters AL at the top of the column)  I went back to the search page and entered Book B and Page 265. The search turned up two results – one description being AL B.

searchresult
An Archives of Maryland Online Publication https://mdlandrec.net/

This took me directly to the land deed.

1770landdeed
An Archives of Maryland Online Publication https://mdlandrec.net/

The deed continues on pages 266 through 268. Instead of saving each page separately I entered the page range into the bottom box on right. This allows the display of up to 10 pages. This is such a great feature! It allowed me to download the entire document in one file eliminating the necessity of merging the pages into one document.

1770landdeedsource
An Archives of Maryland Online Publication https://mdlandrec.net/

I took a screenshot with the page range (4 images) to help with my source citation. The land record and source citation “reminder” were saved to Jacob RUPE’s media file with the file names (MRIN Filing System):
MRIN00554 1770 Frederick Rinehart to Jacob Rupe land deed.pdf
MRIN00554 1770 Frederick Rinehart to Jacob Rupe land deed source.png

This done I was able to move on to the next search until I found ALL the land records I was looking for plus a few bonus ones:

  • 1770 Frederick RINEHART to Jacob RUPE
  • 1778 Christopher SHROD to George WEAVER
  • 1785 George WEAVER sold land to Peter ZEP
  • 1787 Jacob RUB to Johannes SHOWER
  • 1787 Martin RUB to Peter TRUSHAL
  • 1788 Jacob RUB to Henry RUB
  • 1793 Henry RUB to Jacob BOBLITS
  • 1798 Henry ROOP to Jacob BOBLITS

The files have been attached to each individual in my database. Next, I will write the source citations and transcribe the documents. I’ve already read through them and found several clues which confirm known facts and others which may disprove some assumptions. And the story continues…..

bestwishescathy1

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann Jacob RUPP
Parents: Johann Jacob RUPP Jr. and Maria Apollonia FETZER
Spouse: Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER
Parents of spouse: Johannes NONNENMACHER and Maria Barbara STAMBACH
Whereabouts: Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, Pennsylvania, Maryland
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 6th great-grandfather

  1. Johann Jacob RUPP
  2. Heinrich Thomas “Henry” RUPE Sr.
  3. James ROOP
  4. Gordon H. ROOP
  5. Gordon Washington ROOP
  6. Walter Farmer ROOP
  7. Myrtle Hazel ROOP
  8. Fred Roosevelt Dempsey
  9. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Save

Proof of Patriotic Service During the Revolutionary War for Jacob RUPE

In a recent post, I wrote about leaving my comfort zone as Maryland research is new to me and researching Rhineharts Folly, the land owned in Baltimore County, Maryland, by my 6th great-grandfather Johann Jacob RUPP (1723-aft.1792), known as Jacob RUPE in America.

1761plat
An Archives of Maryland electronic publication. Courtesy of Maryland State Archives

I found the original 1755 patent of 12 acres by Derick Rheinhart and the 1763 re-survey of 115 acres (adding 103 acres to the original 12) by Frederick Rinehart. The wording of the two surveys and the description of the land showed Derick RHEINHART and Frederick RINEHART were the same man.

I don’t have the following deeds however I know they exist (spelling of the surnames may be variants):

  • the 1770 sale of 115 acres by Frederick RINEHART to Jacob RUPE
  • the 1787 sale of 15 acres by Jacob RUPE to Johannes SCHAUER
  • the 1788 sale of 100 acres by Jacob RUPE to Heinrich RUPE
  • the 1793 sale of 100 acres by Heinrich RUPE to Jacob BOBLITZ.

Without these records I cannot be certain Rheinharts Folly was owned by Jacob RUPE and later his son Henry. (MDLANDREC, a digital image retrieval system for land records and indices for Baltimore County, is on my to-do list – learn how to use it for retrieving the land records).

The next step in the process of proving my ancestor owned this particular piece of land was interrupted when I discovered the 1783 Supply Tax assessments for Baltimore County, Maryland. The name of the land owned by the taxpayer was included on this tax list. Would it prove the land owned by my Jacob RUPE was the land seen in the plat above?

The DAR and SAR accept this supply tax as evidence taxpayers performed Patriotic Service. Taxpayers were persons listed with property or men who were taxed 15 shillings. Only the persons listed as paupers were not taxpayers.

The Act to Raise Supplies for the Year 1783 was passed by the general assembly in the November 1782 session.

1783supplytaxact
General Assembly, Laws, MSA S966-20 (Nov. 1782 Session, p. 329, Ch. 6. (http://aomol.msa.maryland.gov/000001/000203/html/am203–329.html : accessed 1 March 2015). Courtesy of Maryland State Archives

CHAP. VI
An ACT to raise the supplies for the year seventeen hundred and eighty-three.
A tax of 25f is imposed on every £. 100’s worth of property; one half thereof shall be collected by distress and sale, after the 20th of May next, in specie, unless 10f thereof be paid by the 1st of March, in fresh pork, at 27f6; barrelled pork, at £. 4 10 0 for each barrel containing 220lb; wheat, at 5f3; new crop tobacco, at 10f, and an allowance of four per cent. for cask; or fine barrelled flour, at 15f the short hundred, and an allowance of 3f for the barrel.  In case of thus discharging 10f, the party so doing is then chargeable with only 2f6 more in specie, for the first payment.  In like manner, the other half of the tax shall be levied after the 15th of September, unless, before that day, 10f of it be paid in specifics, as aforesaid, in which case only 2f6 will be due in specie.

One fifth of the specie received under this act is appropriated to the use of congress; the residue is first appropriated to the support of the civil list; and the money arising from the sale of the specifics shall, in the first place, be applied to the discharge of a year’s interest on specie certificates.

1783supplytaxact2
General Assembly, Laws, MSA S966-20 (Nov. 1782 Session, p. 343, Ch. 34. (http://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/speccol/sc2900/sc2908/000001/000203/html/am203–343.html : accessed 1 March 2016). Courtesy of Maryland State Archives

CHAP. XXIV
A Supplement to the act to raise the supplies for the year seventeen hundred and eighty-three.
In this act, each collector is required, by the 10th day of every month (beginning with June next) until all the taxes due in his county be collected, to make out an alphabetical list of those who shall have paid their tax, before the 1st day of the month.  One copy of such list he is to lodge with his county clerk, and another copy he shall send, by the first opportunity, to the intendant.  This provision was calculated to stigmatize all such as, at that critical time, should neglect so important a duty as that of punctually paying their taxes.

The 1783 Supply Tax assessments for Baltimore County have been transcribed and are available here. The images of the tax lists are also online.

1783pipecreek
The cover sheet of the tax list of the Pipe Creek Hundred in Baltimore County, Maryland, courtesy of the Maryland State Archives.
1783tax1
The sheet Jacob RUPE, aka Jacob ROOP, was found on, courtesy of the Maryland State Archives.

Jacob RUPE was on the 1783 Supply Tax list, his surname was spelled ROOP. The items included on the list were the owners names: Jacob ROOP and lands names: Tetrix Folly.

Why Tetrix Folly and not Rhineharts Folly? The next person entered on the list was Tetrick RINEHART who did not own land but paid taxes on other property. This appears to be a variation of the name of the previous owner of Rhineharts Folly seen on the land records as Derick RHEINHART and Frederick RINEHART. Jacob ROOP’s land called Tetrix Folly had 115 acres, the same amount as Rhineharts Folly. Rinehart’s first name on the tax list in the possessive form would be Tetrick’s and likely pronounced as spelled – Tetrix.

The value of Jacob ROOP’s land was 30 and improvements were valued at 20. He had no slaves, 3 horses, and 7 black cattle. His horses and cattle were valued at 41 and other property at 12 giving a total of 103 for all property. The assessment totaled 1£5f9d. There was 1 free male and 3 white inhabitants in the household.

It was 1783, Jacob and Barbara’s older children were married and no longer living at home. Their youngest son Heinrich or Henry was close to 18 years old and not yet married. Note: all households in the Pipe Creek Hundred had only 1 free male listed in the household which appears to be the head of household and all other person were included in the total inhabitants in the household. Did the free male in the household have to be 18 or 21 years of age to be included in the count?

As an aside the following persons were also found on the 1783 tax list:

  • Michael ROOF, on the same page as Jacob, may be his son Michael b. 1749
  • George WEAVER, husband of Barbara RUPE, daughter of Jacob
  • John SHOWERS, husband of Anna Maria RUPE, daughter of Jacob
  • Martin ROOP was in BA North Hundred, may be Jacob’s son b. 1751

What began as a search to prove Rhineharts Folly belonged to my 6th great-grandfather Jacob RUPE turned into the discovery of his being on a supply tax list. Is this tax list proof enough for patriotic service during the Revolutionary War? Both the DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution) an the SAR (Sons of the American Revolution) consider the payment of such “supply” taxes enacted by special state laws as patriotic service. (see further reading below Genealogy Sketch box)

The next step would be to locate the land deeds proving Jacob RUPE owned Rhineharts Folly and was a resident of Baltimore County at the time the supply tax was paid. If I find only records for Rhineharts Folly, will his land being named Tetrix Folly on the tax list still allow acceptance of his patriotic service during the Revolutionary War? Or am I only seeing more complications?

 bestwishescathy1

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann Jacob RUPP
Parents: Johann Jacob RUPP Jr. and Maria Apollonia FETZER
Spouse: Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER
Parents of spouse: Johannes NONNENMACHER and Maria Barbara STAMBACH
Whereabouts: Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, Pennsylvania, Maryland
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 6th great-grandfather

  1. Johann Jacob RUPP
  2. Heinrich Thomas “Henry” RUPE Sr.
  3. James ROOP
  4. Gordon H. ROOP
  5. Gordon Washington ROOP
  6. Walter Farmer ROOP
  7. Myrtle Hazel ROOP
  8. Fred Roosevelt Dempsey
  9. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

Further reading material:

Is That Service Right? by the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution

Maryland State Archives MARYLAND INDEXES (Assessment of 1783, Index) 1783 Baltimore County MSA S 1437 (Transcription of the 1783 Supply List)

Overview of Maryland Revolutionary War Era Taxes as Proof of Patriotic Service for the National Society Sons of the American Revolution

Maryland Tax Laws in Force During the American Revolution

Maryland Revolutionary Tax Records

Baltimore County, Maryland – 1783 Supply Tax, Courtesy of Maryland State Archives

West Virginia Society Sons of the American Revolution Proving Patriotic Service by Revolutionary Taxes

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Rhineharts Folly in Pipe Creek Hundred, Baltimore County, Maryland

According to Theron A. Rupe who wrote “From Oberhoffen to America” our 1752 immigrant Johann Jacob RUPP bought a 115 acres tract of land called Rhineharts Folly in Baltimore County in 1770 with Pennsylvania money.  In 1788 he sold 15 acres of the property to Johann Shaur. The new owner of this small part was very likely his son-in-law Johannes SCHAUER who married his oldest daughter Anna Maria RUPE in 1771. The remaining 100 acres were sold to his youngest son Heinrich RUPE for a fraction of what he paid for it in 1770. Johann Jacob and his wife Maria Barbara were still alive in 1792 a year before Heinrich sold Rhineharts Folly to Jacob BOBLITZ in 1793. The 1770, 1788, and 1793 land records have not been found but…

Last August Eileen A. Souza of Old Bones Genealogy wrote about a unique collection of land records in her post The Tracey Collection: Colonial Land Records in Carroll County, Maryland. I was in the middle of writing about my children’s ancestors from Luxembourg but took a short hour to look into the collection.

I knew the land owned by Jacob RUPE, as Johann Jacob RUPP was known in America, was named Rhineharts Folly making it easy to locate these three cards in the Tracey collection.1

1755RinehartsFolly12a
http://mdhistory.net/msaref07/tracey_fr_wa_cr/html/msa_scm13085-0214.html
1761RinehartsFOllyresurvey115a2
http://mdhistory.net/msaref07/tracey_fr_wa_cr/html/msa_scm13085-0214.html
1761RinehartsFollyresurvey115a
http://mdhistory.net/msaref07/tracey_fr_wa_cr/html/msa_scm13085-0215.html

In 1755 12 acres of land were granted to FreDerick Rinehart on the north branch of the great Pipe Creek. In 1761 it was increased to 115 acres. Other information on the cards led to this map.

marylandlandmap
http://mdhistory.net/msaref07/tracey_fr_wa_cr/html/msa_scm13086-0014.html

I was able to pinpoint Rhineharts Folly in quadrant G81 per the index cards. At the time the land was in Baltimore County, not Carroll County as seen here. Carroll was created in 1837 from parts of Baltimore and Frederick counties.

mapG81
Enlargement of the corner of the above map.

And The Search Continues

As I am once again working on this immigrant’s story and family I went in search of anything more I could find on Rhineharts Folly.

Eileen’s series Where to Research in Carroll County, Maryland was mostly about libraries and societies which can be visited for research but she also included the Maryland State Archives which have an online site.

I left my comfort zone (Maryland research is new to me) and began searching for land deeds for Rhineharts Folly. On the Maryland State Archives site, I found these index cards. (Index to the database here)

1755RhinehartsFollycard12a
Maryland State Archives, Maryland Indexes (Patents, Index) MSA S1426, online http://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/stagser/s1400/s1426/r/pdf/54rhe-richards,joh.pdf
1763RineheartsFolly115a
Maryland State Archives, Maryland Indexes (Patents, Index) MSA S1426, online http://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/stagser/s1400/s1426/r/pdf/54riggin,w-riz.pdf

Notice on these index cards the location is seen as Now Carroll County.

I have to admit I was bewildered by the Maryland State Archives (MSA) site and was blindly clicking here and there in search of anything I could find about the piece of land bought by Jacob RUPE. When I slowed down I found MSA Baltimore County Land Survey, Subdivision, and Condominium Plats, used the advanced search for Rheinhart or Rinehart, and found these:

1755searchresult
Courtesy of Maryland State Archives
1763searchresult
Courtesy of Maryland State Archives

SEVEN IMAGES!  I was doing the genealogy happy dance and will be posting this link to Cheryl Hudson Passey’s Celebration Sunday~Genealogy Happy Dance! 

I found the original 1755 patent of 12 acres by Derick Rheinhart

Baltimore County
By virtue of a Common Warrant granted out of his Lordships Land Office on the 25th day of August 1755 to Lay out for Derick Rheinhart of Baltimore County twelve Acres of Land
I Nicholas Ruxton Gay Deputy Surveyor of said County have Surveyed and Laid out for and in the name of him the said Derick Rheinhart a tract or parcel of Land lying & being in the County aforesaid. Begining at a bounded white Oak Standing on the North side of a branch descending into Great Pipe Creek, and runing thence West fourteen perches; South thirty five deg. West Seventy five perches; North eighty two deg. East fifty Six perches; and then with a Straight line to the begining containing and laid out for twelve Acres more or Less to be held of the Manor of Baltimore by the name of Rheinharts folly. December 20th 1755
Ruxton Gay DSBC
Platted perch a Scale of 100 perches in an Inch
[Transcribed by Cathy Meder-Dempsey 27 February 2016]

and the 1763 re-survey of 115 acres (adding 103 acres to the original 12) by Frederick Rinehart. The wording of the two surveys and the description of the land shows Derick Rheinhart and Frederick Rinehart were the same man.

1761landdeed3
An Archives of Maryland electronic publication. Courtesy of Maryland State Archives

Baltimore County
By virtue of a a Special Warrant Granted ou of his Lordships Land Office bearing date the ninth day of June Anno Domini 1761 to Lay out and resurvey for Federick Rineheart of Baltimore County a tract or Parcell of Land Called Rinehearts folly Lying and being on the County Afforesaid Originally on the 20th day of December Anno Dom. 1755 Granted unto him the Said Frederick Rineheart for Twelve acres under new Rent nevertheless Correcting & amending any Errors in the Originall Survey and by my out Landes (sic, lines?) add any Vacant Land thereto Contiguous be the Same Cultivated or Otherwise.
I William Smith Deputy Surveyer of Baltimore County have Carefully Re-Surveyd and Laid out the afforesaid Tract of Land According to its Antunts (sic) metes & Bounds Containing and now Laid out for Twelve acres more or Less & I have by Virtue of the afforesaid warrant added to the out Bounds thereof the Quantity of one Hundred and Three Acres of Vacant Land Beginning for the Said Vacancy at the Begining of the Originall Survey as Marked on the Platt with the Letter A and have ?ausde the whole into one Intire tract Vizt. Lying in Baltimore County Begining at a Bounded White oak Standing on the North Side of a Branch descending into Pipe Creek and running thence North Twenty two degrees East forty Perches North Twenty Eight degrees East Sixty Perches North East Seventy two Perches North Thirteen degrees East

1761landdeed4
An Archives of Maryland electronic publication. Courtesy of Maryland State Archives

Twenty Eight Perches North Seventy Three degrees East Twenty two Perches South five degrees West Sixty Perches South Twelve degrees East one Hundrd Perches South Eighty degrees West one hundred Seventy three Perches onto the third Line of the Originall Survey then Bounding on the Originall Survey to the Begining Vvy. South Eighty two degrees West fifty two Perches North thirty five degrees East seventy five Perches & then with a straigt Line to the Begining Containing and Laid out for one Hundred & fifteen Acres more or Less to be held of the manor of Baltimore by the name of Rignhearts folley Resurvey. December the 4th 1761
Wm Smith DSBC
Platted perch a scale of  100 perches in an Inch
[Transcribed by Cathy Meder-Dempsey 27 February 2016]

1761plat
An Archives of Maryland electronic publication. Courtesy of Maryland State Archives

What did all this searching get me? A plat of the land called Rhineharts Folly – the first plat I have ever found for one of my ancestors! Or is it?

All I need is the 1770 sale to Jacob RUPE, the 1788 sales of the same land to Johannes SCHAUER and Heinrich RUPE and the 1793 sale of land to Jacob BOBLITZ. But isn’t there another way to prove the land owned by my Jacob RUPE was the land seen in the plat above?

Why was it important to learn Derick RHEINHART and Frederick RINEHART were the same man? Stay tuned for a new discovery in my search.

 

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann Jacob RUPP
Parents: Johann Jacob RUPP Jr. and Maria Apollonia FETZER
Spouse: Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER
Parents of spouse: Johannes NONNENMACHER and Maria Barbara STAMBACH
Whereabouts: Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, Pennsylvania, Maryland
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 6th great-grandfather

    1. Johann Jacob RUPP
    2. Heinrich Thomas “Henry” RUPE Sr.
    3. James ROOP
    4. Gordon H. ROOP
    5. Gordon Washington ROOP
    6. Walter Farmer ROOP
    7. Myrtle Hazel ROOP
    8. Fred Roosevelt Dempsey
    9. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

 

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. Dr. Arthur G. Tracey patent/tract index and map locations for Carroll, Frederick, and Washington Counties, an ebook edition of the original microfilm prepared by Dr. Edward C. Papenfuse and Sarah Patterson, Maryland State Archives, October 2009. (http://mdhistory.net/msaref07/tracey_fr_wa_cr/html/index.html : accessed 21 December 2015)