52 Ancestors: #32 DNA Discoveries in the WILDINGER Family

Last year my brother had his DNA tested and turned the results over to me. As I write these last articles on my maternal 4th great-grandparents, I will be checking his matches to see if any hold the key to open a door in a brick wall on this side of the family tree. These brick walls being mostly descendants of my maternal ancestors who have not been traced mainly due to emigration.

I have been waiting impatiently to write about this couple, Wilhelm WILTINGER and Margaretha WELTER. This is what I know about their lives and where I found information which has not all been documented.

Where the Information Was Found

Wilhelm WILTINGER and Margaretha WELTER of Ernzen, Germany, were my 4th great-grandparents. The bits and pieces I have for them come mostly from Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 – such a long title for the family book of the town of Ernzen and environs. I call it simply FB Ernzen.

Church records are available online at FamilySearch for Ernzen up to 1797 as it was then part of the parish of Echternach in Luxembourg. Civil records for births from about 1798 to 1907, marriages from 1798 to 1937, and deaths from 1798 to 1987 are not online. Although a short 20 minutes drive from where I live, the Kreisarchiv in Bitburg, Germany, houses these records. Tentative plans are being made to visit the archives with my genealogy society Luxracines next spring.

From WILTINGER to WILDINGER

Wilhelm WILTINGER was born about 1770 in Ettelbrück, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. He was the son of Michel WILTINGER and Margaretha DIESBURG of Ettelbrück. These two “facts” were likely taken from his 1849 death record.[1] As he died in Ernzen, this record will have to be obtained from the archives in Bitburg. I am hoping the person who took the information off of the death record may have made an error in noting both parents were from Ettelbrück.

I have tried to shed more light on Wilhelm’s parents. I am inclined to think Margaretha DIESBURG was not originally from Ettelbrück. My guess is she is from the DIESBURG line which originated on Diesburgerhof near Ferschweiler, the next village over from Ernzen. I found a child with the same name born in 1744 who would be a perfect match. Her family group is recorded in the FB Ferschweiler[2] and I found her in the 1766 census living with one of her married sisters.[3] She was not yet married. This leaves me with a four year period from 1766-1770 when Michel and Margaretha could have met and married. But where? Marriages in Luxembourg have been indexed for the time period and I have tried all variations of the names without locating a marriage. It has crossed my mind that a different surname may have been used by the groom, i.e. a house name.

1766 Luxembourg Census.[3]
As for Wilhelm’s father I have searched all available GEDCOM files online to find persons with the WILDINGER name – the spelling which has been used in my family from 1798 to present. It is my mother’s maiden name. The only hits I get on the Luxracines website (members only access to GEDCOMs) are my own file. I am beginning to suspect that while my ancestor’s name may have been WILTINGER and changed to WILDINGER, the original surname may have evolved to the more common and widespread WILDANGER. Most were found in the Girst and Dickweiler area and spread out to Echternach. These are all in Luxembourg.

For now Michel WILTINGER and Margaretha DIESBURG, the parents of Wilhelm WILTINGER will remain a brick wall. A more time consuming one-name study of the WILDANGER individuals in Luxembourg and the nearby German area may the only way to solve this brick wall. Or could DNA also be part of the solution.

The WELTER line

Margaretha WELTER was the daughter of Michael WELTER and Katharina KLEIN. Michael and Katharina married in Ernzen on 22 November 1764.[4]

1764 Marriage Record for Michael Welter and Katharina Klein.[4]
They had not yet had any children when the 1766 census was taken. Their names were spelled Michel and Catherine and they were living in a KLEIN household.[5]

1766 Luxembourg Census[5]
Their first child was born the year the census was enumerated, followed by a set of twins in 1768, a son in 1770, another set of twins in 1773, and finally their youngest in 1777. Both sets of twins were a boy and a girl.[6]

1777 Baptismal Record[7]
Margaretha was their youngest, born and baptized on 18 April 1777 in Ernzen (present-day Germany). Her godparents were Margaretha KLEIN and Nicolaus HUSS, both of Ernzen.[7]

A Marriage Before 1798?

Margaretha married Wilhelm WILTINGER before 1798. The marriage is estimated from the time their first known child was born. No marriage record has been found. Church and civil records were checked in Ettelbrück and Echternach to no avail.

Wilhelm and Margaretha had the following children, all born in Ernzen:[8]

  1. Nicolas born on 29 September 1798.
  2. Elisabeth born on 21 August 1805.
  3. Franciscus “Franz” born on 6 Aug 1810. He died on 8 December 1812 in Ernzen.
  4. Bernardus born on 12 May 1813.

The only daughter Elisabeth married Dominik WEBER (1803-1840), son of Johann WEBER and Katharina PETRI of Hoesdorf, on 13 December 1831 in Ernzen.[9] Hoesdorf (Luxembourgish: Héischdref) is a village in the commune of Reisdorf, in eastern Luxembourg.

Margaretha WELTER, the mother of Nicolas, Elisabeth, and Bernard, died on 8 January 1833 in Ernzen.[9] Her oldest son Nicolas was 35 years old and still single. Her youngest son Bernard was going on 20. Her daughter Elizabeth had been married a little more than a year.

On 12 October 1833, nine months after the death of her mother, Elizabeth gave birth to her first child, a daughter Maria. She chose her brother Nicolas to be the godfather. Maria THEIS of Hoesdorf was the godmother.[9]

My third great-grandparents, Nicolas WILDINGER and Catherine SCHRAMEN married on 18 January 1834 in Ferschweiler.[10] Catherine was the daughter of Michael SCHRAMEN and Elizabeth SCHMITT. She was born on 23 October 1812 in Ferschweiler and was baptized the next day.[11] Their story can be found here: 52 Ancestors: #42 The WILDINGER-SCHRAMEN Family of Ferschweiler .

Elisabeth’s husband Dominik WEBER died on 9 May 1840 in Ernzen and was buried two days later.[9] He left Elisabeth with four children.

Wilhelm WILTINGER, likely now using the WILDINGER spelling, died on 28 September 1849 in Ernzen and was buried two days later.[1]

Where Are the Children?

Wilhelm’s death came at a time when many were thinking about moving across the newly established border to Luxembourg or even further abroad, to America. Elisabeth’s brother-in-law Theodor JARDIN went to America with all of his living children after the death of his wife Katharina WELTER, sister of Dominik, in 1855.[12] Elisabeth and her brother Bernard had been close to the JARDIN family, both being godparents to JARDIN children.

Elisabeth WILDINGER was 53 years old and had been widowed seventeen years when she obtained an Auswanderungsgenehmigung (emigration approval) on 9 October 1857 for herself and her two children, Mathias, born on 10 November 1840, and Maria, born on 12 October 1833. The petition was admitted to the hearing without a stamp due to poverty. Elisabeth made her mark on the petition.[13]

There is no mention of where the family immigrated to or of the other two children, Anna Katharina born 1835 or Theodor born in 1838. However….

Richard Schaffner was not the first to compile a family book for the parish of Ernzen. A copy of Familienbuch Ernzen 1 (1823-1900) is in the parish of Ernzen according to Schaffner. He does not mention the compiler’s name. In the entry for Elisabeth WILDINGER in Schaffner’s version, he notes on page 45 of the first book the following information was found: “Die Witwe Elis. Weber zog im Jahr 1857 mit ihren 4 Kindern und ihrem Bruder Bernard Wildinger nach Nordamerika.” The widow Elisabeth WEBER moved in the year 1857 with her four children and her brother Bernard Wildinger to North America.

Early on I searched for Elisabeth and her brother Bernard WILDINGER in the USA but never found either of them or her WEBER children. Perhaps they went to Canada or Mexico. Not having experience with these countries I left this research problem for another day.

My third great-grandparents Catherine SCHRAMEN and Nicolas WILDINGER had five children born between 1835 and 1852. Catherine died on 2 November 1869 in Ferschweiler and was buried on 4 November 1869.[10] Four and a half years later Nicolas, the only child of Wilhem WILTINGER and Margaretha WELTER to remain in Germany, died on 3 June 1874 in Ferschweiler.[10] They left three living children, two of whom have been traced. All that was known of their youngest son Peter is that he fled from military service – “militärflüchtig laut Anzeiger z. Amtsbl. Trier 1873, Seite 243.”[10]

Let’s Talk About DNA

As mentioned earlier I now manage my brother’s DNA. As our mother is from Luxembourg (and all of her ancestry is centered in this tiny area) the DNA we share with her is either not getting many matches or is difficult to find within the thousands of matches showing on AncestryDNA.

There are several ways to sort matches on AncestryDNA. The most obvious (easiest) are those who have matching ancestors in their trees followed by matching surnames. Many users have private trees. When you search for a surname, matches with private trees will turn up in the list but you cannot access to the information and therefore do not know who their ancestor is with the surname.

Even today searching for the WILDINGER surname on AncestryDNA turns up zero hits. Checking the box to Include similar surnames is not helpful as it turns up too many matches. I tried the known spellings and still had no results.

Then in April 2017, a match was found which looked promising.

DNA match’s profile on Ancestry

This predicted 4th cousin match showed PETERS as a shared surname. My Peters line is not a German line. There were no Shared matches with this person. Shared matches are only listed up to 4th cousins.

Clicking on Location I found he had a WEBER ancestor from Ernzen. This is not one of my ancestral surnames and at the time I was not expecting a match to a family on our maternal side. Taking a closer look at the attached tree I realized the connection could be WELDINGER on his tree. A spelling I had not tried.

Pedigree chart of the match on Ancestry.

Predicted 4th cousin is a 4C1R

The year of birth for the daughter of the WEBER-WELDINGER couple in the pedigree chart above is 1818. My 3rd great-grand aunt Elisabeth WILDINGER was born in 1805 and would have been only 13 when this child was born. Even with this error, it looked promising as the husband’s name matched that of Elisabeth’s husband and the location fit.

I got to do US research – checking census, BMD, etc. – and found Elisabeth WILDINGER had emigrated to America before 1860. She was living in Berwick in Seneca County, Ohio, with her married daughter Catherine in 1860. She was listed with the surname WEAVER. Her daughter was only 24, born abt. 1835, and a good match for the child seen in the pedigree chart above with year of birth being 1818. Although she was still living, I have not found Elisabeth in the 1870 or 1880 census. She died on 10 March 1891 in Big Spring, Seneca County, Ohio, at the age of 86 years.[14]

1891 Death Entry for Elisabeth WEAVER.[14]
Two of her children were also found. Catherine, who was the ancestor of the match with my brother, and her younger brother Mathias. I have not found the older daughter Maria or the son Theodor nor have I found the immigration records. I entered this match’s line back to my WILDINGER ancestor into the tree I have attached to my brother’s DNA.

This was done only after confirming this match’s line back to my WILDINGER ancestor. The tree has only the direct ancestors – no siblings, children, etc. I am considering the pros and cons of adding each confirmed match’s line back to the MRCA (most recent common ancestor). This tree includes sources but I have not attached records from Ancestry. I don’t usually work with it and have not considered the hints (shaky leaves) that are showing up.

2nd Great-Grand Uncle Discovered

However while entering this match’s line, I took the time to check the hints for Ancestry Member Trees. I was surprised to find Wilhelm WILTINGER and Margaretha WELTER’s grandson Peter WILDINGER through their son Nicolas (my third great-grandfather) in four trees. All four had my Nicolas as the earliest known ancestor. No mention of Wilhelm and Margaretha. One member tree has for Peter: “Killed in WWI Action on the German Lines” in 1873. That is not what I would call a reliable statement.

The other three member trees are for a Peter WELDINGER who married in Illinois, had children there, and later moved to Iowa. The 1900, 1910, and 1920 census show he came to America in 1870 and was naturalized in 1880 (U.S. Naturalization Record confirms 30 October 1880). If this Peter WELDINGER is my second great-granduncle (there is presently no match or the owner/descendant has not done a test) then he must have fled from military service by emigrating to America.

Another DNA discovery was made as several new matches showed up when I did a new search for the locations Ernzen and Ferschweiler while writing this. I will have to work through these first but it looks promising as one of them may be the key to unlock the door in the DIESBURG brick wall.

Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 (compiled in 2000), p. 246, Family #869. Wiltinger-Welter.
[2] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei Sancta Lucia Ferschweiler mit: Diesburgerhof (ab 1803) und L(a)eisenhof (ab1830) 1680-1899, PDF (Kordel, 1999), p. 43-44, Family #193. Diesburg-Schmitt.
[3] Luxembourg, Dénombrement, 1766 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Archives Générales du Royaume, Bruxelles), Decanat de Bittbourg v. 1 A-K > Feischveiler (paroisse d’Echternach) > Image 250 of 753. Household Nr. 13, Mathias Petri. (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSLL-M7DK-Y?i=249&cat=1184675 : accessed 6 October 2017).
[4] Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Echternach > Mariages, décès 1706-1778 > image 145 of 293. 1764 Marriage Record, right page, 1st entry. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32399-12418-50?cc=2037955 : 9 January 2015).
[5] Luxembourg 1766 Census, Decanat de Bittbourg v. 1 A-K > Erntzen (paroisse d’Echternach) > Image 245 of 753. Household Nr. 7, Jean Klein (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSLL-M7DL-W?cat=1184675 : accessed 6 October 2017).
[6] FB Ernzen, p. 240, Family #846. Welter-Klein.
[7] Luxembourg Church Records, Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 83 of 131. 1777 Baptismal Record, left page, 7th entry. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32399-12819-27?cc=2037955 : accessed 9 November 2016).
[8] FB Ernzen, p. 246, Family #869. Wiltinger-Welter.
[9] Ibid., p. 225, Family #800. Weber-Wildinger.
[10] FB Ferschweiler, p. 349, Family #1625. Wildinger-Schramen.
[11] Ibid., p. 295, Family #1378. Schramen-Schmitt.
[12] FB Ernzen, p. 117-118, Family #380. Jardin-Welter.
[13] Josef Mergen, Die Amerika-Auswanderung aus dem Kreis Bitburg im 19.-Jahrhundert 
[14] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F6CM-WJX : accessed 5 October 2017), Elizabeth Weaver, 10 Mar 1891; citing Death, Big Spring, Seneca, Ohio, United States, source ID v 4 p 216, County courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 388,771.

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Don’t Ignore New Ancestor Discoveries

NewAncestorDiscoveries2We found potential new ancestors—just by looking at your DNA.

A month after my brother’s AncestryDNA results came in I started seeing New Ancestor Discoveries. These are potential new ancestors or relatives who are not already in the attached family tree on the DNA page.

I found this a bit misleading until I realized what we can do with these “shaky leaves” from Ancestry.

The first one to pop up was for the Alexander McDonald Boles DNA Circle. It had 15 members and 3 had DNA matches with my brother. I say “had” because after a few weeks it disappeared.

However before it disappeared the Mary Ann Burks DNA Circle showed up with nearly the same members as the Boles circle. At first I was stumped by the names Mary Ann BURKS and Alexander McDonald BOLES. They could hardly be potential new ancestors as they were born around 1852, a time period in which all my ancestors are known and well documented.

In the Mary Ann Burks DNA Circle are 13 members, 3 of these have matches with my brother. One match belongs to a larger family group of 10 persons – none of the others in this group match my brother.

NewAncestorDiscoveries3After taking a look at the trees of L. and G., two of the matches, I discovered the connection. The Alexander McDonald Boles DNA Circle had shown up because he was the father of Mary Ann BURKS’ children – but they were not married.

NewAncestorDiscoveries1One of their children, J.P. “Hard” BURKS, has been in my database for a dozen years. He was married to Susie REELS, daughter of Isaac “Ike” REELS and Margaret Ann WEAVER. Because I do a lot of collateral research the surname REELS was familiar to me and I knew right away where this was taking me.

Genealogy Happy Dance

In 2004 and 2007 I corresponded with David, a descendant (2nd great-grandson) of Ike REELS through his son Millard Green REELS.

At the time I was part of a group of PETERS researchers working together under the guidance of Paula Kelley Ward who has been doing genealogy for over 40 years. We have her to thank for the work she did on Jordan N. PETERS’ War of 1812 pension file.

When David first first contacted me we were not certain if the wife of Andrew REEL, Susannah PETERS, was a daughter of Zachariah PETERS and Kesiah “Keziah” LIVELY of Franklin County, Virginia. Born about 1815 she was the right age to be their youngest daughter. However at the time there were two groups of PETERS families in Franklin County which further complicated matters. One of English ancestry (ours) and the other being of German ancestry. By process of elimination we determined Susannah had to be the daughter of my 4th great-grandparents, Zach and Keziah.

I needed more than finding the REEL/REELS surname in the families trees of these people who have matches with my brother. When I checked the Shared Matches I found L. and my brother had 4 shared matches – 3 of these have very small or no family trees attached. The 4th has 6 DNA Circle connections with my brother which point to the PETERS family.

ancestorcirclesG. has two shared matches with my brother. One of these has a private tree but since our PETERS group had worked on the collateral lines I recognized her as a descendant of my Jordan N. PETERS through his first wife Mary “Polly” TROUP. As her tree is private she is not in the DNA Circles.

I believe these DNA matches are further proof of the connection between Susannah PETERS, wife of Andrew REEL, and her until now assumed parents, Zachariah PETERS and Kesiah “Keziah” LIVELY. I contacted David, L. and G. about my discovery and am waiting to hear back from them.

Don’t wait to check out your New Ancestor Discoveries. Take a good look at them as soon as they appear because they might disappear as quickly as they showed up. If a circle does disappears and you didn’t have time to look into it, don’t despair. It may show up again. While I was finishing up this post the Alexander McDonald Boles DNA Circle reappeared!

bestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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The Johann Jacob Rupp Family History Spans Two Continents

Back in the 1990’s my 4th cousin twice removed (4C2R) Theron Arvel RUPE consulted the microfilm of the Family History Library for the Protestant church records before 1752 for the little town of Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg in the Bas-Rhin department in Alsace in north-eastern France. Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg is the longest name of any commune in the Bas-Rhin department. It should always be referred to in it’s entirety [previous posts have been corrected] as there is another Oberhoffen in the Bas-Rhin department. Oberhoffen-sur-Moder lies 40 km (25 miles) south of Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg.

oberhoffensignAn entry in Annette Kunsel Burgert’s Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America[1] led Theron to research in Bas-Rhin for the Johann Jacob RUPP family. On pages 413-414 under entry 409 for Rubb, Joh. Jacob of Oberhoffen (Burgert did not give the full name of the town) the following information was given:

Johannes NONNENMACHER of Merckweyler md. 25 November 1721 Maria Barbara STAMBACH, daughter of Jacob STAMBACH of Oberkutzenhausen. They had 5 children: Maria Barbara 1722 md. Joh. Jacob RUBB, Anna Eva 1724-1733, Anna Maria 1727, Christina 1730 md. Joh. Michel WERNER, and Margaretha 1733. After the death of Johannes NONNENMACHER his widow Maria Barbara md. 1734 Joh. Michael FÜNFROCK. She died in 1768 and he emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1770.[1]

Although the above was very helpful for the ancestry of Johann Jacob RUPP’s wife Barbara no information was given for his parents. Nevertheless, Burgert included very important information on the three sons of Jacob RUPP and his wife Barbara – their dates of birth and baptism as well as the name of the church record they were found in: Steinseltz Reformed Kirchenbuch.[1]

Steinseltzrecords
FamilySearch Catalog: https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/350938?availability=Family%20History%20Library

Theron consulted the film (above) and found several entries for Johann Jacob RUPP. The first (below) was for his birth on 8 March 1723 and his baptism the next day. His parents are seen as Johann Jacob RUPP jun. (Jüngere=the younger) and his wife Maria Apolnia (sic). His godparents were Hans Georg RUPP’s son Johann Peter, Peter THOMAS’ son Johann Jacob, and Johann Philipp ERLMANN’s daughter Anna Juliana. Hans Georg RUPP was an older brother of the father of the child. The relationship of the other two sponsors has not been researched.

1723baptism
Photocopy of Film Number: 775041. Notizen 1737, 1758 Taufen 1685-1787 Konfirmationen 1689-1792 Heiraten 1685-1787 Tote 1685-1786 Taufen, Heiraten, Tote 1789-1790, 1792. International Film of the Family History Library. Accessed by Theron A. Rupe in the 1990s.

As fate would have it, also on the same page of the church book was the birth and baptism of a set of twins born to Johann Jacob RUPP sen. (Senior=the elder) and his wife Anna Catharina (2. above) At the time Theron, or the person helping him with deciphering and translating, thought the elder RUPP was the father of the younger RUPP and followed the elder’s trail back. Rupp Sen. was the son of another man named Johann Jacob RUPP. Confusing? At the time it seemed logical and the line of Jacob RUPP b. 1723 was seen going back two more generations with father and grandfather having the same name.

If you take another look at the FamilySearch catalog entry for the church records of Steinseltz, under Notes you will see the records once available only on FHL film have been online since 20 July 2010 at the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin at this direct link to the church and civil records.

Access to the Archives of the Bas-Rhin is free. To access the site you must agree to their conditions by checking the box at the bottom “J’accepte ces conditions” (I accept these conditions). These are in French and in a nutshell allow you to use the images for your own personal use. You are not allowed to distribute them to the public or third parties without permission. If you wish to share them on the internet or in a publication you must sign a license for the public release of the images and send it to the Bas-Rhin archives for approval. This applies to commercial and non-commercial use. A fee may be applied when the use is of a commercial nature. There are several different variants of the license depending on the use of the images. Once you have agreed to the conditions, by checking the box, you may proceed to the graphic version or the adapted version of the site.

I learned about the records being online in May 2013 and found about 130 church records for RUPP individuals for the time period 1685-1752 within days but it took a bit longer to figure out where they belonged in the RUPP family tree.

The Most Important Discovery

Hans Barthol RUPP was the father of the younger Johann Jacob RUPP. Johann Jacob RUPP the elder was NOT the father of Johann Jacob RUPP the younger. They were born two years apart and most likely were cousins. Johann Jacob (father of Johann Jacob sen.) and Hans Barthol (father of Johann Jacob jun.) had an 8 years difference in age and died the same year. They were the only RUPP men of similar age during the time period in the Steinseltz church records. No reference to their parents was made in the records found. My assumption at this time is they may have been brothers. Further research will take me to Lembach and Wissembourg for Protestant church records before 1685 and more specifically during the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648) most likely the period in which Hans Barthol RUPP’s parents were born and married.

coverofsteinseltzchurchbook
Photocopy of Film Number: 775041. Notizen 1737, 1758 Taufen 1685-1787 Konfirmationen 1689-1792 Heiraten 1685-1787 Tote 1685-1786 Taufen, Heiraten, Tote 1789-1790, 1792. International Film of the Family History Library. Accessed by Theron A. Rupe in the 1990s.

Above is the title page the Protestant church register of Steinseltz. This is from the LDS film and not an image from the Bas-Rhin archives site. It is in this register that all information was found for the RUPP family from the time the register began in 1685 to 1752 when the Johann Jacob RUPP family emigrated to America. As I do not have a license to use the images I have listed complete source citations at the end for all interested in seeing the actual record for the births, marriages, and deaths found. If you have problems accessing or finding them please feel free to get in touch with me for help.

steinseltzsignJohann Jacob RUPP, son of Johann Jacob RUPP, der Jüngere (the younger) and Maria Apollonia FETZER, was born on 8 March 1723 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France[2]. He was baptized on 9 March 1723 in Steinseltz, the neighboring town where the Protestant Church was located.[2] He died after 1792 in Maryland or Virginia.

merkwillersignJohann married Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER, daughter of Johannes NONNENMACHER and Maria Barbara STAMBACH, on 7 February 1746 in Kutzenhausen, Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France.[1], [3], [4] Maria was born on 17 November 1722 in Merkwiller, Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France.[5] She was baptized on 19 November 1722 in Kutzenhausen.[5] She died after 1792 in Maryland or Virginia.

kutzenhausensignJacob and Barbara had the following children.

  1. Jörg Heinrich Rupp was born on 17 November 1746 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and was baptized on 20 November 1746 in Steinseltz.[6] He died at less than two months of age on 7 January 1747 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and was buried on 8 January 1747 in Steinseltz.[7]
  2. Johann Jacob Rupp was born on 22 December 1747 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and was baptized on 26 December 1747 in Steinseltz.[8] It is not known if this son came to Baltimore County with his parents or where he lived during his lifetime.
  3. Johann Michel “Michael” Rupp was born on 6 April 1749 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and was baptized on 11 April 1749 in Steinseltz.[9],[10]  Michael married Magdalena “Magdaline” Tanner before 1776. Magdalena died before 3 April 1806. He also married Mary (Rhinehart) Weaver after 3 April 1806. Michael died before 13 April 1816 in Manchester, Baltimore County, Maryland, and left a will. His second wife Mary died 19 September 1848.
  4. Johann Martin Rupp was born on 6 March 1751 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and was baptized on 12 March 1751 in Steinseltz.[11], [12] Martin married Mary Barbara Mattias about 1777. Mary was born after 1755. He died between 1830-1835, most likely in Tennessee.
  5. Anna Maria “Mary” Rupp was born about 1753 in Pennsylvania or Maryland. Anna married John Shower about 1772 in Manchester, Baltimore County (present-day Carroll County), Maryland. John was born about 1750. He died before 2 March 1810 and left a will. Mary died intestate in 1833.
  6. Barbara Rupp was born about 1759 in Baltimore County, Maryland. She married George Weaver before 1778. George was born before 1755. He died in between 1800-1810. Barbara died between 1830-1840 in Montgomery County, Virginia.
  7. Henry RUPE Sr. was born about 1765 in Baltimore County, Maryland. Henry married Catherine Barbara NOLL, daughter of Johan Anton “Anthony” NOLL and Maria Magdalena BRUNNLE, about 1785 in Baltimore County, Maryland. Catherine was born on 24 February 1768 near Manchester, Baltimore County, Maryland. She was baptized on 13 March 1768 in Manchester. She died before 12 January 1860 in Montgomery County, Virginia. Henry died between 19 November 1845-1 December 1845 on the Old Henry Roop Place near Riner, Montgomery County, Virginia. Henry and Catherine were buried in the Family Cemetery on the Old Henry Roop Place.

The family decided to go to America after the birth of child #4. Burgert wrote, “Zweibruecken Manumissions Protocoll, Clee- and Catharinenburg, 1752: Jacob Rubb with wife and three children, from Oberhoffen, leaves for America.”[1]

In 1770 Jacob RUPE bought Rhineharts Folly in Baltimore County, Maryland. The following year on 12 April 1771, per Burgert, Jacob RUP, German, was naturalized. Her source: Colonial Maryland Naturalizations by Jeffrey A. Wyand, Florence L. Wyand (Genealogical Publishing Com, 1975).[1]

There may have been a son named George RUPE who signed the Oath of Allegiance in 1778 in Baltimore County, Maryland. I have not found any documentation to support his being a son nor have I located a person by this name with an estimated birth being between 1752-1757. Could the oldest living son of the emigrant have used the name George? His father owned land in Baltimore County and was most likely the Jacob Rupe who signed the Oath of Allegiance in 1778 with George Rupe and Martin Ra(u)pe.

Also included in many family trees for Jacob RUPE and his wife Barbara is a son named John. I found no trace of a John RUPE in Baltimore County, Maryland. The brothers Johann Michael and Johann Martin went by their second names, Michael and Martin. Could the fact that Jacob and Barbara named three of their sons Johann with a middle name in the German tradition have caused this confusion? There was a John RUPE in Franklin County, Virginia, from at least 1799 to after 1827. In 1812 and 1817 he was surety for the marriage of two RUPE ladies to BECKNER men. In 1827 he was security for his son-in-law Samuel BECKNER. He did not appear to have sons who lived to adulthood and his line was likely continued by 3 or 4 daughters. Further research is planned to determine if he was a son of Jacob RUPE.

Next week I will be going back another generation to Johann Jacob RUPP jun. and his family. Have you missed one or the other post about Johann Jacob RUPP and his wife Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER? Here’s a list:

Johann Jacob RUPP of Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, Northern Alsace, present-day France

Rupe/Roop/Ruppe/Rupp Migration in the Years 1752-1820

“I found the ship!”

How to Find Your 18th Century Immigrant’s Signature

Rhineharts Folly in Pipe Creek Hundred, Baltimore County, Maryland

Where I Found the Land Records of my RUPE Ancestors in Maryland

Three Fantastic Finds Made While Researching 1752 Immigrant Johann Jacob Rupp

Proof of Patriotic Service During the Revolutionary War for Jacob RUPE

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Sources:
[1] Annette Kunsel Burgert, Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America (Camden Press, Camden, Maine, 1992), pg. 413-414. Photocopy of 4 pages received from Louise Roop Akers in March 2001.
[2] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), browsable images of microfilm collection of parish and civil records (online http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 36 of 268, right page. Images from this site are not allowed to be shared with others, used on the internet, or for commercial purposes without permission. 1723 Baptismal Record, 6th entry under MDCCXXIII. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[3] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Kutzenhausen, Parroise protestante, BMS, 1737-1784, 3 E 253/13, image 14 of 54, bottom left . 1746 Marriage Record (part 1). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 27 May 2013).
[4] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Kutzenhausen, Parroise protestante, BMS, 1737-1784, 3 E 253/13, image 14 of 54, top right. 1746 Marriage Record (part 2). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 27 May 2013).
[5] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Kutzenhausen, Parroise protestante, BMS, 1714-1736, 3 E 253/9, image 20 of 81, right page. 1722 Baptismal Record, 4th entry (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 16 June 2013).
[6] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 85 of 268, left page. 1746 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).
[7] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 242 of 268, left page. 1747 Death Record, right page 1st entry. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[8] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 88 of 268. 1747 Baptismal Record, right page bottom. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[9] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 92 of 268. 1749 Baptismal Record, left page bottom, 1st part. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[10] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 93 of 268. 1749 Baptismal Record, right page top, 2nd part. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[11] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 98 of 268 . 1751 Baptismal Record, left page bottom, 1st part. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[12] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 99 of 268. 1751 Baptismal Record, right page top, 2nd part. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann Jacob RUPP
Parents: Johann Jacob RUPP and Maria Apollonia FETZER
Spouse: Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER
Parents of spouse: Johannes NONNENMACHER and Maria Barbara STAMBACH
Whereabouts: Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, France and Baltimore County, Maryland
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 6th great-grandfather

  1. Johann Jacob RUPP
  2. Henrich “Henry” RUPE Sr.
  3. James ROOP
  4. Gordon H. ROOP
  5. Gordon Washington ROOP
  6. Walter Farmer ROOP
  7. Myrtle Hazel ROOP
  8. Fred Roosevelt Dempsey
  9. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ Family Life in Montgomery County, Virginia

This is where we left off following The Early Years in Maryland (1765-1793), The Years in Rockbridge (1793-1801), and At Home on the Old Henry Roop Place:

The trip with eight children, animals, and household goods was not a trip to the store. The oldest son Jacob was fifteen and his brothers Henry and John, the twins, were twelve, all three old enough to help their father. Their little brother George being seven years old probably followed them everywhere they went not wanting to be considered a sissy by sticking around his sisters and mother. Elizabeth, the oldest daughter and fourteen, may have been responsible for keeping her siblings in line, maybe bossing 9 years old Barbara around, and watching over little Caty who was six while their mother cared for baby William.

The family of Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL reached Montgomery County in time for Catherine to give birth to Samuel on 4 September 1801.[1] Six boys and three girls. But they were not yet finished with the family planning.

He erected another mill on this farm, as he and a son, Jacob, were both expert millwrights. He and his hardy sons felled the forest and cleared most of this land where they erected a large log dwelling on an eminence overlooking the spring, stillhouse, and mill, and to protect them from a surprise attack by the Indians, who were then quite numerous.[2]

While Henry and his “hardy sons” were busy clearing the land and building a new home for  the family, Catherine gave birth to child number ten, Mary also known as Polly about 1802.[3] In 1868 when Polly’s oldest son reported her death he gave her place of birth as Lunenburg County.[4] This death notice has not been found or confirmed and is the cause of a discrepancy in the family tradition.

I suspect her place of birth is incorrect considering the geographical location of Lunenburg County compared to Rockbridge and Montgomery counties where the family was said to be before and after her birth. It would mean Henry and his family left Rockbridge County traveling through Montgomery County where their son Samuel is said to be born, on to Lunenburg County where Polly is said to be born, and then back to Montgomery County where they finally settled down.

About the same time Henry RUPE bought his first tract of land in the county in 1804 his wife Catherine gave birth to her eleventh child, a daughter Rachel.[5] His family was still growing and he found a necessity for more land as seen in Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ At Home on the Old Henry Roop Place.

Henry and Catherine became the parents of a daughter Nancy in 1806[6] and a son James, my 4th great-grandfather and their 13th child, about 1808.[7]

When the census was taken on 6 August 1810[8] Henry RUPE was 45 years old and his household included 17 persons as follows:

1810 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Page 18, Henry Rupe
4 males under 10 (James 2, Samuel 9, William 10, and poss. Elizabeth’s son William ca. 6)
3 males 16 thru 25 (George 16, John 21, Henry 21, Jacob 24)
2 males 45 and over (Henry 45 & poss. James Compton, husband of Elizabeth)
2 females under 5 (Nancy 4, Rachel 6)
1 female 10 thru 15 (Mary 8)
3 females 16 thru 25 (Catherine 15, Barbara 18, Elizabeth 23)
2 females 45 and over  (Catherine 42 & unknown)
Number of Household Members Under 16: 7
Number of Household Members Over 25: 4
Number of Household Members: 17

1810rupecensus
1810 U.S. Federal Census [courtesy of Ancestry] [8]
It is interesting to note the pre-1850 census listings were all in alphabetical order except for 1810 which was recorded by visit. Living next door to Henry RUPE was his nephew Jacob WEAVER, his wife, son, mother and siblings. Jacob’s father George was enumerated in Salisbury, Stokes County, North Carolina, in 1800[9] and died before 1810 either in North Carolina or after moving to Montgomery County. The RUPE and WEAVER families were sandwiched in between Austin AKERS and Northrup FULLER who shared land lines with Henry as seen in the 1809 land grant description.[10]

Henry and Catherine’s oldest daughter Elizabeth is believed to have married about 1803 however a marriage record has not been found. I am no longer sure this is the case and will have to do further research before I write about Elizabeth. After her father’s death she would be seen as Elizabeth COMPTON or CUMPTON when she sold her part of her father’s estate on 14 June 1851.[11]

In Henry’s household in 1810 all of his children are accounted for. Extras in the household are a man and a woman in the same age bracket as Henry and Catherine as well a a young male under 10 years old. James COMPTON who is believed to have been the husband of Elizabeth was not found in 1810. Could he have been included as the male over 45 in this listing? Is the young male Elizabeth’s son? Unless there are COMPTON descendants who already know the answers, these questions may only be answered by a new round of fact-finding.

Chances are Catherine was pregnant in August 1810 when the census was taken. She was 43 years old when she gave birth to her 14th child, a son Joseph, born about 1811.[12] Joseph would remain the youngest of the RUPE brood. Catherine had spent the last twenty-five years bearing children and these days were finally over. Henry and Catherine saw all fourteen children grow to maturity. A bit unusual for the times and shows they took great care of their family.

No evidence has been found of any of Henry RUPE’s older sons serving during the War of 1812 (18 Jun 1812-24 Dec 1814). Jacob, the twins John and Henry, and George would have been old enough being between 26 and 18 years of age. Instead of going to war the older children began to marry.

  • John RUPE married Elizabeth THOMPSON (1795-1870) on 14 January 1813[13]
  • Jacob ROOP married Susannah ALLEY (1790-1860) on 15 Apr 1815[14]
  • Catherine “Caty” RUPE married Jacob AKERS (1775-1860) on 27 June 1815[15]
  • George RUPE married Margaret BALDWIN (1800-1839) on 5 December 1818
    [16]
  • William RUPE married Ester AKERS (1802-1846) on 7 June 1820[17]

They were all married in Montgomery County, except for George who married in Jefferson County, Tennessee. Redmond Ira ROOP, in his 1927 reunion speech, told of George’s learning the hatter’s trade in Christiansburg. Among those who worked by his side was the famous Col. David CROCKETT of Tennessee, who became stranded in Christiansburg in 1802 on his way home from Baltimore, where he had gone with a cattle drive. George RUPE followed David CROCKETT to Tennessee about 1815.[18]

Less than a week after Henry purchased 46 acres[19] from his nephew Jacob WEAVER the 1820 census was taken on 7 August 1820.[20] One little line of “chicken scratch” and this is what comes out of it:

1820rupecensus
1820 U.S. Federal Census [courtesy of Ancestry] [20]
1820 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Newburn Township
Henry Roop Sr.
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
2 males under 10 (Joseph 9 and George 5, s/o Barbara)
1 male 10 thru 15 (James 12)
1 male 16 thru 18 (Samuel 18)
1 male 16 thru 25 (Samuel 18)
1 male 26 thru 44 (Henry Jr. 31)
1 male 45 and over (Henry Sr. 55)
1 female under 10 (Barbary 2, d/o Mary)
1 female 10 thru 15 (Nancy 14)
3 females 16 thru 25 (Rachel 16, Mary 18, Barbara 28)
1 female 45 and over : (Catherine 52)
Number of Persons – Engaged in Agriculture: 3 (Henry Sr., Henry Jr., Samuel)
Free White Persons – Under 16: 5
Free White Persons – Over 25: 3
Total Free White Persons: 12
Total All Persons – White, Slaves, Colored, Other: 12

You may ask, why are we seeing children of the daughters Barbara and Mary and no husbands. By 1820 six of the fourteen children were married and had their own households. The second oldest daughter Barbara had a son, was not married, and lived with her parents.

Montgomery County (to wit)
The examination of Barbary Roop of sd County single woman Taken upon oath before me E. Howard one of the commonwealth Justices for the County afforesaid this 25 Day of July 1816 who saith that on the 20th day of Novr last past in the county afforesaid she the sd Barbary Roop was Delivered of a Male Baster Child and that the said Bastard Child is Likely to become Chargeable to the County and that George Peterman of the sd County did git her with child of the sd Bastard Child.
Taken and signed the Day
and year above written before me.
E. Howard                 Barbary her X mark Roop[21]

Mary, the next oldest unmarried daughter living at home, had an illegitimate daughter in 1819. The father was allegedly Isom DOBBINS.[22]

Before the next marriage could take place in the family Henry Jr. was fined $16.13 on 3 October 1822 for bastardy.[23]

The Commonwealth of Virginia, to the Sheriff of Montgomery County Greeting:
We command You, that of the Goods and Chattels of Henry Roope
lat is your bailiwick, you cause to be made the sum of Sixteen Dollars and thirteen cents which the overseers of the poor late before the Justices of our Court of Montgomery County have against him for costs of recognizance for bastardy in that behalf expended, whereof the said Roope is convict as appears to us of record; and that you have the same before the Justices of our said Court, at the Court-House on the 1st Tuesday in November next, to render unto the said overseers f the costs aforesaid, And have then there this writ. Witness Charles Taylor, Clerk of our Court at the Court-House the 3rd day of October 1822 in the 47th year of the Commonwealth.
Charles Taylor[23]

The notice does not mention the child or the mother of the child. Eight months later, at the age of 34, he married 18 years old Mary “Polly” THOMPSON (1802-1880) on 7 June 1823 in Montgomery County[24]. Henry’s twin brother John had married Polly’s sister Elizabeth ten years earlier.

Henry and Catherine’s youngest daughter Rachel married John B. PHARIS (1797-1864) on 20 October 1823 in Montgomery County.[25]

When the census was taken on 1 June 1830[26] Henry was 65 years old and Catherine 62. In their household were three unmarried daughters, Barbara, Mary, and Nancy, with their eight illegitimate children; three sons, and an unknown female in the 30 thru 39 age group.

1830 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Blacksburg, Enumerated by John R. Charlton, page 89
Henry Roope Sr.
3 males under 5 (grandsons: Byrd 3, s/o Barbara; Henry 4, s/o Mary; and James R. 4, s/o Mary)
1 male 5 thru 9 (grandson Crockett 7, s/o Mary)
1 male 10 thru 14 (grandson George 15, s/o Barbara)
1 male 15 thru 19 (Joseph 19)
2 males 20 thru 29 (James 23, Samuel 29)
1 male 60 thru 69 (Henry 65)
2 females 5 thru 9  (granddaughters: Susan 7, d/o Barbara, and Elizabeth 7, d/o Mary)
1 female 10 thru 14 (granddaughter Barbary 12, d/o Mary)
2 females 20 thru 29 (Mary 28, Nancy 24)
2 females 30 thru 39 (Barbara 38, unknown)
1 female 60 thru 69 (Catherine 62)
Free White Persons – Under 20: 9
Free White Persons – 20 thru 49: 8
Total Free White Persons: 17
Total – All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 17

1830rupecensus
1830 U.S. Federal Census [courtesy of Ancestry] [26]
This screenshot of the census for Henry Sr., Henry Jr., Jacob, William, and John shows 52 persons in 5 households. Missing in the count are three daughters, Elizabeth (believed to be married to James COMPTON with 2 children, a 3rd already married), Caty with 8 children, Rachel with 3 children, and son George who was in Wayne County, Indiana, with 4 children. This brings the grand total up to 78 persons in the family including in-laws. No wonder cousin Everette McGrew wrote:

They were Whigs, but never owned slaves, the family being so large and able bodied that they had little use for them, and for the further reason that there were few slaveowners in that immediate locality.[27]

As for their being Whigs, I cannot find anything to support this statement. The Whig Party was formed in 1833 and dissolved in 1854. I believe Everette may have used the term in a more broad sense indicating they were opposed to tyranny as were the American Whigs who fought for independence in 1776.

During the first half of the 1830s the three youngest sons married in Montgomery County.

  • James “Jimmie” ROOP married Elizabeth CARROLL (1808-1880) on 23 July 1830[28]
  • Joseph ROOP married Mary “Polly” CARROLL (1809-1909) on 13 Sep 1831[29]
  • Samuel ROOP married Martha “Patsy” TOWNSLEY (1815-1870) on 7 January 1834[30]

On 1 June 1840[31] when the census was enumerated Henry was 75 years old and head of a household which included his 72 years old wife Catherine, his youngest son Joseph with his wife and their four children, and his unmarried daughter Nancy and two of her three sons. His other two unmarried daughters as well as his married children had their own households in Montgomery County with the exception of the twins John and Henry Jr. who were in Pulaski County, formed in 1839 from parts of Montgomery and Wythe counties.

1840censusrupe
1840 U.S. Federal Census [courtesy of Ancestry] [31]
1840 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Page 26
Henry Rupe
2 males under 5 yo (grandsons: Martin 2, s/o Joseph, and Lindsay Crockett 1, s/o Nancy)
2 males 5 & under 10 yo (Bluford 6, s/o Joseph, and Asa G. 7, s/o Nancy)
1 male 20 & under 30 yo (Joseph 29)
1 male 70 & under 80 yo (Henry 75)
1 female under 5 yo (Malinda 4, d/o Joseph)
1 female 5 & under 10 yo (Mary Jane 8, d/o Joseph)
2 females 20 & under 30 yo (Nancy 34 and Joseph’s wife Mary 31)
1 female 70 & under 80 yo (Catherine 72)
11 persons in household
2 persons engaged in agriculture

wheelofmillHenry RUPE and his family toiled hard on the land he bought. They owned and worked several grist mills, timbered and farmed the land, as their livelihood. Henry left fourteen children when he died in 1845. They gave him 94 grandchildren during his lifetime – only two of these did not live long enough to be named. Eighteen more grandchildren were born before his widow Catherine passed away. The last two grandchildren were born after her death bringing the total to 114. Ninety-two of these grandchildren carried the RUPE or ROOP surname while only 22 carried a different surname than their grandfather.

Did Henry RUPE leave a will with the names of his children? Did he wish for his property to be divided and how? The answers to these questions as well as the  source of the name “Old Henry Roop Place” will be revealed in the next installment.

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Sources:
[1] Louise Roop Anderson Akers, comp., The Family Rub, Rup, Rupe, Roop, Roope (2001 Printed by Jamont Communications, 339 Luck Ave., Roanoke, VA 24016). Note: My copy of this book is the hard cover copy which the compiler also gave to the Library of Virginia. She made some corrections and additions written in pen before gifting me the book.  On page 6 she wrote in 9-4-1801 for Samuel Roop’s date of birth.
[2] Everette L. McGrew, My Mother Was A Rupe (revised edition August 2000).
[3] Ibid.
[4] Ibid.
[5] The year of birth (1804) is an estimation made using the census: 1850 age 45, 1860 age 56, 1870 age 65, 1880 age 75
[6] The year of birth (1806) is an estimation made using the census: 1860 age 54, 1870 age 58, 1880 age 70. FAG #13622047 photo of grave marker shows 1806.
[7] The year of birth (1808) is an estimation made using the census: 1850 age 32, 1860 age 50, 1870 age 62, 1880 age 71.
[8] 1810 U.S. Federal Census, (index and images), Ancestry, citing Third Census of the United States, 1810 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. NARA microfilm publication M252, 71 rolls, Virginia, Montgomery, sheet 641, line 10. Henry Rupe household. (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 October 2014).
[9] 1800 U.S. Federal Census, (index and images), Ancestry, citing Second Census of the United States, 1800 population schedule, images) National Archives and Records Administration,Washington D.C., microfilm M32, 52 rolls, North Carolina, Stokes County, Salisbury, Page: 576; Image: 583; Family History Library Film: 337908. George Weaver household. (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 April 2016).
[10] Virginia Land Office Patents and Grants, (http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=195&last=&g_p=G59&collection=LO Grant : accessed ), Henry Roop grantee, land grant 1 September 1809, Montgomery County; citing Land Office Grants No. 59, 1809-1810, p. 195 (Reel 125).
[11] Akers, 1851 deed (will be shared in next post)
[12] “Virginia, Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917,” (index only), Ancestry, citing FamilySearch index entries derived from digital copies of original and compiled records, FHL Film Number: 2048578. Joseph Roop, born abt 1811 in Montgomery County, Virginia, died 10 May 1874 in Montgomery County, Virginia, age at death 63, white, widowed, male, father Henry, mother Barbara. (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 10 March 2016).
[13] “Virginia Marriages, 1785-1940,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XR8N-66G : accessed 6 April 2016), John Roup and Betsy Thompson, 08 Jan 1813; citing Montgomery County, Virginia, reference P 137; FHL microfilm 32,633.
[14] Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XR8N-XLT : accessed 6 April 2016), Jacob Rupe and Susannah Alley, 15 Apr 1815; citing Montgomery County, Virginia, reference P 145; FHL microfilm 32,633.
[15] Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XR8N-F3F : accessed 6 April 2016), Jacob Acres and Caty Rupe, 27 Jun 1815; citing Montgomery County, Virginia, reference P 146; FHL microfilm 32,633.
[16] “Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002,” (index and images), Ancestry, citing Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002. Tennessee State Library and Archives, Nashville, Tennessee. Microfilm. George Roupe, male, married 5 Dec 1818 in Jefferson County, Tennessee, spouse Margaret Baldwin. (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 March 2016).
[17] “Virginia Marriages, 1785-1940,” (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XR8N-K3P : accessed 6 April 2016), William Rupe and Easter Akers, 06 Jun 1820; citing Montgomery County, Virginia, reference P 170; FHL microfilm 32,633.
[18] McGrew
[19] Akers, Montgomery County Deed Book G, pg. 483.
[20] 1820 U.S. Federal Census, (index and images), Ancestry, citing Fourth Census of the United States, 1820 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C., NARA microfilm publication M33, 142 rolls, Virginia, Montgomery, Newburn, sheet 181A, line 16. Henry Roop Sr. household. (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 December 2004).
[21] Akers, photocopy of document in book.
[22] “Virginia Marriages, 1785-1940,” (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XRS5-Z9D : accessed 6 April 2016), Wm. Lane and Barbara Roop, 02 Jul 1856; citing Montgomery, Virginia, reference n 44; FHL microfilm 2,048,462.
[23] Akers
[24] “Virginia Marriages, 1785-1940,” (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XR8N-G9P : accessed 6 April 2016), Henry Rupe and Polly Thompsom, 07 Jun 1823; citing Montgomery County, Virginia, reference P 185; FHL microfilm 32,633.
[25] “Virginia Marriages, 1785-1940,” (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XR8N-GHH : accessed 6 April 2016), John B. Pharis and Rachel Rupe, 20 Dec 1823; citing Montgomery County, Virginia, reference P 188; FHL microfilm 32,633.
[26] 1830 U.S. Federal Census, (index and images), Ancestry, citing Fifth Census of the United States, 1830 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C. NARA microfilm publication M19, 201 rolls, Virginia, Montgomery, Blacksburg, page 89, line 14. Henry Roope Sr. household. (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed ‎17 October 2014).
[27] McGrew
[28] “Virginia, Marriages 1740-1850,” (index-only), Ancestry, citing Dodd, Jordan R., et al.. Early American Marriages: Virginia to 1850. Bountiful, UT, USA: Precision Indexing Publishers. James Rupe, male, spouse Elizabeth Earl (sic), female, marriage date 23 Jul 1830 in Montgomery County, Virginia. (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 6 April 2016).
[29] Akers, Copy of bond in book. “I do hereby certify that I celebrated the rites of matrimony between Joseph Roop & Mary Carl of Montgomery Cty on the 13th day of September 1831 by virtue of a publication given under my hand this 26th day of June 1832. Richd Buckingham.”
[30] Akers, Copy of bond in book.
[31] 1840 U.S. Federal Census, (index and images), Ancestry, citing Sixth Census of the United States, 1840 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C., NARA microfilm publication M704, 580 rolls, Virginia, Montgomery County, page 26, line 20. Henry Rupe household. ‎(http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 December 2004).

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Henrich “Henry” RUPE Sr.
Parents: Johann Jacob RUPP and Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER
Spouse: Catherine Barbara NOLL
Parents of spouseJohan Anton “Anthony” NOLL and Maria Magdalena BRENTEL
Whereabouts: Baltimore MD, Rockbridge VA, Montgomery VA
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 5th great-grandfather

  1. Henrich “Henry” RUPE Sr.
  2. James ROOP
  3. Gordon H. ROOP
  4. Gordon Washington ROOP
  5. Walter Farmer ROOP
  6. Myrtle Hazel ROOP
  7. Fred Roosevelt Dempsey
  8. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ The Years in Rockbridge (1793-1801)

One hundred and ten years ago today on 26 March 1906 a great-great-great-granddaughter of Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL was born.
Happy Birthday to my grandmother Myrtle Hazel ROOP (1906-1997).

Time to Leave Maryland

I wonder if Maryland was becoming too crowded for the Henry RUPE family in the 1790s? After he sold Rineharts Folly on Tuesday, 23 April 1793, there is no further trace of the family in Baltimore County.[1] If you missed their time in Maryland you can read
Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ The Early Years in Maryland (1765-1793).

From family tradition and documents which point to new locations, we know my fifth great-grandparents Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL prepared to leave Maryland. They packed up their personal and household goods, rounded up their livestock and five children and made their way to a destination which may not have been known when they set out. Did they have a wagon for the journey ahead or did they buy a Lancaster Conestoga wagon? Did they travel alone or with others? Unless someone kept a diary, we will never know the answers to all of our questions. Some facts, or is it fiction, were passed down and recounted by Henry’s great-grandson Redmond Ira ROOP at a family reunion in 1927 in Carroll County, Maryland (extracts in italics in the boxes).

Traveling on what was once the Baltimore and Memphis Turnpike, the Rupe caravan crossed the Potomac at Harper’s Ferry in 1796.[2]

In 1793 Henry was about 28, his wife Catherine 25, son Jacob 7,  daughter Elisabeth 6, twin sons John and Henry 4, and baby daughter Barbara was less than a year old. If they did not make the trip until 1796 as recounted by Redmond another three years need to be added to the ages.

However 1793 would seem to be more logical as their next child, son George was born in Virginia per his three living children’s 1880 census listings. George who was not found on the 1850 census died the summer of 1859 at the age of 65. This would place his birth at about 1794.

The Three Older Brothers of Henry?

The caravan included Henry, his wife Catherine, and their family of several sons and daughters, the three older brothers of Henry, and their families.[2]

Who doesn’t have a story of several brothers? I asked this question in
Rupe/Roop/Ruppe/Rupp Migration in the Years 1752-1820. I believe not the brothers but a sister’s family may have taken the journey with them as well as a single sister-in-law.

Catherine left behind her elderly father Anthony NOLL age 70, a younger step-mother Catharina, brothers Francis and John, sisters Lovis, Elizabeth, Magdalena and Betsey, and a half-sister also named Catharina. All were mentioned in the will Anthony NOLL left in 1801 in Baltimore County. My fifth great-grandmother Catherine Barbara NOLL and another daughter Polly NOLL were not mentioned in the will.[3]

Colonial_Roads_in_the_South
Public domain, released by David Dilts, a Family History Research Wiki user.

Henry left behind his brother Michael and sister Anna Maria, both married with children. His oldest brother Jacob has not been traced as well as George, who is only known because he signed the Oath of Alligiance in 1778 in Baltimore County. A brother named John, included in the family group by early researchers, has not been documented.

It is not known if his parents were still living in 1793. There has been some speculation by earlier researchers that the older RUPE couple may have accompanied Henry and his family on the Great Wagon Trail through the Shenandoah Valley. Redmond did not mention the parents in his narrative.

Henry’s brother Martin most likely took to the trail several years earlier as his daughter Sophia was born in Virginia abt. 1790. He was in Surry County, North Carolina, by 1795.

Henry’s sister Barbara and her husband George WEAVER also made the trip with their family – but when? George WEAVER sold his land in Baltimore County in 1785 when his wife Barbara relinquished her dower rights. However they remained in the county for five more years having children in 1786, 1789, and 1790. Is it possible the WEAVERs traveled with the RUPE family or the did the RUPE family follow the WEAVERs?

The Trip

Who hasn’t read of the hardship our ancestors endured while traveling overland. Horse and oxen pulled the covered wagons over rutted and narrow dirt roads or trails. Streams and rivers had to be crossed, dry or swollen from rains. Not all crossings went well.

In crossing the Potomac the cattle and other larger animals were forced to swim, and the sons of Henry held the ropes attached to the horns of the cows. One wild cow pulled one of the unsuspecting Rupe boys overboard while crossing and he might have been lost had they not missed the cow, which finally reached shore with the boy swinging to her tail some distance down stream.[2]

The first leg of the journey had taken them from Manchester southwest through Frederick on to Harpers’ Ferry where they entered Virginia after crossing the Potomac River. A crossing retold over the years to become part of the family legend. Imagine the scene! If only I had my great-grandfather Walter Farmer ROOP’s talent for drawing.

The three brothers of Henry split with one of them going to Ohio, one to Western North Carolina, and the other to Georgia.[2]

Per family tradition following the crossing of the Potomac the caravan split up. However I cannot find proof of a RUPE brother going to Ohio or Georgia. As mentioned earlier, Martin RUPE, the brother who went to North Carolina, traveled through Virginia in 1790 when a child was born in the state, and lived in Surry County, North Carolina, from at least 1795 until before 1810.

The End of the First Leg of the Journey

NaturalBridgeRockbridgeVA
Oren Frederic Morton, A History of Rockbridge County, Virginia, published 1920 by McClure Co., Staunton, Virginia- (https://archive.org/stream/historyofrockbri00mortrich#page/n313/mode/2up : accessed 20 March 2016)

The trail entered the Shenandoah Valley between two mountain ranges, the Blue Ridge on the east and the Allegheny Mountains on the west, near Winchester. At times it was not unusual to see a half a dozen wagons a day passing through a point in the Shenandoah Valley. The RUPE family were bound for the southwestern part of the state but their journey would end, for a while, before they reached the Natural Bridge in Rockbridge County. At a rate of 10 to 15 miles a day it would have taken them about 2-3 weeks to travel from Manchester, Maryland, to this point in Rockbridge County.

Henry and family journeyed through the Shenandoah Valley and into Rockbridge County, bound for the southwestern section of the state, then rather sparsely settled. When they reached Buffalo Creek, four miles north of Natural Bridge, a great flood overtook them and they were forced to remain for several days. A report reached them that Natural Bridge had washed away, and it being the only passage, it would require four years to restore the bridge. They settled on Buffalo Creek and built a mill there, which they operated for years before they learned that the report of the bridge destruction was like Mark Twain’s comment on the first report of his death, considerable exaggereated (sic).[2]

If the WEAVER family had been traveling with RUPE family through the Shenandoah Valley to Rockbridge they likely separated when Henry’s family built the mill and settled on Buffalo Creek. George and Barbara WEAVER were in Stokes County, North Carolina, by 1798 when their oldest son married.

In 1798 Henry RUPE was living in Rockbridge County, Virginia. This is a fact documented in Baltimore County’s land records. Rineharts Folly, the land he sold in 1793,  once again plays a role in the family tale.

1798rooptoboblits
BALTIMORE COUNTY COURT (Land Records) 1798-1798 WG 56, pp. 0039-0040 [2 images] MSA CE 66-106. (https://mdlandrec.net : accessed 5 March 2016)
To view the full images of this land record please refer to my post Where I Found the Land Records of my RUPE Ancestors in Maryland for directions.

Henry Roop                     This Indenture made the nineteenth day
To                                       of May seventeen hundred and ninety Eight
Jacob Boblits                    Between Henry Roop of Rockbrdig County
and State of Virginia of the one part and Jacob Boblits of Baltimore
County and State of Maryland of the other part Witnesseth that
the said Henry Rop for and in consideration of the sum of one
hundred and fifteen Pounds Current Money did Convey unto the
said Jacob Boblits by a deed of Conveyance bearing date the
nineteenth day of April Seventeen hundred and ninety three one
hundred acres of land all that Tract of land called Rine=
=harts Folley Resurveyed lying and being in Baltimore County
aforesaid as by said Deed may more fully appear and for as
much as the said Deed is found to be erronious in several parts
therefore the said Henry Roop in order to Correct the Errors in the
aforesaid ded of Conveyance as well as for and in consideration
of the sum of one hundred and fifteen pounds Current money
afsd to him in hand paid before the ensealing and delivering of
the afsd Deed of Conveyance by the said Jacob Boblits the receipt
whereof the said Henry Roop doth hereby Acknowledge and him
selfe to be therewith fully sattisfyed contented and Paid Hath
and by these Presents doth give grant Bargain sell alien
enfeoff and confirm unto him the said Jacob Boblits his heirs and
assigns forever all that Tract of land called Rineharts Folley
resurveyed situate lying and being in Baltimore County aforesaid
Beginning at the original beginning and running and boun
=ding as is expressed in the original Certificate and Grant
of said land which Expresses to contain one hundred acres
of land more or less To have and To hold all the afsd Tract
of land called Rineharts Folley Resurveyed and all the ap=
=purtanances thereunto belonging or in any wise appurtaining
unto hin the said Jacob Boblits his heirs and assigns for
=ever: and for and unto their only Proper use and behoofe
and the said Henry Roop doth hereby for himselfe and his heirs
Exrs. and Admrs. Convenant grant and agree to Warrant and
forever defend the aforesaid bargained land and appertanances
and every part and Parcel thereof with all rights Titles previledges
proffits and benefitts thereunto belonging or in any wise appurtaining
unto him the said Jacob Boblits his heirs and assigns forever against
all manner Persons whatever. Claiming or to Claime any right Title
or interest in or unto the afsd bargained land and appurtanances
or any Part or parcel thereof and In Witness whereof the said Henry
Roop hath hereunto sett his hand and affixed his seal the day
and year first above written                 Henry his X mark Roop  Seal
signed sealed and Delivered                 Received the day of the within
in the Presents of                                     date of Jacob Boblits one hundred
Alexis Lemmon                                        and fifteen pounds Current
Charles his KB mark Boblits
money the full Consideraton for the land appertainances with
=in mentioned                     pr me                Henry his + mark Roop
witnessed by                       Baltimore County Cst on the nineteenth day
Alexis Lemmon                   of May 1798 Came the within named Henry
Roop before us the subscribers two of Justices of the peace for
said County and acknowledged the within Instrument of
writing to be his act and deed and the land and appertain=
=ances within mentioned to the Right Title and Estate of the within
named Jacob Boblits his heirs and assigns forever according
to the true intent and meaning thereof                    Alexis Lemmon
Received to be Recorded the 15th day of                 George Kerlinger
September 1798 same Day Recorded and Examinded p. Wm. Gibson Clk

[Transcription by Cathy Meder-Dempsey, 12 March 2016]
Note:
afsd = aforesaid; pr= per; Cst= scilicit (latin meaning that is to say or to wit)

Due to an error or omission in the original land deed dated 19 April 1793 the document had to be recorded again. I may be incorrect about this but Alexis Lemmon and Charles Boblitz may have traveled to Rockbridge County to have the deed signed by Henry Roop who left his mark on 19 May 1798 and then had it recorded in Baltimore County on 15 September 1798. Was Charles Boblitz the son or a relative of Jacob Boblitz, the grantee? Was he taking care of family business by going to Rockbridge? The 1793 deed was missing the day of the month at the beginning but the description of the tract was identical to that found in the 1788 deed in which Jacob RUPE sold the land to his son Henry RUPE. In the deed above the complete description was omitted.

A Wedding Before Moving On

Early in the year 1800 they left Rockbridge Co. and wound up in Lunenburg Co., VA where they had at least one child before settling on Pelham’s Branch, near Little River, about eight miles southwest of Christiansburg, Montgomery Co., VA.[2]

This last statement is incorrect. Henry was still in Rockbridge in early 1801 when he gave witness to the age of a young lady who was married the same day. Later in the year when the tax list was drawn up, he would no longer be in the county.

1801oathnullbride
1801 Oath. Courtesy of Nellie Hart, a descendant of James HART and Polly NULL, received per email 25 Feb 2006.

Rockbridge County To Wit
This Day Came before me a Justice
of the Peace for said County Henry Roop and
made oath that Polly Null who is about
to be married to James Hart is of his own
knowledge above the age of Twenty one
years — Certified under my hand this 13th Jany
1801                     Alex Sheilds (sic)

The marriage which took place in Rockbridge County on 13 January 1801 brings up a question. Who was Polly NULL?

1801hartmarriage
1801 Marriage Bond. Courtesy of Nellie Hart, a descendant of James HART and Polly NULL, received per email 25 Feb 2006.

Know all men by these presents that we
James Hart and John Berryhill
are held and firmly bound to James Monroe
governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia or
his successor in the sum of one hundred and
fifty Dollars to which payment well and
truly to be made we bind ourselves our heirs
Exors & jointly and severally firmly by these
Presents – Witness our hands and seals this
13th Day of January 1801
The Condition of the above obligation is such
that whereas there is a marriage shortly intended
to be solemized (sic) between the above bound James
Hart and Polly Null Daughter of
Anthony Null of Baltimore County
and State of Maryland
If therefore there shall be no lawful cause to obstruct
the same then this obligation to be void or else to
remain in full force
James (his +mark) Hart   seal
James (his o mark) Berryhill   seal
Teste
A. Reid Jr.

Polly NULL, daughter of Anthony NULL of Baltimore County, Maryland, married in Rockbridge and had her age witnessed by Henry. Neither document points to Henry’s relationship to the bride. There was only one Anthony NOLL in Baltimore County, Maryland, during this time period. The NULL and NOLL spelling of the surname was found in the land records of Anthony NOLL. Polly NULL has to be a younger sister of Catherine NOLL and a sister-in-law of Henry.

Finding Polly raises several questions. Did she accompany the RUPE family or did she join them several years later? She would have been a young teenager in 1793 and may have gone along to help her sister Catherine with the five young children. Did she choose to join Catherine instead of staying with her father and step-mother? Why did Catherine and Polly’s father omit them from his last will and testament in 1801? Did the RUPE family keep in touch with the families in Baltimore County over the years?

This 1801 marriage is the last documented proof of Henry RUPE, seen at this time as ROOP, being in the county of Rockbridge. Soon after, while Polly NULL and her husband James HART remained in Rockbridge, Henry pulled up stakes and continued south with his family which now numbered 10 persons: Henry was 36 years old, his wife Catherine 33, their children Jacob 15, Elizabeth 14, twins John and Henry 12, Barbara 9, George 7, Caty 5, and William less than a year old.

The RUPE family left for a new destination and it couldn’t have been Lunenburg County, Virginia.

bestwishescathy1

Sources:
[1] MDLandRec, A Digital Image Retrieval System for Land Records & Indices for Baltimore County, (https://mdlandrec.net : accessed March 2016)
[2] Redmond Ira ROOP (1869-1947) at a 1927 family reunion in Carroll County, Maryland per research notes of Linda Pearl Dickey Roop (1943-1994)
[3] “Maryland, Register of Wills Books, 1629-1999,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-24153-57010-13?cc=1803986&wc=M97S-ZJ3:n1483733492 : accessed 22 Jul 2013), Baltimore > Wills 1797-1802 vol 6 > images 177 and 178 of 288.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Henrich “Henry” RUPE Sr.
Parents: Johann Jacob RUPP and Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER
Spouse: Catherine Barbara NOLL
Parents of spouseJohan Anton “Anthony” NOLL and Maria Magdalena BRENTEL
Whereabouts: Baltimore MD, Rockbridge VA, Montgomery VA
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 5th great-grandfather

  1. Henrich “Henry” RUPE Sr.
  2. James ROOP
  3. Gordon H. ROOP
  4. Gordon Washington ROOP
  5. Walter Farmer ROOP
  6. Myrtle Hazel ROOP
  7. Fred Roosevelt Dempsey
  8. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Where I Found the Land Records of my RUPE Ancestors in Maryland

So much like a never-ending detective story, Cathy, you think the mystery is going to be solved … only to be continued 😀

Janice Webster Brown of Cow Hampshire, New Hampshire’s History Blog wrote this comment in the Genealogy Bloggers group on Facebook about my most recent post
Proof of Patriotic Service During the Revolutionary War for Jacob RUPE in the series on my 6th great-grandfather. I was flattered by this compliment which makes the research and writing more rewarding.

To help solve some of the mystery in Jacob RUPE’s history I turned to MDLandRec, a digital image retrieval system for land records and indices for Maryland counties. The service is currently being provided at no charge to individuals who apply for a user name and password.

Our kids always make fun of us for reading the directions before we set up any kind of electronics in our home. I admit I didn’t do this for the Maryland Land Records site. I stumbled a bit before I found my way around. I should have taken some time to look at their Help guides.

My advice is take a look at the guides, don’t do what I did. It would have saved me some time as I was under the false impression, after my first login, that the land record instruments were only available and/or searchable for 1964-2016. I was going to give up on the site however all searches for information on earlier land records in Maryland pointed to the site. Also the Wiki on FamilySearch Maryland Land and Property was very helpful in confirming the older records are on the site.

Getting back to the MDLandRec site, for early records you need to click on Active Indices (see p. 24 of 38 in the other MD counties guide). There are likely many different scenarios for searching for specific land records due to what is available for each county. I’d like to give an example using my Jacob RUPE and one of his land records I was searching for.

Jacob RUPE bought Rhineharts Folly in Baltimore County in 1770 from Frederick Rhinehart. This was a “known,” not a fact until I could prove it, found in Theron A. Rupe’s narrative “From Oberhoffen to America” as mentioned in my posts, Rhineharts Folly in Pipe Creek Hundred, Baltimore County, Maryland and Proof of Patriotic Service During the Revolutionary War for Jacob RUPE.

For this time period and county MDLandRec has a Grantee Index 1653-1849, Grantor Index 1655-1849, and an Index for 1659-1800. There is also a Tract Index 1798-1851.

Since I knew the names of both the grantor and grantee as well as the tract name I could use any of the first three indices. The Tract Index begins in 1798, too late for the 1770 deed I was searching for. The Tract Index would prove helpful in tracking future owners of Rhineharts Folly but first things first. To use the grantee and grantor indices you need to know the meaning of the two.

If you work with land records, you have to keep these straight. Grantors sell; grantees buy. Or, put another way, the grantor is the sell-or and the grantee is the buy-ee. (Yes, it’s silly, but it helps keep them straight!)
~ Amy Johnson Crow in her post 5 Misspelled, Misused Genealogy Words… and How to Get Them Right

Since my 6th great-grandfather Jacob RUPE was the grantee or buyer I checked the Grantee Index:

1770granteeindexrupe
An Archives of Maryland Online Publication https://mdlandrec.net/

With the information found on the index (No., Folio, and letters AL at the top of the column)  I went back to the search page and entered Book B and Page 265. The search turned up two results – one description being AL B.

searchresult
An Archives of Maryland Online Publication https://mdlandrec.net/

This took me directly to the land deed.

1770landdeed
An Archives of Maryland Online Publication https://mdlandrec.net/

The deed continues on pages 266 through 268. Instead of saving each page separately I entered the page range into the bottom box on right. This allows the display of up to 10 pages. This is such a great feature! It allowed me to download the entire document in one file eliminating the necessity of merging the pages into one document.

1770landdeedsource
An Archives of Maryland Online Publication https://mdlandrec.net/

I took a screenshot with the page range (4 images) to help with my source citation. The land record and source citation “reminder” were saved to Jacob RUPE’s media file with the file names (MRIN Filing System):
MRIN00554 1770 Frederick Rinehart to Jacob Rupe land deed.pdf
MRIN00554 1770 Frederick Rinehart to Jacob Rupe land deed source.png

This done I was able to move on to the next search until I found ALL the land records I was looking for plus a few bonus ones:

  • 1770 Frederick RINEHART to Jacob RUPE
  • 1778 Christopher SHROD to George WEAVER
  • 1785 George WEAVER sold land to Peter ZEP
  • 1787 Jacob RUB to Johannes SHOWER
  • 1787 Martin RUB to Peter TRUSHAL
  • 1788 Jacob RUB to Henry RUB
  • 1793 Henry RUB to Jacob BOBLITS
  • 1798 Henry ROOP to Jacob BOBLITS

The files have been attached to each individual in my database. Next I will write the source citations and transcribe the documents. I’ve already read through them and found several clues which confirm known facts and others which may disprove some assumptions. And the story continues…..

 bestwishescathy1

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann Jacob RUPP
Parents: Johann Jacob RUPP Jr. and Maria Apollonia FETZER
Spouse: Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER
Parents of spouse: Johannes NONNENMACHER and Maria Barbara STAMBACH
Whereabouts: Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, Pennsylvania, Maryland
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 6th great-grandfather

  1. Johann Jacob RUPP
  2. Heinrich Thomas “Henry” RUPE Sr.
  3. James ROOP
  4. Gordon H. ROOP
  5. Gordon Washington ROOP
  6. Walter Farmer ROOP
  7. Myrtle Hazel ROOP
  8. Fred Roosevelt Dempsey
  9. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Proof of Patriotic Service During the Revolutionary War for Jacob RUPE

In a recent post, I wrote about leaving my comfort zone as Maryland research is new to me and researching Rhineharts Folly, the land owned in Baltimore County, Maryland, by my 6th great-grandfather Johann Jacob RUPP (1723-aft.1792), known as Jacob RUPE in America.

1761plat
An Archives of Maryland electronic publication. Courtesy of Maryland State Archives

I found the original 1755 patent of 12 acres by Derick Rheinhart and the 1763 re-survey of 115 acres (adding 103 acres to the original 12) by Frederick Rinehart. The wording of the two surveys and the description of the land showed Derick RHEINHART and Frederick RINEHART were the same man.

I don’t have the following deeds however I know they exist (spelling of the surnames may be variants):

  • the 1770 sale of 115 acres by Frederick RINEHART to Jacob RUPE
  • the 1787 sale of 15 acres by Jacob RUPE to Johannes SCHAUER
  • the 1788 sale of 100 acres by Jacob RUPE to Heinrich RUPE
  • the 1793 sale of 100 acres by Heinrich RUPE to Jacob BOBLITZ.

Without these records I cannot be certain Rheinharts Folly was owned by Jacob RUPE and later his son Henry. (MDLANDREC, a digital image retrieval system for land records and indices for Baltimore County, is on my to-do list – learn how to use it for retrieving the land records).

The next step in the process of proving my ancestor owned this particular piece of land was interrupted when I discovered the 1783 Supply Tax assessments for Baltimore County, Maryland. The name of the land owned by the taxpayer was included on this tax list. Would it prove the land owned by my Jacob RUPE was the land seen in the plat above?

The DAR and SAR accept this supply tax as evidence taxpayers performed Patriotic Service. Taxpayers were persons listed with property or men who were taxed 15 shillings. Only the persons listed as paupers were not taxpayers.

The Act to Raise Supplies for the Year 1783 was passed by the general assembly in the November 1782 session.

1783supplytaxact
General Assembly, Laws, MSA S966-20 (Nov. 1782 Session, p. 329, Ch. 6. (http://aomol.msa.maryland.gov/000001/000203/html/am203–329.html : accessed 1 March 2015). Courtesy of Maryland State Archives

CHAP. VI
An ACT to raise the supplies for the year seventeen hundred and eighty-three.
A tax of 25f is imposed on every £. 100’s worth of property; one half thereof shall be collected by distress and sale, after the 20th of May next, in specie, unless 10f thereof be paid by the 1st of March, in fresh pork, at 27f6; barrelled pork, at £. 4 10 0 for each barrel containing 220lb; wheat, at 5f3; new crop tobacco, at 10f, and an allowance of four per cent. for cask; or fine barrelled flour, at 15f the short hundred, and an allowance of 3f for the barrel.  In case of thus discharging 10f, the party so doing is then chargeable with only 2f6 more in specie, for the first payment.  In like manner, the other half of the tax shall be levied after the 15th of September, unless, before that day, 10f of it be paid in specifics, as aforesaid, in which case only 2f6 will be due in specie.

One fifth of the specie received under this act is appropriated to the use of congress; the residue is first appropriated to the support of the civil list; and the money arising from the sale of the specifics shall, in the first place, be applied to the discharge of a year’s interest on specie certificates.

1783supplytaxact2
General Assembly, Laws, MSA S966-20 (Nov. 1782 Session, p. 343, Ch. 34. (http://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/speccol/sc2900/sc2908/000001/000203/html/am203–343.html : accessed 1 March 2016). Courtesy of Maryland State Archives

CHAP. XXIV
A Supplement to the act to raise the supplies for the year seventeen hundred and eighty-three.
In this act, each collector is required, by the 10th day of every month (beginning with June next) until all the taxes due in his county be collected, to make out an alphabetical list of those who shall have paid their tax, before the 1st day of the month.  One copy of such list he is to lodge with his county clerk, and another copy he shall send, by the first opportunity, to the intendant.  This provision was calculated to stigmatize all such as, at that critical time, should neglect so important a duty as that of punctually paying their taxes.

The 1783 Supply Tax assessments for Baltimore County have been transcribed and are available here. The images of the tax lists are also online.

1783pipecreek
The cover sheet of the tax list of the Pipe Creek Hundred in Baltimore County, Maryland, courtesy of the Maryland State Archives.
1783tax1
The sheet Jacob RUPE, aka Jacob ROOP, was found on, courtesy of the Maryland State Archives.

Jacob RUPE was on the 1783 Supply Tax list, his surname was spelled ROOP. The items included on the list were the owners names: Jacob ROOP and lands names: Tetrix Folly.

Why Tetrix Folly and not Rhineharts Folly? The next person entered on the list was Tetrick RINEHART who did not own land but paid taxes on other property. This appears to be a variation of the name of the previous owner of Rhineharts Folly seen on the land records as Derick RHEINHART and Frederick RINEHART. Jacob ROOP’s land called Tetrix Folly had 115 acres, the same amount as Rhineharts Folly. Rinehart’s first name on the tax list in the possessive form would be Tetrick’s and likely pronounced as spelled – Tetrix.

The value of Jacob ROOP’s land was 30 and improvements were valued at 20. He had no slaves, 3 horses, and 7 black cattle. His horses and cattle were valued at 41 and other property at 12 giving a total of 103 for all property. The assessment totaled 1£5f9d. There was 1 free male and 3 white inhabitants in the household.

It was 1783, Jacob and Barbara’s older children were married and no longer living at home. Their youngest son Heinrich or Henry was close to 18 years old and not yet married. Note: all households in the Pipe Creek Hundred had only 1 free male listed in the household which appears to be the head of household and all other person were included in the total inhabitants in the household. Did the free male in the household have to be 18 or 21 years of age to be included in the count?

As an aside the following persons were also found on the 1783 tax list:

  • Michael ROOF, on the same page as Jacob, may be his son Michael b. 1749
  • George WEAVER, husband of Barbara RUPE, daughter of Jacob
  • John SHOWERS, husband of Anna Maria RUPE, daughter of Jacob
  • Martin ROOP was in BA North Hundred, may be Jacob’s son b. 1751

What began as a search to prove Rhineharts Folly belonged to my 6th great-grandfather Jacob RUPE turned into the discovery of his being on a supply tax list. Is this tax list proof enough for patriotic service during the Revolutionary War? Both the DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution) an the SAR (Sons of the American Revolution) consider the payment of such “supply” taxes enacted by special state laws as patriotic service. (see further reading below Genealogy Sketch box)

The next step would be to locate the land deeds proving Jacob RUPE owned Rhineharts Folly and was a resident of Baltimore County at the time the supply tax was paid. If I find only records for Rhineharts Folly, will his land being named Tetrix Folly on the tax list still allow acceptance of his patriotic service during the Revolutionary War? Or am I only seeing more complications?

 bestwishescathy1

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann Jacob RUPP
Parents: Johann Jacob RUPP Jr. and Maria Apollonia FETZER
Spouse: Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER
Parents of spouse: Johannes NONNENMACHER and Maria Barbara STAMBACH
Whereabouts: Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, Pennsylvania, Maryland
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 6th great-grandfather

  1. Johann Jacob RUPP
  2. Heinrich Thomas “Henry” RUPE Sr.
  3. James ROOP
  4. Gordon H. ROOP
  5. Gordon Washington ROOP
  6. Walter Farmer ROOP
  7. Myrtle Hazel ROOP
  8. Fred Roosevelt Dempsey
  9. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

Further reading material:

Is That Service Right? by the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution

Maryland State Archives MARYLAND INDEXES (Assessment of 1783, Index) 1783 Baltimore County MSA S 1437 (Transcription of the 1783 Supply List)

Overview of Maryland Revolutionary War Era Taxes as Proof of Patriotic Service for the National Society Sons of the American Revolution

Maryland Tax Laws in Force During the American Revolution

Maryland Revolutionary Tax Records

Baltimore County, Maryland – 1783 Supply Tax, Courtesy of Maryland State Archives

West Virginia Society Sons of the American Revolution Proving Patriotic Service by Revolutionary Taxes

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Rupe/Roop/Ruppe/Rupp Migration in the Years 1752-1820

The immigrant Johann Jacob RUPP came from Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, Northern Alsace, present-day France, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1752 with his wife Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER and their three sons Johann Jacob, Johann Michel, and Johann Martin.

The Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg connection and the ship they came on will be discussed in later posts.

In the Beginning There was Family Tradition

Colonial_Roads_in_the_South
Public domain, released by David Dilts, a Family History Research Wiki user.

From the following report given by Johann Jacob RUPP’s great-great-grandson Redmond Ira ROOP at a family reunion in 1927 in Carroll County, Maryland, the family very likely took the Great Valley Road in green in the map above (with some continuing on the dotted green road).

Traveling on what was once the Baltimore and Memphis Turnpike, the Rupe caravan crossed the Potomac at Harper’s Ferry in 1796. The caravan included Henry, his wife Catherine, and their family of several sons and daughters, the three older brothers of Henry, and their families. In crossing the Potomac the cattle and other larger animals were forced to swim, and the sons of Henry held the ropes attached to the horns of the cows. One wild cow pulled one of the unsuspecting Rupe boys overboard while crossing and he might have been lost had they not missed the cow, which finally reached shore with the boy swinging to her tail some distance down stream. The three brothers of Henry split with one of them going to Ohio, one to Western North Carolina, and the other to Georgia. Henry and family journeyed through the Shenandoah Valley and into Rockbridge County, bound for the southwestern section of the state, then rather sparsely settled. When they reached Buffalo Creek, four miles north of Natural Bridge, a great flood overtook them and they were forced to remain for several days. A report reached them that Natural Bridge had washed away, and it being the only passage, it would require four years to restore the bridge. They settled on Buffalo Creek and built a mill there, which they operated for years before they learned that the report of the bridge destruction was like Mark Twain’s comment on the first report of his death, considerable exaggereated (sic). Early in the year 1800 they left Rockbridge Co. and wound up in Lunenburg Co., VA where they had at least one child before settling on Pelham’s Branch, near Little River, about eight miles southwest of Christiansburg, Montgomery Co., VA. The first recorded document for Henry in this area was the purchase of 326 acres on Aug. 17, 1804 from Abner Lester, to whom it had been granted by the Commonwealth in 1795.

Who doesn’t have a story of several brothers? My 5th great-grandfather Henry RUPE was the youngest son of Johann Jacob RUPP and and Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER. I would like to believe he traveled with three older brothers but this may be “exaggereated” (to use Redmond’s spelling). To simplify things I’m dropping the Johann from the father and his three sons’ names as, after they came to America, the second name was found in records.

Descendants of the 1752 immigrant Johann Jacob RUPP used different spellings of the surname — RUPP, RUPE, ROOP, ROUP, ROOPE, ROUPE, RUPPE — from one generation to the next, even in the same family and same generation.

This is where I’m seeing the families from 1752 to 1820.

migrationmap

  1. Henry’s parents Jacob and Barbara and his three oldest brothers Jacob, Michael, and Martin came to America in 1752 arriving in Philadelphia.  This will be discussed in a later post. The length of time they remained in Pennsylvania is unknown.
  2. Henry’s father Jacob RUPP was in Frederick and Baltimore County, Maryland, from about 1759 to 1792. Church records as well as three sets of newly found records confirm his residence in Pipe Creek Hundred in Baltimore County. They will be discussed in more detailed upcoming posts.
  3. Family tradition (above) tells of Henry and his brothers crossing the Potomac at Harpers Ferry in 1796. The transcript of the report by Redmond ROOP may not be reliable. The information has been copied many times and cannot be traced back to its origin. Theron Rupe, another researcher for the family, wrote the family left Maryland in 1793 after Henry sold 100 acres of the original 115 acres owned by his father Jacob.
  4. Family tradition (above) tells of Henry’s family remaining at Buffalo Creek in Rockbridge County, Virginia, until about 1800. I have not found proof of this or of their building or running a mill at this location. Henry ROOP was in Rockbridge County on 13 January 1801 when Polly NULL, from Baltimore County, Maryland, and daughter of Anthony NULL married James HART. Henry gave oath of the bride being of age. [I have images of both records] The 1800 census for Virginia is not available and tax lists have been used as substitutes. The 1801 tax list for Rockbridge was used as a substitute. James HART was listed but Henry RUPE/ROOP appears to have already left the county as he was not on the list. There for the marriage, gone for the tax list!
  5. Henry RUPE was seen in Montgomery County buying land in 1804 from Abner Lester. He continued to acquire land and deeds show his name spelled Roop. On the 1810 trough 1840 census the surname was spelled Roop, Roope, and Rupe. He lived in Montgomery County until his death in 1845.
  6. Martin RUPE was a resident of Surry County, North Carolina from 1795 to about 1810. He may not have taken care of all business in the county before moving on as he was seen on the 1812 tax list. George WEAVER was a resident of Stokes County, North Carolina in 1800. By 1820 the WEAVER family was living next door to Henry RUPE in Montgomery County, Virginia. George’s wife was the sister of Henry RUPE.
  7. Martin ROOP (indexed Roap) was in Union County, South Carolina, by 1810. The area became Cherokee County. Many of his descendants lived there as well as across the state line in Rutledge and Cleveland counties in North Carolina. His descendants in the Carolinas used the surname spelling RUPPE.
  • Places of birth of the children of Henry RUPE indicate he was in Maryland in 1786-1792, Virginia from about 1794.
  • Places of birth of the children of Martin RUPP indicate he was in Maryland in 1779, Pennsylvania 1780-1788, Virginia 1790, North Carolina 1796-1805.
  • Places of birth of the children of George WEAVER indicate he was in North Carolina in 1778* and back in Maryland in 1781-1790.

*Another family tradition, which I will be discussing in a future post, suggests Jacob RUPP and his family, during the American Revolutionary War, “bought land in a  North Carolina land company and after the Treaty of Paris was signed in 1783 the family resurfaced in Baltimore County.” Records I’m finding show Jacob was in Baltimore County during this time and do not support the theory of his being in North Carolina. George WEAVER’s oldest child was listed on the 1850 census as born abt. 1778 in North Carolina. She died before 1860, her children died in 1848, 1865, and bet. 1860-1870. This left no possibility of confirmation of the mother’s place of birth on the 1880 census.

It was important to me to map the migration pattern of the family during this period. I am convinced it will help me prove or disprove the family tradition by pointing me in the right direction at the right time. Of course, any suggestion on a course of action would be greatly appreciated.

Sources:
[1] C. T. Zahn and Frederick S. Weiser, translators and editors, Maryland German Church Records Volume 10, subtitle: Zion Church “The German Church”, Manchester, Carroll County — today Trinity United Church of Christ Records, 1760-1836 and Immanuel Lutheran Church Records, 1760-1853 (published by the Historical Society of Carroll County, Westminster, Maryland).

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann Jacob RUPP
Parents: Johann Jacob RUPP Jr. and Maria Apollonia FETZER
Spouse: Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER
Parents of spouse: Johannes NONNENMACHER and Maria Barbara STAMBACH
Whereabouts: Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, Pennsylvania, Maryland
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 6th great-grandfather

  1. Johann Jacob RUPP
  2. Heinrich Thomas “Henry” RUPE Sr.
  3. James ROOP
  4. Gordon H. ROOP
  5. Gordon Washington ROOP
  6. Walter Farmer ROOP
  7. Myrtle Hazel ROOP
  8. Fred Roosevelt Dempsey
  9. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

52 Ancestors: #43(2) Elizabeth’s parents Robert and Anne CARROLL

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks“The challenge: have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor.”

This is entry #43(2) in Amy Johnson Crow’s Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.

I might be breaking a rule by doing this ancestor in two parts in one week. My posts for this challenge are not spontaneous. I have this planned out to the end of the year. For me, an ancestor’s childhood and parents are part of her life. In the case of this ancestor it became so complicated that I’ve broken this up into two parts.

52 Ancestors: #43(2) Elizabeth’s parents Robert and Anne CARROLL

I thought this would be an easy write-up until I started taking a closer look at what I have on the CARROLL family of Montgomery County, Virginia. To begin with the name was found with many different spellings: CARL, CAREL, CARLE, CAROL, CARRIL, CARREL, CARRELL, CARROLL.

To add to the confusion the George Valentine “Feltha” CORRELL family moved to the area soon after the 1810 census from Augusta County. They were of German heritage and the surname was sometimes spelled CARRELL. Fortunately, I’ve already looked into this family as Feltha’s wife Kate was a WEAVER, daughter of George WEAVER and Barbara RUPP (sister of my Henry RUPE), and granddaughter of my 1752 immigrants (6th great-grandparents) Johan Jacob RUPP and Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER.

CARROLL Marriages

According to family tradition three of Henry RUPE’s sons married CARROLL sisters. Let’s take a look at the CARROLL marriages that took place in Montgomery and Floyd counties from 1830 to 1850:

1. My fourth great-grandparents James ROOP and Elizabeth CARROLL married on 23 July 1830. In the abstract of the marriage[1] his last name was spelled RUPE and her maiden name was indexed as EARL. As mentioned last week RUPE and ROOP were used  interchangeably. The names of the bride’s and groom’s parents were not included in the transcript. To-do list: request copy of marriage record because….I believe that EARL is an indexing error and her maiden name was most likely spelled CARL as it was for her sister Mary the following year:

2. “I do hereby certify that I celebrated the rites of matrimony between Joseph Roop & Mary Carl of Montgomery Cty on the 13th day of September 1831 by virtue of a publication given under my hand this 26th day of June 1832. Richd Buckingham”[2]

3. Richard Buckingham also celebrated the rites of matrimony between John CARL and Theodocia WILSON of Floyd County on the 27th day of November 1832 by virtue of a publication.[3] John died on 1 October 1881 in Floyd County. The abstract of his record of death shows his name as John CARRIL and his parents as Robert and Anne.[4]

4. Peninah CARROLL married Henry KEMPLIN on 26 November 1835 in Floyd County, Virginia. The marriage was performed by Michael Howry. Parents of the couple were not listed on this source.[3] This couple went to Kentucky before 1840.

5. Nancy Carroll married Andrew DAME on 5 September 1844 in Montgomery County, Virginia.[5] No information found on this couple.

6. On 4 November 1846 William ROOP gave bond with Robert CARRELL as security for the marriage of William to Robert’s daughter Catherine CARRELL.[6] In 1850 Anne CARLE age 62 was in the household of William and Catherine ROOP. The relationship is not listed however Anne would appear to be Catherine’s mother.

7. Rose CARROLL married James JUSTICE on 21 October 1848. The abstract of this record includes the name of the bride’s father, Robert CARROLL.[6] At this point things become complicated. Rose may have had two daughters before this marriage. Sarah CARROLL who is seen with her in 1850 and Drusilla CARROLL. The second daughter later took the surname JUSTICE. Sallie/Sarah RATLIFF was seen as Drusilla’s grandmother in 1880 suggesting that Rose’s children’s father was a RATLIFF. Sarah CARROLL was also found with Sarah RATLIFF in 1850 and with Robert CARROLL in 1860. Like her sister Drusilla, Sarah CARROLL appears to have had a child without marrying and is seen in 1880 as Sarah JUSTIS.

8. Joseph R. CARRELL and Sarah KROPFF were married by Thomas G. Shelor on 6 August 1846 in Floyd County, Virginia . Sarah was the daughter of Barbary KROPFF per permission note. Parents of the groom were not mentioned.[3]

9. Robert R. CARRELL and Evaline M. RATLIFF were married by Owen Sumner on 9 July 1848 in Floyd County, Virginia. Evaline was the daughter of Benjamin RATLIFF per bond. Parents of the groom were not mentioned.[3]

From family tradition and the above marriages that list a parent, the following children are Robert’s: *Elizabeth, *Mary, *John, *Catherine, and *Rose. This leaves Peninah, Nancy, Joseph and Robert as possible children.

CARROLL in Census

The Robert CARROLL family was NOT always the only family of that name in Montgomery County per the earliest censuses. In 1810 there was also a Samuel CARREL Sr. age over 45 and in 1820 a James CARRELL age 26-44. Samuel was not on the 1820 census and James was not found in Montgomery in 1830 or later. After this time, in 1830, Robert was the only CARROLL in Montgomery County. Robert and his son John were the only CARROLLs in Floyd County in 1840. Note that Floyd County was formed from Montgomery in 1831.

Since Robert was the only CARROLL in Montgomery County after 1820 I believe that it is possible that 8 of the 9 (if not all) marriages found above may be his children. Using these young people (*proven) I analyzed the pre-1850 census:

1810censuscarrel
1810 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery > Christiansburg (ancestry.com)

1810 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Christiansburg
Name: Robt Carrel
Free White Persons – Males – Under 10: 1 (*John)
Free White Persons – Males – 26 thru 44 : 1 (Robert 26-29)
Free White Persons – Females – Under 10: 2 (*Elizabeth and *Mary)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 15: 1 (unknown b. bet. 1795-1800)
Free White Persons – Females – 26 thru 44: 1 (Anne 26-29)
Number of Household Members Under 16: 4
Number of Household Members Over 25: 2
Number of Household Members: 6

1820censuscarrell
1820 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery > Blacksburg (ancestry.com)

1820 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Blacksburg
Name: Robert Carrell
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
Free White Persons – Males – Under 10: 1 (*John, wrong column?)
Free White Persons – Males – 26 thru 44: 1 (Robert age 36-39)
Free White Persons – Females – Under 10: 4 (*Mary, *Rose, Peninah, *Catherine)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 15: 1 (*Elizabeth)
Free White Persons – Females – 26 thru 44: 1 (Anne age 36-39)
Number of Persons – Engaged in Agriculture: 1
Free White Persons – Under 16: 6
Free White Persons – Over 25: 2
Total Free White Persons: 8
Total All Persons – White, Slaves, Colored, Other: 8

1830censuscarle
1830 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery > Christiansburg (ancestry.com)

1830 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Christiansburg
Name: Robert Carle
Free White Persons – Males – Under 5: 1 (Robert)
Free White Persons – Males – 5 thru 9: 1 (Joseph)
Free White Persons – Males – 20 thru 29: 1 (*John)
Free White Persons – Males – 40 thru 49: 1 (Robert age 46-49)
Free White Persons – Females – Under 5: 1 (Nancy)
Free White Persons – Females – 5 thru 9: 1 (*Catherine)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 14: 2 (*Rose, Peninah)
Free White Persons – Females – 40 thru 49: 1 (Anne age 46-49)
Free White Persons – Females – 50 thru 59: 1 (older woman?)
Free White Persons – Under 20: 6
Free White Persons – 20 thru 49: 3
Total Free White Persons: 10
Total – All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 10

Up until 1830 the analysis of the census went well except for son John (b. abt. 1806) having slipped into the wrong column in 1820. The children fit the CARROLL marriages seen above. Then the 1840 blows everything out of the water.

1840censuscarel
1840 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Floyd (ancestry.com)

1840 U.S. Federal Census
Floyd County, Virginia
Name: Robert Carol
Free White Persons – Males – 5 thru 9: 1 (??)
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 14: 2 (Joseph and Robert)
Free White Persons – Males – 50 thru 59: 1 (Robert age 56-59)
Free White Persons – Females – Under 5: 1 (Rose’s dau Sarah)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 14: 5 (Nancy, 4x??)
Free White Persons – Females – 15 thru 19: 1 (*Rose, *Catherine)
Free White Persons – Females – 30 thru 39: 1 (poss. mother of younger children)
Free White Persons – Females – 50 thru 59: 1 (Anne age 56-59)
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 2
Persons Employed in Manufacture and Trade: 1
Free White Persons – Under 20: 10
Free White Persons – 20 thru 49: 1
Total Free White Persons: 13
Total All Persons – Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 13

Robert and Anne are with their unmarried children but there is another young woman with them and it looks like she may have brought five children with her. Could she be the girl age 10-15 seen with the CARROLL family in 1810? Was she Robert’s sister? Was she the mother of all the younger children?

1850censuscarle
1850 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery (ancestry.com)

In 1850 Robert CARROLL was not found in the census. However Anne CARLE age 62 was in the household of her son-in-law William ROOP (above) and her daughter Catherine. Eight of the nine CARROLL children were found in their own households. As mentioned earlier, no record was found for Nancy who married Andrew DAME.

In 1860 we find Robert CARROLL age 74 in the census with young people who may be grandchildren.

1860censuscarrell1
1860 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery > Christiansburg (ancestry.com)
1860censuscarrell2
1860 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery > Christiansburg (ancestry.com)

1860 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Christiansburg
Robert Carroll 74 wheelright
Robert Carroll 22 laborer (1850 age 22)
Sarah Carroll 21 (1850 age 14/15, poss. a daughter of Rose)
Elisha Carroll 14 (1850 age 0, son of Ruth Ratliff Rose)
Isaac Rose 35 basket maker
Ruth Rose 20 (1850 age 22, daughter of Sarah Ratliff)
Malinda Rose 7
Druscilla Rose 1
Note: ages of persons in household are off by 5-10 years

The young Robert seen in this household may be his son but the age is off by 10 years. A Robert CARROLL age 12 was not found in the 1850 census. In 1850 Robert’s son Robert R. CARROLL was in prison and the wife Evaline had her own household with their son Jesse. She has not been located in 1860 but in 1868 she was a widow and remarried. She had her last child about 1862 and he was named Giles Gordon CARROLL.

Sarah CARROLL seen in Robert’s household in 1860 was found twice in 1850, in the household of Rose Carroll JUSTICE and in the household of Sarah RATLIFF.

Elisha CARROLL was the son of Ruth CARROLL (aka Ruth RATLIFF) per his marriage record. Ruth, wife of Isaac ROSE, was listed as Ruth RATLIFF, daughter of Sarah RATLIFF, when she married in 1853. Ruth and Isaac have not been found after 1860. Why would Ruth’s son Elisha have the CARROLL surname if his mother was a RATLIFF? Could it be that Ruth’s mother Sarah RATLIFF was actually a CARROLL as she is seen in 1870? Is Sarah the young girl seen in Robert’s household in 1810 and then again in 1840. Could she be Robert’s sister?

Sarah RATLIFF in Census

1850 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Sarah Ratliff F 55 Virginia
Ruth Carroll F 22 Virginia (daughter of Sarah per marriage record)
Sarah Carroll F 14 Virginia (daughter of Rose?)
Drusilla Carroll F 10 Virginia (daughter of Rose per 1880)
Elijah Carroll M 0 Virginia (son of Ruth per marriage record)
Lucinda Norris F 30 Virginia (relationship unknown)
Julia A. Norris F 10 Virginia (relationship unknown)
Harvey Norris M 2 Virginia (relationship unknown)

1860 U.S. Federal Census
Sarah Ratliff aka Sarah Carroll was not found.

1870 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Christiansburg
Justice, Rose M. 46
Justice, Drucilla 26 (daughter of Rose per 1880)
Justice, Ellen 11 (daughter of Drusilla per 1900, 1910, 1920, 1930)
Carroll, Sallie 84 (aka Sarah Ratliff)
Rose, Amanda 3 (poss. daughter of Ruth and Isaac Rose who disappeared aft. 1860)

1880 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Auburn
Justis, Drucilla 37 single (died bet. 1930-1940)
Justis, Rosa M. 63 widowed mother (died bet. 1880-1900)
Ratliff, Sallie 90 widowed grandmother (died bet. 1880-1900)

Wrinkle in my timeline

The 1880 census listing for Sallie RATLIFF threw me. I thought at first glance that “Sallie” was the mother of “Rosa” but this would put a wrinkle in my timeline for the Robert CARROLL family and add complications.

I’ve spent hours going back and forth with this information. My problem is a riddle: If Rose CARROLL was the daughter of Robert CARROLL and Sarah RATLIFF was the grandmother of Rose’s daughter Drusilla CARROLL aka Drusilla JUSTICE, then either Sarah was the mother of Rose or she was the mother of Drusilla’s unknown father. I would much rather think that she was not Drusilla’s mother as this would mean that Robert and Sarah (who was not his wife) had a child together.

Can I trust the census records that show these people using one surname and then changing to another without marrying? Can you see my predicament? I hope that by putting all the information into this post someone will see it and hopefully have the answers. I may have to take Diane Gould Hall’s advice and get images of the marriage records in hopes of finding more information than is transcribed.

Bottom Line

The bottom line is that Robert and Anne CARROLL were the parents of John, Elizabeth, Mary, Rose and Catherine and they may have had four more children. Speculation on my part is that Peninah, Nancy, Joseph and Robert were these four children.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful to be able to go back in time and talk to Mary ROOP, the daughter of Robert and Anne CARROLL, who lived to be 100 years old and could vividly tell of events that happened when she was young?

Mrs. Mary Roop, last living child of Robert and Anne CARROLL d. 1909

1907article
The Times Dispatch. (Richmond, Va.), 09 Jan. 1909. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.

Mrs. Mary Roop, of Auburn, in this county, has been quite ill for several days, but her friends have strong hopes of her recovery, although she is quite advanced in years, having celebrated her ninety-eighth birthday on New Year’s Day. She was born on the first day of January, 1809, a few miles from her present residence, and so far as is known she is the oldest person in the county. Her husband, the late Joseph Roop, died of a cancer in 1876, and she has lived with her youngest daughter at the old home place ever since. She can tell of events which happened ninety years ago as vividly as if she were speaking of things which took place only a year ago, and her memory is the wonder of the community.
All five of her sons fought in the late Civil War, one of whom lost his life in the service and the other four are still living in the county,as are three daughters, the youngest having died one years ago. She has a large number of grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and some half a dozen great-great-grandchildren, in all the greatest number of descendants of any living person in this county.[8]

1909obit
The Times Dispatch. (Richmond, Va.), 13 Jan. 1907. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.

Mrs. Mary Roop [Special to The Times-Dispatch.]
Christiansburg, VA., January 8. – Mrs. Mary Roop died at her residence, near Riner, in Montgomery county, yesterday after an illness of several months, aged 100 years and six days, being the oldest person in this county. She was born within a few miles of Riner on the first day of January, 1809. She was a remarkable woman, having never suffered any illness of consequence until a short time ago, and was clear in mind and memory until a few days before her death.
Her husband, the late Joseph Roop, died in 1876, and she continued to live at the old Homestead until her death, refusing to leave to live with any of her children, although often urged to do so. She leaves three sons and three daughters living, three of her children having died, the oldest living child now being nearly eighty years old. She also leaves over 100 descendants, embracing six generations. R. I. Roop, of this place, is one of her grandsons. The burial took place to-day at the family burying ground, near her home.[9]

If you missed the first part you can find it here.

Sources:
[1] Ancestry.com. Virginia, Marriages, 1740-1850 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999. Original data: Dodd, Jordan R., et al.. Early American Marriages: Virginia to 1850. Bountiful, UT, USA: Precision Indexing Publishers.
[2] Louise Roop Anderson Akers, comp., The Family Rub, Rup, Rupe, Roop, Roope (2001 Printed by Jamont Communications, 339 Luck Ave., Roanoke, VA 24016). Photocopy of page with marriages by Richard Buckingham.
[3] Floyd County, Virginia, Marriages 1831-1900; transcribed by Barbara Reininger from images copied from microfilm by Rena Worthen; online http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~barbr/zz_marriages.htm.
[4] Ancestry.com. Virginia, Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. Original data: “Virginia Deaths and Burials, 1853–1912.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010. Index entries derived from digital copies of original and compiled records.
[5] Ancestry.com. Virginia, Select Marriages, 1785-1940 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2014. Original data: Virginia, Marriages, 1785-1940. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013. FHL Film Number: 32633. Reference ID: P 289
[6] Louise Roop Anderson Akers, comp., The Family Rub, Rup, Rupe, Roop, Roope (2001 Printed by Jamont Communications, 339 Luck Ave., Roanoke, VA 24016). Photocopy of marriage bond of William Roop and Catherine Carrell.
[7] “Virginia, Marriages, 1785-1940,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XR8J-69S : accessed 21 Oct 2014), James Justice and Rose Carroll, 21 Oct 1848; citing Montgomery County, Virginia, reference P 308; FHL microfilm 32633.
[8] The times dispatch. (Richmond, Va.), 13 Jan. 1907. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.  (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038615/1907-01-13/ed-1/seq-18/ : accessed 2014)
[9] The times dispatch. (Richmond, Va.), 09 Jan. 1909. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038615/1909-01-09/ed-1/seq-2/ : accessed 2014)

© 2014 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52 Ancestors: #42 James ROOP 1808-1890 – Found on 8 Consecutive Censuses!

52ancestors“The challenge: have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor.”

This is entry #42 in Amy Johnson Crow’s Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.

52 Ancestors: #42 James ROOP 1808-1890 – Found on 8 Consecutive Censuses!

Descendants of the 1752 immigrant Johann Jacob RUPP used different spellings of the surname — RUPP, RUPE, ROOP, ROUP, ROOPE, ROUPE, RUPPE — from one generation to the next, even in the same family and same generation.

James ROOP was the baby of the RUPE family until his brother Joseph was born three years later. They were the 13th and 14th children of Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL.

I can’t imagine my 4th great-grandfather James ROOP being called Jimmie. I think he may have been given the nickname “Jimmie” after his death, maybe from a well meaning descendant. When he was old enough to marry, have his own household, see his children marry, make his will – he was always James ROOP, without a middle initial. This will be discussed, below, after the 1880 census listing.

James was the youngest of 17 people in his father Henry RUPE’s household in 1810. By this time James’ oldest sister Elizabeth had been married about seven years to James COMPTON. Was this couple and their son part of the household?

1810censusroop
1810 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery > Henry Rupe [ancestry.com]
1810 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Christiansburg
Page 18
Henry Rupe
Free White Persons – Males – Under 10: 4 (James 2, Samuel 9, William 10, and ?)
Free White Persons – Males – 16 thru 25: 3 (George 19, John 21, Henry 21, William 24)
Free White Persons – Males – 45 and over: 2 (Henry 45 and ?)
Free White Persons – Females – Under 10: 2 (Nancy 4, Rachel 6)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 15: 1 (Mary 8)
Free White Persons – Females – 16 thru 25: 3 (Barbara 18, Catherine 15, and ?)
Free White Persons – Females – 45 and over : 2 (Catherine 42 and ?)
Number of Household Members Under 16: 7
Number of Household Members Over 25: 4
Number of Household Members: 17

Living next door to Henry RUPE was his nephew Jacob WEAVER with his wife, a son, two brothers, a sister, and his mother – Henry’s sister.

James’ parents Henry and Catherine were born in Virginia per census listings of their four living children William, Rachel, Nancy, and James in 1880. This is not correct. Family tradition is that Heinrich Thomas “Henry” RUPE (1765-1845) was born about 1765 in Baltimore County, Maryland. We know that his wife Catherine Barbara NOLL (1768-aft. 1845) was born on 24 February 1768 and christened on 13 March 1768 in Manchester, Baltimore County, Maryland per church records.[1] Manchester was originally part of Baltimore County, before the creation of Carroll County in 1837.

Following the end of the American Revolutionary War (19 Apr 1775-14 Jan 1784), Henry married Catherine in Baltimore County, Maryland. Catherine was a Lutheran and Henry was German Reformed. The church they attended was called Zion and it was a union church. Both the Lutherans and the Reformed used the same building. The births and christenings of their first five children were recorded at this church: Jacob born 15 June 1786 and christened 30 July 1786; Elizabeth born 4 September 1787 and christened 31 October 1787; twins Heinrich Thomas “Henry” and Johannes “John” born 27 February 1789 and christened 26 April 1789; and Barbara E. born 29 October 1792 and christened after 29 October 1792.[1]

James’ father Henry owned 100 acres of  land in Baltimore County, Maryland, that he had bought from his father Johann Jacob RUPP who acquired 115 acres in 1770 with Pennsylvania money. The land was known as Rhineharts Folly and was sold to Jacob Boblitz in 1793. Henry and Catherine were preparing to move their family farther south.

They left Maryland in 1793 and made at least one stop along the way in Rockbridge County before continuing on to their destination. They arrived in Montgomery County, Virginia, in 1800. There is an interesting anecdote about why it took them so long.

Traveling on what was once the Baltimore and Memphis Turnpike, the Rupe caravan crossed the Potomac at Harper’s Ferry in 1796. The caravan included Henry, his wife Catherine, and their family of several sons and daughters, the three older brothers of Henry, and their families. In crossing the Potomac the cattle and other larger animals were forced to swim, and the sons of Henry held the ropes attached to the horns of the cows. One wild cow pulled one of the unsuspecting Rupe boys overboard while crossing and he might have been lost had they not missed the cow, which finally reached shore with the boy swinging to her tail some distance down stream. The three brothers of Henry split with one of them going to Ohio, one to Western North Carolina, and the other to Georgia. Henry and family journeyed through the Shenandoah Valley and into Rockbridge County, bound for the southwestern section of the state, then rather sparsely settled. When they reached Buffalo Creek, four miles north of Natural Bridge, a great flood overtook them and they were forced to remain for several days. A report reached them that Natural Bridge had washed away, and it being the only passage, it would require four years to restore the bridge. They settled on Buffalo Creek and built a mill there, which they operated for years before they learned that the report of the bridge destruction was like Mark Twain’s comment on the first report of his death, considerable exaggereated. Early in the year 1800 they left Rockbridge Co. and wound up in Lunenburg Co., VA where they had at least one child before settling on Pelham’s Branch, near Little River, about eight miles southwest of Christiansburg, Montgomery Co., VA. The first recorded document for Henry in this area was the purchase of 326 acres on Aug. 17, 1804 from Abner Lester, to whom it had been granted by the Commonwealth in 1795. ~a report given by Henry’s great-grandson Redmond Ira ROOP at a family reunion in 1927[2]

During  their travels three more children were born: George P. ca. 1794, Catherine ca. 1795, and William in 1800 in Rockbridge. Once in Montgomery the family continued to grow. Samuel B. was born 1801, Mary “Polly” abt 1802, Rachel abt 1804, and Nancy abt 1806 before the two youngest, James abt 1808 and Joseph abt 1811 were born.

After Joseph was born, James’ parents must have decided that fourteen was enough. The oldest of their brood were beginning to have a look around at possible spouses in preparation for marrying and starting families of their own. Before the 1820 census five marriages took place and two of James’ sisters had illegitimate children:

  • John RUPE married Elizabeth THOMPSON (1795-1870) on 14 January 1813 in Montgomery County, Virginia
  • Jacob ROOP married Susannah ALLEY (1790-1860) 15 April 1815 in Montgomery County, Virginia
  • Catherine “Caty” RUPE married Jacob AKERS (1775-1860) on 27 June 1815 in Montgomery County, Virginia
  • George RUPE married Margaret BALDWIN (1799- ) on on 5 December 1818 in Jefferson County, Tennessee
  • William RUPE married Ester AKERS (1802-1846) on 7 June 1820 in Montgomery County, Virginia
  • Barbary RUPE created a bit of a scandal by giving birth to a male bastard child on the 20th day of November 1815. Barbary signed a statement on the 25th day of July 1816 that it was George PETERMAN who got her with child. They did not marry.
  • Mary “Polly” ROOP had a daughter abt. 1818. Per the daughter’s marriage record her father was a DOBBINS.

One would think with so many children marrying Henry’s household would be shrinking. This was not the case as his two unmarried daughters and their children remained in the home. James was twelve in 1820 and may have been responsible for chores that his older married brothers once took care of. His single brothers Henry 31 and Samuel 18 were living at home and may have taken James along when they went hunting or worked their father’s land.

1820censusroop
1820 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery > Newburn > Henry Roop Sr. [ancestry.com]
1820 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Newburn Township
Henry Roop Sr.
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
Free White Persons – Males – Under 10: 2 (Joseph 9 and George 5, s/o Barbara)
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 15: 1 (James 12)
Free White Persons – Males – 16 thru 18: 1 (Samuel 18)
Free White Persons – Males – 16 thru 25: 1 (Samuel 18)
Free White Persons – Males – 26 thru 44: 1 (Henry 31)
Free White Persons – Males – 45 and over: 1 (Henry 55)
Free White Persons – Females – Under 10: 1 (Barbary 2, d/o Mary)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 15: 1 (Nancy 14)
Free White Persons – Females – 16 thru 25: 3 (Rachel 16, Mary 18, Barbara 28)
Free White Persons – Females – 45 and over : 1 (Catherine 52)
Number of Persons – Engaged in Agriculture: 3
Free White Persons – Under 16: 5
Free White Persons – Over 25: 3
Total Free White Persons: 12
Total All Persons – White, Slaves, Colored, Other: 12

In 1823 James saw two more of his siblings marry. Henry ROOP Jr. married Mary “Polly” THOMPSON (1802-1880) on 7 June 1823 and Rachel RUPE married John B. PHARIS (1797-1866) on 20 October 1823. Both marriages took place in Montgomery County, Virginia.

When John R. Charlton came around the RUPE place in June of 1830, James was 23 and still living at home. His parents were growing old and his sisters Barbara, Mary and Nancy were unmarried mothers of 5 boys and 3 girls and still living in the RUPE household. Jacob, Henry Jr., John, and William had their own households.

1830censusroop
1830 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery > Henry Roope Sr. [ancestry.com]
1830 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Blacksburg
Enumerated by John R. Charlton
Page 89
Henry Roope Sr.
Free White Persons – Males – Under 5: 3 (grandsons: Byrd 3, s/o Barbara; Henry 4, s/o Mary; and James R. 4, s/o Mary)
Free White Persons – Males – 5 thru 9: 1 (grandson Crockett 7, s/o Mary)
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 14: 1 (grandson George 15, s/o Barbara)
Free White Persons – Males – 15 thru 19:    1 (Joseph 19)
Free White Persons – Males – 20 thru 29: 2 (James 23, Samuel 29)
Free White Persons – Males – 60 thru 69: 1 (Henry 65)
Free White Persons – Females – 5 thru 9:    2 (granddaughters: Susan 7, d/o Barbara, and Elizabeth 7, d/o Mary)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 14: 1 (granddaughter Barbary 12, d/o Mary)
Free White Persons – Females – 20 thru 29: 2 (Mary 28, Nancy 24)
Free White Persons – Females – 30 thru 39: 2 (Barbara 38, unknown)
Free White Persons – Females – 60 thru 69: 1 (Catherine 62)
Free White Persons – Under 20: 9
Free White Persons – 20 thru 49: 8
Total Free White Persons: 17
Total – All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 17

James ROOP married Elizabeth CARROLL on 23 July 1830 in Montgomery County, Virginia. Did they live with his parents during the early years of their marriage? His father, who did not own slaves, had quite a large amount of land by then and needed his sons’ help to farm it.

The last of James’ brothers married in the 1830s in Montgomery County. Joseph ROOP married Mary “Polly” CARROLL (1809-1909) on 13 September 1831 and Samuel B. ROOP married Martha “Patsy” TOWNSLEY (1815-1870) on 7 January 1834. Joseph and James’ wives were sisters, daughters of Robert and Anne CARROLL.

James and Elizabeth had a half dozen children born in Montgomery County in the 1830s:

  • Ch 1: Amanda “Manda” ROOP (1831-1894) born September 1831
  • Ch 2: Floyd ROOP (1833-1923) born 12 May 1833
  • Ch 3: Evaline ROOP (1835-1888) born 3 March 1835
  • Ch 4: Peradine ROOP (1835-1909) born 30 November 1835
  • Ch 5: Gordon H. ROOP (1838-1863) born about 1838
  • Ch 6: Barbary Ellen ROOP (1839-1910) born 28 June 1839

In 1840 John R. Charlton once again walked or rode through the division, this time enumerating 9 RUPE households. James’ sisters Barbary and Mary had their own households. Their father Henry was not listed as a Revolutionary War pensioner.

1840censusroop
1840 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery > James Rupe (line 3) [ancestry.com]
1840 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Page 26
James Rupe
Free White Persons – Males – Under 5: 1 (Gordon 2)
Free White Persons – Males – 5 thru 9: 1 (Floyd 7)
Free White Persons – Males – 30 thru 39: 1 (James 32)
Free White Persons – Females – Under 5: 3 (Avaline 5, Peradine 4, and Barbary Ellen 1)
Free White Persons – Females – 5 thru 9: 1 (Amanda 9)
Free White Persons – Females – 30 thru 39: 1 ((Elizabeth 32)
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 1
Free White Persons – Under 20: 6
Free White Persons – 20 thru 49: 2
Total Free White Persons: 8
Total All Persons – Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 8

Three more children were born in Montgomery County following the 1840 census:

  • Ch 7: Giles Henderson ROOP (1841-1863) born 2 February 1841
  • Ch 8: William H. T. ROOP (1843-1863) born 6 November  1843
  • Ch 9: Rachel Monacha ROOP (1845-1901) born about 1845

James’ father Henry RUPE prepared a will on 18 November 1845 and died suddenly of heart failure at the age of 80, while out walking on the farm sometime between the date of the will and the date of probate, which was 1 December 1845. He was survived by his wife Catherine whose date of death remains unknown. James and his siblings buried their father on the Old Henry Rupe Homeplace.

Memorial Plaque
Henry and Catherine Rupe Family Memorial (2003) courtesy of Roger Roop.

Catherine and her daughters Elizabeth Compton, Barbara Rupe, Mary Roop, and Nancy Roop were missing in the 1850 census. Redmond Ira ROOP, a lawyer and great-grandson of old Henry, in his presentation at the 1927 family reunion, said that Catherine died in 1861 at the age of 95. She would have been 93 if she died in 1861, but what’s a year or two when you are in your nineties? She was not found in the 1860 census.

James’ brother William lost his wife, mother of nine children, about the same time as their father died. William then married Catherine CARROLL (1819-1879)  on 4 November 1846 in Montgomery County, Virginia. Catherine was the third daughter of Robert and Anne CARROLL to marry one of the ROOP boys.

The year before the 1850 census was an eventful year for James, his wife, and their nine children. Elizabeth was pregnant with her 10th child. James wanted to get his own piece of land as his father’s estate would require several years to be settled. His father had left a large estate and James’ brother Jacob was named as executor in the will. On account of there being so many heirs widely scattered over the country, Jacob almost despaired a number of times before the estate was finally settled. Once in his desperation he exclaimed, “Well, it has been so troublesome and vexatious that I am almost sorry that old gentleman ever died.”[2]

James and Elizabeth’s 10th child was born in September of 1849 and was named James Anderson ROOP. He was the first of their children to be born in Floyd County on the land that James would own. He’d made the decision to buy a piece of land containing 600 acres about 9 1/2 miles northwest of Floyd, in Floyd County, Virginia, on what is now known as the White Oak Grove Road. Alvin GRAHAM sold the 600 acres to James ROOP and the deed was recorded on 17 November 1849 in Floyd County’s Deed Book E on page 377.

James cleared up the land and hewed the logs to build their house. He built a one-room, log structure, about 24 feet by 12 feet. The logs were daubed with mortar. The chimney was located on the southwest end and made with rocks. He built an unusually large fireplace with an arch of homemade bricks over the fireplace and a plain log mantel. The one-story log house had a hip roof with shingle and very plain wood cornices. There was no porch and the entrance was a plain yellow pine door made by nailing large planks together. It had common iron hinges and an old-fashioned door lock on the outside. Two unshuttered windows with 16 7″ by 10” panes brought light into the single room. The ceiling was 8 feet high. James must have had help to lift the logs so high. Broad even planks made from hand-hewed logs covered the floor. There was no cellar and therefore no stairway. He built the kitchen about 8-10 feet away from the house as was common in those days.[3]

Years later the building was in such poor condition that it was torn apart and moved. In 1938 it was being used for a cow house by James’ grandson Amos L. ROOP (1855-1941) who lived on the property at the time.

1850censusroop
1850 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Floyd > ED 15 > Page 445 > HH #938-938 >James Roop [ancestry.com]
1850 U.S. Federal Census
Floyd County, Virginia
The Western District No. 15, Page No. 445
Enumerated by me, on the 7th day of September 1850. Joseph L. Howard Ass’t Marshal.
HH #938-938
James Roop 42 M Farmer $600 Montgomery cannot read & write
Elizabeth Roop 42 F Floyd cannot read & write
Amanda Roop 18 F Montgomery
Floyd Roop 17 M Laborer Montgomery
Evaline Roop 15 F Montgomery
Peradine Roop 14 F Montgomery attended school within year
Gordon Roop 12 M Montgomery attended school within year
Barbary C. Roop 10 F Montgomery attended school within year
Giles Henderson Roop 8 M Montgomery
William H. T. Roop 6 M Montgomery
Rachel Manerva Roop 5 F Montgomery
James Roop 8/12 M Floyd

Starting in 1850 until 1880 James was always seen as a farmer in the census. In 1850 the enumerator Joseph L. Howard misread the column “Place of Birth Naming the State, Territory, or Country” and filled in the name of the county that the individual was born in. Thank you Mr. Howard! This is how I know that little James was the first child to be born on the new homeplace. Two more children were born there:

  • Ch 11: Hamilton N. ROOP (1854-1919) born abt. December 1853
  • Ch 12: Charles Monroe ROOP (1854-1928) born 10 August 1854

Five marriages took place in 1855-1856. Manda, Floyd and Peradine married in 1855, the year before the White Oak Grove Church was built by neighbors of the community about a mile southeast of the James ROOP home. The first pastor of the church was my 5th great-grandfather, Rev. Owen SUMNER. The church was used as a school during the week. Evaline and Gordon may have married too early in 1856 to have their marriages performed in the new building but both were married by Rev. SUMNER, the grandfather of Gordon’s wife Emaline LESTER.

More information on the marriages of James and Elizabeth’s children will be included in Elizabeth’s story next week.

1860censusroop1
1860 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Floyd > HH#712-669 [ancestry.com]
1860roopcensus2
1860 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Floyd > HH#712-669 [ancestry.com]
1860 U.S. Federal Census
Floyd County, Virginia
Page No. 99+100, Sheet No. 533+534
Enumerated by me, on the 16th day of July, 1960. Geo M. Well, Ass’t Marshal.
Post Office Floyd C.H. Va.
HH #712-669
James Roop 50 M Farmer $2000 $292 Virginia
Elizabeth Roop 50 F Virginia cannot read & write
Amanda Lester 28 F Virginia
Giles H. Roop 19 M Virginia attended school
William H. T. Roop 17 M Virginia attended school
Barbary C. Roop 20 F Virginia attended school
Rachel M. Roop 14 F Virginia attended school
Jas Roop 10 M Virginia attended school
Hamilton N. Roop 7 M Virginia attended school
Charles M. Roop 5 M Virginia attended school
Jas R. Lester 4 M Virginia (son of Amanda)
Lafayette Lester 2 M Virginia (son of Amanda)

American Civil War (4 Feb 1861-23 Jun 1865)

At the beginning of the War Between the States the soldiers were gathered in the White Oak Grove Church and mustered. The ladies of the community prepared food and took it to the church for the men. Four of James ROOP’s sons (Floyd, Gordon, Giles Henderson and William H. T.) and two of his daughters’ husbands (Amanda’s husband George Washington LESTER and Peradine’s husband Sylvester MILLS) served in Company A, 54th Infantry Regiment Virginia. Daughter Evaline’s husband Mathias RATLIFF served in Company E of the same regiment. Seven men in the family served and three did not come home: my third great-grandfather Gordon and his brothers Giles and William died in Georgia in 1863 while serving.

James and Elizabeth’s daughter Rachel married at home in 1866. Rev. SUMNER came to the house to perform the ceremony. Their son James married in 1868 in Montgomery County.

1870censusroop1
1870 U. S. Federal Census > VA > Floyd > Alum Ridge > 5B > HH#68-66 [ancestry.com]
1870censusroop2
1870 U. S. Federal Census > VA > Floyd > Alum Ridge > 5A > HH#68-66 [ancestry.com]
1870 U. S. Federal Census
Floyd County, Virginia
Page No. 9+10, Sheet 5A+5B
Alum Ridge Township
Enumeratd by me on the 5th day of August, 1870. B. P. Elliott, Ass’t Marshal.
Post Office Floyd C. H. Va.
HH #68-66
Roop, James 62 M W Farmer $1,500 $430 Virginia male US citizen over 21 yo
Roop, Elizabeth 62 F W Keeping house Virginia cannot read & write
Roop, Hamilton N. 17 M W farm laborer Virginia cannot read & write
Roop, Charles M. 15 M W farm laborer Virginia cannot read & write
Roop, Barbara E. 30 F W without occupation Virginia cannot read & write

In 1870 James’ household included his wife, two youngest sons, and Barbara Ellen who was on her way to being an old maid. James and Elizabeth’s youngest sons Hamilton and Charles were married by Rev. SUMNER at his home in 1872 and 1873. This left James and Elizabeth alone in 1880 as Barbary was living with her sister Rachel and her family.

1880censusroop
1880 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery > Christiansburg > ED 50 Sheet 356B > HH#151-153 [ancestry.com]
1880 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Page No. 18
Christiansburg Magisterial District
Enumeration District No. 50, Sheet No. 356B
Enumerated the 11th day of June, 1880. John C. Wade, enumerator.
HH #151-153
Roop, James Sr. W M 71 married Farmer cannot read & write VA VA VA
Roop, Elizabeth W M 71 wife married Keeping House cannot write VA VA VA

James ROOP was never listed with a middle initial in any of the above censuses or on marriage records of his children. Ancestry.com has him indexed as James W. ROOP in the 1880 census. A close look at the census image shows that he was listed as Sr. and his son James A. ROOP who lived next door was listed as Jr. This does not mean that James shared the same middle initial or middle name with his son. The abbreviation Sr. was misread for a W. [I needed to get that straigthened out!]

The last of James and Elizabeth’s children finally married in 1888. Barbary was 49 years old the first time she married. It would not be the last. She was widowed twice and married again in 1898 and 1906. She didn’t remain an old maid after all.

James’ wife Elizabeth passed away during the 1880s. James most likely was enumerated on the Montgomery County census in 1890 as he is not seen on the substitute used for Floyd. The actual 1890 Floyd County, Virgina, census was among those destroyed in the fire/flood in Washington in 1921. An abbreviated copy was made before the original was sent off and can be found in the Court House in Floyd. In 1890 James made his will, dated 31 January 1890, in Floyd County and died there on 2 November 1890. If he had been on the 1890 substitute for Floyd he would have been found in nine consecutive censuses.

James Roop’s Will
Recorded in Floyd County, Virginia
Will Book F
Page 486

Will and Testament of James Roop – In the name of God, Amen. I James Roop of the County of Floyd and State of Virginia, being weake of body, but of mind and memory and calling to mind the mortality of my body make and ordain this my Will and Testament – and as vouching my worldly estate. When with it has pleased God to bless me with this life – I deaded to Floyd Roop, my son, he being heir of my body one hundred akers of land being part, this land lying in the County of Floyd and the State of Virginia, joining land of James Simmons and John Altizer and others. – I also bond James Roop, my son, being heir of my body, one hundred akers of land, this land being sold to George W. Lester of said James Roop and this deed were made to George W. Lester instead of James Roop, this land joining Cornelius Altizer. – I also bond Hamilton N. Roop, my son, being heir of my body, one hundred and twenty akers of land, said Hamilton N. Roop sold to A. L. Roop and this dead being made to A. L. Roop instead of Hamilton N. Roop, this land joining George Nixon. – I also deaded Charley Roop, my son, one hundred akers of land, he being heir of my body, this deed were made to his wife and heirs instead of said Charley Roop, this land joining Perdine Peterman.
I allso desire Gordon Roop, my son, he be heir of my body, his heirs to have fifteen dollars, a peace, there names being Thomas Roop, and Gordon Roop and Dolley Roop.
Perdine Roop, my daughter, she being heir of my body, has received her part in land this dead was made to Silvester Mills her husban instead of said Perdine his wife, This land is none (sic, known) as the Canaan Simons land lying on the Waters of Little River joining lands of C. D. Lester, this land lying in the County of Floyd and State of Virginia. – The amount of Perdine money that I paid for this land is mention in Silvester’s deed.
I allso desire at my death for the rest of my estate to be eaqely divided amongst my four daughters. They being heirs of my body, Amanda Roop, and Avealine Roop, and Barbery Roop, and Rachel M. Roop. My requests is that A. L. Roop to be my Administrator. – This 31st day of January 1890.
                                                      His
                                                        James X Roop
                                                                  Mark
Witness: James A. Simmons
                H. D. Simmons

Virginia – In Floyd County Court held on this 14th day of September 1897, a paper in writing, purporting to be the last Will and Testament of James Roop, deceased, was produced  in court proven by the Oaths of James A. Simmons and H. D. Simmons, the Subscribing Witnesses thereto. Admitted to probate and ordered to be recorded. Thereupon,  A. L. Roop, the Executor named in same Will. Together with Ira S. Hylton and J. M. Roop, his surieties, entered unto said acknowledged a Bond in the Penalty of $1000.00 conditioned according to law. A certificate is granted said A. L. Roop for obtaining probate of said will in due form.[4]

Final settlement of James ROOP’s will was made on 18 September 1897 in Floyd County, Virginia.

Sources:
[1] C. T. Zahn and Frederick S. Weiser, translators and editors, Maryland German Church Records Volume 10, Zion Church “The German Church”, Manchester, Carroll County — today Trinity United Church of Christ Records, 1760-1836 and Immanuel Lutheran Church Records, 1760-1853  (published by the Historical Society of Carroll County, Westminster, Maryland).
[2] Everette L. McGrew, My Mother Was A Rupe (revised August 2000).
[3] Peters, Genevieve H., “The Jimmie Roop Homeplace” Richmond, Va. : Library of Virginia, 1999. 4 image files. This write-up is a part of the Virginia W.P.A. Historical Inventory Project sponsored by the Virginia Conservation Commission under the direction of its Division of History.
[4] Louise Roop Anderson Akers, comp., The Family Rub, Rup, Rupe, Roop, Roope (2001 Printed by Jamont Communications, 339 Luck Ave., Roanoke, VA 24016). Photocopy of page from Will Book found in this publication, transcribed 18 Oct 2014.

© 2014 Cathy Meder-Dempsey