52 Ancestors: #35 The Welter-Hennes Family of Ernzen, Germany

Anton WELTER (1773-1849)

Anton WELTER, son of Johann Bernard WELTER and Maria BRIMERS, was born on 15 December 1773 on Ernzerhof outside of Ernzen. He was baptized the same day in Ernzen.[1]

1773 Baptismal Record of “Antonius Welter”[1]
Anton was the only son, a middle child, but also the youngest as his two younger sisters died at an early age. His mother Maria died in 1781[2] leaving an 8-year-old Anton and his two older sisters. Her widower Bernard, as he was known, married again six months after her death.[3] He and his second wife Maria BARTZ had a daughter nearly nine months after the marriage.[4] The baby only survived two months.[5] Bernard and Maria did not have any other children. Anton’s step-mother died in 1791.[6] By this time Bernard’s children were nearly all grown. His oldest daughter Elisabeth had been married two years at the time and Catharina would marry in 1800. His only son Anton was nearly 18 years old. Bernard never married again.

Anna Katharina HENNES (1779-1845)

Anna Katharina HENNES, daughter of Johann HENNES and Magdalena MÜLLER, was born on 14 May 1779 in Holsthum.[7]

View of the village of Holsthum

Like Anton WELTER, Anna Katharina was a middle child and had two older sisters. Her father Johann died in 1786 when his wife was pregnant with their youngest child.[8] Matthias, their only son, was born two months later. Two months after giving birth to her deceased husband’s child, Magdalena MÜLLER married Johann TRAMPERT.[9] Magdalena was 44 and Johann was 27. With this marriage, her husband took on the responsibility of five step-children between 9 years and 2 months. Magdalena and her second husband did not have children of their own.

Anna Katharina and Anton marry in 1803

Anna Katharina HENNES married Anton WELTER on 23 March 1803 in Ernzen.[10] They had three children during their first seven years of marriage. Their first, Bernard was born in 1805 and named after his paternal grandfather. A record of baptism has not been searched for but it is likely his grandfather was his godfather as was the practice of the times. Their next two children were girls: Elisabeth was born on 31 January 1807[11] and Katharina WELTER on 21 July 1810.

Before they had more children there were several deaths in the family. Anna Katharina’s step-father Johann TRAMPERT died on 19 August 1812 at the age of 55 years.[9] Anton and Anna Katharina youngest daughter Katharina died on 5 December 1812 at the age of nearly two and a half years.[10] Anton’s father Johann Bernard WELTER died on 27 March 1813 at the age of 76 years.[3] Almost a week later the family would be attending another funeral. Anna Katharina’s mother Magdalena MÜLLER died on 2 April 1813 at the age of 70 years.[12] Three deaths in four months make me wonder if they were caused by disease or a hard winter.

A year later Anna Katharina and Anton named their son born on 4 April 1814 Peter. He lived only ten months dying on 6 February 1815. A little more than two years later another son was born and named Peter. He was born on 10 August 1817 and died on 12 May 1819 at the age of twenty months.[10]

Anton and Anna Katharina’s youngest child, Anna Maria was born on 3 April 1822.[10]  Anna Katharina was 43 and Anton was going on 49.

The WELTER children begin to marry

Their oldest daughter Elisabeth married Hubert WEIMANN, son of Bernard WEYMANN and Susanna MALAMBRÉ, on 11 February 1835 in Ernzen. Hubert was born on 13 July 1805 in Ernzen.[13]

Their oldest son Bernard married Katharina WEBER on 2 April 1837 in Aach (Eifel).[14] Katharina was born on 2 January 1795 in Aach to Peter WEBER und Susanna KREIN.

The mother of this family, Anna Katharina HENNES died on 9 March 1845 in Ernzen and was buried two days later.[10] Her widower Anton was left with three children, two of whom were married.

The youngest daughter Anna Maria married Peter STEIL on 18 February 1846 in Ernzen.[15] Peter was born on 3 January 1810 in Berdorf (Luxembourg).[16]

The father of this family, Anton WELTER died on 26 January 1849 in Ernzen and was buried two days later.

After their parents’ deaths

The oldest of the WELTER children, Bernard died on 1 February 1855 in Ernzen at the age of 55. His widow Katharina WEBER died two decades later on 30 April 1875 in Ernzen and was buried two days later. They may have remained childless.[14]

Anna Maria, the youngest of the WELTER children, died on 9 January 1861 and was buried two days later. She was 38 years old and left a husband and four children.

Elisabeth’s husband Hubert WEIMANN died at the age of 67 on 29 October 1872 in Ernzen and was buried two days later. He left her with three children.

Peter STEIL, Anna Maria’s widower, died on 21 December 1872 in Ernzen and was buried two days later. He was survived by two daughters and a son. The son emigrated to North America during the year and likely only learning of the death of his father after the new year.

A Peter STEIL, age 18, was found on a passenger list with an arrival in New York on 20 May 1872 via Liverpool, England. A match for Peter STEIL born 12 January 1854 in Ernzen was not found in America. He cannot be the same person as the Peter Steil 1852-1913 who lived in Stearns County, Minnesota, as he came over in 1867. Suggestions on other spelling for the STEIL name would be appreciated.

Elisabeth WELTER, the last living child of Anton and Anna Katharina, died on 24 September 1877 in Ernzen and was buried three days later. Elisabeth, my third great-grandmother, was 70 years old. She left three children who would live to see the outbreak of World War I. Only one of these would live to see the end of it.

How are the DNA matches looking for this branch?

One of the first Shared Ancestor Hints on Ancestry DNA for my brother’s test was for a match who descends from Johann HENNES, the father of Anna Katharina HENNES.

AncestryDNA

The person who matches was quick to reply to my short message sent in June 2016 and we have not corresponded since then. It’s been over a year since she has signed in. I really need to get in touch with her as I realized while writing this post that we have another set of common ancestors who do not show up as a hint. She does not have the parents of Mathias HENNES’ wife Elisabetha MALAMBRÉ. My 4th great-grandmother Susanna MALAMBRÉ was Elisabetha’s sister. This match is a 6th cousin through Johann HENNES and Magdalena MÜLLER and through Gérard MALAMBRÉ and Barbara BIESDORF.

1856 Passenger list for the Peter Hennes family. Ancestry.com. New York, Passenger Lists, 1820-1957

Mathias HENNES, the brother of Anna Katharina HENNES, had two sons who went to America. The youngest son Michael went in 1837 at the age of 21. He appears to have not been married and therefore without known descendants. The older son Peter went in 1856 with his wife and their seven children. They had lived in Silberberg/Nusbaum since their marriage in 1836, the year before Michael left.[17] They met up with him in Lemont, Cook County, Illinois, and he was in their household at the time of the 1860 census.

At the time I found this match I did not know so many people with connections in my tree left the Eifel area for America. This gives me another reason which may convince people to upload their raw data to GEDmatch. I haven’t been able to map any of the maternal chromosomes as matches are few and hard to figure out. It would be nice to get this tiny 14 centimorgans segment labeled but with there being two sets of MRCAs I’d need more matches to triangulate.

A few photos to end this post

While I was working a stand at the 12th National Day of Genealogy and Family History in Leudelange on October 15th, my husband took a bike ride especially planned to go through the Nusbaum area so he could get some pictures for this post.

The winding road to Nusbaum
A view of Nusbaum from afar
Willkommen in Nusbaum – Welcome to Nusbaum

bestwishescathy1

Sources:
[1] Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 66 of 131. 1773 Baptismal Record, right page, 3rd entry. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32399-12771-29?cc=2037955 : accessed 9 November 2016).
[2] Ibid., Echternach > Baptêmes, mariages, décès 1779-1783 > image 102 of 177. 1781 Death Record, right page, bottom. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32400-11740-46?cc=2037955 : 9 January 2015) and part 2 of 1781 Death Record, left page top. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32400-11629-47?cc=2037955 : 9 January 2015).
[3] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 (compiled in 2000), p. 237-238, Family #839. Welter-Brimers and Welter-Bartz.
[4] Luxembourg Church Records, Echternach > Baptêmes, mariages, décès 1779-1783 > image 122 of 177. 1782 Baptismal Record, left page. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32400-11658-39?cc=2037955 : 9 January 2015).
[5] Ibid., Echternach > Baptêmes, mariages, décès 1779-1783 > image 140 of 177. 1782 Death Record, right page, 2nd from bottom. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32400-11497-19?cc=2037955 : 9 January 2015).
[6] Ibid., Echternach > Baptêmes, mariages, décès 1788-1797 > image 118 of 331. 1791 Death Record, left page. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32401-8336-15?cc=2037955 : 9 January 2015).
[7] FB Ernzen, p. 234, Family #830. Welter-Hennes.
[8] Werner Neumann, Familienbuch der ehemaligen Pfarrei Schankweiler mit dem Pfarrort Schankweiler und den Filialen Holsthum und Peffingen, pg. 79, Family #485. Hennes-Mühler.
[9] FB Schankweiler, pg. 238, Family #1377. Trampert-Müller.
[10] FB Ernzen, p. 234, Family #830. Welter-Hennes.
[11] Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 / Deutschland Geburten und Taufen, 1558-1898, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462714. Elisabetha Welter, christened 31 Jan 1807 in Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia; father Antonii Welter; mother Chatarinae Hennes.(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NTJ5-T7S : accessed 15 October 2017).
[12] FB Ernzen, pg. 219, Family #775. Trampert-Müller.
[13] Germany Marriages, 1558-1929 / Deutschland, Heiraten, 1558-1929, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462,714. Hubertum Wayman and Elisabetham Welter, married 12 Feb 1835; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JH8P-DBZ : accessed 15 October 2017).
[14] FB Ernzen, p. 235, Family #832. Welter-Weber.
[15] FB Ernzen, pg. 203, Family #719. Steil-Welter.
[16] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Berdorf > Naissances 1799-1858 > image 84 of 534. 1810 Birth Record No. 1. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6S5H-ND?cc=1709358&wc=9RY3-HZ9%3A129626101%2C129760301 : accessed 22 October 2017).
[17] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei St. Petrus Nusbaum in der Südeifel mit Nusbaum, Nusbaumerhöhe, Freilingen, Freilingerhöhe, Enzen, Silberberg, Stockigt, und Rohrbach 1722-1899, PDF (Kordel bei Trier, 2001), pg. 113-114, Family #464. Hennes-Hostert.

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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52 Ancestors: #34 The Malambré Brick Wall

Gerard MALAMBRÉ first turned up in the baptismal record of his daughter Susanna, my 4th great-grandmother, on 7 November 1772.[1]

1772 Baptismal Record of Susanna Malambré[1]
Before this date, there is no evidence of his existence. If I am to trust the information in the family book of Ernzen where he lived from this time, he died on 7 September 1808 at the age of 80.[2] Where can I find him between his birth around 1728 and the birth of his daughter in 1772? If his age at the time of death is correct, he was 44 years old when Susanna was born and baptized. After Susanna’s birth, six more children were born to Gerard MALAMBRÉ and his wife Barbara BIESDORF between 1775 and 1788.[3][4][5][6][7][8]

This is a moot point to make but, as no record has been found prior to the baptism of Susanna in 1772, no marriage record has been found for Gerard and Barbara.

Susanna was likely their second child of eight. Her sister Anna Maria, whose date of birth and baptism are not known, was the first to marry in 1792[9] which makes me suspect she was their first born. Anna Maria was seen as a godmother in 1786.[10] If she was 16 at the time she would have been born about 1770. How young could a godmother be?

The baptismal records of Susanna and her other siblings were found in the Echternach parish to which Ernzen was affiliated. As already mentioned, they were born between 1772 and 1788. The 1788 baptismal record of their youngest daughter Maria Catharina brought new information to light.[8]

1788 Baptismal Record of Maria Catharina Malampreux[8]
The record not only includes the place of residence of Gerard and Barbara at the time of the baptism of their youngest child but also where they hailed from. Barbara BIESDORF’s town of origin was Dickweiler.

1766 Luxembourg Census for the household of Hubert Bisdorff which included two families. His own with his wife and children and a Hubert Wildanger and his wife.[11]
Now, this is where my newest not so secret new tool comes into play. The 1766 Luxembourg census. Dickweiler was a part of the parish of Rosport. Only one BIESDORF family lived in Dickweiler in 1766 and it included Anna Barbara who was 14 years or older.[11] Also in the household were three siblings (the census does not indicate this relationship) who were godparents of her children in 1772, 1775, and 1777. Thomas Webers’ family book of Rosport includes the BIESDORF family. Anna Barbara was born in 1744[12] and was 22 years old at the time of the census. Her parentage has been proven with her baptismal record[12] with secondary evidence coming from the baptismal records of her children who had her siblings as godparents. Case closed?

The 1788 baptismal record[8] was the case cracker for the child’s mother’s parentage but what of the father? Gerard MALAMBRÉ was from “Ramrig” per the record. This is likely Rambrouch, also known as Rammerech in Luxembourgish, a commune and small town in western Luxembourg, in the canton of Redange. It lies close to the border with Belgium. The 1766 census for the parish of Rambrouch did not have any families with a name similar to Malambré, Malampré, or Malampreux. It is a rare surname not even mentioned in the Dictionary of Luxembourgish Family Names.[13]

I searched the 1766 census in several other villages I thought Gerard might have lived in but without an index, this is hit and go. Two Melampré siblings married in Hemstal in 1758. By 1766 the male was deceased without issue and his wife had remarried. Their place of residence at the time of marriage was Pletschet on the marriage record. Pleschette is a village in the Medernach area. The 1766 census for the parish of Medernach did not yield any results. A family book of Helmstal published in 1907 gives the place of residence as Pascheterhof which was part of the parish of Consdorf. Once again this did not produce any new leads. My next attempt may be to look through all the villages in the parish of Echternach.

The names MALAMPRÉ, MALAMPREUX, and MALAMBRÉ fascinate me and I would like to get past this brick wall. The name has not, as far as I can tell, been passed on to very many descendants.

Beautifully tended graves of Malambré descendants in the church cemetery of Ernzen.

Gerard (d. 1808) had only one son Christian (1775-1811) who had only one son Matthias (1807-1884) who had only one son Michael (1840-1912) who had a son Albert Peter (1878-1952) who had eight children between 1909-1928. These children have descendants with the Malambré name. Albert Peter also had a son who married in Saarbrücken where the name may also have been passed on.

Let me now bring the attention back to Susanna who was born and raised in Ernzen where she brought up her children from two marriages.

A view of the village of Ernzen

My Ancestor Susanna MALAMBRÉ

Susanna MALAMBRÉ was born on 7 November 1772 in Ernzen (present-day Germany) to Gerard MALAMBRÉ and Barbara BIESDORF. She was baptized the same day in the parish of Echternach. Her godparents were Susanna BIESDORF, her maternal aunt, and Hubertus VILLAR, both from Dickweiler.[1]

Susanna MALAMBRÉ’s First Marriage

Susanna married Bernard WEYMANN before 1796. A marriage record has not been found. In 1795 the Duchy of Luxembourg became the Département des Forêts following its surrender after a siege of over seven months by French Revolutionary troops. The anti-religious policy of the new government is one of the reasons a marriage record may not be found for Susanna and Bernard.

According to Rob Deltgen, President of Luxracines and owner of deltgen.com, the people rebelled against the new laws continuing to be married by their priest, even if it meant having the ceremony performed in the kitchen, and refusing to have a civil record of the marriage recorded. When the Napoleonic Code was introduced in 1804 all persons were required to be married in a civil ceremony. Couples who had only been wedded by a priest since the introduction of civil records had to be married in a civil ceremony to legitimize their children’s births. The children’s names were listed in the margin of the marriage record.

1763 Baptismal Record of Bernard Weyman[14]
Susanna’s first husband Bernard was born and baptized on 15 August 1763 in Ernzen.[14] The son of Nikolaus WEYMAN and Maria Katharina HUSS, Bernard was my 4th great-grandfather. In the 1766 Luxembourg census, he was seen in his maternal grandfather’s household with his father and siblings, an older sister and brother.[15] His mother, the daughter of Hubert HUSS, had died the previous year and his father would remarry in the census year.

1766 Luxembourg Census for the household of Bernard Huss with his widowed son-in-law Nicolas Weimann[15]
Susanna and Bernard had the following children:

  1. Anna Maria WEYMANN was born and baptized on 28 January 1796 in Ernzen.[16] She married Bernard RAUSCH on 11 February 1823 in Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen. Bernard was born in 1797 in Geichlingen, Bitburg-Prüm, Germany. They were the parents of seven children. Anna Maria died on 8 July 1852 in Ernzen and was buried two days later. Her widower Bernard died on 28 March 1855 in Ernzen and was buried three days later.[17]

Before their next child was born, Susanna’s mother Barbara BIESDORF died in 1804 in Ernzen.[2]

  1. Hubert WEIMANN was born and baptized on 13 July 1805 in Ernzen.[18] He married Elisabeth WELTER, daughter of Anton WELTER and Anne Catherine HENNES, on 11 February 1835 in Ernzen. Elisabeth was born and baptized on 31 January 1807 in Ernzen. Hubert and Elisabeth had seven children of whom only three lived to adulthood. Hubert died on 29 October 1872 in Ernzen and was buried two days later. Elisabeth died on 24 September 1877 in Ernzen and was buried three days later.[19] They were my 3rd great-grandparents and their story can be found here.
  1. Elisabeth WEIMANN was born and baptized on 20 August 1807 in Ernzen.[20] It is not known if she lived to marry or when she died.

Bernard WEYMANN died on 2 January 1807 in Ernzen.[21] He left his wife Susanna with Anna Maria nearly 11 years old and Hubert a year and a half old. Bernard and Susanna may not have known they were expecting another child when he died. Nearly eight months later Susanna gave birth to their daughter Elisabeth.[20]

Susanna’s father was still living at the time of her husband Bernard’s death. Gerard MALAMBRÉ died 7 September 1808 in Ernzen.[2]

Susanna’s Second Marriage

Two years after the death of her first husband and five months after the death of her father, Susanna married Matthias WELTER, son of Johann WELTER and Magdalena MEYER, on 13 February 1809 in Ernzen.[22] Matthias was born and baptized on 3 May 1772 in Ernzen.[23] He was not only my 4th great-grandmother’s second husband, he was also my first cousin six times removed. His grandparents Mathias WELTER and Anna Margaretha Elisabetha HUSS were my 6th great-grandparents. Further, Susanna’s first and second husbands were second cousins through Peter and Catharina HUSS, my 7th great-grandparents.

Susanna and Matthias had the following children:

  1. Nicolas WELTER was born and baptized on 20 November 1809 in Ernzen.[24]
  1. Joannes WELTER was born and baptized on 4 May 1812 in Ernzen.[25] He died on 4 December 1812 in Ernzen at the age of seven months.[26]
  1. Matthias WELTER was born on 4 November 1813 in Ernzen.[27] He was baptized the following day. He died on 29 May 1814 in Ernzen at the age of nearly seven months.[26]
  1. Magdalena WELTER was born and baptized on 16 September 1815 in Ernzen.[28] She had a son Michael in 1848 whose father was unknown. Magdalena married Dominik FABER on 13 February 1861 in Ernzen. Dominik was born on 26 June 1797 in Consdorf (Luxembourg). He was previously married and had eight children with his first wife. Magdalena and Dominik had a son born the same year they were married. Dominik died on 11 December 1871 in Ernzen and was buried two days later. Magdalena died on 25 January 1879 in Ernzen.[29]

Matthias WELTER died on 3 April 1830 in Ernzen.[26] Susanna MALAMBRÉ likely had three to four of her children still at home. Her oldest daughter Anna Maria WEYMANN had married in 1823 but her son Hubert WEIMANN and daughter Magdalena WELTER were unmarried and likely living at home. Nothing is known of the life of her son Nicolas WELTER who would have been 20 years old at the time.

Susanna lived nearly two more decades, dying on 5 December 1848 in Ernzen. She was buried two days later.[26] She’d lived to see the births of 15 grandchildren but also the deaths of six of these. One more grandchild would be born a dozen years later.

The Problem Remains

This article’s focus should have been mostly on my 4th great-grandparents Susanna MALAMBRÉ and Bernard WEYMANN, however, the missing information on her father Gerard MALAMBRÉ compelled me to do more research on her paternal side of the family. By discussing the steps I took to search for Gerard in the 1766 census I hope someone will notice what I may have missed. Still, Gerard MALAMBRÉ will have to wait for someone, perhaps one of my readers, to find the key to open the door in his brick wall.

bestwishescathy1

Sources:
[1] Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 60 of 131. 1772 Baptismal Record, right page, first entry. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32399-13007-31?cc=2037955 : accessed 12 November 2016).
[2] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 (compiled in 2000), p. 137, Family #453 . Malambré-Biesdorf.
[3] Luxembourg Church Records, Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 72 of 131. 1775 Baptismal Record (left page, 4th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L971-1XJ8?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-PY3%3A1500937901%2C1501065634 : accessed 18 October 2017).
[4] Ibid., Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 83 of 131. 1777 Baptismal Record (right page, 3rd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-8971-1X4C?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-PY3%3A1500937901%2C1501065634 : accessed 18 October 2017).
[5] Ibid., Echternach > Baptêmes, mariages, décès 1779-1783 > image 24 of 177. 1779 Baptismal Record (left page, 1st entry for October). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-M6MR?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-YWT%3A1500937901%2C1500939202 : accessed 19 October 2017).
[6] Ibid., Echternach > Baptêmes, mariages, décès 1779-1783 > image 114 of 177. 1782 Baptismal Record (left page, 1st entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-MDHS?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-YWT%3A1500937901%2C1500939202 : accessed 18 October 2017).
[7] Ibid., Echternach > Baptêmes, mariages, décès 1784-1788 > image 21 of 172. 1784 Baptismal Record (left page, 2nd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-MDMJ?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y4W%3A1500937901%2C1500960252 : accessed 18 October 2017).
[8] Ibid., Echternach > Baptêmes, mariages, décès 1784-1788 > image 155 of 172. 1788 Baptismal Record (left page, last entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-M6DG?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y4W%3A1500937901%2C1500960252 : accessed 18 October 2017).
[9] Ibid., Echternach > Baptêmes, mariages, décès 1788-1797 > image 150 of 331. 1792 Marriage Record (right page, 2nd entry).(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WM-9C2S?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-4W5%3A1500937901%2C1500937902 : accessed 20 October 2017).
[10] FB Ernzen, p. 214, family #764. Tossing-Adam.
[11] Luxembourg, Dénombrement, 1766 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Archives Générales du Royaume, Bruxelles), Film/DGS 1781975 > Film # 008198977 > Decanat de Bittbourg v. 1 A-K > Dicksweiler (paroisse de Rosport) > Image 587 of 753. Hubert Bisdorff household. (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSLL-M7XM-D?i=586&cat=1184675 : accessed 19 October 2017).
[12] Luxembourg Church Records, Rosport > Baptêmes 1740-1779, 1795-1796, confirmations 1740-1765, mariages 1778-1779, 1795-1796, sépultures 1779-1797 > image 6 of 79. 1744 Baptismal Record (right page, 2nd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WM-SNH?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-HZ6%3A1501108227%2C1501108228 : accessed 19 October 2017).
[13] Kollmann, Cristian, Peter Gilles and Claire Muller. Luxemburger Familiennamenbuch. 2016. Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter Mouton. (http://www.degruyter.com.proxy.bnl.lu/view/product/449765 : Retrieved 26 April 2016)
[14] Luxembourg Church Records, Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 16 of 131. 1763 Baptismal Record, right page, 4th from bottom. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32399-13080-33?cc=2037955 : accessed 12 November 2016).
[15] Luxembourg 1766 Census, Film/DGS 1781975 > Film # 008198977 > Decanat de Bittbourg v. 1 A-K: > Feischveiler (paroisse d’Echternach) > Image 246 of 753. (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSLL-M7DL-T?i=245&cat=1184675 : accessed 14 October 2017).
[16] Luxembourg Church Records, Echternach > Baptêmes, mariages, décès 1788-1797 > image 286 of 331. 1796 Baptismal Record (left page). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WM-9CST?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-4W5%3A1500937901%2C1500937902 : accessed 15 October 2017).
[17] FB Ernzen, p. 171, family #590. Rausch-Weymann.
[18] Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 / Deutschland Geburten und Taufen, 1558-1898, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462714. Hubertus Veiman, christened 13 Jul 1805 at Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia; father Bernardi Veiman; mother Susannae Malampre. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NFD4-PYH : accessed 15 October 2017).
[19] FB Ernzen, p. 232, Family #822. Weimann-Welter.
[20] Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898. Elisabetha Weiman, christened 20 Aug 1807 in Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia; ftaher Bernardi Weiman; mother Susannae Malampre.
(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NTJ5-T78 : accessed 15 October 2017).
[21] FB Ernzen, p. 243, Family #858. Weymann-Malambre.
[22] Germany Marriages, 1558-1929 / Deutschland, Heiraten, 1558-1929, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462,714. Mathias Welter md. Susanna Malampre on 13 Feb 1809 in Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JH8P-DQL : accessed 15 October 2017).
[23] Luxembourg Church Records, Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 57 of 131. 1772 Baptismal Record (left page, 2nd to last entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-9971-1X61?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-PY3%3A1500937901%2C1501065634 : accessed 14 October 2017).
[24] Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898, FHL microfilm 462714. Nicolaus Welter, christened 20 Nov 1809 in Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheiland, Germany; father Mathiae Welter; mother Susannae Malampre. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NFD4-L2L : 28 November 2014).
[25] Ibid., FHL microfilm 462714. Joannes Welter, christened 04 May 1812 at Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia; father Mathiae Welter; mother Susannae Wayman. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N2CB-FBF : accessed 18 October 2017).
[26] FB Ernzen, p. 239, Family #844. Welter-Malambre.
[27] Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898, FHL microfilm 462714. Mathias Welter, 05 Nov 1813 at Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia; father Mathiae Welter; mother Susannae Wayman. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NTJ5-5G9 : accessed 18 October 2017).
[28] Ibid., FHL microfilm 462714. Magdalena Welter, 16 Sep 1815 at Sankt Markus Kathalisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Germany; father Mathiae Welter; mother Susannae Malampre(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N2CB-N1S : accessed 18 October 2017).
[29] FB Ernzen, pg. 238, family #841. Faber-Welter.

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

52 Ancestors: #32 DNA Discoveries in the WILDINGER Family

Last year my brother had his DNA tested and turned the results over to me. As I write these last articles on my maternal 4th great-grandparents, I will be checking his matches to see if any hold the key to open a door in a brick wall on this side of the family tree. These brick walls being mostly descendants of my maternal ancestors who have not been traced mainly due to emigration.

I have been waiting impatiently to write about this couple, Wilhelm WILTINGER and Margaretha WELTER. This is what I know about their lives and where I found information which has not all been documented.

Where the Information Was Found

Wilhelm WILTINGER and Margaretha WELTER of Ernzen, Germany, were my 4th great-grandparents. The bits and pieces I have for them come mostly from Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 – such a long title for the family book of the town of Ernzen and environs. I call it simply FB Ernzen.

Church records are available online at FamilySearch for Ernzen up to 1797 as it was then part of the parish of Echternach in Luxembourg. Civil records for births from about 1798 to 1907, marriages from 1798 to 1937, and deaths from 1798 to 1987 are not online. Although a short 20 minutes drive from where I live, the Kreisarchiv in Bitburg, Germany, houses these records. Tentative plans are being made to visit the archives with my genealogy society Luxracines next spring.

From WILTINGER to WILDINGER

Wilhelm WILTINGER was born about 1770 in Ettelbrück, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. He was the son of Michel WILTINGER and Margaretha DIESBURG of Ettelbrück. These two “facts” were likely taken from his 1849 death record.[1] As he died in Ernzen, this record will have to be obtained from the archives in Bitburg. I am hoping the person who took the information off of the death record may have made an error in noting both parents were from Ettelbrück.

I have tried to shed more light on Wilhelm’s parents. I am inclined to think Margaretha DIESBURG was not originally from Ettelbrück. My guess is she is from the DIESBURG line which originated on Diesburgerhof near Ferschweiler, the next village over from Ernzen. I found a child with the same name born in 1744 who would be a perfect match. Her family group is recorded in the FB Ferschweiler[2] and I found her in the 1766 census living with one of her married sisters.[3] She was not yet married. This leaves me with a four year period from 1766-1770 when Michel and Margaretha could have met and married. But where? Marriages in Luxembourg have been indexed for the time period and I have tried all variations of the names without locating a marriage. It has crossed my mind that a different surname may have been used by the groom, i.e. a house name.

1766 Luxembourg Census.[3]
As for Wilhelm’s father I have searched all available GEDCOM files online to find persons with the WILDINGER name – the spelling which has been used in my family from 1798 to present. It is my mother’s maiden name. The only hits I get on the Luxracines website (members only access to GEDCOMs) are my own file. I am beginning to suspect that while my ancestor’s name may have been WILTINGER and changed to WILDINGER, the original surname may have evolved to the more common and widespread WILDANGER. Most were found in the Girst and Dickweiler area and spread out to Echternach. These are all in Luxembourg.

For now Michel WILTINGER and Margaretha DIESBURG, the parents of Wilhelm WILTINGER will remain a brick wall. A more time consuming one-name study of the WILDANGER individuals in Luxembourg and the nearby German area may the only way to solve this brick wall. Or could DNA also be part of the solution.

The WELTER line

Margaretha WELTER was the daughter of Michael WELTER and Katharina KLEIN. Michael and Katharina married in Ernzen on 22 November 1764.[4]

1764 Marriage Record for Michael Welter and Katharina Klein.[4]
They had not yet had any children when the 1766 census was taken. Their names were spelled Michel and Catherine and they were living in a KLEIN household.[5]

1766 Luxembourg Census[5]
Their first child was born the year the census was enumerated, followed by a set of twins in 1768, a son in 1770, another set of twins in 1773, and finally their youngest in 1777. Both sets of twins were a boy and a girl.[6]

1777 Baptismal Record[7]
Margaretha was their youngest, born and baptized on 18 April 1777 in Ernzen (present-day Germany). Her godparents were Margaretha KLEIN and Nicolaus HUSS, both of Ernzen.[7]

A Marriage Before 1798?

Margaretha married Wilhelm WILTINGER before 1798. The marriage is estimated from the time their first known child was born. No marriage record has been found. Church and civil records were checked in Ettelbrück and Echternach to no avail.

Wilhelm and Margaretha had the following children, all born in Ernzen:[8]

  1. Nicolas born on 29 September 1798.
  2. Elisabeth born on 21 August 1805.
  3. Franciscus “Franz” born on 6 Aug 1810. He died on 8 December 1812 in Ernzen.
  4. Bernardus born on 12 May 1813.

The only daughter Elisabeth married Dominik WEBER (1803-1840), son of Johann WEBER and Katharina PETRI of Hoesdorf, on 13 December 1831 in Ernzen.[9] Hoesdorf (Luxembourgish: Héischdref) is a village in the commune of Reisdorf, in eastern Luxembourg.

Margaretha WELTER, the mother of Nicolas, Elisabeth, and Bernard, died on 8 January 1833 in Ernzen.[9] Her oldest son Nicolas was 35 years old and still single. Her youngest son Bernard was going on 20. Her daughter Elizabeth had been married a little more than a year.

On 12 October 1833, nine months after the death of her mother, Elizabeth gave birth to her first child, a daughter Maria. She chose her brother Nicolas to be the godfather. Maria THEIS of Hoesdorf was the godmother.[9]

My third great-grandparents, Nicolas WILDINGER and Catherine SCHRAMEN married on 18 January 1834 in Ferschweiler.[10] Catherine was the daughter of Michael SCHRAMEN and Elizabeth SCHMITT. She was born on 23 October 1812 in Ferschweiler and was baptized the next day.[11] Their story can be found here: 52 Ancestors: #42 The WILDINGER-SCHRAMEN Family of Ferschweiler .

Elisabeth’s husband Dominik WEBER died on 9 May 1840 in Ernzen and was buried two days later.[9] He left Elisabeth with four children.

Wilhelm WILTINGER, likely now using the WILDINGER spelling, died on 28 September 1849 in Ernzen and was buried two days later.[1]

Where Are the Children?

Wilhelm’s death came at a time when many were thinking about moving across the newly established border to Luxembourg or even further abroad, to America. Elisabeth’s brother-in-law Theodor JARDIN went to America with all of his living children after the death of his wife Katharina WELTER, sister of Dominik, in 1855.[12] Elisabeth and her brother Bernard had been close to the JARDIN family, both being godparents to JARDIN children.

Elisabeth WILDINGER was 53 years old and had been widowed seventeen years when she obtained an Auswanderungsgenehmigung (emigration approval) on 9 October 1857 for herself and her two children, Mathias, born on 10 November 1840, and Maria, born on 12 October 1833. The petition was admitted to the hearing without a stamp due to poverty. Elisabeth made her mark on the petition.[13]

There is no mention of where the family immigrated to or of the other two children, Anna Katharina born 1835 or Theodor born in 1838. However….

Richard Schaffner was not the first to compile a family book for the parish of Ernzen. A copy of Familienbuch Ernzen 1 (1823-1900) is in the parish of Ernzen according to Schaffner. He does not mention the compiler’s name. In the entry for Elisabeth WILDINGER in Schaffner’s version, he notes on page 45 of the first book the following information was found: “Die Witwe Elis. Weber zog im Jahr 1857 mit ihren 4 Kindern und ihrem Bruder Bernard Wildinger nach Nordamerika.” The widow Elisabeth WEBER moved in the year 1857 with her four children and her brother Bernard Wildinger to North America.

Early on I searched for Elisabeth and her brother Bernard WILDINGER in the USA but never found either of them or her WEBER children. Perhaps they went to Canada or Mexico. Not having experience with these countries I left this research problem for another day.

My third great-grandparents Catherine SCHRAMEN and Nicolas WILDINGER had five children born between 1835 and 1852. Catherine died on 2 November 1869 in Ferschweiler and was buried on 4 November 1869.[10] Four and a half years later Nicolas, the only child of Wilhem WILTINGER and Margaretha WELTER to remain in Germany, died on 3 June 1874 in Ferschweiler.[10] They left three living children, two of whom have been traced. All that was known of their youngest son Peter is that he fled from military service – “militärflüchtig laut Anzeiger z. Amtsbl. Trier 1873, Seite 243.”[10]

Let’s Talk About DNA

As mentioned earlier I now manage my brother’s DNA. As our mother is from Luxembourg (and all of her ancestry is centered in this tiny area) the DNA we share with her is either not getting many matches or is difficult to find within the thousands of matches showing on AncestryDNA.

There are several ways to sort matches on AncestryDNA. The most obvious (easiest) are those who have matching ancestors in their trees followed by matching surnames. Many users have private trees. When you search for a surname, matches with private trees will turn up in the list but you cannot access to the information and therefore do not know who their ancestor is with the surname.

Even today searching for the WILDINGER surname on AncestryDNA turns up zero hits. Checking the box to Include similar surnames is not helpful as it turns up too many matches. I tried the known spellings and still had no results.

Then in April 2017, a match was found which looked promising.

DNA match’s profile on Ancestry

This predicted 4th cousin match showed PETERS as a shared surname. My Peters line is not a German line. There were no Shared matches with this person. Shared matches are only listed up to 4th cousins.

Clicking on Location I found he had a WEBER ancestor from Ernzen. This is not one of my ancestral surnames and at the time I was not expecting a match to a family on our maternal side. Taking a closer look at the attached tree I realized the connection could be WELDINGER on his tree. A spelling I had not tried.

Pedigree chart of the match on Ancestry.

Predicted 4th cousin is a 4C1R

The year of birth for the daughter of the WEBER-WELDINGER couple in the pedigree chart above is 1818. My 3rd great-grand aunt Elisabeth WILDINGER was born in 1805 and would have been only 13 when this child was born. Even with this error, it looked promising as the husband’s name matched that of Elisabeth’s husband and the location fit.

I got to do US research – checking census, BMD, etc. – and found Elisabeth WILDINGER had emigrated to America before 1860. She was living in Berwick in Seneca County, Ohio, with her married daughter Catherine in 1860. She was listed with the surname WEAVER. Her daughter was only 24, born abt. 1835, and a good match for the child seen in the pedigree chart above with year of birth being 1818. Although she was still living, I have not found Elisabeth in the 1870 or 1880 census. She died on 10 March 1891 in Big Spring, Seneca County, Ohio, at the age of 86 years.[14]

1891 Death Entry for Elisabeth WEAVER.[14]
Two of her children were also found. Catherine, who was the ancestor of the match with my brother, and her younger brother Mathias. I have not found the older daughter Maria or the son Theodor nor have I found the immigration records. I entered this match’s line back to my WILDINGER ancestor into the tree I have attached to my brother’s DNA.

This was done only after confirming this match’s line back to my WILDINGER ancestor. The tree has only the direct ancestors – no siblings, children, etc. I am considering the pros and cons of adding each confirmed match’s line back to the MRCA (most recent common ancestor). This tree includes sources but I have not attached records from Ancestry. I don’t usually work with it and have not considered the hints (shaky leaves) that are showing up.

2nd Great-Grand Uncle Discovered

However while entering this match’s line, I took the time to check the hints for Ancestry Member Trees. I was surprised to find Wilhelm WILTINGER and Margaretha WELTER’s grandson Peter WILDINGER through their son Nicolas (my third great-grandfather) in four trees. All four had my Nicolas as the earliest known ancestor. No mention of Wilhelm and Margaretha. One member tree has for Peter: “Killed in WWI Action on the German Lines” in 1873. That is not what I would call a reliable statement.

The other three member trees are for a Peter WELDINGER who married in Illinois, had children there, and later moved to Iowa. The 1900, 1910, and 1920 census show he came to America in 1870 and was naturalized in 1880 (U.S. Naturalization Record confirms 30 October 1880). If this Peter WELDINGER is my second great-granduncle (there is presently no match or the owner/descendant has not done a test) then he must have fled from military service by emigrating to America.

Another DNA discovery was made as several new matches showed up when I did a new search for the locations Ernzen and Ferschweiler while writing this. I will have to work through these first but it looks promising as one of them may be the key to unlock the door in the DIESBURG brick wall.

Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 (compiled in 2000), p. 246, Family #869. Wiltinger-Welter.
[2] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei Sancta Lucia Ferschweiler mit: Diesburgerhof (ab 1803) und L(a)eisenhof (ab1830) 1680-1899, PDF (Kordel, 1999), p. 43-44, Family #193. Diesburg-Schmitt.
[3] Luxembourg, Dénombrement, 1766 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Archives Générales du Royaume, Bruxelles), Decanat de Bittbourg v. 1 A-K > Feischveiler (paroisse d’Echternach) > Image 250 of 753. Household Nr. 13, Mathias Petri. (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSLL-M7DK-Y?i=249&cat=1184675 : accessed 6 October 2017).
[4] Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Echternach > Mariages, décès 1706-1778 > image 145 of 293. 1764 Marriage Record, right page, 1st entry. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32399-12418-50?cc=2037955 : 9 January 2015).
[5] Luxembourg 1766 Census, Decanat de Bittbourg v. 1 A-K > Erntzen (paroisse d’Echternach) > Image 245 of 753. Household Nr. 7, Jean Klein (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSLL-M7DL-W?cat=1184675 : accessed 6 October 2017).
[6] FB Ernzen, p. 240, Family #846. Welter-Klein.
[7] Luxembourg Church Records, Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 83 of 131. 1777 Baptismal Record, left page, 7th entry. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32399-12819-27?cc=2037955 : accessed 9 November 2016).
[8] FB Ernzen, p. 246, Family #869. Wiltinger-Welter.
[9] Ibid., p. 225, Family #800. Weber-Wildinger.
[10] FB Ferschweiler, p. 349, Family #1625. Wildinger-Schramen.
[11] Ibid., p. 295, Family #1378. Schramen-Schmitt.
[12] FB Ernzen, p. 117-118, Family #380. Jardin-Welter.
[13] Josef Mergen, Die Amerika-Auswanderung aus dem Kreis Bitburg im 19.-Jahrhundert 
[14] “Ohio, County Death Records, 1840-2001,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F6CM-WJX : accessed 5 October 2017), Elizabeth Weaver, 10 Mar 1891; citing Death, Big Spring, Seneca, Ohio, United States, source ID v 4 p 216, County courthouses, Ohio; FHL microfilm 388,771.

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

52 Ancestors: #27 The Dahm-Kimes Family and the History of a House Name

The small village of Moestroff in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg lies between Reisdorf and Bettendorf. It was once part of the parish of Reisdorf and from about 1763 was attached to Bettendorf. During the late 1700s to about 1804, there were, however, children of Moestroff being baptized in the parish of Reisdorf instead of Bettendorf. From 1794, when civil records began to be recorded, Moestroff has been part of the commune of Bettendorf.

Road into Reisdorf from Wallendorf, it’s German neighbor.

For the time period I am now researching, the history of the families is intertwined in the villages of Reisdorf and Moestroff due to the marriages of ancestors of my children from both towns.

Former train station in Reisdorf along the bike route to Moestroff

Several roads lead to Reisdorf. The main road from Echternach to Diekirch passes through Reisdorf. Roads lead down to Reisdorf from Beaufort, Larochette, and Vianden. There is also a “back road” from Wallendorf, Germany, to Reisdorf. The shortest route between Reisdorf and Moestroff is the bike path where the railroad used to run.

Chapel of Reisdorf

At the intersection of the road from Wallendorf and the main road to Diekirch is a small chapel which was built during the lifetime of the couple I am featuring this week. Above the doorway the year 1808 is chiseled in stone and highlighted with gold leaf paint.

Entrance of the little chapel of Reisdorf

A quick tour of the town of Reisdorf takes us to the church built in 1900.

Catholic church of Reisdorf

And behind the church is the town hall.

Town hall, Mairie de Reisdorf.

As seen in my last 52 Ancestors post when we visited Moestroff, my children’s 5th great-grandparents Franz ZWANK of Moestroff married Clara WELTER of Reisdorf. This is also the case of the next set of 5th great-grandparents, Pierre DAHM and Anna Catharina STRENG. Pierre was from Moestroff and Anna Catharina from Reisdorf. Both couples made their homes in Moestroff.

Pierre DAHM (1764-1830) and Anna Catharina KIMES (1762-1832)

Pierre DAHM, son of Jean DHAM (d. 1790) and Marie WELTER (d. 1814), was born and baptized on 14 April 1764 in Moestroff.[1] The baptism of Petrus Dham took place in Moestroff due to imbecillitatem infantis, or the child’s weakness. Children born in Moestroff at this time were baptized in the parish of Bettendorf which makes this entry for Pierre a bit unusual. The family surname at the time was spelled DHAM instead of the later DAHM.

1764 Baptismal Record of Petrus DHAM [1]
Pierre’s oldest sibling was his sister Elisabeth who was born about 1756. This is known as she was the informant for the death of their mother Marie Welter in 1814. It is not known if there were children born between Elisabeth and my children’s 5th great-grandfather Pierre but I suspect there must have been as they were eight years apart. Baptismal records for Bettendorf begin only in 1763 which explain the missing records, including that of Elisabeth’s baptism. A daughter Susanne was born in 1768, four years after Pierre. Death records are sparse for this period and no record has been found that Susanna survived or that there may have been other children.

Pierre married Anna Catharina KIMES, daughter of Nicolas KIMES (d. 1797) and Anna Maria STRENG (d. 1804), on 5 April 1796 in Bettendorf.[2] Anna Catharina was born on 8 December 1762 in Reisdorf,[3] likely their oldest child. She had three younger brothers who survived to adulthood. Wilhelm lived in Reisdorf, Martin in Bettendorf, and Theodor in Nusbaum-Stockigt (about 14 km from Reisdorf and in Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany).

Pierre and Anna Catharina’s children

Pierre and Anna Catharina had four children, all lived to adulthood, but only two married and had issue.

Maria DAHM (1797-1859) was born on 10 July 1797 in Moestroff and was baptized the same day in Bettendorf.[4] She married Jacques “Jacob” ZWANK, son of Franciscus “Franz” ZWANCK and Maria Clara “Clara” WELTER, on 22 October 1823 in Bettendorf.[5] Jacques was born on 17 May 1795 in Moestroff and was baptized the same day in Bettendorf.[6] He died on 15 February 1858 in Moestroff.[7] Maria died nearly two years later on 28 November 1859 in Moestroff.[8] They were the parents of seven children and were featured in 52 Ancestors: #39 The ZWANK-DAHM Family of Moestroff in 2015.

Wilhelm DAHM (1799-1843) was born on 8 September 1799 in Moestroff.[9] He married Margretha STEFFEN, daughter of Nicolas STEFFEN and Elisabeth ZENNER, on 28 January 1830 in Bettendorf.[10] Margretha was born on 27 December 1807 in Erpeldange.[11] They had three children who all continued this line. Wilhelm died on 19 June 1843 in Erpeldange (Diekirch) at the age of 43 years.[12] His widow Margretha died on 26 January 1876 in Diekirch.[13] Her death was reported by her son-in-law Theodore BAULER. His relationship with her was not clearly stated. She was 71 years old (off by 3 years) and born in Erpeldange. All of this information “fit” however there was an error on the death record. Her deceased husband was listed as Michel DAHM instead of Wilhelm. After finding Margretha in Theodore BAULER’s 1875 household in the census, I believe this is the correct person. Her son-in-law did not know the name of her husband, a man he had likely never met as Wilhelm died when his daughter Maria DAHM, Theodore’s wife, was not quite four years old.

Mathias DAHM (1802-1829) was born on 31 July 1802 in Moestroff.[14] He died on 26 February 1829 in Moestroff at the age of 26 years.[15] He was a tailor or Schneider and never married.

Théodore DAHM (1804-1879) was born on 4 August 1804 in Moestroff.[16] He died on 2 February 1879 in Ettelbruck at the age of 74 years.[17] He was never married and outlived all of his siblings. Over the years he worked as a day laborer and a domestic servant.

The children’s father Pierre DAHM died on 1 February 1830 at 2 in the afternoon.[18] His widow and the mother of the children Anna Catharina STRENG died two years later on 10 January 1832 at 5 in the morning.[19] They both passed away at home in Moestroff. The informants for their deaths were their youngest son Théodore and their neighbor Nicolas WEYLAND.

Genealogy F.A.N. Club

The fact that Nicolas WEYLAND was the neighbor of the DAHM-STRENG family led me to a discovery concerning the home the DAHM family lived in.

Nicolas WEYLAND was the son-in-law of Franz ZWANK and Clara WELTER mentioned earlier. They were the parents of Jacques ZWANK who married Maria DAHM, daughter of Pierre DAHM and Anna Catharina KIMES. It would appear that the ZWANK and DAHM families were neighbors before their children connected the families by marriage, the N. (neighbor) part of F.A.N.

You may ask, what about the WELTER connection? This I cannot answer. Clara WELTER’s father Johann was born in Reisdorf about 1730 and Pierre DAHM’s mother Marie WELTER was born about 1729, location unknown. If Johann and Marie were siblings, then Pierre and Clara would have been first cousins, and Jacques and Maria second cousins. Maybe when the earlier generations are researched I will be able to answer this question on the F. (family) part of F.A.N.

House name for the DAHM-KIMES family’s home

Now that we see how close these families were to each other geographically, I’d like to discuss the home of the DAHM family.

When Pierre’s younger sister Susanna was born in 1768 her baptismal record[20] indicated the family lived in Moestroff in a house known as Scheuer. (the Latin being aedibus Scheur)

1768 Baptismal Record [20]
On 26 April 1790 when Pierre’s father Jean DAHM died, the priest wrote in Latin, pater familias in aedibus Scheur or the father of a family in house Scheuer.[21]

1790 Death Record [21]
No other birth, marriage, or death record was found which documents the house name of the family. However, the Luxembourg census included the house name during some of the census years, mainly from 1855 to 1875.

I began by following Théodore as he was the longest living child of the DAHM family.

In 1843[22] and 1846[23] Théodore was living with his sister Maria, her husband Jacques ZWANK, and their children. In 1847 he was not found. In 1849 Théodore was in the household of a WENANDY family and working as a domestique.[24] In 1851 he was again with the ZWANK-DAHM family.[25] In 1852 he had his own household but as with previous years, the house name was not listed.[26]

Those were the years the census did not include the name of the house.

1855 Census sheet for the Zwank-Dahm household including Théodore Dahm, brother-in-law of the head of household. The name of the house (maison dite in French) in the red box.

In 1855 the names of the houses were included on the census sheet. Théodore was in the household of his sister Maria and brother-in-law Jacques. The house name was Scheuer.[27] In 1858 Maria was widowed and living in Scheier (Luxembourgish version of Scheuer) house with two of her unmarried children.[28] Not only Maria but also two of her married children and her brother Théodore had households of their own and were listed on consecutive pages of the census in a home called Scheier. Maria, being the oldest child of Pierre and Anna Catharina, likely was the owner of the family home and her children and brother were all living with her but had their own households.

Maria died in 1859[8] two days before her daughter Marie ZWANK married Nicolas PEFFER Sr.[29] The PEFFER-ZWANK couple, my children’s 3rd great-grandparents, lived in Maria DAHM’s home from the time they married. In 1861 it was called the Peffers house[30], in 1864 Dahms[31], in 1867[32], 1871[33], and 1875 Scheier.[34] From 1880 to 1900 no house names were given on the census sheets of the PEFFER family.

From 1768 until 1875 the name of the home the families were living in was Scheuer or Scheier. Both words mean barn but are also surnames. Were they living in a building which was once a barn, or could SCHEUER have been the name or occupation of one of Pierre DAHM’s ancestors?

I hope you’ve enjoyed this visit to Reisdorf and the discussion of the house name of the DAHM-KIMES family of Moestroff.

bestwishescathy1

Sources:
[1] Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Bettendorf > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1763-1797 > image 5 of 94. 1764 Baptismal Record (left page, first entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-M9Y3?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-SPJ%3A1500974653%2C1500923326 : accesed 31 July 2017).
[2] Ibid., Bettendorf > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1763-1797 > image 78 of 94. 1796 Marriage Record (right page, last entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WM-M341?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-SPJ%3A1500974653%2C1500923326 : accessed 31 July 2017).
[3] Ibid., Reisdorf > Baptêmes 1725-1805, mariages 1763-1805 > image 19 of 59. 1762 Baptismal Record (left, 2nd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WS-H9MQ-4?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-RM8%3A1501010555%2C1501010556 : accessed 31 July 2017).
[4] Ibid., Bettendorf > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1763-1797 > image 60 of 94. 1797 Baptismal Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32400-2625-75?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-SPJ:1500974653,1500923326 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[5] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 82 of 1494. 1823 Marriage Record No. 10. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-38177-77?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2ZY:2071013250 : accessed 10 Apr 2013).
[6] Luxembourg Parish Records, Bettendorf > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1763-1797 > image 57 of 94. 1795 Baptismal Record (left, top). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32400-2824-51?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-SPJ:1500974653,1500923326 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[7] Luxembourg Civil Records, Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1462 of 1494. 1858 Death Record No. 6. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-36487-72?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2ZY:2071013250 : accessed 10 Apr 2013).
[8] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1487 of 1494. 1859 Death Record No. 48. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-39674-59?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2ZY:2071013250 : accessed 10 Apr 2013).
[9] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances 1797-1800, baptêmes 1779-1793, mariages 1779-1793, 1797-1800, décès 1797-1800, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 189 of 222. 1799 (22 fructidor an VII) Birth Record (left bottom and right top). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-MS31?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-SPK%3A1500974653%2C1500990942 : accessed 2 August 2017).
[10] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 211 of 1494. 1830 Marriage Record No. 6. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6RW9-D6F?cc=1709358&wc=9RY8-SP8%3A129626601%2C129729901 : accessed 2 August 2017).
[11] Ibid., Diekirch > Tables décennales 1803-1892 Naissances, mariages, décès 1797-1800 Naissances 1800-1823 > image 951 of 1493. 1807 Birth Record (left page, middle). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-D42Q-KQV?cc=1709358&wc=9RYM-W38%3A129628901%2C130575701 : accessed 2 Augut 2017).
[12] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Décès 1814-1881 > image 437 of 1379. 1843 Death Record No. 39. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-D17S-7MM?cc=1709358&wc=9RYS-FM9%3A129625001%2C1290913101 : accessed 2 August 2017).
[13] Ibid., Diekirch > Décès 1825-1890 > image 1034 of 1358. 1876 Death Record No. 9. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6XY7-BSK?cc=1709358&wc=9RYC-2NL%3A129628901%2C129628902 : accessed 3 August 2017).
[14] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances 1800-1827 > image 22 of 306. 1802 Birth Record No. 29 (12 Thermidore an X). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DRLP-R9?cc=1709358&wc=9RYW-DPD%3A129626601%2C129760501 : accessed 2 August 2017).
[15] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1084 of 1494. 1829 Death Record No. 11. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6RW9-CWQ?cc=1709358&wc=9RY8-SP8%3A129626601%2C129729901 : accessed 2 August 2017).
[16] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances 1828-1890 Mariages 1800-1816 > image 1335 of 1507. 1804 Birth Record NO. 64 (16 Thermidor an XII). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-X2MS-BQ?cc=1709358&wc=9RYD-FM9%3A129626601%2C129945501 : accessed 2 August 2017).
[17] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Décès 1879-1881 > image 3 of 119. 1879 Death Record No. 8. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6F79-Q1Z?cc=1709358&wc=9RY3-GPF%3A129625001%2C129625002 : accessed 2 August 2017).
[18] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1093 of 1494. 1830 Death Record No. 4. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-38720-90?cc=1709358 : accessed 28 September 2015).
[19] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1116 of 1494. 1832 Death Record No. 3. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-37297-72?cc=1709358 : accessed 28 September 2015).
[20] Luxembourg Parish Records, Bettendorf > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1763-1797 > image 8 of 94. 1768 Baptismal Record (left page, 2nd to last entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-M9TY?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-SPJ%3A1500974653%2C1500923326 : accessed 1 August 2017).
[21] Luxembourg Civil Records, Bettendorf > Naissances, mariages, décès 1779-1812 > image 121 of 238. 1790 Death Record (right page, 4th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DRLY-K3?cc=1709358&wc=9RYW-DP8%3A129626601%2C130236801 : accessed 1 August 2017).
[22] Luxembourg, Volkszählungen 1843-1900 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Bettendorf > 1843 > image 2 of 288. 1843 Zwank-Dahm household. “Luxembourg, Volkszählungen 1843-1900,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32360-26751-78?cc=2037957&wc=M5LT-T3L:346114101,345863501 : accessed 18 February 2015).
[23] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1846 > image 325 of 334. Zwank-Dahm household. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32356-28692-50?cc=2037957&wc=M5LR-BZ9:346114101,345858602 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[24] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1849 > image 286 of 343. Pierre Winandy household. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-997B-FWGK?cc=2037957&wc=M5LR-TQW%3A346114101%2C345864801 : accessed 4 August 2017).
[25] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1851 > image 359 of 386. Zwank-Dahm household No. 51. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32351-20262-71?cc=2037957&wc=M5LR-446:346114101,345865601 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[26] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1852 > image 352 of 365. Theodore Dahm household No. 57. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-997B-ZRX?cc=2037957&wc=M5LR-S58%3A346114101%2C345865501 : accessed 4 August 2017).
[27] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1855 > image 325 of 358. Zwank-Dahm household No. 28. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32379-20635-34?cc=2037957 : accessed 26 September 2015).
[28] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1858 > image 336 of 365. Zwank-Dahm household No. 45. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32359-9055-64?cc=2037957&wc=M5LT-2JF:346114101,345867601 : accessed 18 February 2015).
[29] Luxembourg Civil Records, Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 521 of 1494. 1859 Marriage Record No. 21. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-35911-81?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2ZY:2071013250 : accessed 03 Apr 2013).
[30] Luxembourg Census Records, Bettendorf > 1861 > image 118 of 367. 1861 Peffer-Zwank household no. 33. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32377-4921-43?cc=2037957&wc=M5GM-MNL:346114101,345867101 : accessed 17 February 2015).
[31] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1864 > image 350 of 395. 1864 Peffer-Zwank household no. 12. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32381-22900-4?cc=2037957&wc=M5GS-2J7:346114101,345868401 : accessed 17 February 2015).
[32] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1867 > image 279 of 364. 1867 Peffer-Zwank household No. 19 maison dite Scheier. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32373-10122-70?cc=2037957&wc=M5LB-3TR:346114101,345869101 : accessed 17 February 2015).
[33] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1871 > image 736 of 823. 1871 Peffer-Zwank houshold no. 10. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32377-18258-50?cc=2037957&wc=M5L1-J46:346114101,345869501 : accessed 17 February 2015).
[34] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1875 > image 246 of 789. 1875 Peffer-Zwank household no. 7. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32380-14325-83?cc=2037957&wc=M5G9-VZK:346114101,345870501 : accessed 17 February 2015).

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

52 Ancestors: #26 A Visit of Moestroff, Ancestral Home of the Zwanck-Welter Family

I love it when I’m speculating about a relationship, searching for records to back it up, and end up finding the one document that brings it all together!

Remember doing jigsaw puzzles as a child? Did you try to connect the pieces even when they didn’t fit? The pieces of my puzzle were all spread out and I was sure they would come together into one picture.

Castle of Moestroff hidden behind walls and overgrown hedges and trees

Clara WELTER and Franz ZWANCK are another set of my children’s 5th great-grandparents in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Clara and Franz lived in the town my husband often visited while growing up. Being the oldest grandchild of Suzanne PEFFER and Fritz KREMER he would spend his summer vacation with his grandparents, running around the little village, and playing with the children there. Little did he know, his friends were most likely distantly related to him as many families have deep roots in the little hamlet.

The mill of Moestroff across the Sauer River from the castle and church.

Moestroff is a village which is on one of our main bike routes when riding north of Echternach and we stopped there to take a few photos this week.

The church of Moestroff (side view from back) with the priest’s entry door.

Franz ZWANCK (1750-1820)

Franciscus “Franz” ZWANCK was born about 1750 in Moestroff, commune of Bettendorf, district of Diekirch, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. His estimated date of birth was calculated from the age at death seen in his death record. I believe he may have been born several years after 1750. He was the son of Pierre ZWANG (d. aft. 1789) and Anne Marie HUSCHET (d. bef. 1789) per Franz’s 1789 marriage record. He died on 3 June 1820 in Moestroff.[1]

Clara WELTER (1766-1826)

Franciscus married Maria Clara WELTER, daughter of Johann WELTER and Anna Maria FELTES, on 26 October 1789 in Bettendorf.[2] Clara, as she was known, was born on 4 July 1766 in Reisdorf[3], the fifth of seven children. She died on 25 January 1826 in Moestroff.[4]

The steeple of the church of Moestroff

Franz and Clara’s children

  1. Catherine ZWANK was born on 2 August 1790[5] and died on 29 March 1852.[6] (more below)
  2. Peter ZWANK § was born on 19 August 1793 in Moestroff and was baptized the same day in Bettendorf.[7] He died at the age of 3 years on 8 September 1796 in Moestroff.[8]
  3. Jacques “Jacob” ZWANK was born on 17 May 1795[9] and died on 15 February 1858.[10] (more below)
  4. Johann ZWANCK was born on 26 April 1797.[11] He died on 28 February 1832.[12] (more below)
  5. Margreta ZWANG § was born on 22 April 1799 in Moestroff.[13] She lived only eight days dying on 29 April 1799.[14]
  6. Maria ZWANG § was born 26 May 1800[15] and died on 26 January 1815 at the age of 14 years in Moestroff.[16]
  7. Franciscus ZWANCK § was born on 28 April 1804
    [17] and died on 18 July 1804 at the age of nearly three months.[18] Both events took place in Moestroff.

§ is the symbol I use for children who are the end of the line. The additions of Margreta and Maria were only made today. I had found the death record of Maria who died in 1815 and was searching for her birth record when I found Margreta’s birth record. So close in age, I thought they may have been the same person. I continued to search and found the birth record of Maria and the death record of Margaretha proving they were two.

The children who survived to adulthood

Catherine ZWANK

Catherine ZWANK was born and baptized on 2 August 1790 in Moestroff. Catherine married Matthias ABENS, son of Théodore ABENS and Susanne HASTERT, on 29 May 1811 in Bettendorf.[19] Matthias was born on 2 January 1785 in Ralingen, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany.[19] He died on 3 August 1819 in Moestroff.[20] Catherine and Matthias had two children: Christophe (1816-1880) who remained in Moestroff and Anna Maria (1819-aft. 1889) who moved to the Province of Luxembourg in Belgium.

Catherine also married Nicolas WEYLAND, son of Hubert WEYLAND and Marguerite ÖRNTZEN (I believe this name may have later been ERNZEN), on 22 January 1828 in Bettendorf.[21] Nicolas was born on 29 January 1779 in Örntzheim (Nommern).[22] He died on 25 June 1859 in Moestroff.[23] Catherine and Nicolas also had two children: Catharina (1830-1900) who went to live in Paris, France, with her husband and family and Jacques Hubert (1833-aft. 1909) who went to live in the Province of Luxembourg in Belgium with his family.

Catherine died on 29 March 1852 in Moestroff.

UPDATE: My friend Linda, a researcher in Luxembourg, confirmed: Örntzheim (Nommern) is in fact Ernzen, part of Larochette (also called Feels or in Latin Rupe, all meaning -Little-Rock). Larochette was in the parish of Nommern before the French Revolution.

Jacques ZWANK

 

The castle, with the steeple of the church in the background, in the town of Moestroff where Jacques ZWANK raised his family

Jacques “Jacob” ZWANK was born on 17 May 1795 in Moestroff and baptized the same day in Bettendorf. Jacques married Maria DAHM, daughter of Pierre “Peter” DAHM and Anne Cathérine KIMMES, on 22 October 1823 in Bettendorf.[24] Maria was born on 10 July 1797 in Moestroff and christened the same day in Bettendorf.[25] Jacob died on 15 February 1858 in Moestroff and Maria died on 28 November 1859 in Moestroff.[26] Their story was told in 52 Ancestors: #39 The ZWANK-DAHM Family of Moestroff. Jacob and Maria’s children remained in Moestroff.

Johann ZWANCK

The castle of Vianden, the town where Johann ZWANCK raised his family

Johann ZWANCK was born on 26 April 1797 in Moestroff. He died on 28 February 1832 in Vianden. Johann married Cathérine HIERTZ, daughter of Jean HIERTZ and Barbe WEYRICH, on 17 January 1826 in Vianden.[27] Cathérine was born on 2 October 1804 in Vianden[28] Her death record has not been located. Johann and Cathérine had four children: Johann (1826-aft. 1886), Jacob (1828-1898), Wilhelm (1828-1832), Agathe (1831-?).

Getting back to the jigsaw puzzle

What I do when I have a genealogy puzzle is to add assumed children with TEMPORARILY ATTACHED typed in at the top of their notes to a set of parents in my database. These parents may already have proven children whose timelines are helpful in determining if I am on the right track. I work through each “child” adding information as it is found. If they end up not being connected I can easily detach the child leaving all of the information in my database. I don’t delete the information because, even if it is not useful to me, it may help someone else with their research.

The puzzle the ZWANG family presented was partly solved in this way. As you can see in the genealogical information above, the family name was seen with several different spellings: ZWANG, ZWANK, and ZWANCK. I had to be careful that all of these spellings were variations of the same name and not another family name.

Before I found the one document that brings it all together! this was what I knew. Pierre ZWANG and Anne Marie HUSCHET may have had at least 4 children. This was speculation on my part. Records were found for a possible son Ludovicus (1748-1776), a possible daughter Irmina Catharina (b. 1750), and sons Franz (b. abt. 1750) and Nicolas (b. 1764). The baptismal records of the first two children DID NOT have the maiden name of the mother –  HUSCHET. For Franz, the subject of this post, no baptismal record was found however his marriage record gave the maiden name of his mother as HUSCHET. Nicolas’ baptismal record only had Anne Marie as his mother’s name.

One avenue I have not considered is that the ZWANG-HUSCHET couple may have had children in another town. In records found for the HOSCHEID family (which I worked through when I wrote A Priest Born in the 16th Century Leaves a Key to Open the Door in a Brick Wall) the surname HOSCHEID was also spelled HUSCHETE. I may have to re-visit the Brandenbourg records to see if there is a connection.

It must be mentioned here that early parish records for Moestroff were found in Reisdorf and later parish records were found in Bettendorf. Unfortunately, there is a period between the two where records are missing. Notably for Bettendorf before 1763.

Further speculation on my part was that Irmina Catharina went by Catharina and married Johann KELSCH on 9 March 1777 in Bettendorf. The marriage record does not list parents. Johann KELSCH was the godfather of Franz’s son Johann in 1797. As no age was listed, this Johann KELSCH could have been either the husband of Catharina ZWANG or her son. I found two researchers who list a date of death for Catharina’s husband. The date was 6 March 1798.

1798 Death Record of Pierre ZWANG found on pages 345 and 346 of the civil register of Bettendorf.[29]
While searching for the death record of Johann KELSCH (I still have not found it!) I found a death record I had not expected to find.

The early civil records for Luxembourg begin in 1796. This is the period in which the Republican Calendar was being used. The date I was searching for, 6 March 1798, would have been 16 Ventôse in the year VI. I found records dated the 3rd and the 20th of the month of Ventôse in the year VI but none in between.

One of the death records for the 3rd included the name KELSCH but it was the name of one of the informants and not the person who had died. The civil servant who was likely not very well educated in French made many spellings errors. They were errors he repeated in other entries and therefore likely how he thought they were written.

The handwriting and the spelling made it difficult to decipher the document, a death record for Pierre ZWANG, the father of Franz ZWANG. The record clearly states Franz was the son of Pierre but the relationship of Johann KELSCH who was the second informant is not given. However, his age was given as 21 which could only mean he was the son of Catharian ZWANG and Johann KELSCH.

From this record, I now know Pierre ZWANG was born about 1728 as his age was 70 years at the time of death on 21 February 1798.[29]

The family name ZWANG is a German word which means force. In the end, I did not need to use force to piece the puzzle together. The pieces fell into place although it did take hours of looking through the Luxembourg records, adding the records to my database, and citing the sources.

Do you have a similar way of solving the problems you run into in your genealogy research? I hope you’ve enjoyed this visit to Moestroff with the ZWANCK-WELTER family.

bestwishescathy1

Sources:
[1] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 993 of 1494. 1820 Death Record (age at death 70). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-37494-69?cc=1709358 : accessed 26 September 2015).
[2] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances, mariages, décès 1779-1812 > image 112 of 238. 1789 Marriage Record (left page, top). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DRLB-BM?cc=1709358&wc=9RYW-DP8%3A129626601%2C130236801 : accessed 24 July 2017).
[3] Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Reisdorf > Baptêmes 1725-1805, mariages 1763-1805 > image 20 of 59. 1766 Baptismal Record (left page, 5th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WS-H9M2-Z?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-RM8%3A1501010555%2C1501010556 : accessed 24 July 2017).
[4] Luxembourg Civil Records, Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1045 of 1494. 1826 Death Record No. 7. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-35658-79?cc=1709358 : accessed 26 September 2015).
[5] Luxembourg Parish Records, Bettendorf > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1763-1797 > image 47 of 94. 1790 Baptismal Record (right page, 4th entry). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32400-1478-56?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-SPJ:1500974653,1500923326 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[6] Luxembourg Civil Records, Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1388 of 1494. “.” 1852 Death Record No. 16. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-37526-82?cc=1709358&wc=9RY8-SP8:129626601,129729901 : accessed 7 Sep 2011).
[7] Luxembourg Parish Records, Bettendorf > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1763-1797 > image 53 of 94. 1793 Baptismal Record (last entry on right page). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32400-2766-52?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-SPJ:1500974653,1500923326 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[8] Ibid., Bettendorf > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1763-1797 > image 94 of 94. 1796 Death Record (left page, 6th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WM-MS17?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-SPJ%3A1500974653%2C1500923326 : accessed 24 July 2017).
[9] Ibid., Bettendorf > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1763-1797 > image 57 of 94. 1795 Baptismal Record (left, top). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32400-2824-51?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-SPJ:1500974653,1500923326 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[10] Luxembourg Civil Records, Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1462 of 1494. 1858 Death Record No. 6. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-36487-72?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2ZY:2071013250 : accessed 10 Apr 2013).
[11] Luxembourg Parish Records, Bettendorf > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1763-1797 > image 60 of 94. 1797 Baptismal Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32400-2625-75?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-SPJ:1500974653,1500923326 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[12] Luxembourg Civil Records, Vianden > Mariages 1834-1890 Décès 1797-1866 > image 918 of 1406. 1832 Death Record No. 10. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DTQS-LJ6?cc=1709358&wc=9RY9-DP8%3A130504801%2C130555401 : accessed 24 July 2017).
[13] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances, mariages, décès 1779-1812 > image 198 of 238. 1799 (3 Floreal year VII) Birth Record part 1 (right, bottom). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DRLT-2L?cc=1709358&wc=9RYW-DP8%3A129626601%2C130236801 : accessed 29 July 2017) See also image 199 for part 2.
[14] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances, mariages, décès 1779-1812 > image 216 of 238. 1799 Death Record ( 9 Floreal year VII). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DRLL-B8?cc=1709358&wc=9RYW-DP8%3A129626601%2C130236801 : accessed 29 July 2017).
[15] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances, mariages, décès 1779-1812 > image 227 of 238. 1800 Birth Record No. 19 (6 Prairial year VIII). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DRLB-RV?cc=1709358&wc=9RYW-DP8%3A129626601%2C130236801 : accessed 29 July 2017).
[16] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 950 of 1494. 1815 Death Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-35621-4?cc=1709358 : accessed 25 September 2015).
[17] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances 1828-1890 Mariages 1800-1816 > image 1328 of 1507. 1804 Birth Record No. 46 (8 Floreal an XII). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-13200-175-20?cc=1709358 : accessed 26 September 2015).
[18] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances 1828-1890 Mariages 1800-1816 > image 1328 of 1507. 1804 Birth Record No. 46 (8 Floreal an XII). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-13200-175-20?cc=1709358 : accessed 26 September 2015).
[19] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances 1828-1890 Mariages 1800-1816 > image 1439 of 1507. 1811 Marriage Record (left page, first entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-X2MW-CV?cc=1709358&wc=9RYD-FM9%3A129626601%2C129945501 : accessed 24 July 2017).
[20] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 985 of 1494. 1819 Death Recod (left, bottom). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6RW9-DJV?cc=1709358&wc=9RY8-SP8%3A129626601%2C129729901 : accessed 29 July 2017).
[21] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 166 of 1494. 1828 Marriage Record No. 1. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6RW9-6C4?cc=1709358&wc=9RY8-SP8%3A129626601%2C129729901 : accessed 24 July 2017).
[22] Luxembourg Parish Records, Nommern > Baptêmes 1744-1787, confirmations 1750-1789, mariages 1751-1765, 1769-1787, sépultures 1752-1787 > image 68 of 170. 1779 Baptismal Record (part 1, right page, bottom). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WS-9SWR?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-L2V%3A1500981117%2C1501018978 : accessed 29 July 2017). See also image 59 for second part.

[23] Luxembourg Civil Records, Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1481 of 1494. 1859 Death Record No. 23. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6RW9-FQH?cc=1709358&wc=9RY8-SP8%3A129626601%2C129729901 : accessed 27 July 2017).
[24] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 82 of 1494. 1823 Marriage Record No. 10. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-38177-77?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2ZY:2071013250 : accessed 10 Apr 2013).
[25] Luxembourg Parish Records, Bettendorf > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1763-1797 > image 60 of 94. 1797 Baptismal Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32400-2625-75?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-SPJ:1500974653,1500923326 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[26] Luxembourg Civil Records, Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1487 of 1494. 1859 Death Record No. 48. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-39674-59?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2ZY:2071013250 : accessed 10 Apr 2013).
[27] Ibid., Vianden > Naissances 1793-1828 > image 113 of 484. 1804 Birth Record (10 vendémiaire an XIII). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-XCWW-SC?cc=1709358&wc=9RYW-SPD%3A130504801%2C130707001 : accessed 29 July 2017).
[28] Ibid., Vianden > Naissances 1829-1890 Mariages 1797-1833 > image 1437 of 1493. 1826 Marriage Record No. 2. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DTCS-W58?cc=1709358&wc=9RY4-929%3A130504801%2C130760501 : accessed 24 July 2017).
[29] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances, mariages, décès 1779-1812 > image 179 of 238. 1798 Death Record part 1 (3 ventôse an VI) (right, bottom).(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DRL1-Y1?cc=1709358&wc=9RYW-DP8%3A129626601%2C130236801 : accessed 29 July 2017). See also image 180 for second part.

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

52 Ancestors: #3 Michel CLOS and Elisabetha THEWES md. 1770

In 2015 in 52 Ancestors: #27 The Sheep Herder’s Family I wrote about Théodore REIFFER and his wife Elisabetha CLOS. They were my children’s  4th great-grandparents. While Théodore’s parents are still unknown, I found a little bit of information on Elisabetha’s parents and siblings.

My Principal Source is not a Primary Source

Three entries in Richard Schaffner’s Familienbuch Körperich, at first glance, seem to be for three different men named Michael CLOOS, KLOS, or CLOS.

The information in entry #319 came from the Körperich church register book #2. CLOOS or KLOS Michael, son of Johann CLOOS and Anna KLAREN of Dauwelshausen, married Elisabeth THEWES or THIEWES, daughter of Nikolaus THEWES and Gertrud LESSEN from Ammeldingen, on 15 May 1770 in Körperich. At the time of the marriage, the bride was living in Seimerich.[1]

In entry #1153 the marriage of Michael KLOS or CLOS and Elisabeth THIBES or THEVES is estimated at before 1771 (likely due to the birth records found for the couple’s children). Michael resided in Ammeldingen, Gentingen, and Eisenbach while Elisabeth resided in Gentingen. These are likely places referenced in the baptismal records of their children. They had three daughters between 1771 and 1776. The places of birth, dates of birth/baptism, and their godparents’ names and residence are listed. No entry is made for marriages of the daughters which means Mr. Schaffner did not find marriages in Körperich.[2]

In entry #320 Michael CLOS of Eisenbach died on 20 December 1775 at the age of 28 years.[3]

I believe all of the entries are for the same Michael CLOS (and other spelling variations). Although the book is the main source for this family it is not a primary source. To prove my assumption I will have to consult family books of towns in the immediate area for further information. The primary source, the church records mentioned in the Körperich family book, will have to be hunted down as well.

Click on the marker to open a description with information on when which person lived in these places. The farthest distance between two places is about 15 kilometers or less than 10 miles.

The Michel CLOS Story, This is How it Might Have Been

Michel was born about 1747. At the age of about 23 years, he married Elisabeth. They had two daughters within four years.  Michel died shortly before Christmas 1775. Elisabeth was pregnant with their third child. Five months after his death, she gave birth to their third daughter. The only mention of Elisabeth after the birth of her third child is a reference to the grandparents of Susanna REIFFER being deceased at the time of her marriage on 31 January 1833.[4] Elisabeth, Michel’s widow, therefore died before 1833.

There were no further entries in the Körperich FB for the daughters of Michel and Elisabeth. One of the daughters married in Mettendorf in 1790. A second daughter is known to have married before the birth of a child in 1803, however, the marriage record has not been located.

Michel and Elisabeth had the following children.

i. Margaretha was born on 29 November 1771 in Gentingen and baptized the same day in Körperich. Her godparents were Marg. Goebel of Gentingen and Nik. Thebes of Ammeldingen.[2] Note: The godfather was likely the maternal grandfather of the child.

ii. Elisabetha was born and baptized on 9 March 1774 in Körperich. Her godparents were Elis. Klein from Körperich and Michael Windandy (sic, poss. a typo. A Michael Winandy was living in Körperich at the time).[2] She died on 27 December 1829 in Bastendorf.[5] Note: This child was my children’s ancestor, see The Sheep Herder’s Family

iii. Margaretha was born in Körperich and baptized on 24 May 1776 in Körperich. Her godparents were Marg. Clos from Eisenach and Nik. Wonner from Körperich.[2] Note: How was Marg. Clos related to the child? Could she have been a paternal aunt? No date of birth was given in the entry.

Why were the first and third daughter given the same name? Did the first daughter die before 1776? What happened after the birth of the third daughter? Did Elisabeth marry again? Did she move to another area? Where did she raise her daughters?

In 1790 Margaretha, a daughter of Michael and Elisabeth, married in Mettendorf. Was the bride the older 19 years old Margaretha or was she the younger 16 years old Margaretha?

Daughter Margaretha Marries

Margaretha married Everardus WELTER on 14 September 1790 in Mettendorf.[6], [7]

1790marriagewelterkloos
Source: “Deutschland Heiraten, 1558-1929,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JHHG-35Q : 26 December 2014), Everardus Welter and Margaretha Kloos, 14 Sep 1790; citing Katholisch, Mettendorf, Rheinland, Prussia; FHL microfilm 585,923.
1790marriagewelterkloos2
Source: “Deutschland Heiraten, 1558-1929,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4PJ-7QC : 26 December 2014), Everhardus Welter and Margaretha Kloos, 10 Mar 1790; citing Katholisch, Mettendorf, Rheinland, Prussia; FHL microfilm 585,922.

To learn more about the WELTER-KLOOS couple I need to consult the Mettendorf Family Book the next time I visit the Luxracines library. Will the entry for this couple lead to more information for the family of Michel CLOS and Elisabeth THEWES? Will the entry show their daughter Margaretha died before 2 January 1792 when a man named Everardus WELTER married Angela RENSON? Were there more than one person named Everardus WELTER living in Mettendorf at the time?

ac·count·a·bil·i·ty

Janine Adams of the Organize Your Family History blog and members of her newly formed Facebook group, Genealogy Research Loggers, are helping me to create a habit of regularly entering my genealogy research into a research log. I’m using the Research Manager of my genealogy software Ancestral Quest 15. It is a powerful tool which I have not been using effectively. While entering items to the Research Manager, questions were formed (and recorded!) which I hope will help me to keep better track of the many loose ends in the family tree research.

bestwishescathy1Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner, comp., Familienbuch der Pfarrei St. Hubertus Körperich in der Südeifel mit Körperich, Niedersgegen, Obersgegen, Gentingen, Roth an der Our, Seimerich und Scheuerhof (später Neuscheuerhof) 1689-1899 (2002), p. 73 family #319.
[2] Ibid., p. 247 family #1153.
[3] Ibid, p. 73 family #320.
[4] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Diekirch > Naissances 1879-1890 Mariages 1796-

1842 > image 1312 of 1492. 1833 Marriage Record No. 9. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-
11618-99298-93?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2N2:1627336735 : accessed 01 Apr 2013).
[5] Luxembourg Civil Records, Bastendorf > Décès 1828-1862 > image 14 of 305. 1829 Death Record No. 19. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12394-256460-30?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2CM:n117549397 : accessed 04 Apr 2013).
[6] Germany Marriages, 1558-1929 / Deutschland, Heiraten, 1558-1929, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 585,923. Everardus Welter and Margaretha Kloos, 14 Sep 1790; parents of the groom: Michaelis Kloos and

Elisabethae Thewes; parents of the bride: Joachim Welter and Barbarae Roderig; citing Katholisch, Mettendorf, Rheinland, Prussia. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JHHG-35Q : accessed 8 January
2017).
[7] Ibid., FHL microfilm 585,922. Everhardus Welter and Margaretha Kloos, 10 Mar 1790; parents of the groom: Michaelis Kloos and Elisabethae Thewes; parents of the bride: Joachim Welter and Barbarae Roderig; citing Katholisch, Mettendorf, Rheinland, Prussia. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4PJ-7QC : 26 December 2014).

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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52 Ancestors: #43 The WEIMANN-WELTER Family of Ernzen

Week 43 (October 22-28) – Oops. An ancestor who made an “oops,” or one that you made while researching one of them. (We’ve all done it, believe me!)

ernzen1Ernzen, Eifelkreis Bitburg-Prüm, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany

Hubert WEIMANN of Ernzen

My third great-grandfather Hubert WEIMANN (1805-1872) was born on 13 July 1805 in Ernzen, Eifelkreis Bitburg-Prüm, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany.[1], [2] His parents were Bernard WEYMANN (1763-1809) and Susanna MALAMBRE (1772-1848), both of Ernzen. Hubert had two sisters, Anna Maria born 28 January 1796[2] and Elisabeth born on 20 August 1807,[2] both in Ernzen. Elisabeth was born seven months after the death of her father Bernard WEYMANN who died on 2 January 1807[2] in Ernzen. His widow Susanna remarried on 13 February 1809[3] to Matthias WELTER (1772-1830). They had four children, only one lived to adulthood and married.[3]

Elisabeth WELTER of Ernzen

Elisabeth WELTER, my third great-grandmother, was born on 31 January 1807[1], [4] in Ernzen. She was the daughter of Anton WELTER (1773-1849) born on Ernzerhof near Ernzen and Anne Catherine HENNES (1779-1845) born in Holsthum. They were married on 23 March 1803[4] in Ernzen. This was just before the beginning of the Napoleonic Wars (18 May 1803- 13 Sep 1815) during which time their first four of six children were born (§ denotes end of line):

  • Child 1: Bernard WELTER (1805-1855) born in 1805. He married Katharina WEBER (1795-1875) on 2 April 1837 in Aach in the Eifel. Bernard died on 1 February 1855 in Ernzen.[4], [5]
  • Child 2: Elisabeth WELTER (1807-1877), my third great-grandmother
  • § Child 3: Katharina WELTER (1810-1812) born 21 July 1810 in Ernzen. She died 5 December 1812 in Ernzen.[4]
  • § Child 4: Peter WELTER (1814-1815) born 4 April 1814 in Ernzen. He died 6 February 1815 in Ernzen.[4]
  • § Child 5: Peter WELTER (1817-1819) born 10 August 1817 in Ernzen. He died 12 May 1819 in Ernzen.[4]
  • Child 6: Anna Maria WELTER (1822-1861) born 3 April 1822 in Ernzen. She made her First Communion in 1834. Anna Maria married Peter STEIL 18 February 1846 in Ernzen. She died on 9 January 1861 in Ernzen where she was buried two days later.[4], [6]

A Marriage Takes Place in Sankt Markus Catholic Church

Hubert WEIMANN married Elisabeth WELTER on 11 February 1835[1] in Ernzen. A religious marriage ceremony took place the next day on 12 February 1835[1] in Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen. Peter LINKELS who was at Sankt Markus from 1806-1835 most likely performed the ceremony.

Ernzenchurch tinySankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen

As mentioned earlier Hubert’s mother Susanna MALAMBRE was married(2) to Matthias WELTER. Susanna and Mathias’ children, Hubert’s half-siblings, were his wife Elisabeth’s second cousins. Matthias and Elisabeth were first cousins once removed. Confused? I love looking at the bigger picture!

A New Priest for Sankt Markus

Richard Schaffner’s Familienbuch der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel as well as FamilySearch‘s Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 (index) have helped to add dates and places to this family’s story. Mr. Schaffner viewed the civil and religious records while compiling the information on all families of Ernzen however neither his book nor FamilySearch‘s database have images of the records. To make up for the missing records my photographer-husband and I visited Ernzen earlier this month to illustrate the stories with photos of the town today.

When I wrote this post a key figure in the lives of the family was missing (oops) but I did not know this until I took a very close look at the photos we took that day. On the side and behind the Sankt Markus church is the cemetery. Graves with the surnames WEIMANN, MALAMBRE, and WELTER were seen in the cemetery. Behind the church we found a plot reserved for the the priests who had served Sankt Markus.

ernzenpriests1 tinyOn the left the parrish priests of Ernzen are listed with the years they served at Sankt Markus (1803-2001). The priests are included in Mr. Schaffner’s Family Book of Ernzen. They were an important part of families’ lives and I did not think to look for them in the compilation. Oops, a mistake I will have to remedy when I work on families in other towns with family books.

Ernzenpriests2 tinyPhilipp MEYER was born 9 November 1804 in Heispelt. He became a priest on 28 May 1831 in Trier, was chaplain in Daun before becoming the new pastor in Ernzen from 29 September 1835 until his death on 10 June 1868. He was buried in the church cemetery on 13 June 1868.[7] The grave is marked with this stone.

ernzenpriests3 tinyHere lie the bones of the deceased
Pastor MEYER
from Ernzen. Died on 10 June 1868 aged 64 years. Born in
Heispelt in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg in 1804. He joined the
pastors of the parrish of Ernzen and tended his sheep for nearly 33 years.
He was a good shepherd and a good shepherd gives his life for his flock
which he did for that he will hopefully receive the crown of eternal life.

R I P

Father MEYER was the priest who performed baptisms, marriages, and burials for the WEIMANN-WELTER family from 1835 to 1868.

Hubert and Elisabeth’s Children

Hubert and Elisabeth’s first child came along a little over nine months after their marriage. Bernard was born and baptized on 30 November 1835[1], [8] in Sankt Markus. His godparents were his uncle Bernard RAUSCH, husband of the father’s sister, and his maternal grandmother Katharina HENNES, both of Ernzen.[1] Custom was for a male child to have the godfather’s name. I wonder if they may have chosen Bernard RAUSCH as the godfather in honor of the paternal grandfather. Baby Bernard died less than a month later, on the day after Christmas.

Their second child was born on 2 January 1837[1] and was baptized a day later in Sankt Markus.[9] His godparents were his uncle Bernard WELTER and Katharina CLASEN of Ernzen.[1] The child was given the name Bernard. Given the godfather’s name but did his parents want him to carry the name of his paternal grandfather and/or his deceased older brother?

Hubert and Elisabeth’s third child was a daughter, my 2nd great-grandmother. She was born on 18 June 1839[1], [10][11] and was baptized the next day in Sankt Markus.[12] Her godparents were Maria WELTER and Anton PROMMENSCHENKEL of Ernzen.[1]

Johann the fourth child was born and baptized on 1 August 1841.[1][13] The godparents who stood up for him in Sankt Markus were Johann HEINZ and Magdalena WELTER of Ernzen.[1]

Bernard, the oldest of the three living children died on 28 July 1842 and was buried two days later in Ernzen.[1]

Two years later Elisabeth gave birth to her 5th child Katharina on 28 June 1844[1] in Ernzen. Katharina was baptized the next day[14] in Sankt Markus in the presence of her godparents Katharina CLASSEN and Johann RAUSCH of Ernzen.[1]

Elizabeth’s mother Anne Catherine HENNES died on 9 March 1845 in Ernzen and was buried there two days later on 11 March 1845.[4]

Hubert and Elisabeth did not give up hope of having a son name Bernard. On 23 May 1847[1] their third son and sixth child was born in Ernzen. Two days later[15] he was baptized in Sankt Markus and was given the name Bernard. His godparents were Bernard and Katharina CLASSEN of Ernzen.

Five months later their two youngest children died. Katharina died on 31 October 1847 and was buried on 2 November.[1] Three days later baby Bernard died on 5 November and was buried on 7 November.[1]

Maria, 9 years old, and Johann, 7 years old, did not remain the only children as their mother Elisabeth gave birth to a seventh child. After losing three sons named Bernard they must have decided to choose another name for their son born on 29 October 1848[1] and baptized the next day[16] in Sankt Markus. His godparents were Peter STEIL and Elisabeth HENNES of Ernzen and he was given the name Peter.[1]

About a week later the family was back in church for a funeral. Hubert’s mother Susanna MALAMBRE died on 5 December 1848 and was buried two days later on 7 December 1848.[2], [3]

Two months later another funeral was being held in Sankt Markus. Elisabeth’s father Anton WELTER died on 26 January 1849 in Ernzen and was buried there two days later on 28 January 1849.[4]

The Grown Children Begin to Marry

Following the deaths of the grandparents the WEIMANN children, Maria, Johann and Peter continued to grow to adulthood. The oldest, Maria, was the first to marry on Thursday, 25 January 1866[10][11] to Bernard WILDINGER. Isn’t it strange she would choose a man with the name her parents had given to three sons who died young? Maria and Bernard were married in a religious ceremony over a week later on Saturday, 3 February 1866 in Sankt Markus Catholic Church.[17]

Maria and Bernard gave Hubert and Elisabeth their first grandchild on 23 December 1866.[10][11] He was baptized in Sankt Markus the day after Christmas. His godparents were his maternal grandfather Hubert WEIMANN of Ernzen and his paternal grandmother Catherine SCHRAMEN of Ferschweiler. Sadly Hubert died at the age of nine months on 20 September 1867.

The oldest son of Hubert and Elizabeth WEIMANN, Johann married Maria REUTER (1839-1907) on 27 November 1867[13] in a civil ceremony in Bollendorf. The marriage was also celebrated in a religious ceremony on 30 November 1867 in Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[18]

On 10 June 1868[7] Father MEYER who had served the WEIMANN family and the parrish of Ernzen died. He was replaced by Father Eduard WITTUS on 15 September 1868.

On 29 October 1872[1] Hubert WEIMANN died at the age of 67 years in Ernzen where he was born, grew up and raised his family. Father Eduard WITTUS who came to pastor at Sankt Markus after the death of Father MEYER may have been the priest who said mass for Hubert’s burial.

A year after Hubert’s death his youngest son Peter married Katharina HANSEN (1848-1914) on Tuesday, 23 September 1873[19] in a civil ceremony in Bollendorf. They were married in a religious ceremony in Sankt Markus on Monday, 29 September 1873.[20]

The mother of this family, Elisabeth WELTER died on Monday, 24 September 1877 in Ernzen and was buried there three days later on Thursday, 27 September 1877.[1]

Hubert and Elisabeth’s children raised their families in Ernzen. They witnessed the beginning of World War I. Peter, the youngest of the three, died on 27 November 1914[19] and was followed less than a year later by his sister Maria on 2 September 1915.[10][11] Johann, the last living child, died a little over a year after the end of the Great War on 3 December 1919.[13]

Take a Walk Through Ernzen

Ernzenvisit4tinyErnzenvisit3tinyErnzenvisit1tinyErnzenvisit2tiny

Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 (compiled in 2000), p. 232, Family #822. Weimann-Welter.
[2] Ibid., p. 243, Family #858. Weymann-Malambre.
[3] Ibid., p. 239, Family #844. Welter-Malambre.
[4] Ibid., p. 234, Family #830. Welter-Hennes.
[5] Ibid., p. 235, Family #832. Welter-Weber.
[6] Ibid., p. 203, Family #719. Steil-Welter.
[7] Ibid., p. 152, Person #510. Meyer (priest).
[8] Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 / Deutschland Geburten und Taufen, 1558-1898, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462714. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NFD4-XNL : accessed 23 October 2015), Bernardus Weimann, 30 Nov 1835; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[9] Ibid., FHL microfilm 462714. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NFD4-XN5 : accessed 23 October 2015), Bernardus Weimann, 03 Jan 1837; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[10] Familienbuch Ernzen, p. 245-246, family #867. Wildinger-Weimann.
[11] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei Sancta Lucia Ferschweiler mit: Diesburgerhof (ab 1803) und L(a)eisenhof (ab1830) 1680-1899, PDF (Kordel, 1999), p. 349, family #1624. Wildinger-Weimann.
[12] Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 / Deutschland Geburten und Taufen, 1558-1898, (index), <FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462,714. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NFD4-54C : accessed 23 February 2015), Maria Weiman, 19 Jun 1839; citing Sankt Lucia Katholisch, Ferschweiler, Rheinland, Prussia.
[13] Familienbuch Ernzen, p. 232-233, Family #823. Weimann-Reiter.
[14] Germany Births and Baptisms, FHL microfilm 462714. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NFD4-KMB : accessed 23 October 2015), Catharina Weimann, 29 Jun 1844; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[15] Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N2CB-NBL : accessed 23 October 2015), Bernardus Weimann, 25 May 1847; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[16] Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N2CB-2VM : accessed 23 October 2015), Petrus Weimann, 30 Oct 1848; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[17] Germany Marriages, 1558-1929 / Deutschland, Heiraten, 1558-1929, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462714. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JH8P-DXT : accessed 23 February 2015), Bernardus Weldinger and Maria Weimann, 03 Feb 1866; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[18] Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JH8P-DM5 : accessed 23 October 2015), Joannes Weimann and Maria Reuter, 30 Nov 1867; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[19] Familienbuch Ernzen., p. 233, Family #825. Weimann-Hansen.
[20] Germany Marriages, (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JH8P-DJT : accessed 23 October 2015), Petrus Weimann and Cath. Hansen, 29 Sep 1873; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Hubert WEIMANN
Parents: Bernard WEYMANN and Susanna MALAMBRE
Spouse: Elisabeth WELTER
Parents of the Spouse: Anton WELTER and Anne Catherine HENNES
Whereabouts: Ernzen, Germany
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 3rd great-grandfather

1. Hubert WEIMANN
2. Maria WEIMANN
3. Johann “Jean” WILDINGER
4. Nicolas WILDINGER
5. Living WILDINGER
6. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.

52 Ancestors: #42 The WILDINGER-SCHRAMEN Family of Ferschweiler

Week 42 (October 15-21) – Proud: Which ancestor did something that made you proud? Which ancestor are you proud of finding?

I’m proud to be able to share photos taken last week of the road into Ferschweiler, the town sign, the catholic church, and the Luzienturm (tower) from the year 1538. It was wonderful to walk the church grounds where my ancestors are buried and see the church they were baptized and married in. The graves are no longer there but their spirits remain.

The WILDINGER-SCHRAMEN Family of Ferschweiler

My third great-grandfather Nicolas WILDINGER was born on 29 September 1798  in Ernzen, Eifelkreis Bitburg-Prüm, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany.[1] He was the son of Wilhelmus WILTINGER (1770-1849) born about 1770 in Ettelbrück, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg[2], and Margaretha WELTER (1777-1833) born 18 Apr 1777 in Ernzen.[2] It is not known at this time when his parents married.

Note: The compiler of the Ernzen Family Book wrote Ehe nachprüfen (check marriage) followed by oo vor 1798 (married before 1798).[2]

Nicolas was most likely the oldest of 4 children. His three younger siblings were born during the Napoleonic Wars (18 May 1803-13 Sep 1815):

  • Elizabeth WILDINGER (1805- ) born 21 August 1805 in Ernzen.[2] She married Dominik WEBER on 13 December 1831. As a widow with 4 children she immigrated to America in 1857.[3]
  • Franciscus “Franz” WILDINGER (1810-1812) born 6 August 1810 in Ernzen and died 8 December 1812 in Ernzen.[2]
  • Bernardus WILDINGER (1813- ) born 12 May 1813 in Ernzen.[2] Immigrated to America in 1857.[3]

Nicolas’ mother Margaretha WELTER died 8 January 1833 in Ernzen[2] too early to see her oldest son Nicolas marry.

The Road to Ferschweiler

DSC_0023 Ferschweiler edited tinyNicolas WILDINGER married Catherine SCHRAMEN on 18 Jan 1834 in Ferschweiler. Their religious marriage took place on 21 January 1834 in the Sankt Lucia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler.[1]

Catherine SCHRAMEN was born 23 Oct 1812 in Ferschweiler and was baptized the next day on 24 October 1812 in the Sankt Lucia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler.[4] She was the daughter of Michael SCHRAMEN (1786-1833) born 5 October 1786 in Ferschweiler[4] and Elisabetha SCHMITT (1790-1869) born 4 March 1790 in Ferschweiler.[4] They were married on 27 Nov 1811 in Ferschweiler. They had six known children, Catherine the eldest and:

  • Johann “Joannes” SCHRAMEN (1817-1894) born 14 January 1817 in Ferschweiler.[4] He married Katharina ADAM (1823- ) on 15 November 1852 in Ernzen. Joannes died on 20 January 1894 in Ferschweiler.[5]
  • Catherine “Katharina” SCHRAMEN (1820- ) born 21 February 1820 in Ferschweiler and was baptized the next day on 22 February 1820 in the Sankt Lucia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler.[4] She married Johann MARX ( – ) in 1842.
  • Margaret SCHRAMEN (1821-1822) born and baptized on 7 November 1821 in Ferschweiler.[4] She died on 22 October 1822 in Ferschweiler.[4]
  • Nicolaus SCHRAMEN (1824-1852) born and baptized on 31 October 1824 in Ferschweiler.[4] Nicolaus Schramen went to America about 1852 and may have lived in Illinois from 1855-1880.

Catherine’s father Michael SCHRAMEN died 20 September 1833 in Ferschweiler[4] four months before she married Nicolas WILDINGER.

Ferschweiler, The Birthplace of the WILDINGER Children

DSC_0016 Ferschweiler edited tinyCatherine and Nicolas had the following children:

Ch 1: [–?–] WILDINGER (1835-1835) born and died on 25 March 1835  in Ferschweiler.[1]
Ch 2: Elisabetha WILDINGER (1836-1882) born 10 July 1836 in Ferschweiler.[1]
Ch 3: Bernard “Bernhard” “Bernardus” WILDINGER (1838-1893) born 7 November 1838 in Ferschweiler, baptized two days later on 9 November 1838 in the Sankt Lucia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler.[1]
Ch 4: Elisabeth WILDINGER (1844-1867) born 11 August 1844 in Ferschweiler.[1]
Ch 5: Peter WILDINGER (1852- ) born 5 August 1852 in Ferschweiler and baptized three days later on 8 August 1852 in the Sankt Lucia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler. Per the Ferschweiler Family Book he was fled from military service – “militärflüchtig laut Anzeiger z. Amtsbl. Trier 1873, Seite 243.[1]

Nicolas’ father Wilhelmus WILTINGER died 28 September 1849 in Ernzen and was buried two days later on 30 September 1849 in Ernzen.[2] He did not live to see his youngest grandson Peter WILDINGER’s birth or baptism.

St. Luzia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler, first built in the years 1826-28 and rebuilt in 1947-49.

DSC_0025 Ferschweiler edited tiny

Two of Nicolas and Catherine’s children married:

  • Elisabetha WILDINGER married Nikolaus ROOS (1831-1879) on 8 January 1861 in Ferschweiler.[6]
  • Bernard WILDINGER married Maria WEIMANN (1839-1915) on 25 January 1866 in Ernzen. They were married in a religious ceremony on 3 February 1866 in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[7], [8]

Following these marriages at least 14 grandchildren were born, two of the six ROOS grandchildren[6] and four of the eight WILDINGER grandchildren[7] died very young.

And There Were More Funerals

Nicolas and Catherine’s second daughter Elisabeth, not to be confused with her older sister Elisabetha, died at the age of 23 on 28 December 1867 in Ferschweiler and was buried two days later on 30 December 1867 in Ferschweiler.[1] Hardly a year and a half later Catherine’s mother Elisabetha SCHMITT died 20 May 1869 in Ferschweiler at the age of 79. She was buried two days later on 22 May 1869 in Ferschweiler.[3] Less than six months later at the age of 57 years, Catherine SCHRAMEN died 2 November 1869 in Ferschweiler and was buried two days later on 4 Nov 1869 in Ferschweiler.[1]

Nicolas WILDINGER lived a little over four years as a widower before dying on 3 June 1874 in Ferschweiler at the age of 75.[1]

He left two children, the elder Elisabetha and my 2nd great-grandfather Bernard. It is not known if his youngest son Peter was still living. Elisabetha died 29 September 1882 in Ferschweiler[6] and Bernard died 14 October 1893 in Ernzen.[7]

View of Luzienturm in Ferschweiler from the Church

DSC_0035 Ferschweiler edited tiny

Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei Sancta Lucia Ferschweiler mit: Diesburgerhof (ab 1803) und L(a)eisenhof (ab1830) 1680-1899, PDF (Kordel, 1999), p. 349, Family #1625. Wildinger-Schramen.
[2] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 (compiled in 2000), p. 246, Family #869. Wiltinger-Welter.
[3] Familienbuch Ernzen, p. 225, Family #800. Weber-Wildinger.
[4] Familienbuch Fershcweiler, p. 295, Family #1378. Schramen-Schmitt.
[5] Familienbuch Ferschweiler, p. 294, Family #1374. Schramen-Adam.
[6] Ibid., p. 250, Family #1167. Roos-Wildinger.

[7] Familienbuch Ernzen, p. 245-246, family #867. Wildinger-Weimann.
[8] Familienbuch Fershcweiler, p. 349, family #1624. Wildinger-Weimann.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Nicolas WILDINGER
Parents: Wilhelmus WILTINGER and Margaretha WELTER
Spouse: Catherine SCHRAMEN
Parents of Spouse: Michael SCHRAMEN and Elisabetha SCHMITT
Whereabouts: Ernzen and Ferschweiler, Eifelkreis Bitburg-Prüm, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 3rd great-grandfather

1. Nicolas WILDINGER
2. Bernard “Bernhard” “Bernardus” WILDINGER
3. Johann “Jean” WILDINGER
4. Nicolas WILDINGER
5. Living WILDINGER
6. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.

52 Ancestors: #39 The ZWANK-DAHM Family of Moestroff

Week 39 (September 24-30) – Unusual: What is the most unusual record you’ve ever found? Or, who is the most unusual of your ancestors? (You can take that any way you want to!)

This was how I had planned to begin this post using the Unusual theme:

ZWANG, ZWANCK, ZWANK are the spellings I’ve found for this family’s unusual name. It seems to have evolved from ZWANG to ZWANCK and then the c was dropped and it became ZWANK.

An Unusual Meeting

On today’s bike ride with my husband, a third great-grandson of the couple featured in this post, we rode through Moestroff and were on our way to Bettendorf when I asked him if he knew where Steinesch was located. He’d never heard of it and we rode on.

As we rode through Bettendorf he swerved to the right and stopped at the building for the technical services of Bettendorf. A few workers were out front and we struck up a conversation with one of them. While researching the ZWANK-DAHM family I found one of their sons was listed on the census as living in a location by the name of Steinesch. We asked him about the location and he said he was not familiar with the place.

cows1
A field, near Stengescht, in Gilsdorf

During the conversation he said he also did genealogy research. He offered to ask around and took my name and number. We thanked him and continued our ride. Not five minutes later my husband’s phone rang. The man we’d talked to was calling to tell us he had found the place on a map, would make a copy, and leave it in an envelope behind a flower box at their building for us to pick up on our ride back home.

When we got home I had a look at the map and saw it could not be the same place. He had found Stengescht, a piece of land between Bettendorf and Gilsdorf. From records found for the son who lived in Steinesch I know he lived in Moestroff on the other side of Bettendorf – not the side where Gilsdorf lies. But good things came out of this unusual meeting. I met another person interested in genealogy and the map he left led me to a new-to-me website for Luxembourg.

The ZWANK-DAHM Family

Jacques “Jacob” ZWANK was born and baptized on 17 May 1795[1] in Moestroff/Bettendorf. He was the son of Franciscus “François” ZWANCK (1762-1820)  and Clara “Claire” WELTER (1763-1826). They were married on 26 October 1789[2] in Bettendorf and had the following known children:

  • Child 1: Catherine (1790-1852)
  • Child 2: Peter (1793- ?)
  • Child 3: Jacques (1795-1858)
  • Child 4: Jean (1797- ?)
  • Child 5: Maria (1800-1815)
  • Child 6: Franciscus (1804-1804)

Jacques’ father Franciscus died 3 June 1820[3] in Moestroff and did not get to see his son marry three years later. Jacques married Maria DAHM on 22 October 1823[4] in Bettendorf.

Maria DAHM was the daughter of Pierre “Peter” DAHM (1764-1830) and Anne Catherine KIMMES (1762-1832). She was born and baptized on 10 July 1797[5] in Moestroff/Bettendorf. Her parents, who were married the previous year on 5 April 1796[6] in Bettendorf, and her siblings have not been researched.

It was a Wednesday when 28 years old Jacobus, as he was seen on the marriage record[4], and 25 years old Maria met with Nicolas RECHT, mayor of Bettendorf, at 8 o’clock in the morning to be married. Jacques’ mother Clara and Maria’s parents Peter and Anne Catherine were present and consented to the marriage. The banns had been published on the 25th of September and the 5th of October.

1823marriagepub
1823 Marriage Publication[7]
Also present at the marriage were four witnesses, none noted as being related, who signed the marriage record along with the mayor. The bridal couple and their parents were not able to write or sign their names to the document.

Jacques and Maria, both day workers when they married, made their home in Moestroff. Seven known children were born to them from 1824 to 1840, only one died in infancy.

  • Ch 1: Wilhelm ZWANK (1824-1905) was born on 23 December 1824[8] in Moestroff. Wilhelm married Cathérine BOCK (1829-1907) who gave him 13 children in 20 years with 6 living to adulthood. He died 21 January 1905[9] in Moestroff. Cathérine followed in 1907.[10]

Jacques’ mother Clara “Claire” WELTER died 25 January 1826[11] in Moestroff. Her death was declared by her son Jean who had also married and lived in Vianden. Clara lived long enough to see her grandson Wilhelm celebrate his first birthday. Soon after her mother-in-law’s death, Maria was pregnant with her second child.

  • Ch 2: Catharina ZWANK (1826-1862) was born on 23 October 1826[12] in Moestroff. She married Johann LAUTWEIN (1823-1857) and gave him two children. She had a child out of wedlock two years into her widowhood. The child lived only a month and  Catharina died, a month later, on 31 March 1862[13] in Moestroff.
  • Ch 3: Theodore ZWANK (1828-1829) was born 13 November 1828[14] in Moestroff. He died 17 April 1829[15] in Moestroff.

Maria’s father Pierre DAHM died on 1 February 1830[16] in Moestroff at the age of 63. His death was declared by his son Theodore.

  • Ch 4: Johann ZWANK (1830-1891) was born 26 March 1830[17] in Moestroff. He married Catharina SCHMITT (1842-1873) who gave him 4 known children. Catharina died 13 January 1873[18] and Johann died 19 March 1891[19]in Moestroff. This was the son who lived in Steinesch.

Maria’s mother Anne Catherine KIMMES died on 10 January 1832[20] in Moestroff. As was the case with her husband, her death was reported by her son Theodore DAHM.

  • Ch 5: Marie ZWANK (1832-1892) was born 8 December 1832[21] in Moestroff. She married Nicolas PEFFER (1833-1887) and gave him 7 children, 4 lived to adulthood. Nicolas died in 1887[22] and Marie died 6 May 1892[23] in Moestroff. Marie and Nicolas were my husband’s 2nd great-grandparents.
  • Ch 6: Henri ZWANK (1835-aft. 1858) was born 1 April 1835[24] in Moestroff. Henri was last seen in the 1858 census[25] when he was listed as single. No marriage or death record has been found for him. Later census records may help to trace him.
  • Ch 7: Nicolas ZWANK (1840-1864) was born 1 March 1840[26] in Moestroff. Nicolas was last seen in the 1864 census.[27]He was single and living in his oldest brother Wilhelm’s household. As is the case with his bother Henri, later census records may help to trace him.

Jacques “Jacob” ZWANK was seen on the censuses dated 23 December 1843[28], 15 December 1846[29], 31 December 1847[30] and 6 December 1849[31] in Moestroff. In his household were his wife and children as well as his brother-in-law Theodore DAHM (1843 and 1846).

Jacques and Maria’s oldest son Wilhelm married Cathérine BOCK (1829-1907) on 6 November 1850[32] in Bettendorf. Wilhelm and Cathérine already had a daughter born out of wedlock earlier the same year in February. Her birth record[33] had the surname ZWANK as Wilhelm declared being her father. Annotation to the birth record were also made at the time of the child’s marriage.

Jacques and Maria’s oldest daughter Catharina married Johann LAUTWEIN (1823-1857) on 14 November 1851[34] in Bettendorf. Johann was a gardner from Trier, Germany. Present as witnesses were the bride’s brother Wilhelm ZWANK, her uncle Theodore DAHM, and the groom’s brother-in-law Niklas KAURICH.

Jacques was seen on the censuses dated 31 December 1851[35], 3 December 1852[36], and 2 December 1855[37] in Moestroff. As in 1843 and 1846 his brother-in-law Theodore DAHM lived with the family in 1851 and 1855.

Jacques “Jacob” ZWANK died at 4:30 in the afternoon of Monday, 15 February 1858[38] in Moestroff. His son Wilhelm and his brother-in-law Theodore DAHM reported his death the next morning.

The widowed Maria DAHM was seen on the census dated 3 December 1858[39] with her sons Johann and Henri. Johann was the one to report her death on 28 November 1859[40] in Moestroff. She died at 7:00 in the morning and her death was reported at 5:00 in the afternoon. It was noted on the death record that Johann did not know the names of his mother’s parents.

It is not known if Maria had been sickly or if her death was sudden. We know the marriage banns had already been published for her daughter Marie who married Nicolas PEFFER (1833-1887) on 30 November 1859[41] in Bettendorf, two days after her mother’s death.

Johann ZWANK, the son who reported the death of Maria DAHM, waited a bit longer to marry than his sister Marie. He married Catharina SCHMITT (1842-1873) on 16 August 1865[42] in Bettendorf. None of his relatives were present at the marriage. They were married less than 8 years when Catharina died[43] leaving him with two living children.

“There will come a time when you believe everything is finished. That will be the beginning.” ~ Louis L’Amour

This family is not finished!

Jacques and Maria’s two youngest sons were not found in Moestroff after 1858 (Henri) and 1864 (Nicolas). The tables décennales (10 years lists of birth, marriage, death) for Bettendorf (includes Moestroff) have been viewed for all ZWANK individuals from 1803-1922 and all have been accounted for.

I may have to take a look at southern Luxembourg were many young men went to work around this time. Wilhelm’s son Theodore (likely named after Theodore DAHM) went to Tétange in the commune of Kayl – I only learned this when I found his daughter who was born in Tétange visiting her grandparents (Wilhelm) in 1900.[44]

Sources:
[1] Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Bettendorf > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1763-1797 > image 57 of 94. 1795 Baptismal Record (28 Floréal III). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32400-2824-51?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-SPJ:1500974653,1500923326 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[2] Ibid., Bettendorf > Tables des mariages 1764-1797 (index organisée par l’époux) > image 163 of 163. 1789 Marriage Card. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32462-1079-40?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-N3L:1500974653,1501141688 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[3] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 993 of 1494. 1820 Death Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-37494-69?cc=1709358 : accessed 26 September 2015).
[4] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 82 of 1494. 1823 Marriage Record No. 10. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-38177-77?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2ZY:2071013250 : accessed 10 Apr 2013).
[5] Luxembourg Church Records, Bettendorf > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1763-1797 > image 60 of 94. 1797 Baptismal Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32400-2625-75?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-SPJ:1500974653,1500923326 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[6] Ibid., Bettendorf > Tables des mariages 1764-1797 (index organisée par l’époux) > image 27 of 163. 1796 Marriage Card. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32462-1274-42?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-N3L:1500974653,1501141688 : accessed 17 February 2015).
[7] Luxembourg Civil Records, Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 75 of 1494. 1823 Marriage Publication, lower right. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-40292-24?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2ZY:2071013250 : accessed 10 Apr 2013).
[8] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances 1800-1827 > image 243 of 306. 1824 Birth Record No. 57. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11571-20082-70?cc=1709358&wc=9RYW-DPD:129626601,129760501 : accessed 24 September 2015),.
[9] Ibid., Bettendorf > Décès 1895-1923 > image 143 of 389. 1905 Death Record No. 8. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32048-24816-86?cc=1709358 : accessed 25 September 2015).
[10] Ibid., Bettendorf > Décès 1895-1923 > image 178 of 389. 1907 Death Record No. 36.  (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32048-24601-62?cc=1709358 : accessed 26 September 2015).
[11] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1045 of 1494. 1826 Death Record No. 7. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-35658-79?cc=1709358 : accessed 26 September 2015).
[12] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances 1800-1827 > image 283 of 306. 1826 BIrth Record No. 55. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11571-22212-50?cc=1709358&wc=9RYW-DPD:129626601,129760501 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[13] Ibid., Bettendorf > Décès 1860-1890 > image 39 of 465. 1862 Death Record No. 10.  (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11711-62212-56?cc=1709358 : accessed 25 September 2015).
[14] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances 1828-1890 Mariages 1800-1816 > image 24 of 1507. 1828 Birth Record No. 49. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-13200-5971-65?cc=1709358&wc=9RYD-FM9:129626601,129945501 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[15] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1085 of 1494. 1829 Death Record No. 17. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-35616-85?cc=1709358 : accessed 22 March 2010).
[16] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1093 of 1494. 1830 Death Record No. 4. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-38720-90?cc=1709358 : accessed 28 September 2015).
[17] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances 1828-1890 Mariages 1800-1816 > image 53 of 1507. 1830 Birth Record No. 22. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-13200-7075-82?cc=1709358&wc=9RYD-FM9:129626601,129945501 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[18] Ibid., Bettendorf > Décès 1860-1890 > image 204 of 465. 1873 Death Record No. 4. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11711-60697-39?cc=1709358 : accessed 28 September 2015).
[19] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances, mariages, décès 1882-1894 > image 107 of 155. 1891 Death Record No. 11. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11578-17928-85?cc=1709358 : accessed 25 September 2015).
[20] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1116 of 1494. 1832 Death Record No. 3. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-37297-72?cc=1709358 : accessed 28 September 2015).
[21] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances 1828-1890 Mariages 1800-1816 > image 103 of 1507. 1832 Birth Record No. 51. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-13200-3911-1?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-28S:1346120346 : accessed 03 Apr 2013).
[22] Ibid., Bettendorf > Décès 1860-1890 > image 422 of 465. “.” 1887 Death Record No. 12. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11711-60202-94?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2ZR:n1595569028 : accessed 03 Apr 2013).
[23] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances, mariages, décès 1882-1894 > image 122 of 155. 1892 Death Record No. 24. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11578-25158-66?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-28F:1967249950 : accessed 03 Apr 2013).
[24] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances 1828-1890 Mariages 1800-1816 > image 150 of 1507. 1835 Birth Record No. 18. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-13200-4288-81?cc=1709358&wc=9RYD-FM9:129626601,129945501 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[25] Luxembourg, Volkszählungen 1843-1900 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Bettendorf > 1858 > image 336 of 365. Zwank-Dahm household No. 45. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32359-9055-64?cc=2037957&wc=M5LT-2JF:346114101,345867601 : accessed 18 February 2015).
[26] Luxembourg Civil Records, Bettendorf > Naissances 1828-1890 Mariages 1800-1816 > image 252 of 1507. 1840 Birth Record No. 10. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-13200-2500-66?cc=1709358&wc=9RYD-FM9:129626601,129945501 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[27] Luxembourg Census, Bettendorf > 1864 > image 351 of 395. Zwank-Bock household No. 13. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32381-23624-85?cc=2037957&wc=M5GS-2J7:346114101,345868401 : accessed 27 September 2015).
[28] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1843 > image 2 of 288. 1843 Zwank-Dahm household. “Luxembourg, Volkszählungen 1843-1900,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32360-26751-78?cc=2037957&wc=M5LT-T3L:346114101,345863501 : accessed 18 February 2015).
[29] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1846 > image 325 of 334. Zwank-Dahm household. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32356-28692-50?cc=2037957&wc=M5LR-BZ9:346114101,345858602 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[30] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1847 > image 298 of 340. Zwank-Dahm household No. 288. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32355-22478-75?cc=2037957&wc=M5LR-VZJ:346114101,345864101 : accessed 23 September 2015).
[31] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1849 > image 280 of 343. Zwank-Dahm household. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32355-6810-6?cc=2037957&wc=M5LR-TQW:346114101,345864801 : accessed 15 September 2015).
[32] Luxembourg Civil Records, Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 423 of 1494. 1850 Marriage Record No. 9. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-36015-24?cc=1709358 : accessed 28 September 2015).
[33] Ibid., Bettendorf > Naissances 1828-1890 Mariages 1800-1816 > image 465 of 1507. 1850 Birth Record No. 8. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-13200-5348-80?cc=1709358 : accessed 26 September 2015).
[34] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 440 of 1494. 1851 Marriage Record No. 16. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-36917-73?cc=1709358 : accessed 28 September 2015).
[35] Luxembourg Census, Bettendorf > 1851 > image 359 of 386. Zwank-Dahm household No. 51. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32351-20262-71?cc=2037957&wc=M5LR-446:346114101,345865601 : accessed 24 September 2015).
[36] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1852 > image 305 of 365. Zwank-Dahm household No. 10. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32350-830-73?cc=2037957&wc=M5LR-S58:346114101,345865501 : accessed 15 September 2015).
[37] Ibid., Bettendorf > 1855 > image 325 of 358. Zwank-Dahm household No. 28. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32379-20635-34?cc=2037957 : accessed 26 September 2015).
[38] Luxembourg Civil Records, Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1462 of 1494. 1858 Death Record No. 6. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-36487-72?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2ZY:2071013250 : accessed 10 Apr 2013).
[39] Luxembourg Census, Bettendorf > 1858 > image 336 of 365. Zwank-Dahm household No. 45. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32359-9055-64?cc=2037957&wc=M5LT-2JF:346114101,345867601 : accessed 18 February 2015).
[40] Luxembourg Civil Records, Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 1487 of 1494. 1859 Death Record No. 48. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-39674-59?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2ZY:2071013250 : accessed 10 Apr 2013).
[41] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 521 of 1494. 1859 Marriage Record No. 21. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-35911-81?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2ZY:2071013250 : accessed 03 Apr 2013).
[42] Ibid., Bettendorf > Mariages 1817-1890 Décès 1800-1859 > image 582 of 1494. 1865 Marriage Record No. 16. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12456-36087-92?cc=1709358 : accessed 26 September 2015).
[43] Ibid., Bettendorf > Décès 1860-1890 > image 204 of 465. 1873 Death Record No. 4. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11711-60697-39?cc=1709358 : accessed 28 September 2015).
[44] Luxembourg Census, Bettendorf > 1900 > image 751 of 793. Zwank-Bock household No. 36. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32396-9874-9?cc=2037957 : accessed 27 September 2015). See also front and back matter on images 750 and 752.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Jacques “Jacob” ZWANK
Parents: Franciscus “François” ZWANK and Clara “Claire” WELTER
Spouse: Maria DAHM
Parents of Spouse: Pierre “Peter” DAHM and Anne Cathérine KIMMES
Whereabouts: Moestroff, Bettendorf, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: husband’s 3rd great-grandfather

1. Jacques “Jacob” ZWANK
2. Marie ZWANK
3. Nicolas PEFFER
4. Suzanne PEFFER
5. Marie Françoise “Maisy” KREMER
6. Cathy Meder-Dempsey’s husband

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.

52 Ancestors: #22 A New Beginning for my German Genealogy Research

Week 22 (May 28 – June 3) – Commencement: Countless schools will be having their commencement ceremonies around this time. Think not only about school, but also about commencement meaning “a beginning.”

A New Beginning

Nearly two and a half years ago a visit of an exposition by Luxracines at our local mall was a new beginning for my genealogy research. Soon afterwards I joined Luxracines, a genealogy society in Luxembourg, and was making plans for my first field trip, Luxracines on Tour 2013 Part I. The Luxracines on Tour 2013 (Part II) field trip in May 2013 was a great success.

boat
Roman ship on the Mosel River

Following a cruise of the Mosel River on a Roman ship and lunch at a typical German “Gasthaus” we visited Peter Daus’ private library above the Restaurant Daus in the Haus Daus in Wittlich.

daus
Restaurant Daus in Haus Daus in Wittlich, Germany

The library had about 2000 Familienbücher (family books) for towns in Rheinland-Pfalz, Pfalz and Saarland. Ortsfamilienbücher or Familienbücher are compilations of information extracted from civil and parish registers for all families of a town or village and arranged in alphabetical order. Information on occupations, military service and emigration can also be found in these books.

I pulled the books on the villages my ancestors came from and began taking pictures of the covers/title pages and all entries for surnames that matched mine with my Nikon Coolpix (macro and without flash). Although time was short and work space a bit cramped, I took nearly 120 photos – some (below) came out a bit blurry but still useful for citing sources.

ferschcover
Familienbuch Ferschweiler[1]
The WILDINGER-WEIMANN family was the very first family I looked up. I knew Bernard WILDINGER was born in Ferschweiler and found him in Richard Schaffner’s 1999 compilation Familienbuch Ferschweiler.[1]

ferschweiler
Page 249, entries for families no. 1624 and 1625[1]
My second great-grandfather Bernard WILDINGER is listed under family number 1624 with his wife Maria WEIMANN. Next to Bernard’s name the number <1625.3> links him to family number 1625 (his parents and siblings) in the same book (next entry) and as the 3rd child of the couple.

Abbreviations used in family books:
   geboren / born
~    getauft / christened
+     gestorben / born
bgr or ¨    begraben / buried
oo    Ehe / marriage
o-o     außerehelich / extramarital
S    standesamtlich / civil
   kirchlich / religious
?    fraglich / questionable
   vermutlich / presumably
   errechnet / estimated
NN    Name(n) unbekannt / unknown name
P.    Paten / godparents
Q.    Quelle / source
u.    und / and
zw.    zwischen / between
lu    lutherisch / Lutheran
rk    römisch-katholisch / Roman Catholic

ernzen
Familienbuch Ernzen[2]
Not only were Bernard and Maria listed in Ferschweiler[1] but also in Ernzen[2] where they were married and had their children. These entries helped me to write the following story of this family.

The WILDINGER-WEIMANN Family of Ernzen, Germany

Bernard WILDINGER was born on 7 November 1838 in Ferschweiler to Nikolaus WILDINGER und Catharina SCHRAMEN.[1] He was baptized Bernardus on 9 November 1838 in Sankt Lucia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler.[3]

Bernard married Maria WEIMANN on 25 January 1866 in a civil ceremony [Source: St.A. (Standesamtliche=civil) Heirats-Act Nr. 5] in Bollendorf/Ernzen.[2] They were married on 3 February 1866 (Source: Kirchenbuch 4/152/2)[2] in a religious ceremony in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[4]

Maria WEIMANN was born on 18 June 1839 in Ernzen to Hubert WEIMANN and Elisabeth WELTER.[2] She was baptized on 19 June 1839 in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[5] Her godparents were Maria WELTER and Anton PROMMENSCHENKEL, both of Ernzen.[2]

Bernard and Maria had eight known children:

  1. Hubert was born on 23 December 1866 in Ernzen. After Christmas, on St. Stephen’s Day, 26 December 1866 he was baptized in the catholic church. His godparents were Hubert WEIMANN from Ernzen and Kath. SCHRAMEN from Ferschweiler. He died at nine months on 20 September 1867 and was buried two days later in Ernzen.[2]
  2. Peter was born 19 October 1868 in Ernzen.[2] He was baptized on 21 October 1868 in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[6] His godfather was Peter WILDINGER. Peter did not marry and died at the age of 31 years on 11 May 1899 in Ernzen.[2]
  3. Elise was born unknown and died 14 May 1870 in Ernzen.[2]
  4. Peter was born 7 August 1871 in Ernzen. He was baptized 8 August 1871 in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen[7] in the presence of his godparents Peter STEIL and Marg. DEUTSCH. He was deaf and dumb (taubstumm), never married and died in 1952 in Ernzen.[2]
  5. Johann was born on 25 February 1874 in Ernzen. He was baptized in the catholic church in the presence of his godparents Johann WEIMANN and Elis. WILDINGER. He was a mason (Maurer), married Katharina PÖPPELREITER on 16 September 1874 in Mettendorf where the family moved in 1904.[2] Johann and Katharina were my great-grandparents.

    wildinger
    My great-grandfather, Johann “Jean” WILDINGER 1874-1924
  6. Nikolaus was born 3 May 1876 in Ernzen. He was baptized in the catholic church in the presence of his godparents Nik. ROOS and Elis. SCHRAMEN. He died in 1948 in Ernzen.[2]
  7. Anna Maria was born 25 November 1878 in Ernzen and was baptized in the catholic church. She married Michael RAIER, an ironworker (Hüttenarbeiter) from Bollendorf on 3 September 1907.[2]
  8. Bernhard was born on 19 June 1881 in Ernzen. He was baptized in the catholic church in the presence of his godparents Bernard SCHRAMEN and Kath. HANSEN. He married Marg. HANSEN on 30 January 1908. His wife was born 20 May 1888 and died in 1915. Bernhard and his family lived in Ernzen and had six children between 1908-1921.[2]

Bernard WILDINGER was a stonemason (Steinhauer). He died at the age of 55 years in Ernzen on 14 October 1893 in Ernzen.[2] His wife Maria was a widow for 22 years before dying on 2 September 1915 in Ernzen.[2]

The Next Step

Although Mr. Schaffner has facilitated my research of this family this is only the beginning for German families. I still need to obtain the records he used for his compilations. The next step is to visit the Rhineland Archives (Landeshauptarchivs) in Koblenz where I hopefully will be able to access the original or digital copies of the church and civil records.

Thanks to my Luxracines membership I’ll be making the trip to Koblenz, Germany, to visit the archives of Rhineland on June 25th. When I registered to participate on this trip I had to give advance notice of the records I’m interested in seeing – birth, marriage, and death records for Ernzen and Ferschweiler for the years (range) the WILDINGER-WEIMANN and the WILDINGER-SCHRAMEN families lived in those towns.

The original documents ordered by researchers are made available for viewing four times a day. The information from the documents may be copied (transcribed) or the page(s) can be scanned on their in-house scanner and saved to a USB flash drive. The use of digital cameras is not permitted.

I am looking forward to this trip to the Landeshauptarchivs in Koblenz and will definitely be blogging about it!

Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 1 der Pfarrei Sancta Lucia Ferschweiler 1680-1899, mit: Diesburgerhof (ab 1803) und L(a)eisenhof (ab1830) (compiled in 1999), p. 349, family #1624. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[2] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 (compiled in 2000), p. 245-246, family #867. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[3] “Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898”, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 463,565. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NDZ1-H61 : accessed 23 February 2015), Bernardus Wildinger; citing Sankt Lucia Katholisch, Ferschweiler, Rheinland, Prussia.
[4] “Deutschland, Heiraten, 1558-1929,”, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462,714. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JH8P-DXT : accessed 23 February 2015), Bernardus Weldinger and Maria Weimann, 03 Feb 1866; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[5] “Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898”, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462,714. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NFD4-54C : accessed 23 February 2015), Maria Weiman, 19 Jun 1839; citing Sankt Lucia Katholisch, Ferschweiler, Rheinland, Prussia.
[6] Ibid, (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N2CB-2JL : accessed 23 February 2015), Peter Wildinger, 21 Oct 1868; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[7] Ibid, (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NFD4-V9B : accessed 23 February 2015), Petrus Wildinger, 08 Aug 1871; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Bernard WILDINGER
Parents: Nicolas WILDINGER and Catherina SCHRAMEN
Spouse: Maria WEIMANN
Parents of spouse: Hubert WEIMANN and Elisabeth WELTER
Whereabouts: Ferschweiler and Ernzen, Germany
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 2nd great-grandparents

1. Bernard WILDINGER and Maria WEIMANN
2. Johann “Jean” WILDINGER
3. Nicolas WILDINGER
4. Living WILDINGER
5. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.