The RUPP-FETZER Family of Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg

rupp1713

Den 21tn febr. seynd nach dreimaliger proclamation eingesegnet worden, Johann Jacob, Johann Barthol RUPP seel. gewesener burger zu Oberhoffen nachgelassener Sohn, und Maria Apollonia, Hans Paul FETZER burger zu Steinselz eheliche tochter.

On the 21st of February, after banns were proclaimed three times, Johann Jacob, the son of the deceased Johann Barthol Rupp, a former citizen of Oberhoffen, and Maria Apollonia, the legitimate daughter of Hans Paul Fetzer, a citizen of Steinseltz, were joined in marriage.

NOTE: Several birth, marriage and death records in this post may be accessed directly on the Bas-Rhin Archives’ site. On your first visit to the site, after you’ve clicked on one of the links below, you will have to scroll to the bottom of the pop-up window entitled License d’utilisation and click on Accepter to accept the terms and conditions.

The young couple, both 23 years old, were married on Tuesday, 21 February 1713 in Steinseltz, Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France.[1] The groom Johann Jacob RUPP was the son of Hans Barthol RUPP and his wife Anna Sybilla, both deceased at the time of the marriage. The bride Maria Apollonia FETZER was the daughter of Hans Paulus FETZER and his deceased first wife Apollonia. The marriage entry found at the bottom of page 368 of the register is four lines long and read as seen above. The names of the mothers of the bridal couple were not given.  Click here to see the image of the marriage record on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site.

Johann Jacob RUPP was born 27 April 1689[2] in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and baptized on 1 May 1689 in Steinseltz. These events were found on page 8, 2nd entry, of the church register. Click here to see the image of the birth record on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site. He had at least 9 siblings, 7 of whom married and 2 who lived long enough to be godparents. None of his siblings are known to have died at an early age. His father died[3] when Johann Jacob was 17 years old and his mother[4] when he was 22 years old.

Maria Apollonia FETZER was born 21 October 1689[5] in Steinseltz. Her birth was mentioned in a line and a half on the top of page 9 of the church register. Click here for birth/baptismal record on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site. She had at least 4 sisters, 3 of whom married, the fourth died before her first birthday. Maria Apollonia lost her mother[6] when she was 19 years old and saw her father remarry at least twice before he died at the age of 89.[7]

steinseltzDuring Johann Jacob’s adolescent years the church records include very few confirmations. Only those of his two younger siblings were recorded. However many of his older siblings were seen as godparents in birth/baptismal records. Young adults could only be godparents after they were confirmed. Before Johann Jacob married he was also the godfather of two children.

The first was quite unusual and the entry was on a piece of paper slipped into the church register. Click here to go to the image on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site. On 11 November 1709[8] an illegitimate child was presented for baptism. Johann Jacob, son of Barthel RUPP of Oberhoffen, and Anna Catharina, daughter of the deceased Hans Martin FETZER, were the godparents of the baby girl christened Anna Catharina. Her mother was Anna Maria, daughter of Michael SCHUHMACHER, a carpenter from Steinseltz. The father of the child was a regimental soldier. He may have gotten her with child without her consent or she offered her favors and ended up pregnant. The wording in German was: Anna Maria, Michael Schuhmachers seel.[ig] gew[esener] b.[ürger] u. Zimmermanns Zu St.[Steinseltz] ehelich nachgel.[assene] tochter, so mit einem soldaten beim regiment de Perry im Keüscher weiß Zugehalten, und durch Hurrerey schwanger worden. This statement suggests the young lady may have allowed the sexual intercourse as a virgin – at least in the eyes of the church.

The next time Johann Jacob was the godfather and namesake of a baby boy, son of Johann Martin PFÖRTER and his wife Anna Maria SCHUHMACHER of Steinseltz was on 11 October 1711.[9] The mother was the same lady who had the illegitimate child in 1709. The baby boy, Johann Jacob PFÖRTER, would marry Johann Jacob RUPP’s niece 21 years later in 1732.

Following their marriage in 1713 Johann Jacob and Maria Apollonia became the parents of their first child, a daughter. Anna Maria was born on 24 April 1714 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and baptized five days later on 29 April 1714 in the Protestant church in Steinseltz. Her godparents were Johann Michel, son of the deceased Michael SCHUHMACHER, and Anna Maria, daughter of the deceased Hans MÜLLER.[10] Anna Maria, the child, died a little more than three months later on 5 August 1714 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and was buried in the cemetery in Steinseltz the next day. Her death and burial were annotated on the birth/baptism record and not found under deaths and burials.

Johann Jacob RUPP and the deceased Michael SCHUHMACHER were mentioned in the same records in 1709, 1711, and 1713? Was this a coincidence or was there some kind of family relation? Was Michael’s wife a RUPP? Could she have been a sister of Johann Jacob’s father Hans Barthol RUPP? Or was Hans Barthol’s wife Anna Sybilla a SCHUHMACHER?

On 10 June 1715 Johann Jacob’s brother Johann Phillip presented his first child in the church in Steinseltz for baptism. The baby boy was named after his uncle Johann Jacob who was one of the two godfathers along with Johann Walter MÜLLER, the schoolmaster of Steinseltz, and a godmother Anna Maria, the wife of Johann [surname illegible].[11]The most interesting detail of this record was the word “Junior” seen for the first time beside the name of Johann Jacob RUPP. This was used to distinguish him from his cousin Johann Jacob RUPP who lived in Steinseltz and was two years his senior. From this time on the cousins were seen as Senior from Steinseltz and Junior from Oberhoffen (the full name of the town was not used in the parish records).

A few months later the second child of Johann Jacob and Maria Apollonia was born on 2 September 1715 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and was baptized Anna Maria on 8 September 1715 in Steinseltz.[12] This birth was followed by Maria Margaretha on 14 November 1717, baptized a week later on 21 November 1717.[13] Places of birth and baptism of all of their children would remain the same from 1714 to 1732.

Before the next child was born Johann Jacob was once again stepping forward to be the godfather of another child of his brother Johann Phillip RUPP. Maria Margareta was born in early August 1719 in Oberhoffen and baptized in Steinseltz on 6 August 1719. Two married ladies were the godmothers.[14]

Maria Dorothea was born 13 October 1719 and baptized two days later.[15] Johann Peter, the first son, was born 7 December 1721, baptized 11 December 1721,[16] died two months later on 15 February 1722 and buried the next day.[17] A year later my 6th great-grandfather Johann Jacob RUPP was born on 8 March 1723 and baptized the next day.[18] The little family now included three daughters and a son. Click here to see the 1723 birth/baptism record (6th entry under 1723) for my 6th great-grandfather on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site.

Johann Jacob’s wife and the mother of his children, Maria Apollonia FETZER, was a godmother for Anna Catharina, daughter of Johann Jacob WENNER and his wife Anna Margareta RUPP, born on 16 March 1724 and baptized on 19 March 1724.[19] The mother of the child was the sister of Johann Jacob RUPP Junior.

Maria Apollonia was 36 years old when she gave birth to her 7th child, 5th living. Maria Magdalena was born 9 May 1725 and baptized on the 13th.[20] Anna Barbara followed on 31 October 1727 and was baptized on 3 November.[21] Maria Magdalena born in 1725 died on 13 August 1728 and was buried two days later.[22] The next child born on 5 October 1729 was given the same name, Maria Magdalena, when she was baptized on the 9th.[23]

Before Johann Jacob and Maria Apollonia’s last child was born, their two oldest daughters were of the age to be confirmed. The confirmation sacrament was usually received at the age of 14 or 15. Anna Maria was confirmed in 1730[24] and Maria Margaretha in 1731.[25]

The youngest child in the family was Eva Magdalena born on 27 September 1732 and baptized on the 30th.[26] A month after the birth of this child her father Johann Jacob RUPP died on 30 October 1732[27] and was buried two days later on 1 November 1732. Click here for his death record (5th entry) on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site.

With her husband’s death Maria Apollonia was left a widow at the age of 43 with 6 daughters and a son between the ages of one month and 17 years. The number of children decreased a little over a week later when the baby Eva Magdalena died on 9 November 1732 and was buried the next day in the cemetery near her father.[28]

Several events took place during the next decade and before the death of my 7th great-grandmother.

  • Her third oldest daughter Maria Dorothea b. 1719 was confirmed in 1733.[29]
  • Three years later Maria Apollonia FETZER was the godmother of a child named Anna Rebecca baptized on 13 December 1736 in Steinseltz.[30]
  • My 6th great-grandfather Johann Jacob RUPP was confirmed on 21 April 1737[31]
  • The second oldest daughter Maria Margaretha b. 1717 became a godmother on 19 October 1738.[32]
  • The youngest living daughter Maria Magdalena b. 1729 was confirmed in 1743.[33]

In 1743 all of the RUPP children were confirmed but none as yet married. Their only living grandparent, Hans Paulus FETZER, Maria Apollonia’s father, died on 28 March 1743 and was buried the next day in the Steinseltz cemetery.[7]

Maria Apollonia FETZER died six weeks later on 11 May 1743[34] in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg. Click here to view the death record (left page, 1st entry) on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site. She was 53 years old and left 5 daughters and a son. It is not known if the girls remained in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg nor when they died. Of these children only two are known to have married.

Son Johann Jacob RUPP married Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER on 7 February 1746[35] in Kutzenhausen, a nearby village. Click here to view the marriage record (last two lines on left page and top half of right page) on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site.

Daughter Maria Dorothea RUPP was 32 years old when she married Joseph EMINGER on 16 May 1752.[36] This marriage took place the year her brother Johann Jacob was preparing to leave for America with his family.

One of these day I will go through the Steinseltz and Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg records for the period after 1752 to find possible descendants of my 6th great-grandfather’s sisters. At this point the only known descendants of Johann Jacob RUPP Junior and his wife Maria Apollonia FETZER are those of their only son, my immigrant ancestor, who went to America in 1752.

bestwishescathy1
 Sources:
[1] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), browsable images of parish and civil records. Any utilization other than for private use, even non-commerical, is subject to a signed license agreement., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 191 of 268, left page, last entry. 1713 Marriage Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[2] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 15 of 268, left page, 2nd entry. 1689 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 1 June 2013).
[3] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 223 of 268, right page, last entry. 1707 Death Record (age 57). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[4] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 224 of 268, right page, last entry. 1711 Death Record (age 63). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[5] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 15 of 248, right page, first entry. 1689 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[6] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 224 of 268, left page, 1st entry in 1709. 1709 Death Record (age 52). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[7] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 239 of 268, right page, 4th entry under 1743. 1743 Death Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).
[8] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 31 of 268. 1709 Baptismal Record (godparents). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 14 June 2013).
[9] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 32 of 268, right page. 1711 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 11 February 2016).
[10] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 33 of 268, left side, 3rd entry under 1714. 1714 Baptismal Record includes annotation concerning her death. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).
[11] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 33, right page, 5th entry. 1715 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).
[12] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 33 of 268, right page, 9th entry. 1715 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[13] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 34 of 268, left page, 8th entry under 1717. 1717 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[14] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 35 of 268, left page, 6th entry. 1719 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).
[15] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 35 of 268, left page, 8th entry. 1719 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[16] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 36 iof 268, left page, 3rd entry. 1721 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[17] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 226 of 268, left page, 1st entry under 1722. 1722 Death Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[18] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 36 of 268, right page, 6th entry under MDCCXXIII. 1723 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[19] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 37 of 268, left page, 7th entry. 1724 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 14 June 2013).
[20] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 38 of 268, left page, 1st entry. 1725 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[21] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 39 of 268, left page, last entry. 1727 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[22] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 228 of 268, left page, 10th entry. 1728 Death Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[23] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 43 of 268, left page, bottom entry. 1729 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[24] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 166 of 268, right page, 8th entry. 1730 Confirmation Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[25] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 166 of 268, right page, 2nd to last entry. 1731 Confirmation Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 14 June 2013).
[26] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 51 of 268, left page, last entry. 1732 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).
[27] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 231 of 268, right page, 5th entry. 1732 Death Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).
[28] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 231 of 268, right page, last entry. 1732 Death Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[29] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 167 of 268, right page, 4th entry under 1733. 1733 Confirmation Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 14 June 2013).
[30] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 61 of 268, left page, last entry. 1736 Baptismal Record (last entry). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 14 June 2013).
[31] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 169 of 268, left page, 3rd entry. 1737 Confirmation Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 16 June 2013).
[32] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 66 of 268, right page, 1st entry. 1738 Baptismal Record (godmother). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 14 June 2013).
[33] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 170 of 268, right page, 9th entry. 1743 Confirmation Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 14 June 2013).
[34] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 240 of 268, left page, first entry. 1743 Death Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[35] Ibid., Kutzenhausen, Parroise protestante, BMS, 1737-1784, 3 E 253/13, image 14 of 54, bottom left and top right. 1746 Marriage Record (part 1). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 27 May 2013).
[36] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 205 of 268, right page, 2nd entry. 1752 Marriage Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann Jacob RUPP
Parents:Hans Barthol RUPP and his wife Anna Sybilla
Spouse: Maria Apollonia FETZER
Parents of spouse: Hans Paulus FETZER and his wife Apollonia
Whereabouts: Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and Steinseltz in Alsace, France
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 7th great-grandfather

  1. Johann Jacob RUPP junior
  2. Johann Jacob RUPP
  3. Henrich “Henry” RUPE Sr.
  4. James ROOP
  5. Gordon H. ROOP
  6. Gordon Washington ROOP
  7. Walter Farmer ROOP
  8. Myrtle Hazel ROOP
  9. Fred Roosevelt Dempsey
  10. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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The Johann Jacob Rupp Family History Spans Two Continents

Back in the 1990’s my 4th cousin twice removed (4C2R) Theron Arvel RUPE consulted the microfilm of the Family History Library for the Protestant church records before 1752 for the little town of Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg in the Bas-Rhin department in Alsace in north-eastern France. Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg is the longest name of any commune in the Bas-Rhin department. It should always be referred to in it’s entirety [previous posts have been corrected] as there is another Oberhoffen in the Bas-Rhin department. Oberhoffen-sur-Moder lies 40 km (25 miles) south of Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg.

oberhoffensignAn entry in Annette Kunsel Burgert’s Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America[1] led Theron to research in Bas-Rhin for the Johann Jacob RUPP family. On pages 413-414 under entry 409 for Rubb, Joh. Jacob of Oberhoffen (Burgert did not give the full name of the town) the following information was given:

Johannes NONNENMACHER of Merckweyler md. 25 November 1721 Maria Barbara STAMBACH, daughter of Jacob STAMBACH of Oberkutzenhausen. They had 5 children: Maria Barbara 1722 md. Joh. Jacob RUBB, Anna Eva 1724-1733, Anna Maria 1727, Christina 1730 md. Joh. Michel WERNER, and Margaretha 1733. After the death of Johannes NONNENMACHER his widow Maria Barbara md. 1734 Joh. Michael FÜNFROCK. She died in 1768 and he emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1770.[1]

Although the above was very helpful for the ancestry of Johann Jacob RUPP’s wife Barbara no information was given for his parents. Nevertheless, Burgert included very important information on the three sons of Jacob RUPP and his wife Barbara – their dates of birth and baptism as well as the name of the church record they were found in: Steinseltz Reformed Kirchenbuch.[1]

Steinseltzrecords
FamilySearch Catalog: https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/350938?availability=Family%20History%20Library

Theron consulted the film (above) and found several entries for Johann Jacob RUPP. The first (below) was for his birth on 8 March 1723 and his baptism the next day. His parents are seen as Johann Jacob RUPP jun. (Jüngere=the younger) and his wife Maria Apolnia (sic). His godparents were Hans Georg RUPP’s son Johann Peter, Peter THOMAS’ son Johann Jacob, and Johann Philipp ERLMANN’s daughter Anna Juliana. Hans Georg RUPP was an older brother of the father of the child. The relationship of the other two sponsors has not been researched.

1723baptism
Photocopy of Film Number: 775041. Notizen 1737, 1758 Taufen 1685-1787 Konfirmationen 1689-1792 Heiraten 1685-1787 Tote 1685-1786 Taufen, Heiraten, Tote 1789-1790, 1792. International Film of the Family History Library. Accessed by Theron A. Rupe in the 1990s.

As fate would have it, also on the same page of the church book was the birth and baptism of a set of twins born to Johann Jacob RUPP sen. (Senior=the elder) and his wife Anna Catharina (2. above) At the time Theron, or the person helping him with deciphering and translating, thought the elder RUPP was the father of the younger RUPP and followed the elder’s trail back. Rupp Sen. was the son of another man named Johann Jacob RUPP. Confusing? At the time it seemed logical and the line of Jacob RUPP b. 1723 was seen going back two more generations with father and grandfather having the same name.

If you take another look at the FamilySearch catalog entry for the church records of Steinseltz, under Notes you will see the records once available only on FHL film have been online since 20 July 2010 at the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin at this direct link to the church and civil records.

Access to the Archives of the Bas-Rhin is free. To access the site you must agree to their conditions by checking the box at the bottom “J’accepte ces conditions” (I accept these conditions). These are in French and in a nutshell allow you to use the images for your own personal use. You are not allowed to distribute them to the public or third parties without permission. If you wish to share them on the internet or in a publication you must sign a license for the public release of the images and send it to the Bas-Rhin archives for approval. This applies to commercial and non-commercial use. A fee may be applied when the use is of a commercial nature. There are several different variants of the license depending on the use of the images. Once you have agreed to the conditions, by checking the box, you may proceed to the graphic version or the adapted version of the site.

I learned about the records being online in May 2013 and found about 130 church records for RUPP individuals for the time period 1685-1752 within days but it took a bit longer to figure out where they belonged in the RUPP family tree.

The Most Important Discovery

Hans Barthol RUPP was the father of the younger Johann Jacob RUPP. Johann Jacob RUPP the elder was NOT the father of Johann Jacob RUPP the younger. They were born two years apart and most likely were cousins. Johann Jacob (father of Johann Jacob sen.) and Hans Barthol (father of Johann Jacob jun.) had an 8 years difference in age and died the same year. They were the only RUPP men of similar age during the time period in the Steinseltz church records. No reference to their parents was made in the records found. My assumption at this time is they may have been brothers. Further research will take me to Lembach and Wissembourg for Protestant church records before 1685 and more specifically during the Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648) most likely the period in which Hans Barthol RUPP’s parents were born and married.

coverofsteinseltzchurchbook
Photocopy of Film Number: 775041. Notizen 1737, 1758 Taufen 1685-1787 Konfirmationen 1689-1792 Heiraten 1685-1787 Tote 1685-1786 Taufen, Heiraten, Tote 1789-1790, 1792. International Film of the Family History Library. Accessed by Theron A. Rupe in the 1990s.

Above is the title page the Protestant church register of Steinseltz. This is from the LDS film and not an image from the Bas-Rhin archives site. It is in this register that all information was found for the RUPP family from the time the register began in 1685 to 1752 when the Johann Jacob RUPP family emigrated to America. As I do not have a license to use the images I have listed complete source citations at the end for all interested in seeing the actual record for the births, marriages, and deaths found. If you have problems accessing or finding them please feel free to get in touch with me for help.

steinseltzsignJohann Jacob RUPP, son of Johann Jacob RUPP, der Jüngere (the younger) and Maria Apollonia FETZER, was born on 8 March 1723 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France[2]. He was baptized on 9 March 1723 in Steinseltz, the neighboring town where the Protestant Church was located.[2] He died after 1792 in Maryland or Virginia.

merkwillersignJohann married Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER, daughter of Johannes NONNENMACHER and Maria Barbara STAMBACH, on 7 February 1746 in Kutzenhausen, Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France.[1], [3], [4] Maria was born on 17 November 1722 in Merkwiller, Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France.[5] She was baptized on 19 November 1722 in Kutzenhausen.[5] She died after 1792 in Maryland or Virginia.

kutzenhausensignJacob and Barbara had the following children.

  1. Jörg Heinrich Rupp was born on 17 November 1746 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and was baptized on 20 November 1746 in Steinseltz.[6] He died at less than two months of age on 7 January 1747 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and was buried on 8 January 1747 in Steinseltz.[7]
  2. Johann Jacob Rupp was born on 22 December 1747 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and was baptized on 26 December 1747 in Steinseltz.[8] It is not known if this son came to Baltimore County with his parents or where he lived during his lifetime.
  3. Johann Michel “Michael” Rupp was born on 6 April 1749 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and was baptized on 11 April 1749 in Steinseltz.[9],[10]  Michael married Magdalena “Magdaline” Tanner before 1776. Magdalena died before 3 April 1806. He also married Mary (Rhinehart) Weaver after 3 April 1806. Michael died before 13 April 1816 in Manchester, Baltimore County, Maryland, and left a will. His second wife Mary died 19 September 1848.
  4. Johann Martin Rupp was born on 6 March 1751 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and was baptized on 12 March 1751 in Steinseltz.[11], [12] Martin married Mary Barbara Mattias about 1777. Mary was born after 1755. He died between 1830-1835, most likely in Tennessee.
  5. Anna Maria “Mary” Rupp was born about 1753 in Pennsylvania or Maryland. Anna married John Shower about 1772 in Manchester, Baltimore County (present-day Carroll County), Maryland. John was born about 1750. He died before 2 March 1810 and left a will. Mary died intestate in 1833.
  6. Barbara Rupp was born about 1759 in Baltimore County, Maryland. She married George Weaver before 1778. George was born before 1755. He died in between 1800-1810. Barbara died between 1830-1840 in Montgomery County, Virginia.
  7. Henry RUPE Sr. was born about 1765 in Baltimore County, Maryland. Henry married Catherine Barbara NOLL, daughter of Johan Anton “Anthony” NOLL and Maria Magdalena BRUNNLE, about 1785 in Baltimore County, Maryland. Catherine was born on 24 February 1768 near Manchester, Baltimore County, Maryland. She was baptized on 13 March 1768 in Manchester. She died before 12 January 1860 in Montgomery County, Virginia. Henry died between 19 November 1845-1 December 1845 on the Old Henry Roop Place near Riner, Montgomery County, Virginia. Henry and Catherine were buried in the Family Cemetery on the Old Henry Roop Place.

The family decided to go to America after the birth of child #4. Burgert wrote, “Zweibruecken Manumissions Protocoll, Clee- and Catharinenburg, 1752: Jacob Rubb with wife and three children, from Oberhoffen, leaves for America.”[1]

In 1770 Jacob RUPE bought Rhineharts Folly in Baltimore County, Maryland. The following year on 12 April 1771, per Burgert, Jacob RUP, German, was naturalized. Her source: Colonial Maryland Naturalizations by Jeffrey A. Wyand, Florence L. Wyand (Genealogical Publishing Com, 1975).[1]

There may have been a son named George RUPE who signed the Oath of Allegiance in 1778 in Baltimore County, Maryland. I have not found any documentation to support his being a son nor have I located a person by this name with an estimated birth being between 1752-1757. Could the oldest living son of the emigrant have used the name George? His father owned land in Baltimore County and was most likely the Jacob Rupe who signed the Oath of Allegiance in 1778 with George Rupe and Martin Ra(u)pe.

Also included in many family trees for Jacob RUPE and his wife Barbara is a son named John. I found no trace of a John RUPE in Baltimore County, Maryland. The brothers Johann Michael and Johann Martin went by their second names, Michael and Martin. Could the fact that Jacob and Barbara named three of their sons Johann with a middle name in the German tradition have caused this confusion? There was a John RUPE in Franklin County, Virginia, from at least 1799 to after 1827. In 1812 and 1817 he was surety for the marriage of two RUPE ladies to BECKNER men. In 1827 he was security for his son-in-law Samuel BECKNER. He did not appear to have sons who lived to adulthood and his line was likely continued by 3 or 4 daughters. Further research is planned to determine if he was a son of Jacob RUPE.

Next week I will be going back another generation to Johann Jacob RUPP jun. and his family. Have you missed one or the other post about Johann Jacob RUPP and his wife Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER? Here’s a list:

Johann Jacob RUPP of Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, Northern Alsace, present-day France

Rupe/Roop/Ruppe/Rupp Migration in the Years 1752-1820

“I found the ship!”

How to Find Your 18th Century Immigrant’s Signature

Rhineharts Folly in Pipe Creek Hundred, Baltimore County, Maryland

Where I Found the Land Records of my RUPE Ancestors in Maryland

Three Fantastic Finds Made While Researching 1752 Immigrant Johann Jacob Rupp

Proof of Patriotic Service During the Revolutionary War for Jacob RUPE

bestwishescathy1
Sources:
[1] Annette Kunsel Burgert, Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America (Camden Press, Camden, Maine, 1992), pg. 413-414. Photocopy of 4 pages received from Louise Roop Akers in March 2001.
[2] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), browsable images of microfilm collection of parish and civil records (online http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 36 of 268, right page. Images from this site are not allowed to be shared with others, used on the internet, or for commercial purposes without permission. 1723 Baptismal Record, 6th entry under MDCCXXIII. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[3] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Kutzenhausen, Parroise protestante, BMS, 1737-1784, 3 E 253/13, image 14 of 54, bottom left . 1746 Marriage Record (part 1). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 27 May 2013).
[4] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Kutzenhausen, Parroise protestante, BMS, 1737-1784, 3 E 253/13, image 14 of 54, top right. 1746 Marriage Record (part 2). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 27 May 2013).
[5] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Kutzenhausen, Parroise protestante, BMS, 1714-1736, 3 E 253/9, image 20 of 81, right page. 1722 Baptismal Record, 4th entry (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 16 June 2013).
[6] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 85 of 268, left page. 1746 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).
[7] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 242 of 268, left page. 1747 Death Record, right page 1st entry. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[8] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 88 of 268. 1747 Baptismal Record, right page bottom. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[9] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 92 of 268. 1749 Baptismal Record, left page bottom, 1st part. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[10] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 93 of 268. 1749 Baptismal Record, right page top, 2nd part. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[11] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 98 of 268 . 1751 Baptismal Record, left page bottom, 1st part. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[12] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 99 of 268. 1751 Baptismal Record, right page top, 2nd part. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann Jacob RUPP
Parents: Johann Jacob RUPP and Maria Apollonia FETZER
Spouse: Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER
Parents of spouse: Johannes NONNENMACHER and Maria Barbara STAMBACH
Whereabouts: Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, France and Baltimore County, Maryland
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 6th great-grandfather

  1. Johann Jacob RUPP
  2. Henrich “Henry” RUPE Sr.
  3. James ROOP
  4. Gordon H. ROOP
  5. Gordon Washington ROOP
  6. Walter Farmer ROOP
  7. Myrtle Hazel ROOP
  8. Fred Roosevelt Dempsey
  9. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ The Early Years in Maryland (1765-1793)

My 6th great-grandparents Anton NOLL and Maria Magdalena BRUNNLE (also seen as BRENTEL and PRENL) belonged to the Zion Church, or German Church, in Manchester, Baltimore County, Maryland. Established on 12 February 1760, the Zion Church was the oldest Lutheran congregation in what is now Carroll County. Today the church is known as the Immanuel Lutheran Church.

On Sunday, 13 March 1768, Anton and his wife Maria Magdalena brought their daughter Catharina Barbara, two and a half weeks old, born on Wednesday, 24 February 1768, to a log structure owned and used jointly by the Lutheran and Reformed congregations.[1] The building was located east of the present complex on ground now used for burial purposes.

ImmanuelLutheranChurchManchester
The log structure was replaced by a second house of worship, a brick building painted yellow, in 1798. It was also a joint Reformed and Lutheran church. A tower erected in 1836 graced the church until both were razed and the ground cleared for a new church building dedicated in 1915. Source: History of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Maryland of the United Lutheran church in America, 1820-1920 by Wentz, Abdel Ross, 1883-1976, Published 1920, pg. 361. (https://ia801400.us.archive.org/0/items/historyofevangel00wentiala/historyofevangel00wentiala.pdf : accessed 12 March 2016)[2]
They met up with friends, neighbors, and fellow worshipers. On this Sunday they  brought Catharina Barbara along to be baptized and asked their friends Johann Jacob FAUBEL, Anna Barbara HOBMANNIN, and Catharina HOBMANNIN to sponsor her.[1] The baby girl’s sisters Lovis (14) and Elizabeth Margreth (11) and her brothers Francis (7) and John (4) may well have been present for the occasion.

The church service was conducted exclusively in German. The record book of the congregation was kept at the church, in a cupboard or on a shelf at the altar. John Casper KIRCHNER, the clergyman, recorded the baptism in German in the book with a pen he dipped in the inkwell which sat waiting to be used.[1]

The year Catharina Barbara was born her father was one of the signers of a petition for the removal of the county seat from the once thriving port of Joppa to Baltimore Town. Her future father-in-law Jacob RUPE and his oldest sons Jacob and Michael also signed the petition. I’ve got this history fact down pat and know without looking it up that it took place in 1768.

In 1783 Catharina, the 15 years old daughter of Anthony NOLL, was confirmed along with thirteen young women aged 15 and 16 and twelve young men aged between 15 and 18 at the Zion Church of Manchester.[1] Catharina’s mother died between 1778-1783 and wasn’t present for this important event.

Three years later Catharina NOLL married Henry RUPE, the youngest son of Jacob RUPE and Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER. Henry, seen as Henrich in the church records when his children were baptized, belonged to the Reformed congregation. He was born about 1765. Although entries were made in the shared church book by John Caspar KIRCHNER for the Lutheran congregation and by Jacob LISCHY for the Reformed congregation for the time period Henry was born, there is no entry for his birth or baptism. Pastor LISCHY recorded only three baptisms in August 1765 and July 1766.

Marriages were often performed at the pastor’s home or at an inn and rarely in the church were the record book was kept. The church record, used by both the Lutheran and Reformed congregations, has records of baptism, communion, confirmations, and much later funerals or burials – no records of marriages. We therefore do not know a date for the marriage of Catharina and Henrich, or Catherine and Henry as they were known outside the German community.

Henry and Catherine’s marriage likely took place in the fall of 1785 before her 18th birthday. They probably lived with Henry’s parents Jacob and Barbara on Rhineharts Folly, land Jacob bought in 1770.

On Sunday, 30 July 1786 Catharina née NOLLIN and Henrich RUP presented their first born son Jacob for baptism. He was a month and a half old having been born on Thursday, 15 June 1786. His parents were his sponsors.[1] Nollin is the feminine form of the mother Catharina’s maiden name NOLL, née was included in the transcription/translation of the German records to English.

Catharina and Henrich had a daughter Elisabetha on Tuesday, 4 September 1787. She was baptized nearly two months later on Wednesday, 31 October 1787. Her sponsor was Elisabetha SELLERIN (feminine form of SELLER, ZELLER).[1]

On Wednesday, 2 April 1788, Jacob RUPE sold the remaining 100 acres of Rineharts Folly to his son Henry RUPE. Originally 115 acres, he’d sold 15 acres to his son-in-law John Shower in 1787. Jacob and Henry’s surname was spelled RUB on the deed and Rhineharts lost an h and was written Rineharts.[3]

1788landrecord
BALTIMORE COUNTY COURT (Land Records) 1788-1788 WG BB, pp. 0557-0558 [2 images] MSA CE 66-77. (https://mdlandrec.net : accessed 5 March 2016)[3]
To view the full images of this land record please refer to my post Where I Found the Land Records of my RUPE Ancestors in Maryland for directions.

Jacob Rub to Henry Rub
This Indenture made this Twenty second Day of April Anno Domini Seventeen Hundred and Eighty eight Between Jacob Rub of Baltimore County and State of Maryland of the one part and Henry Rub of the same County and State aforesaid of the Other part witnesseth that the said Jacob Rub for and in Consideration of the sum of Fifty pounds Current money to him in hand paid at or before the Enscaling and delivery of these presents the Receipt whereof he doth hereby Acknowledge and therewith to be fully Contented and paid hath and by then presents doth give grant sell alien enfeoft and Confirm to him the said Henry Rub his Heirs and assigns forever all that part of a Tract of Land Called Rineharts folly resurveyed lying and being in Baltimore County and beginning for these part at the original Beginning and Running thence North twenty two degrees East Forty perches north Seventy eight degrees East sixty perches North East forty two perches South forty nine degrees and thirty minutes East sixty seven perches to the end of Forty one perches and a half perch on the seventh line of the said land then with it south twelve degreees East fifty eight perches and a half perch South Eighty degrees west one Hundred and Seventy three perches to the third line of the Original then with it to the Begining of said line South Eighty two degrees west fifty two perches North thirty five degrees East Seventy five perches and then by a Straight line to the Begining Containing One Hundred Acres of Land more or Less together with all the Buildings Improvements medows waters priviledges and appurtenances thereto belonging and all the Right Title Interest use property claim and demand of in or to the said Land and premises Reversion and Reversions Remainders Rents Issues and profits thereof and of every part or parcel thereof to have and To Hold the said parcel of Land and premises with the Appurtenances unto him the said Henry Rub his Heirs and assigns forever and to his and their only proper use and behoof and the said Jacob Rub for himself and his Heirs doth hereby Convenant and agree to and with the said Henry Rub his Heirs and assigns that he the said Jacob Rub and his Heirs the aforesaid parcel of Land and premises with the Appurtenances to him the said Henry Rub his Heirs and Assigns forever shall and will warrant defend by these presents against all person and persons Claiming or which may hereafter claim by from or under him the said Jacob Rub or his Heirs or by their means or procurement In Witness whereof the said Jacob Rub hath hereunto set his hand and seal the day and year above written…..
Signed Sealed & delivered
In the presence of                                               Jacob Rub (Seal)
Geo. Goulds Presbury;  Lyde Goodwin          Received the day and year first within written of Henry Rub the sum of Fifty pounds Current Money it being the Consideration within mentioned as witness my hand  – Witness frst? Geo Goulds Presbury                                                            Jacob Rub
On the 22d day of April 1788 Came Jacob Rub before us two of the Justices of the peace for Baltimore County and acknowledged the within Deed to be his Act and the parcel of Land hereby bargained and sold to be the Right title and Estate of the within mentioned Henry Rub his Heirs and assigns forever according to the true Intent and meaning of the said Deed.
Geo Goulds Presbury, Lyde Goodwin
Received to be Recorded the 7th day of June 1788 same day Recorded & Examined                      Wm. Gibson clk
[Transcription by Cathy Meder-Dempsey, 12 March 2016]

Henry bought the land from his father with all the buildings, improvements, meadows, waters,  privileges, and appurtenances. There is no mention of Jacob’s wife Barbara relinquishing her dower rights.

Henry was now the owner of the family home and likely was expected to care for his parents. Jacob and Barbara were 65 years old in 1788.

With Catharina’s next pregnancy the number of children would double from two to four. On Friday, 27 February 1789, Catharina gave births to twins, Johannes and Henrich. The boys were baptized on Sunday, 26 April 1789, in the Lutheran church their mother attended. The sponsors were: Johannes KIEFFER and Eva KIEFERIN for Johannes and Peter and Christina ZIEGLER for Henrich.[1] Johannes and Henrich would would later be known as John and Henry.

On Monday, 29 October 1792, Catharina gave birth to her fifth child, a daughter Barbara. He baptism is recorded in the church record with only the name of her father Henrich, her date of birth, and the name of her sponsor, Barbara RUPPIN (feminine form of RUPP).[1] Her sponsor in all likelihood was her paternal grandmother who was a member of the church and whose husband was Reformed. Why did the clergyman omit the name of the mother and the date of the baptism? Other children baptized in 1792 and 1793 also had the name of their mother missing in the church record.

The page young Barbara’s baptism was recorded on, at first glance, appears to have entries made out of order. In the introduction to the compilation of the church records we learn that people may have come from great distances to have their children baptized. A closer look at the names reveals four Kaltreuter children born between 1787-1792 being baptized, likely on the same day as Barbara. The youngest was born 4 November 1792 which could mean the baptisms took place after this date. Even the most conscientious clergyman can make mistakes. Was Pastor Daniel SCHROEDER overwhelmed by the number of baptisms performed and recorded on one day that he forgot to enter the date?

Whatever the reason for the missing date for the baptism, it is the last record for the three generation family in the church records.

On Tuesday, 23 April 1793, Catherine relinquished her dower rights when her husband Henry RUB sold Rineharts Folly to Jacob BOBLITS. The indenture was recorded on Tuesday, 14 May 1793.[3]

1793landdeed
BALTIMORE COUNTY COURT (Land Records) 1793-1793 WG LL, pp. 0157-0158 [2 images] MSA CE 66-86. (https://mdlandrec.net : accessed 5 March 2016)[3]

Henry Rub to Jacob Boblits
This Indenture made this [blank] day of April Anno Domini Seventeen hundred and ninety-three Between Henry Rub of Baltimore County and State of Maryland of the one part and Jacob Boblitz of the same County and State aforesaid of the other part Witnesseth that the said Henry Rub for and in Consideration of the sum of one hundred and fifteen pounds Current money to him in hand paide at or before the Ensealing and delivering of these presents the Receipt whereof doth hereof acknowledge and therewith to be fully contented and paide Hath and by these presents doth give grant sell alien enfeof and confirm to him the saide Jacob Boblits heirs and assigns forever all that part of a Tract of Land Called Rineharts folly Resurveyed Lying and being in Baltimore County and begining for these part at the Original Begining and runing thence North twenty two Degrees East forty perches North Seventy Eight Degrees East Sixty perches North East forty two perches South fory nine degrees and thirty minutes East Sixty seven perches to the end of Forty one perches and a half perch on the Seventh line of the saide Land then with it South twelve degrees East fifty Eight perches and a half perch South Eighty degrees west one hundred and seventy three perches to the third line of the Original then with it to the begining of Saide Line South Eighty two degrees west fifty two perches North thirty five degrees East Seventy four perches and then by a Straight line to the Begining Containing one hundred acres of Land more or less together with all the Buildings Improvements meadows waters priveliges and appurtenances thereto Belonging and all the right title Intrust use properly claims and Demand of in on to the said Land and Premises Revision and Reversions Remainders rents Houses and profits thereof and of every part of parcel thereof to Have and To Hold the saide parcel of Land and Premises with the appurtenances unto him the said Jacob Boblits his heirs and assigns forever and to his or theirs only use and behoof and the said Henry Rub for himself and his heirs doth hereby Covenant and Agree to and with the saide Jacob Boblits his heirs and assigns that he the saide Henry Rub and his heirs the aforesaid parcel of Land and Promises with the appurtenances to him the saide Jacob Boblits his heirs and assigns forever sall and will warant and defend by these against al person or persons claiming or which may hereafter claim by from or under him the saide Henry Rub or his heirs or by these means or procurement In Witness whereof the said Henry Rub Hath hereunto set his hand and seal the day and year above written.                                 Henry his x mark Rub
Signed Sealed and delivered in the presents of us R. Winchester
Baltimore County (to witt)
On the day of the date hereof came Henry Rub Party to the within Deed Before us the subscribers two of the Justices of the peace for said County and acknowledged the within Instrument of writing to be his act and Deed and the Land and Premises therein mentioned to be the Right and Estate of the within named Jacob Boblits his heirs and assigns forever according to the true Intent and meaning thereof at the same time Catherine the wife of the said Henry Rub and being by Privately Examined from apart and out of the hearing of her said husband did relinquish her right of Dower in and to the within described Land & premises and acknowledged it to be the right of the within named Jacob Boblits his heirs and assigns forever and that she did of her own free will and voluntary will without threats or fear of ill usage from her said husband April 23rd 1793 acknowledged before
R. Winchester       Joshua Lemmon
Received to be recorded the 14th day of May 1793 same day recorded a& examined.
W Gibson clk
[Transcription by Cathy Meder-Dempsey, 12 March 2016]

This would be the last record of Catherine and Henry RUPE in Baltimore County before they left Maryland to migrate to Virginia. This was not, however, the last record they produced in Baltimore County as will be seen in the next part of their story.

bestwishescathy1
Sources:
[1] C. T. Zahn and Frederick S. Weiser, translators and editors, Maryland German Church Records Volume 10, subtitle: Zion Church “The German Church”, Manchester, Carroll County — today Trinity United Church of Christ Records, 1760-1836 and Immanuel Lutheran Church Records, 1760-1853 (published by the Historical Society of Carroll County, Westminster, Maryland).
[2] Wentz, Abdel Ross, History of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Maryland of the United Lutheran church in America, 1820-1920, published 1920, pg. 361. (https://ia801400.us.archive.org/0/items/historyofevangel00wentiala/historyofevangel00wentiala.pdf : accessed 12 March 2016)
[3] MDLandRec, A Digital Image Retrieval System for Land Records & Indices for Baltimore County, (https://mdlandrec.net : accessed March 2016)

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Henrich “Henry” RUPE Sr.
Parents: Johann Jacob RUPP and Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER
Spouse: Catherine Barbara NOLL
Parents of spouseJohan Anton “Anthony” NOLL and Maria Magdalena BRENTEL
Whereabouts: Baltimore MD, Rockbridge VA, Montgomery VA
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 5th great-grandfather

  1. Henrich “Henry” RUPE Sr.
  2. James ROOP
  3. Gordon H. ROOP
  4. Gordon Washington ROOP
  5. Walter Farmer ROOP
  6. Myrtle Hazel ROOP
  7. Fred Roosevelt Dempsey
  8. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Three Fantastic Finds Made While Researching 1752 Immigrant Johann Jacob Rupp

and Working Through Old and New Research Material to Prove the Immigrant’s Ship

WeltymessageI can remember the day I learned the name of the ship my 6th great-grandparents Johann Jacob RUPP and Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER came over on even though it was nearly fifteen years ago. I can close my eyes and imagine the way my living room looked on that day. Very little is the same today as it was then. It has more to do with the day than with new furniture and decorating.

I received a notification of a reply to my message on the GenForum board for AlsaceLorraine, France, from Genealogy.com. Dennis Welty had seen my post dated 15 April 2001 concerning a trip I was planning to make to the Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and Steinseltz area in Northern Alsace to visit the birthplace of Johann Jacob RUPP (1723-aft. 1792).[1] I was so excited reading his message.[2]

My husband called home as I was copying the post to send to Rupe/Roop researchers Louise Akers and Theron Rupe. He told me to check the news on TV as two planes had crashed into the World Trade Center. It was 11 September 2001, the fateful day our world changed. The thrill of being able to share the information from Dennis with Louise and Theron turned to a chill. The events of the day prevented me from celebrating.

At the time I was new to researching my American families. Dennis Welty wrote about things I had no idea how to find or access. But I trusted what he wrote and his conclusion. I shared with others but I did not try to follow through on how he made the discoveries until many years later.

A little over a week ago, while reviewing everything I have on my immigrant ancestor Johann Jacob RUPP (1723-aft. 1792), I checked some of the trees on Ancestry.com. I found a statement I made in Jacob’s notes in my GEDCOM file was attached to a tree in 2009 and has been saved to 46 other family trees.

Jacob and his family arrived in Philadelphia on October 20, 1752 on the ship “Duke of Wirtenburg” that sailed from Rotterdam and Cowes under Captain Daniel Montpelier.[3]

I was convinced the information Dennis Welty sent in his message was correct when I wrote the above. However at the time I did not include the source. One public family tree owner wrote this comment, “Can’t be true, not on 20 Oct 1752 ship list for Duke of Wirtenburg.”  I realized I needed to review everything Dennis Welty mentioned and at least try to find an original source for each part of his message in order to prove the ship.

I came across the name Jacob Roop in Baltimore County Maryland in my Welty research. Frederick Decker and Jacob Roop were executers (sic) of the estate of Andrew Welty in 1774 who owned land near Manchester (now Carroll Co.) Maryland. In the administration accounts he is listed as Jacob Rupe.

Fantastic Find #1

I searched through FamilySearch’s Maryland Register of Wills Records, 1629-1999 for Jacob RUPE’s will (none found) but not for Andrew WELTY’s. Last week I realized I needed prove what Dennis wrote by finding the will records mentioned above and adding them to  Jacob’s story. These are the records I found:

weltywill
Last Will and Testament of Andrew WELTY [4]

I hereby nominate and appoint my Trusty and well beloved friends Frederick Daker and Jacob Roop Executors of this my Last Will and Testament….2 November 1772 Andrew Welty

weltyadminbond
Administrative Bond for the estate of Andrew WELTY [5]

Seen as Jacob RUPE throughout the entire administrators’ bond, he signed his name Jacob RUB. Note: this is a copy of the original bond and the signatures are not the originals but show how the person signed. Jacob signed himself and did not leave a mark like George Fisher.

weltyinventory
Inventory of Andrew WELTHY [6]
Baltimore County — March 30th 1773 then came Frederick Docker and Jacob Rupe Executors of the Testament and Last will of Andrew Welthy late of the County aforesaid deceased and severally made oath….

By finding the will, administrative bond, and inventory of the estate of Andrew WELTY, I was able to prove the first statement made by Dennis in his message.

In the 1768 list of signers for the removal of the county seat to Baltimore town are the names Michael Rub and Jacob Rub (five names down) along with Christian Daker and Andres Welti.

In July 2013 I found the 1768 “list of signers” for the removal of the county seat from Joppa to Baltimore town on the Maryland State Archives site with the names mentioned above by Dennis. Petition 29 was one of six petitions, formulated in English and German,  for the removal of the county seat.[7]

petition1Christian DAKER and Andres WELTI signed with a mark. Also on the petition were three other men who would play a part in the story of the Jacob RUPP family: Dietrich REINHARTH, Johannes SCHAUER, and Anthon NOLL.

petition2Michael and Jacob RUB left their mark (below) while another man left his signature which was transcribed as Jacob RUL [?].

petition3In 1768 Jacob’s sons Jacob b. 1747 and Michael b. 1749 were over 18 years old but signed only with a mark. Did they not have the education their father received in the old county? From the 1772 administrative bond of Andrew WELTY’s estate we know the elder Jacob signed his surname RUB which may likely have been transcribed incorrectly as RUL (?) on this petition.

Also in the 1773 list of taxables belonging to Pipe Creek Hundred is the name Jacob Rupe, Frederick Deker and Margaret Welty (widow of Andrew Welty). This info is from the book “Inhabitants of Baltimore County 1763-1774” by Henry C. Peden Jr.

Fantastic Find #2

While searching online for Henry Peden’s book Inhabitants of Baltimore County 1763-1774 I virtually stumbled upon the scanned images of the 1773 tax list which I needed to confirm Dennis’ statement about Jacob RUPE being on the list of taxables with Frederich DECKER and Andrew WELTY’s widow.[8]

A List of Taxables in Pipe Creek Hundred taken by William Kelley Junior 1773

1773taxFantastic Find #3

Before I found the 1773 tax list I located another tax list which is even more noteworthy. It will be discussed in detail in a new post. This much I can tell you, other researchers claim Revolutionary War service for Jacob RUPP however they are claiming the wrong patriot.

In the church records of Zion Church (Protestant) in Manchester Maryland, Jacob and Barbara Rub were baptismal sponsors on Oct. 29, 1768 for Barbara, dau. of Bernhardt and Anna Maria Weinmann. Christian Weinmann and Barbara Rubin were also sponsors for the same couple in 1772. Jacob and Barbara Rub were also sponsors for Johannes and Anna Maria Schauer in 1776, Henrich and Anamarya Gottier in 1780 and Johannes Born in 1780. Jacob Rub and Magdalena Gottiern were sponsors for George Weber in 1781. Also Michl. and Magdl. Rupp gave birth to a dau An. Mar. in 1783 with Michl. and An. Mar. Ritter sponsors and to another dau. Maria Barbara in 1785 with George and Barbara Rubin Weber sponsors. Also Henry Rub and another Jacob Rub appear in later years as does Phil. Nonnenaker. This is from “Maryland German Church Records Volume 10”.


The above events brought up by Dennis Welty were easily confirmed many years ago (2001) when Louise Akers sent me the book with the compilation of English translation of the German church records.[9] [Keep in mind the presence of persons with the surname GOTTIER above.] I don’t have actual images of the church records and have not tried to find where the collections are kept.

In the church records of Evangelical Reformed Church in Frederick, Maryland, Jacob Rupp is on the list of communicants for Easter 1759 along with Christian Biller and Christoph Stoll. This is from “Maryland Church Records Volume 5.

The 1768 petition mentioned earlier was practically a census of all adult males over 18 as the referendum for and against the change of the county seat was circulated throughout Baltimore County. Jacob RUPP and his sons’ appearance on the petition was the earliest known sighting of the RUPP family in Maryland and in America.

Dennis’ statement (above) gives a new and earlier sighting. I have not been able to confirm Jacob RUPP was on a list of communicants with Christian BILLER and Christoph STOLL in 1759 at Easter as I do not have Volume 5 of this series of Maryland Church Records or access to the records. All previous information Dennis wrote about has been confirmed and it is only a matter of time before this statement will be proven as true.

This was the first mention of Christian BILLER and Christoph STOLL. They were not on the 1768 petition or the 1773 tax list with Jacob RUPP which suggests they remained in Frederick County while Jacob moved [check formation of counties] to Baltimore County between 1759 and 1768. What makes finding these three men on the list of communicants so remarkable is Dennis’ next statement:

These names are significant because on the ship Duke of Wirtenburg which arrived in Philadelphia in October 1752 are the names (in order) Hans George Gottle, Jacob (O) Bub, Christian Stahl and Christoff Fridrich Biller. You can draw your own conclusions. I hope this helps.

At the Court House at Philadelphia on Friday, the 20th October 1752 Joshua Maddox, Esqr. met the foreigners, whose names were recorded, imported in the ship Duke of Wirtenburg, Daniel Montpelier, Commander, from Rotterdam by way of Cowes. All adult male passengers age 16 and above signed the oath of allegiance. A transcribed list was found online[10] as well as in the book Pennsylvania German Pioneers. A Publication of the Original Lists of Arrivals in the Port of Philadelphia from 1727 to 1808 by Ralph Beaver Strassburger, William John Hinke.[11]

shiplistThe names listed by Dennis Welty were found in the book – next step would be to view the original oath of allegiance list for the passengers who came over on the Duke of Wirtenburg to determine if the name Jacob BUB was transcribed incorrectly and should be Jacob RUP. An email query has been sent to the Pennsylvania State Archives – wish me luck.

You can draw your own conclusions

I believe Dennis Welty was correct when he pointed me to the Duke of Wirtenburg being the ship my ancestor Johann Jacob RUPP came over on in 1752. To further support this I would like to note the information found in two other sources which do not include the name of the ship but give 1752 as the year of immigration.[12], [13]

This exciting news, received on 9/11, was overshadowed by what followed several hours later but it taught me a wonderful lesson about reaching out, sharing and helping others, and giving credit where credit is due. If you would like to include this post in your family tree, please do not copy/paste it as errors made [it happens] may be corrected at a later date. Instead please feel free to include a link back to this article. Thank you.

Sources:
[1] Alsacelorraine, France Genforum, Genealogy.com, Cathy Meder-Dempsey, Descendants of Northern Alsace Rupp/Rupe, message #321 posted 21 April 2001, online http://www.filytreemaker.genealogy.com/forum/regional/countries/topics/france/alsacelorraine/321/
[2] Ibid., Dennis Welty, Re: Descendants of Northern Alsace Rupp/Rupe, message #456 posted 11 September 2001, online http://www.filytreemaker.genealogy.com/forum/regional/countries/topics/france/alsacelorraine/456/
[3] “Public Member Trees,” database, Ancestry.com, “Simpson/Roupe” family tree by jrunwolfepack, profile for Johann Jacob Rupp 1723-1793 (http://person.ancestry.com/tree/365371/), media file “Information” attached 3 March 2009 (http://mv.ancestry.com/viewer/29d65d53-d7a7-45f1-b5b5-340c8bc28fd5/365371/-701064003?_phsrc=azf211&usePUBJs=true: accessed 12 February 2016).
[4] “Maryland Register of Wills Records, 1629-1999,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-24090-18189-65?cc=1803986 : accessed 12 February 2016), Baltimore > Wills 1763-1784 vol 3 > image 126 and 127 of 318; citing Hall of Records, Annapolis.
[5] Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-24257-76812-40?cc=1803986 : accessed 12 February 2016), Baltimore > Administration bonds 1769-1772 vol 4 > image 54 of 187; Hall of Records, Annapolis.
[6] Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-24259-28543-45?cc=1803986 : accessed 12 February 2016), Baltimore > Inventories 1772-1776 vol 11 > image 62 and 63 of 186; Hall of Records, Annapolis.
[7] J. Hall Pleasants, editor under the direction of the Maryland Historical Society, Proceedings and Acts of the General Assembly May 9, 1766 to June 22, 1768, Volume 61, pgs. 556-558, Maryland State Archives (http://aomol.msa.maryland.gov/000001/000061/html/ : accessed 18 July 2013)
[8] Maryland State Archives (http://msa.maryland.gov/megafile/msa/coagser/c400/c428/000000/000052/pdf/msa_c428-000052.pdf : accessed accessed 19 February 2016)
[9] C. T. Zahn and Frederick S. Weiser, translators and editors, Maryland German Church Records Volume 10, subtitle: Zion Church “The German Church”, Manchester, Carroll County — today Trinity United Church of Christ Records, 1760-1836 and Immanuel Lutheran Church Records, 1760-1853 (published by the Historical Society of Carroll County, Westminster, Maryland).
[10] Joe Beine, Professional Genealogy & Family History Research, website, citing The Ship Duke of Wirtenburg Passenger List, Rotterdam to Philadelphia, 20 October 1752. (http://www.genesearch.com/genealogy-records/penngermanpioneers/dukeofwirtenburg1752.html : accessed 15 February 2016)
[11] Pennsylvania-German Society, Pennsylvania-German Society Volume 3, publisher The Society, 876 pages, call number 974.8 P38623, State Library of Pennsylvania [Digitizing sponsor: This project is made possible by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services as administered by the Pennsylvania Department of Education through the Office of Commonwealth Libraries and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Tom Corbett, Governor], (https://archive.org/stream/pennsylvaniagerm03penn_2#page/498/mode/2up/search/bub : accessed 15 February 2016)
[12] Annette Kunsel Burgert, Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America  (Camden Press, Camden, Maine, 1992), pg. 413-414, entry #409 for Rubb, Joh. Jacob of Oberhoffen.
[13] Dr. Friedrich Krebs, Eine Liste deutscher Auswanderer nach den amerikanischen Kolonien aus Zweibrücken in der Pfalz 1750-1771, citing Rubb, Jacob, von Oberhofen (Kr. Weißenburg, Els.) mit Weib und 3 Kindern 1752

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann Jacob RUPP
Parents: Johann Jacob RUPP Jr. and Maria Apollonia FETZER
Spouse: Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER
Parents of spouse: Johannes NONNENMACHER and Maria Barbara STAMBACH
Whereabouts: Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, Pennsylvania, Maryland
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 6th great-grandfather

  1. Johann Jacob RUPP
  2. Heinrich Thomas “Henry” RUPE Sr.
  3. James ROOP
  4. Gordon H. ROOP
  5. Gordon Washington ROOP
  6. Walter Farmer ROOP
  7. Myrtle Hazel ROOP
  8. Fred Roosevelt Dempsey
  9. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Rupe/Roop/Ruppe/Rupp Migration in the Years 1752-1820

The immigrant Johann Jacob RUPP came from Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, Northern Alsace, present-day France, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1752 with his wife Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER and their three sons Johann Jacob, Johann Michel, and Johann Martin.

The Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg connection and the ship they came on will be discussed in later posts.

In the Beginning There was Family Tradition

Colonial_Roads_in_the_South
Public domain, released by David Dilts, a Family History Research Wiki user.

From the following report given by Johann Jacob RUPP’s great-great-grandson Redmond Ira ROOP at a family reunion in 1927 in Carroll County, Maryland, the family very likely took the Great Valley Road in green in the map above (with some continuing on the dotted green road).

Traveling on what was once the Baltimore and Memphis Turnpike, the Rupe caravan crossed the Potomac at Harper’s Ferry in 1796. The caravan included Henry, his wife Catherine, and their family of several sons and daughters, the three older brothers of Henry, and their families. In crossing the Potomac the cattle and other larger animals were forced to swim, and the sons of Henry held the ropes attached to the horns of the cows. One wild cow pulled one of the unsuspecting Rupe boys overboard while crossing and he might have been lost had they not missed the cow, which finally reached shore with the boy swinging to her tail some distance down stream. The three brothers of Henry split with one of them going to Ohio, one to Western North Carolina, and the other to Georgia. Henry and family journeyed through the Shenandoah Valley and into Rockbridge County, bound for the southwestern section of the state, then rather sparsely settled. When they reached Buffalo Creek, four miles north of Natural Bridge, a great flood overtook them and they were forced to remain for several days. A report reached them that Natural Bridge had washed away, and it being the only passage, it would require four years to restore the bridge. They settled on Buffalo Creek and built a mill there, which they operated for years before they learned that the report of the bridge destruction was like Mark Twain’s comment on the first report of his death, considerable exaggereated (sic). Early in the year 1800 they left Rockbridge Co. and wound up in Lunenburg Co., VA where they had at least one child before settling on Pelham’s Branch, near Little River, about eight miles southwest of Christiansburg, Montgomery Co., VA. The first recorded document for Henry in this area was the purchase of 326 acres on Aug. 17, 1804 from Abner Lester, to whom it had been granted by the Commonwealth in 1795.

Who doesn’t have a story of several brothers? My 5th great-grandfather Henry RUPE was the youngest son of Johann Jacob RUPP and and Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER. I would like to believe he traveled with three older brothers but this may be “exaggereated” (to use Redmond’s spelling). To simplify things I’m dropping the Johann from the father and his three sons’ names as, after they came to America, the second name was found in records.

Descendants of the 1752 immigrant Johann Jacob RUPP used different spellings of the surname — RUPP, RUPE, ROOP, ROUP, ROOPE, ROUPE, RUPPE — from one generation to the next, even in the same family and same generation.

This is where I’m seeing the families from 1752 to 1820.

migrationmap

  1. Henry’s parents Jacob and Barbara and his three oldest brothers Jacob, Michael, and Martin came to America in 1752 arriving in Philadelphia.  This will be discussed in a later post. The length of time they remained in Pennsylvania is unknown.
  2. Henry’s father Jacob RUPP was in Frederick and Baltimore County, Maryland, from about 1759 to 1792. Church records as well as three sets of newly found records confirm his residence in Pipe Creek Hundred in Baltimore County. They will be discussed in more detailed upcoming posts.
  3. Family tradition (above) tells of Henry and his brothers crossing the Potomac at Harpers Ferry in 1796. The transcript of the report by Redmond ROOP may not be reliable. The information has been copied many times and cannot be traced back to its origin. Theron Rupe, another researcher for the family, wrote the family left Maryland in 1793 after Henry sold 100 acres of the original 115 acres owned by his father Jacob.
  4. Family tradition (above) tells of Henry’s family remaining at Buffalo Creek in Rockbridge County, Virginia, until about 1800. I have not found proof of this or of their building or running a mill at this location. Henry ROOP was in Rockbridge County on 13 January 1801 when Polly NULL, from Baltimore County, Maryland, and daughter of Anthony NULL married James HART. Henry gave oath of the bride being of age. [I have images of both records] The 1800 census for Virginia is not available and tax lists have been used as substitutes. The 1801 tax list for Rockbridge was used as a substitute. James HART was listed but Henry RUPE/ROOP appears to have already left the county as he was not on the list. There for the marriage, gone for the tax list!
  5. Henry RUPE was seen in Montgomery County buying land in 1804 from Abner Lester. He continued to acquire land and deeds show his name spelled Roop. On the 1810 trough 1840 census the surname was spelled Roop, Roope, and Rupe. He lived in Montgomery County until his death in 1845.
  6. Martin RUPE was a resident of Surry County, North Carolina from 1795 to about 1810. He may not have taken care of all business in the county before moving on as he was seen on the 1812 tax list. George WEAVER was a resident of Stokes County, North Carolina in 1800. By 1820 the WEAVER family was living next door to Henry RUPE in Montgomery County, Virginia. George’s wife was the sister of Henry RUPE.
  7. Martin ROOP (indexed Roap) was in Union County, South Carolina, by 1810. The area became Cherokee County. Many of his descendants lived there as well as across the state line in Rutledge and Cleveland counties in North Carolina. His descendants in the Carolinas used the surname spelling RUPPE.
  • Places of birth of the children of Henry RUPE indicate he was in Maryland in 1786-1792, Virginia from about 1794.
  • Places of birth of the children of Martin RUPP indicate he was in Maryland in 1779, Pennsylvania 1780-1788, Virginia 1790, North Carolina 1796-1805.
  • Places of birth of the children of George WEAVER indicate he was in North Carolina in 1778* and back in Maryland in 1781-1790.

*Another family tradition, which I will be discussing in a future post, suggests Jacob RUPP and his family, during the American Revolutionary War, “bought land in a  North Carolina land company and after the Treaty of Paris was signed in 1783 the family resurfaced in Baltimore County.” Records I’m finding show Jacob was in Baltimore County during this time and do not support the theory of his being in North Carolina. George WEAVER’s oldest child was listed on the 1850 census as born abt. 1778 in North Carolina. She died before 1860, her children died in 1848, 1865, and bet. 1860-1870. This left no possibility of confirmation of the mother’s place of birth on the 1880 census.

It was important to me to map the migration pattern of the family during this period. I am convinced it will help me prove or disprove the family tradition by pointing me in the right direction at the right time. Of course, any suggestion on a course of action would be greatly appreciated.

Sources:
[1] C. T. Zahn and Frederick S. Weiser, translators and editors, Maryland German Church Records Volume 10, subtitle: Zion Church “The German Church”, Manchester, Carroll County — today Trinity United Church of Christ Records, 1760-1836 and Immanuel Lutheran Church Records, 1760-1853 (published by the Historical Society of Carroll County, Westminster, Maryland).

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann Jacob RUPP
Parents: Johann Jacob RUPP Jr. and Maria Apollonia FETZER
Spouse: Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER
Parents of spouse: Johannes NONNENMACHER and Maria Barbara STAMBACH
Whereabouts: Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, Pennsylvania, Maryland
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 6th great-grandfather

  1. Johann Jacob RUPP
  2. Heinrich Thomas “Henry” RUPE Sr.
  3. James ROOP
  4. Gordon H. ROOP
  5. Gordon Washington ROOP
  6. Walter Farmer ROOP
  7. Myrtle Hazel ROOP
  8. Fred Roosevelt Dempsey
  9. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

52 Ancestors: #43(2) Elizabeth’s parents Robert and Anne CARROLL

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks“The challenge: have one blog post each week devoted to a specific ancestor. It could be a story, a biography, a photograph, an outline of a research problem — anything that focuses on one ancestor.”

This is entry #43(2) in Amy Johnson Crow’s Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks.

I might be breaking a rule by doing this ancestor in two parts in one week. My posts for this challenge are not spontaneous. I have this planned out to the end of the year. For me, an ancestor’s childhood and parents are part of her life. In the case of this ancestor it became so complicated that I’ve broken this up into two parts.

52 Ancestors: #43(2) Elizabeth’s parents Robert and Anne CARROLL

I thought this would be an easy write-up until I started taking a closer look at what I have on the CARROLL family of Montgomery County, Virginia. To begin with the name was found with many different spellings: CARL, CAREL, CARLE, CAROL, CARRIL, CARREL, CARRELL, CARROLL.

To add to the confusion the George Valentine “Feltha” CORRELL family moved to the area soon after the 1810 census from Augusta County. They were of German heritage and the surname was sometimes spelled CARRELL. Fortunately, I’ve already looked into this family as Feltha’s wife Kate was a WEAVER, daughter of George WEAVER and Barbara RUPP (sister of my Henry RUPE), and granddaughter of my 1752 immigrants (6th great-grandparents) Johan Jacob RUPP and Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER.

CARROLL Marriages

According to family tradition three of Henry RUPE’s sons married CARROLL sisters. Let’s take a look at the CARROLL marriages that took place in Montgomery and Floyd counties from 1830 to 1850:

1. My fourth great-grandparents James ROOP and Elizabeth CARROLL married on 23 July 1830. In the abstract of the marriage[1] his last name was spelled RUPE and her maiden name was indexed as EARL. As mentioned last week RUPE and ROOP were used  interchangeably. The names of the bride’s and groom’s parents were not included in the transcript. To-do list: request copy of marriage record because….I believe that EARL is an indexing error and her maiden name was most likely spelled CARL as it was for her sister Mary the following year:

2. “I do hereby certify that I celebrated the rites of matrimony between Joseph Roop & Mary Carl of Montgomery Cty on the 13th day of September 1831 by virtue of a publication given under my hand this 26th day of June 1832. Richd Buckingham”[2]

3. Richard Buckingham also celebrated the rites of matrimony between John CARL and Theodocia WILSON of Floyd County on the 27th day of November 1832 by virtue of a publication.[3] John died on 1 October 1881 in Floyd County. The abstract of his record of death shows his name as John CARRIL and his parents as Robert and Anne.[4]

4. Peninah CARROLL married Henry KEMPLIN on 26 November 1835 in Floyd County, Virginia. The marriage was performed by Michael Howry. Parents of the couple were not listed on this source.[3] This couple went to Kentucky before 1840.

5. Nancy Carroll married Andrew DAME on 5 September 1844 in Montgomery County, Virginia.[5] No information found on this couple.

6. On 4 November 1846 William ROOP gave bond with Robert CARRELL as security for the marriage of William to Robert’s daughter Catherine CARRELL.[6] In 1850 Anne CARLE age 62 was in the household of William and Catherine ROOP. The relationship is not listed however Anne would appear to be Catherine’s mother.

7. Rose CARROLL married James JUSTICE on 21 October 1848. The abstract of this record includes the name of the bride’s father, Robert CARROLL.[6] At this point things become complicated. Rose may have had two daughters before this marriage. Sarah CARROLL who is seen with her in 1850 and Drusilla CARROLL. The second daughter later took the surname JUSTICE. Sallie/Sarah RATLIFF was seen as Drusilla’s grandmother in 1880 suggesting that Rose’s children’s father was a RATLIFF. Sarah CARROLL was also found with Sarah RATLIFF in 1850 and with Robert CARROLL in 1860. Like her sister Drusilla, Sarah CARROLL appears to have had a child without marrying and is seen in 1880 as Sarah JUSTIS.

8. Joseph R. CARRELL and Sarah KROPFF were married by Thomas G. Shelor on 6 August 1846 in Floyd County, Virginia . Sarah was the daughter of Barbary KROPFF per permission note. Parents of the groom were not mentioned.[3]

9. Robert R. CARRELL and Evaline M. RATLIFF were married by Owen Sumner on 9 July 1848 in Floyd County, Virginia. Evaline was the daughter of Benjamin RATLIFF per bond. Parents of the groom were not mentioned.[3]

From family tradition and the above marriages that list a parent, the following children are Robert’s: *Elizabeth, *Mary, *John, *Catherine, and *Rose. This leaves Peninah, Nancy, Joseph and Robert as possible children.

CARROLL in Census

The Robert CARROLL family was NOT always the only family of that name in Montgomery County per the earliest censuses. In 1810 there was also a Samuel CARREL Sr. age over 45 and in 1820 a James CARRELL age 26-44. Samuel was not on the 1820 census and James was not found in Montgomery in 1830 or later. After this time, in 1830, Robert was the only CARROLL in Montgomery County. Robert and his son John were the only CARROLLs in Floyd County in 1840. Note that Floyd County was formed from Montgomery in 1831.

Since Robert was the only CARROLL in Montgomery County after 1820 I believe that it is possible that 8 of the 9 (if not all) marriages found above may be his children. Using these young people (*proven) I analyzed the pre-1850 census:

1810censuscarrel
1810 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery > Christiansburg (ancestry.com)

1810 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Christiansburg
Name: Robt Carrel
Free White Persons – Males – Under 10: 1 (*John)
Free White Persons – Males – 26 thru 44 : 1 (Robert 26-29)
Free White Persons – Females – Under 10: 2 (*Elizabeth and *Mary)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 15: 1 (unknown b. bet. 1795-1800)
Free White Persons – Females – 26 thru 44: 1 (Anne 26-29)
Number of Household Members Under 16: 4
Number of Household Members Over 25: 2
Number of Household Members: 6

1820censuscarrell
1820 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery > Blacksburg (ancestry.com)

1820 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Blacksburg
Name: Robert Carrell
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
Free White Persons – Males – Under 10: 1 (*John, wrong column?)
Free White Persons – Males – 26 thru 44: 1 (Robert age 36-39)
Free White Persons – Females – Under 10: 4 (*Mary, *Rose, Peninah, *Catherine)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 15: 1 (*Elizabeth)
Free White Persons – Females – 26 thru 44: 1 (Anne age 36-39)
Number of Persons – Engaged in Agriculture: 1
Free White Persons – Under 16: 6
Free White Persons – Over 25: 2
Total Free White Persons: 8
Total All Persons – White, Slaves, Colored, Other: 8

1830censuscarle
1830 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery > Christiansburg (ancestry.com)

1830 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Christiansburg
Name: Robert Carle
Free White Persons – Males – Under 5: 1 (Robert)
Free White Persons – Males – 5 thru 9: 1 (Joseph)
Free White Persons – Males – 20 thru 29: 1 (*John)
Free White Persons – Males – 40 thru 49: 1 (Robert age 46-49)
Free White Persons – Females – Under 5: 1 (Nancy)
Free White Persons – Females – 5 thru 9: 1 (*Catherine)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 14: 2 (*Rose, Peninah)
Free White Persons – Females – 40 thru 49: 1 (Anne age 46-49)
Free White Persons – Females – 50 thru 59: 1 (older woman?)
Free White Persons – Under 20: 6
Free White Persons – 20 thru 49: 3
Total Free White Persons: 10
Total – All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 10

Up until 1830 the analysis of the census went well except for son John (b. abt. 1806) having slipped into the wrong column in 1820. The children fit the CARROLL marriages seen above. Then the 1840 blows everything out of the water.

1840censuscarel
1840 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Floyd (ancestry.com)

1840 U.S. Federal Census
Floyd County, Virginia
Name: Robert Carol
Free White Persons – Males – 5 thru 9: 1 (??)
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 14: 2 (Joseph and Robert)
Free White Persons – Males – 50 thru 59: 1 (Robert age 56-59)
Free White Persons – Females – Under 5: 1 (Rose’s dau Sarah)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 14: 5 (Nancy, 4x??)
Free White Persons – Females – 15 thru 19: 1 (*Rose, *Catherine)
Free White Persons – Females – 30 thru 39: 1 (poss. mother of younger children)
Free White Persons – Females – 50 thru 59: 1 (Anne age 56-59)
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 2
Persons Employed in Manufacture and Trade: 1
Free White Persons – Under 20: 10
Free White Persons – 20 thru 49: 1
Total Free White Persons: 13
Total All Persons – Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 13

Robert and Anne are with their unmarried children but there is another young woman with them and it looks like she may have brought five children with her. Could she be the girl age 10-15 seen with the CARROLL family in 1810? Was she Robert’s sister? Was she the mother of all the younger children?

1850censuscarle
1850 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery (ancestry.com)

In 1850 Robert CARROLL was not found in the census. However Anne CARLE age 62 was in the household of her son-in-law William ROOP (above) and her daughter Catherine. Eight of the nine CARROLL children were found in their own households. As mentioned earlier, no record was found for Nancy who married Andrew DAME.

In 1860 we find Robert CARROLL age 74 in the census with young people who may be grandchildren.

1860censuscarrell1
1860 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery > Christiansburg (ancestry.com)
1860censuscarrell2
1860 U.S. Federal Census > VA > Montgomery > Christiansburg (ancestry.com)

1860 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Christiansburg
Robert Carroll 74 wheelright
Robert Carroll 22 laborer (1850 age 22)
Sarah Carroll 21 (1850 age 14/15, poss. a daughter of Rose)
Elisha Carroll 14 (1850 age 0, son of Ruth Ratliff Rose)
Isaac Rose 35 basket maker
Ruth Rose 20 (1850 age 22, daughter of Sarah Ratliff)
Malinda Rose 7
Druscilla Rose 1
Note: ages of persons in household are off by 5-10 years

The young Robert seen in this household may be his son but the age is off by 10 years. A Robert CARROLL age 12 was not found in the 1850 census. In 1850 Robert’s son Robert R. CARROLL was in prison and the wife Evaline had her own household with their son Jesse. She has not been located in 1860 but in 1868 she was a widow and remarried. She had her last child about 1862 and he was named Giles Gordon CARROLL.

Sarah CARROLL seen in Robert’s household in 1860 was found twice in 1850, in the household of Rose Carroll JUSTICE and in the household of Sarah RATLIFF.

Elisha CARROLL was the son of Ruth CARROLL (aka Ruth RATLIFF) per his marriage record. Ruth, wife of Isaac ROSE, was listed as Ruth RATLIFF, daughter of Sarah RATLIFF, when she married in 1853. Ruth and Isaac have not been found after 1860. Why would Ruth’s son Elisha have the CARROLL surname if his mother was a RATLIFF? Could it be that Ruth’s mother Sarah RATLIFF was actually a CARROLL as she is seen in 1870? Is Sarah the young girl seen in Robert’s household in 1810 and then again in 1840. Could she be Robert’s sister?

Sarah RATLIFF in Census

1850 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Sarah Ratliff F 55 Virginia
Ruth Carroll F 22 Virginia (daughter of Sarah per marriage record)
Sarah Carroll F 14 Virginia (daughter of Rose?)
Drusilla Carroll F 10 Virginia (daughter of Rose per 1880)
Elijah Carroll M 0 Virginia (son of Ruth per marriage record)
Lucinda Norris F 30 Virginia (relationship unknown)
Julia A. Norris F 10 Virginia (relationship unknown)
Harvey Norris M 2 Virginia (relationship unknown)

1860 U.S. Federal Census
Sarah Ratliff aka Sarah Carroll was not found.

1870 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Christiansburg
Justice, Rose M. 46
Justice, Drucilla 26 (daughter of Rose per 1880)
Justice, Ellen 11 (daughter of Drusilla per 1900, 1910, 1920, 1930)
Carroll, Sallie 84 (aka Sarah Ratliff)
Rose, Amanda 3 (poss. daughter of Ruth and Isaac Rose who disappeared aft. 1860)

1880 U.S. Federal Census
Montgomery County, Virginia
Auburn
Justis, Drucilla 37 single (died bet. 1930-1940)
Justis, Rosa M. 63 widowed mother (died bet. 1880-1900)
Ratliff, Sallie 90 widowed grandmother (died bet. 1880-1900)

Wrinkle in my timeline

The 1880 census listing for Sallie RATLIFF threw me. I thought at first glance that “Sallie” was the mother of “Rosa” but this would put a wrinkle in my timeline for the Robert CARROLL family and add complications.

I’ve spent hours going back and forth with this information. My problem is a riddle: If Rose CARROLL was the daughter of Robert CARROLL and Sarah RATLIFF was the grandmother of Rose’s daughter Drusilla CARROLL aka Drusilla JUSTICE, then either Sarah was the mother of Rose or she was the mother of Drusilla’s unknown father. I would much rather think that she was not Drusilla’s mother as this would mean that Robert and Sarah (who was not his wife) had a child together.

Can I trust the census records that show these people using one surname and then changing to another without marrying? Can you see my predicament? I hope that by putting all the information into this post someone will see it and hopefully have the answers. I may have to take Diane Gould Hall’s advice and get images of the marriage records in hopes of finding more information than is transcribed.

Bottom Line

The bottom line is that Robert and Anne CARROLL were the parents of John, Elizabeth, Mary, Rose and Catherine and they may have had four more children. Speculation on my part is that Peninah, Nancy, Joseph and Robert were these four children.

Wouldn’t it be wonderful to be able to go back in time and talk to Mary ROOP, the daughter of Robert and Anne CARROLL, who lived to be 100 years old and could vividly tell of events that happened when she was young?

Mrs. Mary Roop, last living child of Robert and Anne CARROLL d. 1909

1907article
The Times Dispatch. (Richmond, Va.), 09 Jan. 1909. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.

Mrs. Mary Roop, of Auburn, in this county, has been quite ill for several days, but her friends have strong hopes of her recovery, although she is quite advanced in years, having celebrated her ninety-eighth birthday on New Year’s Day. She was born on the first day of January, 1809, a few miles from her present residence, and so far as is known she is the oldest person in the county. Her husband, the late Joseph Roop, died of a cancer in 1876, and she has lived with her youngest daughter at the old home place ever since. She can tell of events which happened ninety years ago as vividly as if she were speaking of things which took place only a year ago, and her memory is the wonder of the community.
All five of her sons fought in the late Civil War, one of whom lost his life in the service and the other four are still living in the county,as are three daughters, the youngest having died one years ago. She has a large number of grandchildren, great-grandchildren, and some half a dozen great-great-grandchildren, in all the greatest number of descendants of any living person in this county.[8]

1909obit
The Times Dispatch. (Richmond, Va.), 13 Jan. 1907. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.

Mrs. Mary Roop [Special to The Times-Dispatch.]
Christiansburg, VA., January 8. – Mrs. Mary Roop died at her residence, near Riner, in Montgomery county, yesterday after an illness of several months, aged 100 years and six days, being the oldest person in this county. She was born within a few miles of Riner on the first day of January, 1809. She was a remarkable woman, having never suffered any illness of consequence until a short time ago, and was clear in mind and memory until a few days before her death.
Her husband, the late Joseph Roop, died in 1876, and she continued to live at the old Homestead until her death, refusing to leave to live with any of her children, although often urged to do so. She leaves three sons and three daughters living, three of her children having died, the oldest living child now being nearly eighty years old. She also leaves over 100 descendants, embracing six generations. R. I. Roop, of this place, is one of her grandsons. The burial took place to-day at the family burying ground, near her home.[9]

If you missed the first part you can find it here.

Sources:
[1] Ancestry.com. Virginia, Marriages, 1740-1850 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999. Original data: Dodd, Jordan R., et al.. Early American Marriages: Virginia to 1850. Bountiful, UT, USA: Precision Indexing Publishers.
[2] Louise Roop Anderson Akers, comp., The Family Rub, Rup, Rupe, Roop, Roope (2001 Printed by Jamont Communications, 339 Luck Ave., Roanoke, VA 24016). Photocopy of page with marriages by Richard Buckingham.
[3] Floyd County, Virginia, Marriages 1831-1900; transcribed by Barbara Reininger from images copied from microfilm by Rena Worthen; online http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~barbr/zz_marriages.htm.
[4] Ancestry.com. Virginia, Deaths and Burials Index, 1853-1917 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011. Original data: “Virginia Deaths and Burials, 1853–1912.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010. Index entries derived from digital copies of original and compiled records.
[5] Ancestry.com. Virginia, Select Marriages, 1785-1940 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2014. Original data: Virginia, Marriages, 1785-1940. Salt Lake City, Utah: FamilySearch, 2013. FHL Film Number: 32633. Reference ID: P 289
[6] Louise Roop Anderson Akers, comp., The Family Rub, Rup, Rupe, Roop, Roope (2001 Printed by Jamont Communications, 339 Luck Ave., Roanoke, VA 24016). Photocopy of marriage bond of William Roop and Catherine Carrell.
[7] “Virginia, Marriages, 1785-1940,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XR8J-69S : accessed 21 Oct 2014), James Justice and Rose Carroll, 21 Oct 1848; citing Montgomery County, Virginia, reference P 308; FHL microfilm 32633.
[8] The times dispatch. (Richmond, Va.), 13 Jan. 1907. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress.  (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038615/1907-01-13/ed-1/seq-18/ : accessed 2014)
[9] The times dispatch. (Richmond, Va.), 09 Jan. 1909. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. (http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85038615/1909-01-09/ed-1/seq-2/ : accessed 2014)

© 2014 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

A Family Bible, An Application for DAR, and Genealogy Networking

Rupe Bible 4
Crockett Rupe Family Bible. Photos used with permission. © Michael McGrew

For me genealogy is about sharing, giving credit and payback! This time payback went full circle with the help of social networking.

Fourteen years ago, when I first began using the internet for my genealogy research, the work done on the family of my immigrant ancestor Johan Jacob RUPP and his wife Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER appeared to be the most thoroughly done. In time I learned that there were several persons responsible for the large amount of work on the family. One of them was my friend Everette Llavon McGREW (1923-2008).

He sent me a copy of his book My Mother Was A Rupe (revised August 2000) in February 2002 to thank me for sharing information and photos of my visit to the RUPP family’s village in Northern Alsace in December 2001. In the introduction he wrote:

I must give some recognition to Linda Dickey Roop….She had done some research and we made the decision that she would, with my help, write the book. So I sent her copies of all that I had pertaining to the family…..she sent me a rough draft for me to read, update, correct and comment. I did that immediately and returned same to her. Linda died in September 1994 from a fast growing cancer at the age of 51, without publishing the book, so I am attempting to take it from there.

So much of the history and genealogy have been lost forever, and I have not found another book written about our family, are the reasons that I am trying to write this book in order to preserve the small amount that I have found. Yes, there will be errors and omissions and I welcome each and everyone who sees something wrong to please let me hear from you in order that I can place it in an addendum to the book and make it a more complete product. I would love to spend the remainder of my days trying to make it perfect, but since we never know how many days we have left in this life, I think it is time to publish and get something about our family before the public now. I am not copyrighting this because I want to share and make available to all; therefore, if you feel the urge to take any or all of it in order to publish a more complete book, lots of luck.

Also my wife should be given some credit for the book because she allowed me to make trips (mostly to Virginia) to gather data from other Rupe descendants, libraries, courthouses, and cemeteries. She also let me spend many hours in my “computer room” when I really should have been going for groceries, digging in flower beds, running the sweeper, etc., because she had polio in 1950 and has been in a wheelchair ever since that time.

Everette loved his family. He was so thrilled when his first great-grandson was born in 2006 on his wife’s birthday and saddened that she did not live to share his joy. When his second great-grandson was born in 2007 he wasn’t disappointed that his birthday was missed by a few days. He had two great-grandsons to keep the McGrew name going and he was happy.

This year I got the chance to pay Everette back for sharing his research with me.

In April Anita Lavender Daniel messaged me through ancestry.com. She was assisting her best friend Patty Meyers Royal with documentation required to join the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) on the service of her 4th great-grandfather William McALEXANDER. They had most everything she needed with the exception of the generation of Isabelle RUPE, daughter of Crockett RUPE and Poratha McALEXANDER, and husband J. F. JOHNSON.

Anita wanted to know if Isabell’s date of death was in “my” Rupe Bible. She had seen the following statement in my gedcom file:

bible1
Crockett Rupe Family Bible. Photos used with permission. © Michael McGrew

My mother….gave me the large, crumbling Rupe Family Bible (1875 Edition) which contained data on her grandfather, Crockett Rupe, and his children. I never asked her where she got it.

I hadn’t worked on the ROOP/RUPE family for a while but knew that my friend Everette Llavon McGREW (1923-2008) was the only person who had ever mentioned a Bible to me. Unfortunately Everette had passed away and I didn’t have a contact address for any of his children.

After a week of trying to find an address or email address I took more drastic measures – I friended Mike McGREW and his daughter Erin on Facebook and hoped that one of them would accept. Everette was such a kind man, I was sure that his children and grandchildren were the same and would help if only I could get in touch.

Erin was the first to send a message asking how she could help. I explained that I was acting as a go-between for a genealogist who was interested in her grandfather’s family Bible. She didn’t know anything about it and passed the message on to her Dad. I hoped that the Bible hadn’t gotten “lost” after Everette’s death.

Within two days I had four new friends on Facebook.

Anita wrote, “DAR will accept scanned copies of Bible pages if they are readable and submitted with a copy of the front page of the Bible that shows date of publication.”

Mike messaged me, “Unfortunately the cover and title pages are missing. I’ll take pictures of the Bible and maybe that will suffice.” Mike scanned and photographed the Bible, emailed the files to me, and I forwarded them to Anita and Patty.

Rupe Bible 1
Crockett Rupe Family Bible. Photos used with permission. © Michael McGrew
Rupe Bible 2
Crockett Rupe Family Bible. Photos used with permission. © Michael McGrew
Rupe Bible 3
Crockett Rupe Family Bible. Photos used with permission. © Michael McGrew

“I think these pages along with what I already have will give me enough proof to link all the generations.  I know Patty appreciates it as well.  I will be seeing her soon and will give her a copy of the Bible pages.  This will be a treasure to hand down to her grandchildren,” Anita wrote and thanked me for all my help.

Patty’s application was submitted after the chapter board met in late June. On August 19th Anita let me know that Patty’s DAR application was approved and she was awaiting assignment of her national number to make it official!

Everette Llavon McGrew and Patty Meyers Royal are 2nd cousins 1 time removed.  Their common ancestors are Crockett RUPE and Poratha McALEXANDER. Everette who had a deep appreciation of his ancestors’ lives would have been proud to be a part of helping his cousin Patty in her endeavour to prove her lineal, bloodline descent from their common ancestor William McALEXANDER (1744-1822) who assisted in achieving American independence.

bible2
Crockett Rupe Family Bible. Photos used with permission. © Michael McGrew
bible3
Crockett Rupe Family Bible. Photos used with permission. © Michael McGrew
bible4
Crockett Rupe Family Bible. Photos used with permission. © Michael McGrew
bible5
Crockett Rupe Family Bible. Photos used with permission. © Michael McGrew

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© 2014 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

A Trip to Northern Alsace, France

 12-28-2001-01Our first stop was the town of Merkwiller-Pechelbronn, the birthplace of Jacob STAMBACH and his daughter Marie Barbara STAMBACH. We will have to go back to this town as I have learned that the house that once belonged to Jacob STAMBACH still stands in this village.

In May 1994 Mr. & Mrs. Ray B. Grove visited Merkwiller. He wrote: “Back on the road again we headed for Merkwiller to see the home of Jakob Stambach which had been sited on a plat plan dated 1717 which we had found in a Füenfrock genealogy. Sure enough, we were able to identify the structure from the plan and took several pictures of this very old but still lived in structure.”[1]

Marie Barbara STAMBACH, born abt. 1703 in Merkwiller, married (1) Johannes NONNENMACHER November 25, 1721. She married (2) Johann Michael FÜNFROCK on March 2, 1733/34, after the death of her first husband. FÜNFROCK emigrated to Pennsylvania in 1770 after his wife’s death in 1768.[2]

Marie Barbara STAMBACH and Johannes NONNENMACHER were the parents of Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER who married Johann Jacob RUPP, our immigrant.

12-28-2001-02
Musée de Pétrole in Merkwiller-Pechelbronn (Petrol Museum in Merkwiller-Pechelbronn)
12-28-2001-03
View of graphic on side of the museum building explaining the mining done in Merkwiller-Pechelbronn.

 

12-28-2001-04The white sign on the building reads: “1735-1965 Anciennes Mines de Petrole” (Old Petrol Mines) and is diagonally across the street from the petrol museum in Merkwiller-Pechelbronn

The bulletin board in the lower right hand corner of the picture is on the facade of the “Mairie” (city hall). (right)

12-28-2001-05

 Leaving Merkwiller-Pechelbronn we passed through Kutzenhausen-le-Haut (Oberkutzenhausen) and continued to Kutzenhausen, the birthplace of Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER RUPP. (left)

“La Maison Rurale de l’Outre Forêt” 

12-28-2001-06“La Maison Rurale de l’Outre Forêt”, the group of buildings on the corner, to the left, houses a living museum . It is one of the oldest fortified farms in the historical center of Kutzenhausen. Situated near the protestant church, it is made up of two buildings used as dwellings, a double barn, annexes, a garden and an orchard. Its history goes back to the end of the 17th – beginning of the 18th century when it was owned by the STAMBACH family. It remained in the hands of farming families until its existence was threatened. In the 1990s it was renovated and now brings about 12,000 visitors a year to the village of Kutzenhausen with its 800 inhabitants. The ways of our ancestors, their traditions, and events in their lives may be re-lived and discovered by the visitor. Our visit was too short to visit the museum but it will be on the top of our list when we go back.

12-28-2001-07The STAMBACH farm with its double barn on the left and one of the two houses on the right.

12-28-2001-08Front view of the protestant church in Kutzenhausen. It was built in 1765. The protestant parish dates back to before 1554 while records go back to 1714. There were a few old grave markers on the left side of the church. The living museum which once belonged to Felix STAMBACH is to the right of the church. On my next visit I will try to find out if the old church was on the same site as it is mentioned in Felix STAMBACH’s will dated 1730. The relationship of Felix STAMBACH (1643-1729) to our Johann Jacob STAMBACH (1657-1715) will have to be researched. Mr. Grove believes that he may have been a brother to Felix.12-28-2001-09Across from the protestant church is the former administration building of the Fleckenstein family (I need to confirm this). In the background is the newer catholic church. The building to the right I believe is the Ferme des Fleckenstein, an Inn owned by the MALL family. According to Mr. Grove, at the entrance and in the courtyard one still sees the remnant of the Fleckenstein coat of arms.12-28-2001-10Typical farm house in Kutzenhausen across from the STAMBACH farm/museum. The steeple of the catholic church can be seen in the background. On the street is the word “ECOLE” is a warning to slow down as the school is nearby.12-28-2001-11Another one of the typical old houses in Kutzenhausen.12-28-2001-12Side view of the catholic church in Kutzenhausen. It was constructed in 1905. From 1693 until 1905 both the Protestants and the Catholics worshipped in same building, the protestant church seen previously.12-28-2001-13Front view of the catholic church in Kutzenhausen.

12-28-2001-14Statues on the opposite side of the street from the Kutzenhausen cemetery on the way out of town.12-28-2001-15Entrance of Steinseltz on the main road. The older buildings are found only in the center of the village.12-28-2001-16Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg, the birthplace of our RUPPs. We drove through Steinseltz and Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg on our way to Wissembourg. We didn’t stop for pictures as it was raining.12-28-2001-17“Maison du Sel” (House of Salt) dates from 1450. The renovated old building faces the Lauter River in Wissembourg. The building has new windows and a new facade but the roofing gives away its age. The attic rooms, on four stories, have windows that open onto little balconies that are protected by the extended roof.12-28-2001-18The Lauter River runs through Wissembourg in front of the “Maison du Sel”.12-28-2001-19Lovely view of the dwellings in Wissembourg along the Lauter River taken from the little bridge next to the “Maison du Sel”.12-28-2001-20Hôtel de Ville, the city hall of Wissembourg, built between 1741-1752 in rose colored sandstone with its little bell tower and clock. This building is in the center of town on the Place de la République. Turning to the left into the rue du Marché-aux-Poissons (Fish Market Street) you reach the little bridge over the Lauter River next to the “Maison du Sel”.12-28-2001-21Coming back to Steinseltz after our visit to Wissembourg, we came in on one of the smaller roads leading into the village. An old sign at the entrance of Steinseltz is speckled with little holes from granade fire.12-28-2001-22We drove into Steinseltz and parked our car across from this building. SURPRISE!! The first thing we noticed was the street sign on the corner of this building.

12-28-2001-23
Close up of the street sign

The main street of Steinseltz is named after one of their former mayors, a RUPP.12-28-2001-24The little street to the left of the street sign “Rue du Maire Rupp” lead us to the Steinseltz cemetery. Inside the gate, to the right, was a row of very old grave markers. They were most likely taken from the churchyard in recent years. The very first stone was for a RUPP.

12-28-2001-25
Close up of the old grave marker

Hier ruht in Gott
Magdalena
RUPP
geb. Juncker
geb. 20 Januar 1819
gest. 29 Juni 1898

I am not sure about the last word in the first line. It translates to read Here rests in God, Magdalena JUNCKER, born 20 January 1819, died 29 June 1898, and she was married to a RUPP.
12-28-2001-27Tombstone for Albert RUPP (1906-1965) and his wife Elise ZIMMERMAN (1907-1996)
(dates are in dd-mm-yyyy format)
The row of old grave markers can be seen in the upper left hand corner.

12-28-2001-28
Grave of Georges RUPP, a former mayor of Steinseltz.

12-28-2001-30In front of the large grave site for Georges RUPP, the mayor, were five markers. The farthest to the right was this one:

Magdalena Rupp
geb. Herold (maiden name)
1846-1901
Lina Rupp
1896-1901

I believe that Lina may have been a granddaughter of Magdalena. To the left of this grave was another one that was very difficult to decipher:

Lina Rupp
geb. Greiner
1874-1917
Henri Rupp
Maire
1866-1921

Note that this Rupp was also a mayor of Steinseltz. It is possible that Henri and Lina were the parents of Georges.

12-28-2001-31This grave was to the left of one previously mentioned but not photographed (Henri and Lina):

Heinrich
Rupp
von Herold
1842-1903

Heinrich Rupp must have been the husband of Magdalena Herold Rupp. There were two more graves to the left of this one but they were so weathered that the names and dates could no longer be read.
12-28-2001-32

Typical old houses in Steinseltz that we passed while going up the hill to see the churches.12-28-2001-33

Front view of one of the two churches in the “rue des Eglises” (Churches Street) in Steinseltz. I have seen another photo of this church and if it is labeled correctly then this is the protestant church.

12-28-2001-34Monument in the church yard of the Protestant church in Steinseltz:

To our
dead
1914-1918
1939-1945

 

 

 

12-28-2001-35At the foot of the monument, the names of the men from Steinseltz who died during World War II including Charles RUPP.
12-28-2001-36

 

 

 

View of one of the older houses in Steinseltz. The stairs lead to the front door. The arched doorway to the right of the stairs is the entrance to the cellar. The large barn door can be seen behind the stairs. On the left is a house built most likely after World War II.12-28-2001-37

View of the main street, rue du Maire Rupp, in Steinseltz.

12-28-2001-38
Plaque on a building in the rue du Maire Rupp

In Memory of
Georges Rupp
1901-1962
Promoter of the
Agricultural Co-op

Hope you all enjoyed the pictures that we took of the area that our ancestors came from. We will be going back again when the weather is nicer. The fields were filled with melting snow and it was raining most of the time we were there. With warmer weather we should be able to get nice photos of the villages from a distance. Summertime is especially nice as the people there hang boxes filled with geraniums below all the windows. Steinseltz is especially well-known for their geraniums. Of course we will be sure to get plenty of photos of the inside and outside of the museum in Kutzenhausen as well as visit with Mr. René RUPP in Oberhoffen-les-Wissembourg.

Please let me know if you have any suggestions for our next visit.

Sources:
[1] Grove, Ray B. Stumbaugh Tree of Life (Our Roots). Online: http://www.robertfleming.org/rfes.htm . Last accessed January 1, 2002. This site is no longer online. The book is on FamilySearch.org > https://dcms.lds.org/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE973005
[2] Burgert, Annette Kunselman. Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America. pg. 413.

© 2001 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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