Luxracines’ Marriage Database Helps Solve the Confusion of John Monner’s Marriage(s)

A year and a half ago Richelle Murray, a member of the Luxembourg Genealogy group on Facebook, asked for help with one of her families in Luxembourg. She was interested in John MONNER who married Anna HAUPERT on 10 February 1836. The conversation kind of fizzled out as the marriage I found for the date and place queried was for an Anna HAUPERT and Peter HAUPERT, a bride and groom with the same surname.1

Fast forward six months later Richelle asked about a record of a child born to Johann MONNER and Catharina HAUPERT. She found birth record No. 36 for her 3rd great-grandmother Marianna. A clerk had filled the left margin of both pages of the book with a court record. She needed help figuring out it is had anything to do with the record she was interested in. It pertained to birth record No. 35 correcting information in a record by court order and was of no importance to Marianna’s record.

While looking into this I checked the Luxracines site to see if the indexing project for marriages, a work-in-progress at the time, would include the wedding date of the MONNER-HAUPERT couple as she had previously asked about the marriage which she thought took place on 10 February 1836.

The search turned up two marriages for the same names in the same place but different dates. What could this mean? Had there been two marriages for two, three, or four different people? The actual marriage records needed to be consulted.

NEW! Marriage Database for Luxembourg 1796-1923

As of this May 2019, indexing is finally complete for the marriages in Luxembourg per the Tables Décennales (10-year lists for births, marriages, and deaths) for the years 1796-1923. This very important database for researchers with Luxembourg ancestry is available online to members of Luxracines.

• 170 communities (communes, Gemeinde) are included!
• 171,688 marriages for the period 1796-1923
• 108,642 marriages for the period 1610-1797
• A total of 280,330 marriages in Luxembourg

Luxracines is grateful to all members who worked on this project.

The Indexing Project for Luxembourg Marriages

Before going any further I need to say a few words about this project. A group of dedicated members of my genealogy society Luxracines worked on this project to index all of the marriages in the Luxembourg civil records using the Tables Décennales.

The indexing is complete and this new database is turning out to be a real time-saver. Researchers no longer need to search through town after town of the 10-year lists to find the marriage of a person who married in a place other than his place of birth or last known residence. Although many families remained in one town for generations there were times when children left home to find work or when entire families moved around seeking work and marriages took place in towns one would not think to look.

Marriages of Luxembourgers abroad are also being added and presently include Paris, Chiry-Ourscamp (a commune in the Oise department in northern France), and the city of Brussels (Bruxelles). Arlon (Belgium) is in the works and plans are to work on Attert (Belgium) next.

Getting back to the MONNER and HAUPERT marriages

Before looking up the marriage records I checked to see if any of our Luxracines members had worked on this particular family. Claude Bettendroffer, who has inputted baptisms, births, marriages, deaths, and burials for the parish and commune of Sandweiler from the church and civil records into his database, had Johann MONNER listed with two wives: Catharina HAUPERT and Catharina HAUPERT, both with the same parents but with different dates of birth. It’s work like Claude’s which makes it easier to find connections in Luxembourg families.

Lëtz look at the marriage records

Luxembourg (Lëtzebuerg) marriage records can be divided into four parts. Following the date, place, and names of authorities present for the marriage ceremony, the record contains:

• Groom’s information
• Bride’s information
• Dates of the publication of banns and the declaration that the bride and groom are joined in marriage by law
• Witnesses, usually four, to the marriage and signatures of all person’s present

The marriage record dated 5 April 18372 included this section on the groom:

1837 Marriage Record of Johann Monner and Catharina Haupert (groom’s info)

Johann Monner, carpenter, 27 years of, born in Pulfermuhl, in the commune of Sandweiler on 8 March 1810, a resident of Pulfermuhl, in the commune of Sandweiler, of age son of Peter Monner, carpenter, and Margaretha Cornely, no occupation, a married couple residing in Pulfermuhl, present and consenting to the marriage. Militia service was rendered per certificate of the Hamm police dated 28 March 1837.

And this section on the bride:

1837 Marriage Record of Johann Monner and Catharina Haupert (bride’s info)

The young lady Catharina Haupert age 25 years born in Sandweiler in the Canton of Sandweiler, without occupation, born on 22 November 1811 and a resident of Sandweiler, the of age daughter of Nicolas Haupert and Catharina Stümper, a legally married couple of Sandweiler who are agreeable to the marriage.

The marriage record dated 10 November 18413 included this section on the groom:

1841 Marriage Record of Johann Monner and Catharina Haupert (groom’s info)

Johann Monner, carpenter, 31 years of, born in Pulfermuhl, in the commune of Sandweiler on 8 March 1810, a resident of Pulfermuhl, in the commune of Sandweiler, of age son of Peter Monner, carpenter, and Margaretha Cornely, no occupation, a married couple residing in Pulfermuhl, present and consenting to the marriage.Widower of the deceased Catharina Haupert who died in Sandweiler on 7 May 1841.

And this section on the bride:

1841 Marriage Record of Johann Monner and Catharina Haupert (bride’s info)

The young lady Catharina Haupert, without occupation, 18 years old, born in Sandweiler in the Canton of Luxembourg the 17 August 1823, a resident of said Sandweiler, and the underage daughter of Johann Nicolas Haupert and Catharina Stümper, a married couple, farmers, residents of Sandweiler, present and consenting to the marriage. [I have not been able to transcribe and translate the last three lines which appear to be a kind of special permission given for the marriage on 12 October 1841.]

The groom in both marriage records was the same person. The brides in the marriage records were sisters, both daughters of Nicolas HAUPERT and Catharina STÜMPER. The second marriage record clearly shows Johann was widowed from his first wife.

Why the interest in Johann MONNER?

When Richelle posted to the Luxembourg Genealogy group, I didn’t know we had a connection. Richelle and I share common ancestors. Johann MONNER was the grandson of my 5th great-grandparents Hubert CORNELY and MARGARETHA EVEN through their daughter Margaretha CORNELY and her husband Peter MONNER.

Margaretha and Peter married on 15 June 18054 in Sandweiler and started a family of eight children. Johann was born on 8 March 18105 in Pulvermühle on the outskirts of Luxembourg City.

At the time Pulvermühle was part of the commune of Sandweiler. It would become part of the commune of Hamm in 1874, and then later of Luxembourg City. These changes in the location of the records would make researching the descendants more difficult as the communes were more populated. Also the spelling of the surname would change for some of the children from MONNER to MONNEUR.

Johann was the second son and third child of Margaretha CORNELY and Peter MONNER. Following his birth, Margaretha had five more children: a daughter and four sons. The youngest two were twin boys.

As seen above Johann married twice. His first wife bore him two sons. His second wife gave him three sons and three daughters from 1842 to 1850. One of the daughters died at the age of five months.

In 1852 Johann, his second wife Catharina, their children, and Johann’s two older sons departed from Le Havre, France, for New York where they arrived on 31 May 1852. Catharina was carrying a child on the journey and gave birth to a son Hillary “Henry” on 23 October 1852 in Dubuque County, Iowa. He would be the first and only MONNER child of Johann and Catharina to be born in America. Catharina died two years later on 10 May 1854.

John, as he was now called, raised his children in Dubuque County and then Jackson County, Iowa, before dying in 1880.

John was not the only child of Peter MONNER and Margaretha CORNELY to leave Luxembourg. Their second youngest son Peter moved to Paris between 1854 and 1860. Pierre MONNEUR was found on the marriage index database of Paris as he remarried there in 1861 following the death of his wife in 1860. One of his sons married his second wife’s daughter in 1868. Two more marriages found with the help of the Luxracines Marriage Database.

Full circle

Richelle’s tree back to our common ancestors.

The marriage record dated 10 February 1836 for Anna HAUPERT and Peter HAUPERT turned out to be important to Richelle’s research. Peter, like the two Catharina’s above, was a child of Nicolas HAUPERT and Catharina STÜMPER. Peter and Anna also went to Dubuque County, Iowa, a year earlier than the MONNER family. They had a son Michael who married Marianne MONNER, daughter of John, in 1865. Michael and Marianna were first cousins and Richelle’s 3rd great-grandparents.

Richelle and I are 6C1R but she does not share DNA with my brother whose test I manage. He has several matches to descendants of John MONNER and his first wife as well as his second wife. The trees these matches have attached to their DNA mistakenly list only one wife for John MONNER and by writing this post I hope the error can be rectified.

Thank you to Richelle and Claude for giving me permission to use their names in this post.

© 2019, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Sandweiler > Naissances 1865-1890 Mariages 1797-1890 Décès 1797-1822 > image 929 of 1493. 1836 Marriage Record No. 7. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-X46J-1Y?cc=1709358&wc=9RYD-MNL%3A130336601%2C130552301 : accessed 19 May 2019). 
  2. Ibid., Sandweiler > Naissances 1865-1890 Mariages 1797-1890 Décès 1797-1822 > image 936 of 1493. 1837 Marriage Record No. 3. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-X46C-DR?cc=1709358&wc=9RYD-MNL%3A130336601%2C130552301 : accessed 3 April 2019). 
  3. Ibid., Sandweiler > Naissances 1865-1890 Mariages 1797-1890 Décès 1797-1822 > image 963 of 1493. 1841 Marriage Record No. 7. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-X46J-TY?cc=1709358&wc=9RYD-MNL%3A130336601%2C130552301 : accessed 3 April 2019). 
  4. Ibid., Sandweiler > Naissances 1797-1864 > image 75 of 932. 1805 Marriage Record (26 prairial an XIII) page 1 and 2. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-61JN-R6?cc=1709358&wc=9RY8-C68%3A130336601%2C130448701 : accessed 17 April 2019) and (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-61JL-3T?cc=1709358&wc=9RY8-C68%3A130336601%2C130448701 : accessed 17 April 2019). 
  5. Ibid., Sandweiler > Naissances 1797-1864 > image 123 of 932. 1810 Birth Record No. 8. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-61J2-JS?cc=1709358&wc=9RY8-C68%3A130336601%2C130448701 : accessed 17 April 2019). 

The Key that Opened the Door in the Schintgen Brick Wall

While gathering the records to tell the story of my 5th great-grandparents Hubert CORNELY and Margaretha EVEN from Wickrange in Luxembourg, I made an awesome discovery which turned out to be a key to open the door in a brick wall.

Hubert and Margaretha’s marriage banns were proclaimed in Reckange-sur-Mess and in Obercorn, the towns they lived in at the time. There was no opposition and the couple married in Reckange on 23 March 1779.1 The marriage record was written in Latin. I’m fluent in English, Luxembourgish, French, and German but Latin is not a language I learned in school. I’ve picked up many of the words in church records but am stumped when it comes to grammar and declension. I can usually pick out the most important parts: the date; names of persons present, residences, and occupations.

1779 Marriage Record of Hubert CORNELY and Margaretha EVEN

Religious marriage records for the most part follow a pattern and can be between two lines and two to three pages long depending on the priest and persons marrying. The longer the better as long as the handwriting is legible.

This marriage record is nearly an entire page and has quite a few marks and signatures at the end. Names and locations were easily abstracted but some of the words were not legible until I got used to the handwriting.

This line stood out:

qua testibus Huberto Schingtgen avunculo sponsi ex Schuweiler

Hubert CORNELY’s mother was Marie SCHINTGEN whose parents and siblings were not known at the time. The spelling is different but at the bottom of the record the witness left his mark and his name was written Huberti SCHINTGEN.

witnessed by Hubert Schintgen uncle of the bridegroom from Schouweiler.

With this short line in the marriage record, I had a lead to the parentage of Marie SCHINTGEN (1725-1790). These are the steps I took to find them.

✔ for Hubert SCHINTGEN’s marriage

Tables des mariages 1700-1798 (index organisée par l’époux/l’épouse), is a card index of marriages performed in parishes in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg before 1800. I wrote about how this database came into existence in this post:

My genealogy society Luxracines has the marriage collection indexed on the Luxracines website which makes it a bit easier to search than browsing the digital images of the cards.

I did a simple search for Hubert SCHINTGEN (SCHENTGEN). This turned up a marriage in Dahlem in 1764 for Hubert SCHENTGEN and Anne SIMON.

✔ the 1764 marriage record

Hubert seen in the 1779 marriage record was from Schouweiler which is in the parish of Dahlem. Geographically this could be a match. At FamilySearch there were two collections which could include the 1764 marriage record:

Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1763-1797

1764 Marriage Record of Hubert SCHENTGEN and Anna SIMON

The marriage was recorded in table format and included the groom’s parents and the bride’s deceased husbands’ names. The marriage took place in Schouweiler.2

Baptêmes 1713-1787, 1794, mariages 1713-1785, 1794, sépultures 1794

1764 Marriage Record of Hubert SCHENTGEN and Anna SIMON

This format actually had the same information as the table format found in the first collection.3 It was a first marriage for Hubert SCHENTGEN (highlighted in yellow) and a third for his bride Anna SIMON (highlighted in orange below) who was the widow of Nicolas ARENDT and of Nicolas KIRBACH. Most important at this time were the names of the parents of Hubert: Michaelis SCHENTGEN and Susanna JOST, a married couple from Mondercange.

This was something to keep in mind for later. The entry above Hubert and Anna’s is for another marriage which took place the same day. Anna’s son Joes (Johannes or Jean) ARENDT from her first marriage (highlighted in orange above) married Catharina SCHENTGEN, daughter of Christian SCHENTGEN and Anna MESCH (later seen as MEYERS or MEYERSCH) (highlighted in pink).

✔ for Michel SCHENTGEN’s marriage

Back on Luxracines’ website, the search for SCHINTGEN or SCHENTGEN with the first name Michel or any variations of the first name was negative. I used the advanced search to filter out surnames starting with SCHINT and SCHENT with a first name starting with Mich. Only one hint was close: Michel SCHINTGES married Susanne JACQUE on 18 June 1713 in Mondercange.

✔ for Michel and Susanne’s marriage record

Although the bride’s maiden name was JACQUE instead of JOST, I looked up the index card for the marriage for possible further information. Individuals in Luxembourg church records may be found with a house name instead of a surname. In this case, it is prudent to view all records for the individual or their relatives to determine if the name is consistent.

1713 Index Card with marriage information for Michael SCHINTGES and Susanne JACQUE

Additional information found on the card: the groom was from Mondercange and widowed (veuf), the bride was from Schifflingen, and the record was in the parish records of Mondercange on page 135.4

1713 Marriage entry for Michael SCHINTGES and Susanna JACQUE

The actual record gave no further identifying information. Parents’ names were not included.5

✔️ for Michel and Susanne’s children

Mondercange is one of the parishes in Luxembourg which has records missing for certain (long) periods of time. The only collection which would include children born to a couple married in 1713 is:

Baptêmes 1667-1673, 1702-1729, confirmations 1696-1714, mariages 1694-1726, sépultures 1677-1694, 1698-1726

This is the book with the earliest church records for Mondercange. I searched for the year 1713 and worked my way forward to 1729 recording each child born to Michel and Susanne. The mother’s maiden name wasn’t listed in any of these baptismal records however the names of the godparents looked promising.

  1. Anna baptized 23 Oct 1714, godparents were Petrus Hilbert of Schifflingen and Anna Kirsch from Ehlingen6
  2. Christianus baptized 25 Nov 1716, godparents were Christianus Schintges and Maria Hautinger (likely Huttinger) both of Mondercange7
  3. Jacobus baptized 16 July 1719, godparents were Jacobus Jost from Schifflingen and Maria Schintgen from Mondercange8
  4. Michael Balthasar baptized 6 Jan 1722, godparents were  Michael Reuter and Maria Marx, both of Mondercange9
  5. Maria baptized 3 May 1725, godparents were Joan Jungers and Maria Josten Jack (no place of residence listed)10

In the above list of children, child #3 Jacob’s godfather was Jacob JOST of Schifflingen. Could he be the grandfather or a maternal uncle of the child? The surname of the godmother of child #5 Maria (who I believe is very likely my 6th great-grandmother) was corrected from JOSTEN (a variation of JOST) to JACK (a variation of JACQUE). Was she a maternal aunt or other relation?

I believe Susanna JACQUE seen in the 1713 marriage record is Susanna JOST seen in the 1764 marriage record of Hubert SCHINTGEN. Hubert likely was born after 1729 during the time period 1730 to 1778 in which baptisms are missing for this parish. There may have been more children who will never be found due to the missing years.

Note: There was another Michel SCHINTGEN with a wife named Maria having children at the same time in Steinbrücken, also a part of the Mondercange parish. Their children’s records appear to show the parents were Michel Schintgen and Marie Schmidt who married 31 March 1706 in Mondercange. This helped to discard persons of the same name.

✔️ online family trees for SCHINTGEN in Mondercange

I searched the members’ trees on Luxracines as well as Geneanet.org for SCHINTGEN (and other spellings) in Mondercange. Very few Luxracines members who share their GEDCOM files have worked on early families of Mondercange, likely due to the many missing records. One tree on Geneanet shows Michel SCHINTGEN married to both Susanna and Maria. Obviously, a mistake I was able to avoid as I had paid attention to the family group living in Mondercange and the family group living in Steinbrücken (Pontpierre).

The SCHINTGEN families of Luxembourg seem to all have had a Michel!

✔️ for pre-1713 baptisms

Since Michel SCHINTGEN who married Susanna JACQUE was a widower, I checked for children born before the 1713 marriage. Only one child was found:

Joes (Johannes) baptized 5 July 1709, parents were Michel and Angela, godparents were Joes Kauffman and Maria Roden both of Mondercange.11

With this information, I checked for a death record for Angela after the child’s birth in 1709 and before the marriage in 1713. I found a death record dated 16 May 1711 for Angela SCHINDGES of Mondercange.12 It is a one-liner and does not mention the wife of or a child of. No confirmation that Angela was the wife of Michel. Angela SCHINDGES was not the only person of this name in the town of Mondercange as another death entry was recorded on 24 July 1714 for a widow named Angela SCHINTGES.

✔ for missing records (substitutions)

For the years 1727 to 1778 records of baptism, marriage, and death are missing in Mondercange. I believe Child #5 Maria SCHINTGEN is my ancestress Maria who was the mother of the bride at the 1779 marriage at which her brother Hubert was a witness.

My Maria married Pierre CORNELY and had five children. Three of these children’s baptismal records include the names of people with the SCHINTGEN surname:

Son Michel CORNELY baptized 16 May 1758 had as godparents Michael Schintgen and Maria Steichen both of Mondercange13

Son Nicolas CORNELY baptized 5 July 1760 had as godparents Nicolas Spreitzer from Luxembourg and Catharina Schöntgen from Wickrange14

Catharina CORNELY baptized 2 Jan 1769 had as godparents Petro Kirsch from Wickrange and Catharina Schintgen from Schouweiler15

The questions these godparents bring up:

  • Is Michel SCHINTGEN of Mondercange the maternal grandfather or a maternal uncle?
  • Is Catharina SCHINTGEN from Schouweiler the wife of Jean ARENDT and the daughter of Christian SCHINTGEN, a maternal uncle of the child? This would mean she was also the step-daughter of Hubert SCHINTGEN. (see 1764 marriage found while searching for Hubert)

To-do list

To learn more of the JOST or JACQUE connection in Schifflingen, the church records for that location need to be browsed. However, the earliest available records are baptisms for 1708-1778 and confirmations for 1745-1776. No marriages prior to 1779. Both too late to find Susanna JACQUE aka JOST who moved away from Schifflingen at the time of her marriage in 1713. Are there Luxembourg researchers who have worked with the Schifflingen church records or on the JOST or JACQUE families who would be willing to share? It would be helpful if someone would step forward as it would save me the time to extract all of the names into a table for analysis.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Marie SCHINTGEN
Parents: Michel SCHINTGEN and Susanna JOST aka JACQUE
Spouse: Pierre CORNELY
Children: Hubert, Michel, Nicolas, Maria, Catharina
Whereabouts: Mondercange and Wickrange (Reckange-sur-Mess)
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 6th great-grandmother

1. Marie SCHINTGEN
2. Hubert CORNELY
3. Catharina CORNELY
4. Jean MAJERUS
5. Marie MAJERUS
6. Catharina FRANTZ
7. Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE
8. Living WILDINGER
9. Cathy MEDER-DEMPSEY

Conclusion

The key I found in the 1779 marriage record of my 5th great-grandparents Hubert CORNELY and Margaretha EVEN opened the door to the SCHINTGEN brick wall. I feel certain Michel SCHINTGEN and Susanna JOST were my 7th great-grandparents as they were the parents of Hubert SCHINTGEN, the uncle of Hubert CORNELY and brother of my 6th great-grandmother Marie SCHINTGEN. It’s the rest which needs firming up.
© 2019, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), <i>FamilySearch</i> (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 11 of 205. 1779 Marriage Record (lower, left). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-M6TL?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y47%3A1500994201%2C1500913302 : accessed 8 January 2018). 
  2. Ibid., Dahlem > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1763-1797 > image 122 of 148. 1764 Marriage Record (table format). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WM-9397?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-449%3A1500923301%2C1500923326 : accessed 4 May 2019). 
  3. Ibid., Dahlem > Baptêmes 1713-1787, 1794, mariages 1713-1785, 1794, sépultures 1794 > image 12 of 91. 1764 Marriage Record (right page, middle).(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WM-99J9?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-165%3A1500923301%2C1500923302 : accessed 4 May 219). 
  4. ibid., Mondercange > Tables des mariages 1677-1729, 1777-1797 (index organisée par l’époux) > image 180 of 225. 1713 Marriage Index Card. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WS-H9SD-D?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-RM1%3A1500913803%2C1501207930 : accessed 1 May 2019). 
  5. Ibid., Mondercange > Baptêmes 1667-1673, 1702-1729, confirmations 1696-1714, mariages 1694-1726, sépultures 1677-1694, 1698-1726 > image 63 of 103. 1713 Marriage Record (right page, last entry).(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-897J-YQCW?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-BZG%3A1500913803%2C1501045222 : accessed 1 May 2019). 
  6. Ibid., Mondercange > Baptêmes 1667-1673, 1702-1729, confirmations 1696-1714, mariages 1694-1726, sépultures 1677-1694, 1698-1726 > image 44 of 103. 1714 Baptismal Record (right page, middle).
    (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-997J-YQ6R?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-BZG%3A1500913803%2C1501045222 : accessed 1 May 2019). 
  7. Ibid., Mondercange > Baptêmes 1667-1673, 1702-1729, confirmations 1696-1714, mariages 1694-1726, sépultures 1677-1694, 1698-1726 > image 46 of 103. 1716 Baptismal Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-897J-YQC6?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-BZG%3A1500913803%2C1501045222 : accessed 1 May 2019). 
  8. Ibid., Mondercange > Baptêmes 1667-1673, 1702-1729, confirmations 1696-1714, mariages 1694-1726, sépultures 1677-1694, 1698-1726 > image 49 of 103. 1719 Baptismal Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-897J-YQJ1?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-BZG%3A1500913803%2C1501045222 : accessed 1 May 2019). 
  9. Ibid., Mondercange > Baptêmes 1667-1673, 1702-1729, confirmations 1696-1714, mariages 1694-1726, sépultures 1677-1694, 1698-1726 > image 51 of 103. 1722 Baptismal Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-897J-YQKL?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-BZG%3A1500913803%2C1501045222 : accessed 1 May 2019). 
  10. Ibid., Mondercange > Baptêmes 1667-1673, 1702-1729, confirmations 1696-1714, mariages 1694-1726, sépultures 1677-1694, 1698-1726 > image 55 of 103
    . 1725 Baptismal Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-997J-YQLZ?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-BZG%3A1500913803%2C1501045222 : accessed 1 May 2019). 
  11. Ibid., Mondercange > Baptêmes 1667-1673, 1702-1729, confirmations 1696-1714, mariages 1694-1726, sépultures 1677-1694, 1698-1726 > image 40 of 103. 1709 Birth Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G97J-YQXK?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-BZG%3A1500913803%2C1501045222 : accessed 4 May 2019). 
  12. Ibid., Mondercange > Baptêmes 1667-1673, 1702-1729, confirmations 1696-1714, mariages 1694-1726, sépultures 1677-1694, 1698-1726 > image 84 of 103. 1711 Death Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L97J-YQCT?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-BZG%3A1500913803%2C1501045222 : accessed 4 May 2019). 
  13. Ibid., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes 1756-1797, confirmations 1791, mariages, sépultures 1779-1797 > image 5 of 135. 1758 Baptismal Record (left page, last enty). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WM-M61H?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y4S%3A1500994201%2C1501112274 : accessed 18 April 2019). 
  14. Ibid., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes 1756-1797, confirmations 1791, mariages, sépultures 1779-1797 > image 7 of 135. 1760 Baptismal Record (right page, 4th entry from bottom). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-M6Q4?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y4S%3A1500994201%2C1501112274 : accessed 18 April 2019). 
  15. Ibd., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes 1756-1797, confirmations 1791, mariages, sépultures 1779-1797 > image 13 of 135. 1769 Baptismal Record (right page, 2nd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WM-M624?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y4S%3A1500994201%2C1501112274 : 9 January 2015),. 

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© 2019, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Hubert CORNELY and Margaretha EVEN of Wickrange, Luxembourg

When I wrote about my 4th great-grandparents Jean Baptiste MAJERUS and Catharina CORNELY of Strassen on 14 January 2018 I had information about Catharina’s parents Hubert CORNELY and Margaretha EVEN of Wickrange but I had not documented all of their children or looked into their parents.

Hubert CORNELY died on 29 August 1816 in Wickrange. Of his nine children, only his oldest son Jean and his two youngest daughters Catharina and Catherine have been researched. It is not known, at this time, if the six children born between 1782 and 1793 survived, married, or had lines which continue.

Re-reading the post, I realize there is still work to be done on the children of Jean Baptiste MAJERUS and Catharina CORNELY. I need to research the spouses and children of their children, i.e. descendancy research.  Source citations were omitted in the post and I will be adding them ASAP.

This is the beginning of a new series of posts on our children’s 6th great-grandparents. For those who were also my ancestors, I will be referring to them as my 5th great-grandparents. 

Hubert CORNELY (ca. 1753-1816)

Hubert CORNELY, my 5th great-grandfather, was born between 1753-1755 in Wickrange to Pierre CORNELY (1720-1793) and his wife Marie SCHINTGEN (1725-abt. 1790-1793). He was likely their first child or their first child to live to adulthood.* Wickrange belonged to the parish of Reckange-sur-Mess where baptismal records begin in 1756 only a couple of years after the estimated birth of Hubert CORNELY. His year of birth was estimated using the age at the time of death1 and his age when he witnessed the birth of a grandson.2

A marriage record for Hubert’s parents has not been found as marriages in the church records of Reckange-sur-Messe begin only in 1779. However, when Hubert married in 1779 he was named as the legitimate son of his parents. All four of his younger siblings born between 1758 and 1769 were baptized as legitimate children of Pierre CORNELY and Marie SCHINTGEN.

Sib 1: Michel CORNELY (1758-1828) was born in Wickrange and baptized on 16 May 1758 in the parish of Reckange-sur-Mess.3 He married Marguerite KIRCHOFF (1764-1830) on 23 March 1790 in Obercorn.4 They had at least seven children in Obercorn where Michel worked as a weaver (textoris). Four of these children married and lived in the commune of Differdange. Michel died in 18285 and Marguerite in 18306, both before the marriage of their youngest son in 1831.

View of the town of Weiler-la-Tour with the nuclear plant in Cattenom, France, in the background. The photo was taken by the sign of the town of Hassel.

Sib 2: Nicolas CORNELY (1760-1833) was born in Wickrange and baptized on 5 July 1760 in the parish of Reckange-sur-Mess.7 He married Catharina GROOS (1763-1843) on 11 May 1789 in Hollerich.8 They were the parents of nine children. Nicolas died 10 June 1833 in Hassel in the commune of Weiler-la-Tour.9 His wife Catharina died 15 November 1843 also in Hassel.10 Both deaths were reported by their son-in-law Peter SONTAG. A set of twins born in 1820 has been attributed to Nicolas and Catharina11 however the baptismal records12 show they were the natural children of the oldest daughter Susanna. Note: Children of an unmarried mother were referred to as natural children in church and civil records.

Sib 3: Maria CORNELY (1764-1826) was born in Wickrange and baptized on 16 December 1764 in the parish of Reckange-sur-Mess.13 She married Peter LORENTZ (1753-1802) on 4 April 1796 at St. Michael in Luxembourg City.14 Peter died 24 December 1802 in Huncherange15 leaving Maria with only one child. Maria died in Bettembourg on 24 January 1826.16

Sib 4: Catharina CORNELY (1769-1839) was born in Wickrange and baptized 2 January 1769 in the parish of Reckange-sur-Mess.17 She married Mathias KLEIN (1772-1838) on 17 October 1802 in Bettembourg.18 They were the parents of three known children, two of whom married and had children. Mathias died 31 August 183819 in Dudelange followed by Catharina on 13 October 183920 in the same place.

*All of his siblings left the area to marry and raise their families while Hubert, the oldest, remained in Wickrange as was the custom of the times, i.e. inheritance by the firstborn child. This custom would continue to be followed by Hubert’s children as will be seen in the section below for Hubert and Margaretha’s children.

Margaretha EVEN (1756-1839)

Margaretha EVEN, my 5th great-grandmother, was born as the middle child of Léonard EVEN (1711-1779) and Marie ÖHRY (1723-aft. 1779). Marie’s maiden name had many spellings in the records found including Ery, Ehry, Ihry, Öhry, and Yry. Anna is the child who has not been located in later records.Léonard married Marie on 9 October 1741 in Obercorn, Luxembourg.21 They were the parents of:

Sib 1: Andreas EVEN (1742-1804) was born on 17 September 1742 in Obercorn.22 He married Margaretha SCHEUER (1751-1823) before December 1774. Marriage records for the years 1771-1779 are missing in the Obercorn church registers. A son was born 31 December 1774.23 Andreas was the oldest child of Léonard and Marie and likely remained in the family home as was the practice of the time. Four of his children married. He died on 24 March 1804 in Obercorn.24 His widow Margaretha lived until 31 January 1823.25

Sib 2: Susanna EVEN (1746-1801) was born about 1746 in Obercorn. She married Peter WANDERSCHEID (1735-1796) on 17 January 1768 in Obercorn.26 A baptismal record was not found for Susanna and the marriage record confirms she was the legitimate daughter of Léonard EVEN and Marie IRY (or ÖHRY). Susanna and Pierre were the parents of seven children, six of whom are known to have married. Peter died on 28 August 1796 and was buried in Obercorn.27 Susanna died on 15 January 1801 in Differdange.28

Sib 3: Henricus EVEN (1749-?) was born on 17 April 1749 in Obercorn.29 Records of marriage and death have not been found.

Kackerterhof near Oetrange

Sib 4: Catherine EVEN (1751-1833) was born 23 May 1751 in Obercorn.30 She married Joannes ERPELDING (1748-183) in Oetrange on 4 March 1774.31 Catherine died on 13 December 1833 on Kackerterhof near Oetrange.32 Her husband predeceased her. It is not known at this time if they had children. The ERPELDING family of Kackerterhof is one of my husband’s lines.

The fifth child of Léonard and Mary was my 5th great-grandmother Margaretha EVEN, their middle child born 14 August 1756 in Obercorn.33

Sib 5: Anna Maria EVEN (1761-?) was born on 6 December 1761 in Obercorn.34 A record of marriage nor a death record were found.

Sib 6: Catharina EVEN (1764-?) was born on 24 May 1764 in Obercorn.35 She was the twin of Barbara. No record of death has been found for this child.

Sib 7: Barbara EVEN (1764-1766) was born on 24 May 1764 in Obercorn.36 She was the twin of Catharina. Barbara died on 10 June 1766 at the age of 2 years.37

Sib 8: Catharina EVEN (1766-1786) was born on Christmas day in 1766 in Obercorn.38 She died at the age of 19 years on 4 May 1786 in Obercorn.39

As can be seen above, only three of Margaretha’s siblings married. She was the last to marry on 23 March 1779. Her father Léonard EVEN died less than three weeks later on 14 April 1779.40 His wife Marie ÖHRY survived him and it is not known when she may have passed away.

Hubert & Margaretha marry in Reckange-sur-Mess

View of the church with surrounding buildings in Reckange-sur-Messe.

As no opposition was made when the marriage bans were proclaimed in the parishes of Obercorn and Reckange, a marriage took place between Hubert CORNELY of Wickrange and Margaretha EVEN of Obercorn on 23 March 1779 in Reckange-sur-Messe.41 Léonard, the father of the bride, was not present. He may not have been well enough to attend as he would die less than three weeks later. The mother of the bride as well as her oldest brother Andreas and her sister Anna Maria were present at the marriage and gave their consent. Hubert’s father Pierre and his mother Marie were also present and consented to the marriage.

1779 Religious Marriage Record of Hubert Cornely and Margaretha Even

The marriage record held a key which would open the door to the SCHINTGEN brick wall. This will be discussed in a separate post.

Hubert and Margaretha had nine children. Three died at a young age. Five married and continued the line. One child remains a mystery as only a record of birth was found.

Their first child, a son, was born on 17 June 1780 and was named Jean after his godfather, his uncle Joannes ERPELDING of Kackerterhof. His godmother was his grandmother Marie SCHINTGEN.42

Two years later Margaretha was born on 22 October 1782 and at her baptism, her uncle Michel CORNELY was her godfather. Her godmother was Margaretha NEISES whose relationship to the family is unknown.43

Less than two years later Anna CORNELY was born on 29 May 1784. Her godfather was Nicolas IHRY, a young man who was likely related through her maternal grandmother who was an ÖHRY.44

The two-year period between births continued and a daughter Barbara was born on 25 November 1786. Her name came from her godmother Barbara RODIUS; her godfather was her uncle Nicolas CORNELY.45

Peter was born on 10 March 178946 and survived less than a week dying on 23 March.47

A year later, Maria Francisca, the sixth child, was born on 24 March 1790. Her godparents were Maria Francisca THEISEN and Nicolaus ODIL, a young single man.48

The children’s paternal grandmother Marie SCHINTGEN died between 23 March 1790 and 27 March 1793. As no death record has been found, it is not known if she was still living when her granddaughter Maria Francisca passed away on 1 June 1792 at the age of two years.49 Note: The death of Marie SCHINTGEN has been estimated using the marriage record of her son Michel in which she was mentioned and the death record of her husband in which he was seen as a widower.

The seventh child of Hubert and Margaretha was born 15 March 1793. Maria’s godparents were Nicolas EVEN, likely the son of her maternal uncle Andreas EVEN, and her paternal aunt Maria CORNELY.50

The children’s paternal grandfather, a widower, Pierre CORNELY died on 27 March 1793.51 Less than a week later his granddaughter Maria died on 2 April 1793 at the age of two and a half weeks.52

My 4th great-grandmother Catharina CORNELY was born on 24 April 1794.53 She was the 8th child but at the time of her birth, only three children of Hubert and Margaretha were known to still be living (assuming Anna died young). Catharina’s godparents were Christophorus GEHLEN and her paternal aunt Catharina CORNELY.

The youngest and ninth child was born on 20 October 1797 and also given the name Catharina. She was the first and only child of Hubert and Margaretha to have a civil birth record which was witnesses by Petrus LORENTZ and Catharina GOEFLINGER.54

The five CORNELY children continued to live in Wickrange where their father was a linen weaver. But soon they would be leaving the family home and marrying in other parts.

The Children of Hubert and Margaretha Marry

Their oldest daughter Margaretha married Peter MONNER (1779-1866) on 15 June 1805 in Sandweiler.55 They lived in Pulvermühle, a neighborhood between Luxembourg City and Sandweiler, where they raised nine children, eight of whom married. A daughter Catharine born in 1807 did not die on 17 May 1808 as seen in trees on Ancestry. The death record is for a woman named Catharine MAMER age 43 years. This daughter has not been found marrying in Luxembourg and a death record has yet to be located. The second son of this family went to America in 1852 and descendants of this line have shown up as DNA matches to the test I manage.

Jean CORNELY, the oldest son of Hubert and Margaretha, married Catharina HELLESCH (1777-1862) on 3 February 1807 in Reckange.56 They made their home in Wickrange, likely with his parents as he was the oldest. They were the parents of five children, three of whom died at a young age. A son Jacques never married. Their youngest child, daughter Margaretha married and was the only child to give them grandchildren.

Water tower of the commune of Bertrange

Barbara married Michel THINNES (1780-1852) on 13 January 1809 in Leudelange.57 They lived in Bertrange and were the parents of eight children. Their two youngest died at an early age. Their oldest son died at the age of 21. Four of their children married and had children. A son Theodore has not been traced.

Hubert CORNELY died at 7 in the morning on 29 August 1816 in Wickrange. His death was reported by his oldest child Jean.58 At home, he left a widow, Margaretha, and two unmarried daughters, both named Catharine.

The elder Catharina CORNELY married Jean Baptiste MAJERUS (1797-1868) on 25 April 1817 in Strassen.59 They were my 4th great-grandparents and their full story can be read here: 52 Ancestors: #46 Jean Baptiste Majerus and Catharina Cornely of Strassen. They were the parents of 11 children; one died at the age of two months and one has not been traced. Nine children married and had children. One son had a daughter who married in Bruxelles in 1881, moved to Switzerland before 1886 and then to England where the line remained. Another daughter of the same son emigrated to America after 1890 and settled in Minneapolis, Hennepin County, Minnesota. Descendants of these two lines have shown up as DNA matches to the test I manage.

The younger Catherine CORNELY (I use a different spelling to keep them apart) married Jean KREMER (1796-1876) on 6 June 1824 in Bertrange.60 They were the parents of eight children of whom only two lived to adulthood. Neither married. The daughter died at the age of 53 years and the son, their first child, died at the age of 80 in 1905.

Margaretha EVEN, the widow of Hubert CORNELY, outlived him by 23 years dying on 14 September 1839 in Wickrange at the age of 83. She died at 8 in the evening at the home of her son Jean who reported the death.61 She lived to see all her children married.

Following the death of their mother Margaretha, the children continued to live their lives in Reckange, Bertrange, Pulvermühle, and Strassen.

The oldest of the siblings, Jean died on 19 January 1858 at the age of 77.62 Two years later the two oldest girls died, Barbara (73) on 24 June 186063 and Margaretha (77) on 11 August 1860.64

A little over a decade later, my ancestress, the elder Catharina CORNELY died on 10 June 1871 in Strassen at the age of 77.65 Her youngest sister, the younger Catherine died on 3 December 1874 in Bertrange, also at the age of 77 years.66

I found it amazing that four of the five children of Hubert CORNELY and Margaretha EVEN who lived to adulthood died at the age of 77.

While researching this family group I didn’t stop at the parents and children of Hubert and Margaretha. I pushed forward following the lines of descendants who show up in the match list of the DNA test I manage as well as backward for any leads to take the family tree back another generation or two. As mentioned above, I will be writing a post about the key I discovered in Hubert and Margaretha’s marriage record. Another post will correct a misidentification the American descendants of Hubert and Margaretha’s daughter Margaretha CORNELY who married Peter MONNER have in their family trees.

P.S. I haven’t included any images of the documents found other than the 1779 marriage record. If you are interested in the documentation, the links are posted in the long list of citations below. If you aren’t interested, keep scrolling down to like or comment on this post. Thank you.

© 2019, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), <i>FamilySearch</i> (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Reckange-lès-Mersch-sur-Mess > Naissances 1867-1890 Mariages 1796-1890 Décès 1796-1883 > image 913 of 1497. 1816 Death Record No. 5. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12156-31738-32?cc=1709358 : accessed 2 December 2015). 
  2. Ibid., Reckange-lès-Mersch > Naissances 1796-1866 > image 122 of 828. 1807 Birth Record (right, lower). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6LVZ-W5F?cc=1709358&wc=9RYQ-VZS%3A130232001%2C130238801 : accessed 21 April 2019). 
  3. Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), <i>FamilySearch</i> (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes 1756-1797, confirmations 1791, mariages, sépultures 1779-1797 > image 5 of 135. 1758 Baptismal Record (left page, last entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WM-M61H?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y4S%3A1500994201%2C1501112274 : accessed 18 April 2019). 
  4. Ibid., Obercorn > Baptêmes 1779-1793, 1797, mariages 1790-1793, 1796-1797, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 298 of 407. 1790 Marriage Record (bottom left, top right). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WS-9HLX?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-4W1%3A1500974001%2C1500974002 : accessed 19 April 2019). 
  5. Luxembourg Civil Records, Differdange > Décès 1813-1858 > image 193 of 591. 1828 Death Record No. 13. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6X1Y-QK?cc=1709358&wc=9RYC-GP6%3A129627401%2C129627402 : accessed 28 April 2019). 
  6. Ibid., Differdange > Décès 1813-1858 > image 217 of 591. 1830 Death Record No. 10. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6X1P-Q5?cc=1709358&wc=9RYC-GP6%3A129627401%2C129627402 : accessed 28 April 2019). 
  7. Luxembourg Church Records, Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes 1756-1797, confirmations 1791, mariages, sépultures 1779-1797 > image 7 of 135. 1760 Baptismal Record (right page, 4th entry from bottom). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-M6Q4?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y4S%3A1500994201%2C1501112274 : accessed 18 April 2019). 
  8. Ibid., Hollerich > Baptêmes, mariages, décès 1785-1796 > image 142 of 203. 1789 Marriage Record (left page, first entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-9KHB?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-C6X%3A1500934001%2C1501009736 : accessed 18 April 2019). 
  9. Luxembourg Civil Records, Weiler-la-Tour > Décès 1796-1890 > image 221 of 632. 1833 Death Record No. 8. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-XC93-N6L?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-YWP%3A130558901%2C129627102 : accessed 27 April 2019). 
  10. Ibid., Weiler-la-Tour > Décès 1796-1890 > image 290 of 632. 1843 Death Record No. 11. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-XC93-89N?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-YWP%3A130558901%2C129627102 : accessed 27 April 2019). 
  11. Dr. Prosper Kasyer and Pfarrer Hubert Job, Familienchronik der Einwohner der Gemeinde Weiler-zum-Turm: Hassel, Syren, und Weiler-Turm ca1750-1930, published 2013 by the author; pages 30-31, family #232, Cornely Nicolas and Groos Catharina, children #11 and #12. 
  12. Diözesanarchiv Luxemburg / Archives diocésaines Luxembourg (images), Matricula Online, Creative Commons License CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 (original records in the Luxembourg Diocesan Archives, Luxembourg City), Microfilm/-fiche GV.MF 526 – 627, Weiler-zum-Turm, KB-03-11, Heiraten – Sterbefälle – Taufen – 1809 – 182, page 57, image 110, right, last entry. 820 Baptismal Record for Elisabetha Cornely. (http://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/weiler-zum-turm/KB-03-11/?pg=110 : accessed 28 April 2019) and page 58, image 111, left page, first entry. 1820 Baptismal Record for Catharina Cornely. (http://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/weiler-zum-turm/KB-03-11/?pg=111 : accessed 28 April 2019). 
  13. Luxembourg Parish Records, Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes 1756-1797, confirmations 1791, mariages, sépultures 1779-1797 > image 10 of 135. 1764 Baptismal Record (left, 5th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WM-M6TG?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y4S%3A1500994201%2C1501112274 : accessed 19 April 2019). 
  14. Ibid., Luxembourg, Saint Michel > Mariages 1764-1796 > image 302 of 305. 1796 Marriage Record (right, top). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WM-9LQJ?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-3YZ%3A1500891707%2C1500962420 : accessed 19 April 2019). 
  15. Luxembourg Civil Records, Bettembourg > Mariages 1796-1890 Décès 1796-1885 > image 670 of 1479. 1802 Death Record (3 nivôse an XI) (left, top). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6X59-BL?cc=1709358&wc=9RY3-K68%3A129623601%2C129637201 : accessed 28 April 2019). 
  16. Ibid., Bettembourg > Mariages 1796-1890 Décès 1796-1885 > image 841 of 1479. 1826 Death Record No. 2. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6XPW-3V1?cc=1709358&wc=9RY3-K68%3A129623601%2C129637201 : accessed 19 April 2019). 
  17. Luxembourg Church Records, Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes 1756-1797, confirmations 1791, mariages, sépultures 1779-1797 > image 13 of 135. 1769 Baptismal Record (right page, 2nd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WM-M624?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y4S%3A1500994201%2C1501112274 : 9 January 2015),. 
  18. Luxembourg Civil Records, Bettembourg > Mariages 1796-1890 Décès 1796-1885 > image 26 of 1479. 1802 Marriage Recor (right page). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6XPW-9YY?cc=1709358&wc=9RY3-K68%3A129623601%2C129637201 : accessed 19 April 2019). 
  19. Ibid., Dudelange > Naissances 1888-1890 Mariages 1796-1890 Décès 1796-1840 > image 1451 of 1477. 1838 Death Record No. 37. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DWY9-MFL?cc=1709358&wc=9RT1-K68%3A129625901%2C130271901 : accessed 19 April 2019). 
  20. Ibid., Dudelange > Naissances 1888-1890 Mariages 1796-1890 Décès 1796-1840 > image 1462 of 1477. 1839 Death Record No. 24. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DWY9-MPN?cc=1709358&wc=9RT1-K68%3A129625901%2C130271901 : accessed 19 April 2019). 
  21. Luxembourg Church Records, Obercorn > Mariages 1727-1770, sépultures 1727-1737, 1740-1778 > image 64 of 96. 1741 Marriage Record (right page, 8th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WS-9Y5?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-44M%3A1500974001%2C1501083590 : accessed 19April 2019). 
  22. Ibid., Obercorn > Baptêmes 1728-1778 > image 23 of 103. 1742 Baptismal Record (left page, 7th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WS-9ZVL?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-HZW%3A1500974001%2C1501099482 : accessed 19 April 2019). 
  23. Ibid., Obercorn > Baptêmes 1728-1778 > image 86 of 103. 1775 Baptismal Record (right page, 2nd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WS-9Z2Z?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-HZW%3A1500974001%2C1501099482 : 9 January 2015). 
  24. Luxembourg Civil Records, Differdange > Naissances 1796-1806 > image 103 of 166. 1804 (3 germinal an XII) Death Record (right, top). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6LVQ-8NQ?cc=1709358&wc=9RYQ-JWG%3A129627401%2C130102702 : accessed 28 April 2019). 
  25. Ibid., Differdange > Décès 1813-1858 > image 132 of 591. 1823 Death Record No. 3. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6X19-S53?cc=1709358&wc=9RYC-GP6%3A129627401%2C129627402 : accessed 28 April 2019). 
  26. Luxembourg Church Records, Obercorn > Mariages 1727-1770, sépultures 1727-1737, 1740-1778 > image 86 of 96. 1768 Marriage Record (bottom left, top right). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WS-9K6?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-44M%3A1500974001%2C1501083590 : accessed 20 April 2019). 
  27. Ibid., Obercorn > Baptêmes 1704-1727, 1746, 1794-1797, 1800-1805, mariages 1795-1797, 1800-1807, sépultures 1794-1797, 1802-1807 > image 266 of 296. 1796 Death Record (left, first entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WS-99JH?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-N3T%3A1500974001%2C1500974302 : accessed 28 April 2019). 
  28. Luxembourg Civil Records, Differdange > Naissances 1881-1890 Mariages 1796-1890 Décès 1796-1812 > image 1392 of 1487. 1801 Death Record (25 nivôse an IX), right page, bottom. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6PW9-RJ2?cc=1709358&wc=9RYZ-JWL%3A129627401%2C130296101 : accessed 20 April 2019). 
  29. Luxembourg Church Records, Obercorn > Baptêmes 1728-1778 > image 33 of 103. 1749 Baptismal Record (left page, 6th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WS-9ZXH?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-HZW%3A1500974001%2C1501099482 : accessed 19 April 2019). 
  30. Luxembourg Church Records, Obercorn > Baptêmes 1728-1778 > image 35 of 103. 1751 Baptismal Record right page, 8th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WS-9Z4P?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-HZW%3A1500974001%2C1501099482 : accessed 19 April 2019). 
  31. Ibid., Oetrange > Tables des mariages 1718-1755, 1761-1763, 1767-1792 (organisée par l’épouse) > image 22 of 122. 1774 Marriage Index Card. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WS-92KT?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-L2W%3A1500972093%2C1501259064 : accessed 30 August 2017). 
  32.   Luxembourg Civil Records, Contern > Décès 1822-1890 > image 78 of 568. 1833 Death Record No. 18. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DRWS-8JR?cc=1709358&wc=9RYM-JWL%3A129626701%2C129626702 : accessed 30 August 2017). 
  33. Luxembourg Church Records, Obercorn > Baptêmes 1728-1778 > image 44 of 103. 1756 Baptismal Record (right page, 2nd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WS-9ZGG?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-HZW%3A1500974001%2C1501099482 : accessed 20 April 2019). 
  34. Ibid., Obercorn > Baptêmes 1728-1778 > image 54 of 103. 1761 Baptismal Record (right page, 2nd entry from bottom). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WS-9ZX7?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-HZW%3A1500974001%2C1501099482 : accessed 20 April 2019). 
  35. Ibid., Obercorn > Baptêmes 1728-1778 > image 61 of 103. 1764 Baptismal Record of twins (left page, 2nd entry from bottom). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WS-9ZZJ?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-HZW%3A1500974001%2C1501099482 : accessed 20 April 2019). 
  36. Ibid., Obercorn > Baptêmes 1728-1778 > image 61 of 103. 1764 Baptismal Record of twins (left page, 2nd entry from bottom). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WS-9ZZJ?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-HZW%3A1500974001%2C1501099482 : accessed 20 April 2019). 
  37. Ibid., Obercorn > Mariages 1727-1770, sépultures 1727-1737, 1740-1778 > image 29 of 96. 1766 Death Record (left page, 3rd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WS-9BV?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-44M%3A1500974001%2C1501083590 : accessed 1 May 2019). 
  38. Ibid., Obercorn > Baptêmes 1728-1778 > image 64 of 103. 1766 Baptismal Record (right page, last entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WS-9CKY?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-HZW%3A1500974001%2C1501099482 : accessed 20 April 2019). 
  39.  Armand Logelin-Simon, Registres Paroissiaux Oberkorn, Tables par Familles 1637-1804, a handwritten compilation by the author of the families found in the church records of Obercorn, Luxembourg, scanned and made available as a free pdf to members of Luxracines on https://www.luxracines.lu/site/en/biblioonline, page 49 family 22 Ewen, Leonard. 
  40. Luxembourg Church Records, Obercorn > Baptêmes, sépultures 1779-1786 > image 118 of 119. 1779 Death Record (right page, last entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WS-9CST?cc=2037955&wc=STHX-7MQ%3A1500974001%2C1501107388 : accessed 20 April 2019). 
  41. Ibid., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 11 of 205. 1779 Marriage Record (lower, left). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-M6TL?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y47%3A1500994201%2C1500913302 : accessed 8 January 2018). 
  42.   Ibid., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 17 of 205. 1780 Baptismal Record (left, top). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WM-MXVB?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y47%3A1500994201%2C1500913302 : accessed 8 January 2018). 
  43. Ibid., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 49 of 205. 1782 Baptismal Record (right, top). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WM-MXDX?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y47%3A1500994201%2C1500913302 : accessed 8 January 2018). 
  44. Ibid., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 78 of 205. 1784 Baptismal Record (left, bottom). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WM-MXQ4?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y47%3A1500994201%2C1500913302 : accessed 8 January 2018). 
  45. Ibid., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 106 of 205. 1786 Baptismal Record (left, bottom). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WM-MX6M?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y47%3A1500994201%2C1500913302 : accessed 8 January 2018). 
  46. Ibid., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 141 of 205. 1789 Baptismal Record (right, bottom). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WM-M654?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y47%3A1500994201%2C1500913302 : accessed 9 January 2018). 
  47. Ibid., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes 1756-1797, confirmations 1791, mariages, sépultures 1779-1797 > image 122 of 135. 1789 Death Record (left page, last entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WM-MX44?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y4S%3A1500994201%2C1501112274 : accessed 21 April 2019). 
  48. Ibid., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 152 of 205. 1790 Baptismal Record (lower left, upper right). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WM-MX8V?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y47%3A1500994201%2C1500913302 : accessed 9 January 2018). 
  49. Ibid., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes 1756-1797, confirmations 1791, mariages, sépultures 1779-1797 > image 122 of 135. 1792 Death Record (left page, last entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WM-MX44?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y4S%3A1500994201%2C1501112274 : accessed 18 April 2019). 
  50. Ibid., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 194 of 205. 1793 Baptismal Record (left, top). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WM-M6PC?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y47%3A1500994201%2C1500913302 : accessed 9 January 2018). 
  51. Ibid., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes 1756-1797, confirmations 1791, mariages, sépultures 1779-1797 > image 122 of 135. 1793 Death Record (left page, 4th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WM-MX44?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y4S%3A1500994201%2C1501112274 : accessed 18 April 2019). 
  52. Ibid., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes 1756-1797, confirmations 1791, mariages, sépultures 1779-1797 > image 122 of 135. 1793 Death Record (right page, 3rd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WM-MX44?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y4S%3A1500994201%2C1501112274 : accessed 18 April 2019). 
  53. Ibid., Reckange-sur-Mess > Baptêmes 1756-1797, confirmations 1791, mariages, sépultures 1779-1797 > image 74 of 135. 1794 Baptismal Record (right, 3rd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WM-MDTM?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y4S%3A1500994201%2C1501112274 : accessed 7 January 2018). 
  54. Luxembourg Civil Records, Reckange-lès-Mersch > Naissances 1796-1866 > image 11+12 of 828. 1797 Birth Record part 1+2, lower right and upper left (20 October an VI).
    (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6LK9-XS?cc=1709358&wc=9RYQ-VZS%3A130232001%2C130238801 : accessed 9 January 2018). 
  55. Ibid., Sandweiler > Naissances 1797-1864 > image 75+76 of 932. 1805 Marriage Record (26 Prairial an XIII). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-61JN-R6?cc=1709358&wc=9RY8-C68%3A130336601%2C130448701 : accessed 17 April 2019). 
  56. Ibid., Reckange-lès-Mersch-sur-Mess > Naissances 1867-1890 Mariages 1796-1890 Décès 1796-1883 > image 278 of 1497. 1807 Marriage Record (left page). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6FW9-QKX?cc=1709358&wc=9RY3-PTL%3A130234801%2C130234802 : 17 July 2014). 
  57. Ibid., Leudelange > Mariages 1802-1823 > image 61+62 of 193. 1809 Marriage Record (two pages). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DYZ3-Q39?cc=1709358&wc=9RY9-YW5%3A130016701%2C130087201 : accessed 16 April 2019). 
  58. Ibid., Reckange-lès-Mersch-sur-Mess > Naissances 1867-1890 Mariages 1796-1890 Décès 1796-1883 > image 913 of 1497. 1816 Death Record No. 5. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12156-31738-32?cc=1709358 : accessed 2 December 2015). 
  59.   Ibid., Strassen > Naissances, mariages 1796-1823, 1850-1890 > image 1000 of 1464. 1817 Marriage No. 4. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12588-58675-14?cc=1709358 : accessed 2 December 2015). 
  60. Ibid., Bertrange > Naissances 1796-1890 Mariages 1796-1827 > image 1446 of 1480. 1824 Marriage Record No. 8. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12703-107213-91?cc=1709358 : accessed 2 December 2015). 
  61. Ibid., Reckange-lès-Mersch-sur-Mess > Naissances 1867-1890 Mariages 1796-1890 Décès 1796-1883 > image 1107 of 1497. 1839 Death Record No. 19. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12156-33353-69?cc=1709358 : accessed 2 December 2015). 
  62. Ibid., Reckange-lès-Mersch-sur-Mess > Naissances 1867-1890 Mariages 1796-1890 Décès 1796-1883 > image 1301 of 1497. 1858 Death Record No. 2. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6FW9-7CC?cc=1709358&wc=9RY3-PTL%3A130234801%2C130234802 : accessed 10 January 2018). 
  63. Ibid., Bertrange > Mariages 1828-1890 Décès 1796-1890 > image 1118 of 1416. 1860 Death Record No. 14. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6X89-BWK?cc=1709358&wc=9RYC-829%3A129622901%2C129640401 : accessed 16 April 2019). 
  64. Ibid., Sandweiler > Décès 1833-1890 > image 291 of 604. 1860 Death Record No. 19. ( (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DRKS-S3G?cc=1709358&wc=9RY9-929%3A130336601%2C130345701 : accessed 17 April 2019). 
  65. Ibid., Strassen > Décès 1850-1890 > image 224 of 446. 1871 Death Record No. 30. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11741-2453-64?cc=1709358 : accessed 22 August 2011). 
  66. Ibid., Bertrange > Mariages 1828-1890 Décès 1796-1890 > image 1252 of 1416. 1874 Death Record No. 27. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-6X8S-3G1?cc=1709358&wc=9RYC-829%3A129622901%2C129640401 : accessed 3 May 2019). 

It’s Time to Start Working on a New Generation

Early in 2018, I wrote the last post on a set of 4th great-grandparents. I closed the post with the following paragraph:

Family history research will never be finished or ready to publish. Share what you have, make corrections and additions, write about your ancestors. Yes, it probably will remain a work in progress or a draft of a family book. By sharing what you think is incomplete, you may reach someone who has the missing information or the key to open the door in your brick wall.

It took me a year to write about 48 sets of 4th great-grandparents = 32 of my husband’s and 16 of mine. In 2014, the first year I blogged, I wrote about all of my paternal ancestors from my father to my paternal 4th great-grandparents. They made up only a quarter of my children’s tree. As the stories were coming along so well I decided to continue with the rest of my children’s ancestors up to their 4th greats in 2015 and their 5th greats in 2017-2018.

The next logical step would be to do their 6th great-grandparents. Of the 128 sets, 15 are brick walls – 5 paternal and 10 maternal (with the 10 being American ancestors). If I limit research and writing to one set a week I could get them done in a little over two years.

These are the names of the ancestors divided into the paternal and maternal sides:

Our children’s paternal 6th great-grandparents:

(256 & 257) Adami MEDER and Elisabetha ESCH
(258 & 259) Joannes REINERS and wife Maria: Susanna LAMBERT’s parents
(260 & 261) Michaelis WILMES and Barbara JACQUEMIN
(262 & 263) Mr. SCHEID (SCHOOD) and Anna Maria FETH
(264 & 265) Brick Wall (paternal grandparents of Théodore REIFFER)
(266 & 267) Brick Wall (maternal grandparents of Théodore REIFFER)
(268 & 269) Joannes CLOOS and Anne Marie KLAREN
(270 & 271) Nikolaus THEWES and Gertrud LESSEN
(272 & 273) Joannis ADAM and Margaritha (first married to THOMMES)
(274 & 275) Jacobi WOLTER and Marie Elisabeth MEYERS
(276 & 277) Joannes SCHENTEN x KOECHER and Catharina KOSTERS
(278 & 279) Parents of Cathérine OBERECKEN
(280 & 281) Mathias LORENS and Eva FRENTZ
(282 & 283) Petri STENGENFORT and unknown wife
(284 & 285) Joannis PREISER and Anna Maria FETH
(286 & 286) Petrus SCHRANTZ and Anne Marie HAMEN
(288 & 289) Jean “Joannis” SCHWARTZ and Maria HEINZ
(290 & 291) Mathia HALER and Angela ALENTS
(292 & 293) Johann Gerard TRIERWEILER and Elisabeth KERSCH
(294 & 295) Carl HOFFMANN and Angela ROSPORT
(296 & 297) Philippi SCHMITT and Apollonia MATTES
(298 & 299) Matthias PLEIN and Margaretha VALERIUS
(300 & 301) Johann WOLLSCHEID and Anna Maria WILLWERT
(302 & 303) Johann BARTHELMES and Eva BARZEN
(304 & 305) Johann Peter GORGES and Anna Maria HORSCH
(306 & 307) Nikolaus RODENS and Anna SCHUE
(308 & 309) Brick Wall (parents of Caspar BOTZ)
(310 & 311) Brick Wall (parents of Magdalena MASEN)
(312 & 313) Nicolaus SCHERFF and Helena OTTO
(314 & 315) Dominique STEIMETZ and Helena “Magdalena” KOCH
(316 & 317) Daniel and Elisabetha CLEMENS
(318 & 319) Matthias WEBER and Anna Margaretha FEILEN
(320 & 321) Henri and Magdalena  CREMERS
(322 & 323) Joannes VENANDI and Maria HOSINGER
(324 & 325) Johann THIVELS alias FRIEDERICH and Catharina FEDERSPIEL
(326 & 327) Martin HUNTGES and Marguerite MAY
(328 & 329) Johann Heinrich “Henri” MERKES and Anna ROSS
(330 & 331) Anton WAGENER and Catharina PIRSCH
(332 & 333) Mathias HASTERT and Anne NIEDERKORN
(334 & 335) Jean SCHMIDT and Maria LENTZ
(336 & 337) Leonard GRITIUS and Marie NEIEN
(338 & 339) Jean SCHETTERT and Anna Catharina SCHAACK
(340 & 341) Jean Baptiste SCHAEFFER and Catherine SCHAACK
(342 & 343) Nicolas GREISCH and Susanne ROLLINGER
(344 & 345) Michel WECKERING and Anna Maria DALEYDEN
(346 & 347) Brick Wall (parents of Marguerite LASCHEID)
(348 & 349) Jacob BERNARD and Jeanne CAPPUS
(350 & 351) Valentin GREBER and Christina STEFFEN
(352 & 353) Dominique PEFFER and Marguerite SINTGEN
(354 & 355) Nicolas PIERRET and Anna Maria ROBINET
(356 & 357) Nicolas GRASSER vulgo REUTERS and Elisabetha WINANDY
(358 & 359) Léonard HOSCHEID and Marie Catharina REULAND
(360 & 361) Pierre ZWANG and Anne Marie HUSCHET
(362 & 363) Johann WELTER and Anna Maria FELTES
(364 & 365) Jean DHAM and Marie WELTER
(366 & 367) Nicolas KIMES and Anna Maria STRENG
(368 & 369) Peter MERTES and Marguerite BIVER
(370 & 371) Johann DONNEN and Barbara CHRITOPHORY
(372 & 373) Casparus ERPELDING and Gertrudes JEHNEN
(374 & 375) Peter CONRADT and Anna Catharina ROEDER
(376 & 377) Petrus RUCKERT and Anna Catharina SPEYER
(378 & 379) Petrus MICHELS and Susanna MARTIN aka MERTES
(380 & 381) Peter SCHMIT and Rosa CLEMENS
(382 & 383) Nicolas WEICKER and Anne Margarethe HARTMANN

Our children’s maternal 6th great-grandparents: The American families

(384 & 385) Brick Wall (great-grandparents of William A. W. DEMPSEY)
(386 & 387) Brick Wall (great-grandparents of William A. W. DEMPSEY)
(388 & 389) Brick Wall (great-grandparents of William A. W. DEMPSEY)
(390 & 391) Brick Wall (great-grandparents of William A. W. DEMPSEY)
(392 & 393) Bailey WOOD and Nancy, his wife
(394 & 395) Martin McGRAW and Margaret “Polly”, his wife
(396 & 397) Hans Jacob HONEGGER and Maria GOETZ
(398 & 399) Isaac WISEMAN and Elizabeth DAVIS
(400 & 401) Ester INGRAM – an assumption
(402 & 403) John KINCAID and Elizabeth Hannah GILLESPIE
(404 & 405) William JOHNSON Sr. and Amy NELSON
(406 & 407) James SIMS and his wife Phebe (written in 2018)
James SIMS (1754-1845) Pioneer of Nicholas County, West Virginia
(see also link to page with all posts for James SIMS)
(408 & 409) Brick Wall DEMPSEY and his wife Susannah
(410 & 411) James LANDRUM and his unknown wife
(412 & 413) Phillip GOING and Judith POTTER
(414 & 415) William CRISP and his wife Lucy
(416 & 417) Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL (written in 2016)
Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ The Early Years in Maryland (1765-1793)
Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ The Years in Rockbridge (1793-1801)
Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ The Years in Rockbridge (1793-1801)
Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ At Home on the Old Henry Roop Place
Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ Family Life in Montgomery County, Virginia
The Last Will and Testament of Henry RUPE 1765-1845
Henry RUPE’s Estate and his Widow Catherine’s Last Days
A Date of Death for Catherine Barbara NOLL (1768-1859)
(418 & 419) Robert CARROLL and his wife Anne
(420 & 421) John LESTER II and Mary Ann TERRY
(422 & 423) Owen SUMNER and Sarah NEWTON
(424 & 425) John PETERS and wife – Can this be proven with DNA?
(426 & 427) Joseph LIVELY and Mary L. CASH
(428 & 429) Augustin PROFFITT and Elizabeth “Betsy” ROBERTSON
(430 & 431) Edward COCKRAM and his wife Mary
(432 & 433) Jeremiah CLAUNCH and his wife
(434 & 435) Brick wall (parents of Nancy BEASLEY)
(436 & 437) Brick Wall (paternal grandparents of Mary E. DOSS)
(438 & 439) James DOSS Jr. and Elizabeth LESTER
(440 & 441) BRICK WALL (paternal grandparents of John COOLEY)
(442 & 443) BRICK WALL (maternal grandparents of John COOLEY
(444 & 445) Edward TREDWAY and Nancy MAGNESS
(446 & 447) Brick Wall (maternal grandparents of Sarah Ann TREADWAY)

Our children’s maternal 6th great-grandparents: The families of the greater Luxembourg area

(448 & 449) Michel WILTINGER and Margaretha DIESBURG
(450 & 451) Michael WELTER and Katharian KLEIN
(452 & 453) Matthias SCHRAMEN and Anna Barbara LEIBRICH (BURG)
(454 & 455) Sebastian SCHMITT and Maria LORANG
(456 & 457) Nikolaus WEYMAN and Maria Katharina HUSS
(458 & 459) Gerard MALAMBRÉ and Barbara BIESDORF
(460 & 461) Johann Bernard WELTER and Maria BRIMERS
(462 & 463) Johann HENNES and Magdalena MÜLLER
(464 & 465) Peter BUBELREITER and Gertrud LAMBERTI or BOSEN
(466 & 467) Johann BOMMES and Anna Maria Luzia THIELEN
(468 & 469) Peter MERTSCHERT and Susanna “Anna” SCHNEIDER
(470 & 471) Theodor MERGEN and Gertrud THELEN
(472 & 473) Johann Nicolaus WAGNER and Anna Maria KLEIWER
(474 & 475) Johann HARTERT and Elisabeth HEINZ
(476 & 477) Peter KERSCHT and Eva SCHMIDS
(478 & 479) Gerhard EWEN and Barbara THEILEN
(480 & 481) Pierre FOURNELLE and Jeanne NEU
(482 & 483) Jean SCHMIT and Eve DUCKER
(484 & 485) Jacques PHILIPPART and Catherine SINGER aka KETTER
(486 & 487) Henri MEUNIER and Margaretha KILBOUR
(488 & 489) Joseph SCHLOESSER and Catherine ARENDT
(490 & 491) Nicolas TRAUDT and Barbe BILL
(492 & 493) Johann CONSBRÜCK and Barbara SCHMIDT
(494 & 495) Sébastian LANSER and Maria Catharina HASTERT
(496 & 497) Nicolaus FRANTZ and Angela BARTEL
(498 & 499) Nicolaus KIEFFER and Susanna SCHILTZ
(500 & 501) Joannis FRISCH and Margaret ZEIMES
(502 & 503) Peter HUBERTY and Jonannata BEREND
(504 & 505) Jean MAJERUS and Margretha BREGER
(506 & 507) Hubert CORNELY and Margaretha EVEN
(508 & 509) Remacle TRAUSCH and Theresia BRAUN (COLLING)
(510 & 511) Johannes HAMES and Agnes HERTZ

Where should I begin? I believe each tiny twig on every small branch of the larger branches in the family tree is as important as the next. If I continued in the same order I’ve been writing about the previous generations, I’d start at the top of the lists above and work down. However, I want to get my Luxembourgish side done first!

My youngest brother turned over his AncestryDNA test to me three years ago. On our paternal side, my brother’s DNA has confirmed the paper trail is correct for the American lines and we have not had any surprises. However, the brick walls are still standing.

On our maternal side, matches are few. This is not surprising as these lines remained in Luxembourg up until my birth. Maternal matches on Ancestry are for the most part America descendants of Luxembourg emigrants from the 1800s. The highest maternal match is a 4th cousin once removed (4C1R) with 44 cMs on 3 segments. We share Jacob FRISCH and Regina HUBERTY, my 4th great-grandparents (children of 501 through 504).

Screenshot of my family tree on Ancestry with annotations.

This is how I’ve decided to proceed. Ancestry now shows a helix icon for the ancestors who are on the ThruLines in trees which are linked to DNA tests. In this screenshot, we see my maternal grandmother’s mother Catharina FRANTZ and all of her ancestors. On the right are the 5th great-grandparents from 496 to 511. Working from the bottom up I opened each to find the first couple with matches who share DNA with my brother and have the ancestor couple in their tree.

And the winner is…

Hubert CORNELY and Margaretha EVEN (506 & 507) have 8 suggested matches descending from three of their children.

  • Two of these matches have been proven as well as several more who do not have their trees linked to the DNA. A nice group of descendants split between a line which went to America and a line which moved from Luxembourg to Belgium to Switzerland to England.
  • Two matches come through a line in which I found an interesting phenomenon: a man who was married twice – to sisters – both with the same name. Yes, this has caused errors in online trees which need to be corrected.
  • Three matches share a very small amount of DNA with my brother (between 6-11 cMs). Their trees are incorrect and the common ancestors cannot be the CORNELY-EVEN couple.

Lëtz Research – Luxembourg Research

Researching Luxembourg families has become easier for me over the years. I have several advantages over the descendants of Luxembourg emigrants. As 3/4 of my children’s family tree is Luxembourgish, I’ve learned how to easily locate a civil or church record. I’m fluent in the languages used in Luxembourg records and have learned the most commonly used Latin terms. I had a great teacher in my father-in-law who helped me decipher the handwriting in the records during the early years. When all else fails, I have my genealogy society Luxracines and its members who are even more skilled in Luxembourg research.

It’s Time to Start Working on a New Generation

The posts may not be ready on a weekly basis. The objective is to get back to researching family groups with the intention of going back further in time on several lines which have not been researched. By starting out with the Luxembourg families, I hope to make connections with cousins descended from Luxembourg emigrants and interested in learning more about their roots in this beautiful country.

Next week I’ll begin my posts on my children’s 6th great-grandparents with Hubert CORNELY and Margaretha EVEN of Wickrange in the commune of Reckange-sur-Messe in Luxembourg.

© 2019, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Wowsers! Ancestry Fixed My ThruLines

Last Sunday I gave feedback to Ancestry on my ThruLines. As I was writing the feedback message I realized it might be good material for a blog post. At the end of the feedback message, I let them know I might use it in a post.

Dear Ancestry, My Feedback on the Step Relationship Bug in ThruLines sat around in my drafts until Wednesday. I took a few moments to check my ThruLines as I’ve done every few days since they came out – getting more and more irritated.

Wowsers! Those ugly grrr!! images I’d added to my great-grandfather’s step-mother and all of her ancestors are missing.

Could it be Ancestry took my feedback into consideration and got the step-relationships fixed? Had they been ready to roll out a fix before or after I sent my feedback? Does it matter? Well, yes, I would like to know why it happened so quickly following the feedback I gave. I want to know if this step relationship bug in the ThruLines was solved for everyone or just for me.

Screenshot courtesy of Ancestry

I’m seeing Milla Susan PETERS as my great-great-grandmother. I’ve been hoping to see her ever since they gave me Nancy Elizabeth JOHNSON, the 2nd wife of Gordon Washington ROOP, as a potential 2nd-great-grandmother showing half-cousins as full cousins.

Why, you ask, was I so excited about one ancestor being corrected? One right ancestor means I should be seeing her parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents in my ThruLines. All of these ancestors are from lines with many descendants who have had their DNA tested.

Screenshot courtesy of Ancestry

Although Milla Susan’s ThruLines shows only two DNA matches, the next generations have many more matches:

  • 107 DNA matches through Jordan N. PETERS (father of Milla Susan)
  • 33 DNA matches through Rachel PROFFITT (mother of Milla Susan)
  • 68 DNA matches through Zachariah PETERS (father of Jordan)
  • 129 DNA matches through Kesiah LIVELY (mother of Jordan)
  • 113 DNA matches through David PROFFITT (father of Rachel)
  • 110 DNA matches through Sarah COCKRAM (mother of Rachel)
  • 123 DNA matches through Joseph LIVELY (father of Kesiah)
  • 128 DNA matches through Mary L. CASH (mother of Kesiah)
  • 97 DNA matches through Augustine “Austin” PROFFITT (father of David)
  • 97 DNA matches through Elizabeth “Betsy” ROBERTSON (mother of David)
  • 231 DNA matches through Edward COCKRAM (father of Sarah)
  • 232 DNA matches through Mary WORTHAM (mother of Sarah)

It’ll take time to confirm each match is a descendant of the ancestor he/she is listed under as the lines down are only as reliable as the trees ThruLines uses to make the connection. The large number of matches for the PETERS, LIVELY, PROFFITT, and COCKRAM lines was expected due to the families being large and having many descendants.

But wait! Not only was the step-relationship corrected for Milla Susan PETERS, but I am now seeing  <<drumroll>>

Screenshot courtesy of Ancestry

William A. W. DEMPSEY and Sarah Ann WOOD as my 2nd great-grandparents. They’ve been missing from the ThruLines since they came out.

Screenshot courtesy of Ancestry

William is my most frustrating brick wall. Sarah Ann’s branch and all matches associated with it are very important. I hope they will help me to sort out all the matches for her side.  This would leave only matches which will point to William’s unknown parents and ancestry. At least that is the way I believe it should work. ThruLines is showing potential parents for him which I cannot accept at this time.

Sarah Ann WOOD’s ancestry is bringing in many matches which will also have to be verified.

  • 41 DNA matches through William A. W. DEMPSEY.
  • 45 DNA matches through Sarah Ann WOOD (wife of William A. W.)
  • 87 DNA matches through Elijah WOOD (father of Sarah Ann)
  • 93 DNA matches through Rachel HONAKER (mother of Sarah Ann)
  • 92 DNA matches through William WOOD (father of Elijah)
  • 90 DNA matches through Mary Ann McGRAW (mother of Elijah)
  • 162 DNA matches through Frederick HONAKER (father of Rachel)
  • 154 DNA matches through Rachel WISEMAN (mother of Rachel)
  • 70 DNA matches through Bailey WOOD (father of William)
  • 95 DNA matches through Nancy _____ (mother of William)
  • 147 DNA matches through Martin McGRAW (father of Mary Ann)
  • 109 DNA matches through Margaret “Polly” _____ (mother of Mary Ann)
  • 173 DNA matches through Hans Jacob HONEGGER (father of Frederick)
  • 30 DNA matches through Maria GOETZ (mother of Frederick)
  • 202 DNA matches through Isaac WISEMAN (father of Rachel)
  • 204 DNA matches through Elizabeth DAVIS (mother of Rachel)

Another New Feature

Screenshot courtesy of Ancestry

ThruLines are now connected to the tree linked to a DNA test. On the pedigree view of the tree, there is now a DNA symbol in on the left to turn on this feature which adds a little blue ThruLines icon next to the ancestors’ names. William, Sarah, and Milla are ThruLines ancestors but in the pedigree view above they haven’t been updated. I discovered this about the same time my ThruLines were fixed on Wednesday.

Did the feedback I sent on Sunday to Ancestry on the ThruLines help them to get this fixed? I will likely never know. But I believe this was a lesson in giving the best feedback possible to help the team to get ThruLines working correctly. As I wrote in my feedback to them, ThruLines could be a powerful tool.

© 2019, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Dear Ancestry, My Feedback on the Step Relationship Bug in ThruLines

This is the first of two posts on Ancestry‘s ThruLines regarding an issue I have had with the new feature.

Access to ThruLines Beta is available to customers without an Ancestry subscription for a limited time.

Unfortunately, hundreds of user trees on Ancestry cannot be taken into account when building ThruLines. The Legal Genealogist went ballistic last Saturday and wrote How do we know? It’s an excellent post with an example of a user tree which cannot be taken seriously. Judy G. Russell recognized the errors in the tree but can a computer program do the same? I think not.

This is not meant to provoke negative comments concerning Ancestry and the features offered by them. This is about giving feedback concerning a known problem in hopes of getting positive results.


Sunday, April 7, 2019

Dear Ancestry,

I have given feedback several times before [concerning the reason I am not satisfied with ThruLines] and will try to be more detailed as there is a bug in the system which has not been fixed.

I realize, at this time, ThruLines is a free tool on AncestryDNA. However, your long-time customers’ experience in family history research should be taken into account. We can work together to get this fixed.

The problem is a known bug in the system as other users have complained about it on social media. Some users who gave feedback say their ThruLines were “fixed” within days. I do not believe Ancestry has taken the step to go into one user’s ThruLines to fix this bug. I strongly believe it was a coincidence the users’ ThruLines were corrected after feedback. It is more likely another user’s tree, which was being used to build the connection between the ancestor and the match, had been corrected and this resolved the issue.

This is the issue I have with ThruLines’ “step bug”

I am seeing a step-parent as the parent in the ThruLines. The information is correct in my tree. No other tree is being used to create this ThruLines ancestor. Along with this step-parent, I am seeing all of her ancestors, unrelated to my line, as my ancestors in ThruLines. Not as POTENTIAL ancestors with a dotted borders – they are being shown as ANCESTORS.

  1. The ancestor who is showing up incorrectly in ThruLines is:
Screenshot courtesy of Ancestry. I included the link to this image in my feedback.
  1. The pedigree of the incorrect person in my tree:
Screenshot courtesy of Ancestry. I included the link to this image in my feedback.

I’ve added images to her ancestors showing they are NOT the ancestors of the home person and/or test person. [This is so that I can quickly recognize them on ThruLines.]

  1. This is her husband, my 2nd great-grandfather, in my tree. His information is correct and includes his two wives and their respective children:
Screenshot courtesy of Ancestry. I included the link to this image in my feedback.
  1. This is the pedigree of his first wife, my 2nd great-grandmother, who along with all of her ancestors are NOT showing up in my Thrulines. There are many DNA matches for people who descend from her PETERS, LIVELY, PROFFITT, and COCKRAM lines, on the match list, but they are being ignored by ThruLines.
Screenshot courtesy of Ancestry. I included the link to this image in my feedback.

I want to stress that ONLY entries in my tree are being used for this (incorrect) ThruLines ancestor. No other user tree is being used to make this connection between the half-cousin matches whose relationship is incorrectly calculated to full cousins.

I understand the idea of ThruLines and believe it could be a powerful tool. One problem will always be the hundreds of trees which are incorrect due to sloppy research, i.e. accepting hints without looking at dates, places, names, etc.

However, in this case, the tree being used is correct and ThruLines is overriding my information and picking the wrong person in the tree. I have no experience in programming. I can only tell you where I am seeing the bug. I’m fully aware of the fact that detecting the source of the bug may be more difficult.

Thank you for your time. In hopes of a quick resolution to this problem,

Best wishes,
Cathy


I wrote the above last Sunday but didn’t want to post it on my blog without giving Ancestry had a bit more time to fix the issue.  This was the first time I included links to the specific areas where the “bug” was detected. Will this kind of feedback help resolve the issue I have with Ancestry‘s ThruLines?

Don’t miss part two tomorrow.

© 2019, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Rewriting the Biography: A Darling Little Boy

Rewriting the Biography has become a catch-all for not only the biography of my 5th great-grandfather James SIMS (1754-1845) but also his children and their descendants. I took a break from working on this series after doing the census work and posts for his sixteen children.

While I was working on these last year, Patricia Simms Williams shared this lovely tribute written by her grandfather following the death of one of his children. The Genealogy Sketch box puts this family in perspective to James SIMS, Patricia, and myself.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Charles Edward SIMMS
Parents: William Thomas SIMS and Mary Catherine WILLIAMS
Spouse: Lydia Ellen WILLIAMS and Cora Estella HURLEY (*)
Children: Ophelia Virginia, Chusvert, Laura, Cecil James, Charles Erman, Carman, Claude, and Cluster Erwin
Whereabouts: West Virginia counties: Fayette, Nicholas, Braxton, and Greenbrier
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 3rd cousin 3 times removed

1. James SIMS and his wife Phebe
2. Martin SIMS and Susannah JOHNSON
3. Nelson SIMS and Nancy JONES
4. William Thomas SIMS and Mary Catherine WILLIAMS
5. Charles Edward SIMMS and Cora Estella HURLEY
6. Charles Erman SIMMS and Nina Mae MILES
7. Patricia Ann SIMMS

Charles Edward SIMMS was born in 1866 to William Thomas SIMS and Mary Catherine WILLIAMS. His father died in 1870 and his mother remarried in 1872. He had two siblings and 5 half-siblings.

Charles married his first wife Lydia Ellen WILLIAMS in 1887. She gave him two sons and a daughter before her death. Charles married again in 1896 to Cora Estella HURLEY.

By 1900 the two sons from his first marriage had died and his household included his wife Cora, his daughters Ophelia from his first marriage and Laura B. from his second marriage. Cora was listed as the mother of two children, one living. This would mean Charles had lost three children by 1900.

In 1902 a son was born to Charles and Cora. No record of birth has been found for him nor a record of his death in September 1905. His name and years of birth and death have been passed down in the family history. Cecil James SIMMS died after his father came in contact with measles while stopping off at a neighbor’s house.

This is his recollection and tribute to his son. The scans of the pages with the handwritten poem did not include a title. I’ve taken the liberty to give it this title.

A Darling Little Boy

Returning once unto my home
Along a muddy way
The path that through the fields did come
I took that fatal day.

Near by a neighbor farmhouse stood
I, weary, sad, thought best
to stop with them partake of food
and gain a little rest.

Fate lays her hand in silent state
Unwarned on all of earth
Regardless of the small or great,
Or those of noble birth

Fate, silent stroke here fell on me
I, measles did inhale,
The bellows of life troubled sea
Rose by the stirring gale.

There was a flower in my home,
A darling little boy;
No dearer object there could come,
This precious little toy.

I used to take my darling son
When near the close of day
The busy cares then being done
And sing in joyful lay.

“I never will cease to love him
My, Jimmy, my Jimmy!
I will never cease to love him
He’s done so much for me.”

But when the sickness seized this flower,
It drooping, withered, died
We strove to save it from that power;
It perished by our side.

We sadly laid him in the grave
To wait that coming day;
And trusting Jesus power to save,
Our heats will ever say:

One by one the Savior gathers,
choicest flowers rich, and rare,
He’ll transplant them in his garden,
They will bloom forever there.

Charles Edward Simms (1866-1936)

This poem conveys Charles’ feelings, his love for his son Jimmy, and the sadness of losing him. It was written like a hymn which is not unusual as Charles was a preacher and teacher. In the years which followed Charles was also a manager for Singer sewing machines as well as a jewelry shop owner.

Following the death of his only living son in 1905, Charles’ wife Cora gave him four more sons. Charles, Carman, Claude, and Cluster. Claude died of influenza in 1918 during the epidemic at the age of 4 years and 15 days. Charles and Cora’s daughter Laura had died the previous year. Patricia wrote:

Laura was not married to Joseph Edward Bruffey, the father of her son Joseph Eugene Bruffey. For some reason, Laura’s mother Cora didn’t want her to get married. Laura had polio as a child, childbirth was hard for her and she died the following day after giving birth to Joseph Eugene. The Bruffey’s wanted to raise the baby but grandma Cora refused to let them.

After all of these losses in Charles’ family, his children Ophelia, Charles, Carman, and Cluster lived long lives. Ophelia lived to be 82, Charles 69, Carman 70, and Cluster 93.

When Patricia shared the scans of the poem with me, she wrote:

It should be shared with someone who will take care of it after I’m gone.
By featuring it here, I hope it will not be lost to future generations interested in our SIMS ancestry.
© 2019, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

D-I-V-O-R-C-E : Sarah Jane Foster vs John W. Clonch

It’s a complicated story

John W. CLONCH married Sarah Jane FOSTER on 20 February 1862 in Gallia County, Ohio. A judge of the Probate Court of Gallia County issued the marriage license. They were joined in marriage by Robert WORH, a justice of the peace. The marriage record does not include the names of parents.1

Their first child, a son William Alexander was born on 2 October 1862.2 A year and a half later, about April 1864, a daughter was born. By this time the marriage was already in trouble and divorce was the next step for Sarah.

This post includes the chancery records found by Ralph L. Hayes in Mason County’s courthouse over two decades ago.3 He was kind enough to share them with me and gave me permission to use them.

Dramatis personae

These are the persons who played a part in the chancery case Sarah Jane FOSTER vs John W. CLONCH in 1864:

  • Sarah Jane FOSTER , age of 21, married John W. CLONCH also 21 on 20 February 1862. She was the plaintiff (oratrix) in this case.
  • John W. CLONCH , the oldest son of William CLONCH and Mary E. DOSS, and husband of Sarah Jane FOSTER . They married in Gallia County, Ohio. He was the defendant in this cause.
  • John W. FOSTER assumed to be the father (or brother) of Sarah Jane and seen as the next friend in this cause.
  • Sarah DEWITT, a young lady of about 24 years who was questioned as a witness.
  • Peter DEWITT, a man of 36 years who was questioned as a witness.
  • William Alexander CLONCH, the two-year-old son of John W. and Sarah J.
  • Lavinia PATTERSON, also known as Lavinia DOSS (her mother’s surname) and Lavinia CLONCH (her father’s surname). She was a sister of John W. and Alexander and wife of James William PATTERSON. She was a witness.
  • Rebecca LEMASTER, sister of Mary Ellen CLONCH. She was one of the persons implicated in the questioning of the witnesses.
  • Mary Ellen CLONCH née LEMASTER, the wife of Alexander CLONCH. She was no longer living with him and having an affair with John W. CLONCH.
  • Alexander CLONCH, the second son of William CLONCH and Mary E. DOSS. He married Mary Ellen LEMASTER on 10 November 1863. He is not named in the proceedings but referred to as the husband of Mary Ellen.
  • William CLONCH and Mary E. DOSS, parents of John, Alexander, and Lavinia. They were never married and their children were known by both surnames.
  • James DEWITT and Rebecca ATKINSON, parents of Sarah and Peter who were witnesses. It was at their house in the Clendenin township that some incidents took place.

Iudex, advocatus, et notarius publicus 

The judge, lawyer, and public notary who were mentioned in the proceedings.

Daniel Haymond POSLEY (1803-1877) was a judge of the seventh judicial circuit of West Virginia. Before this chancery case, he was the Lieutenant Governor of the Restored Government of Virginia (the Unionist government of Virginia during the Civil War) until two weeks before West Virginia became a state. After this chancery case, he would go on to be elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1866, serving from 1867 to 1869. Mr. Polsley was the judge for this case.4

Benjamin J. REDMOND was a Notary Public born in 1840. During the war between the States, Mr. REDMOND served the government as provost marshal of Mason County. After this chancery case, from 1868-1870, he served as a justice in the Robinson district followed by four years as president of the Mason County court.5

William H. TOMLINSON, an attorney at law who questioned the witnesses for the plaintiff.6

 

 

Joseph S. MACHIN, a Notary Public for the county and state and a Master Commissioner for Chancery for the County of Mason.

Vinculo matrimonii

The Chancery Records concerning the divorce of Sarah Jane CLONCH from John W CLONCH.

To the Honorable Daniel Polsley Judge of the Circuit Court for Mason County Humbly complaining thereto unto your Honor your oratrix Sarah J. Clonch wife of John W. Clonch, who sues by John W. Foster her next friend that she is now twenty four years old at the age of twenty one she left her fathers house, and was married to the said John W. Clonch and since that time has been to him a constant, faithful and dutiful wife and has borne him two children to wit: William A. now two years old and an infant daughter three month old. Her husband on the other hand has been negligent and insufferable abusive and violent to her within the last two years frequently beating and choking her for no cause whatever on her part. he has left his house and home taking with him her oldest child and living in adultry with another woman, your oratrix further alledges that he has been seen in the bed with his own brothers wife and has failed to furnish support to your oratrix and her child that she is obliged to labor for their entire support, or they would come to starvation. The only property owned by your oratrix and her husband is the household and kitchen furnature and one horse, the most of which your 


oratrix brought from Her Father’s and helped him to same. To the end therefore oratrix prays that the said John W. Clonch may be made a defendant to this bill and acquired to render a full true and perfect answer to the same upon his corporal oath; that he may be enjoined and restrained from interfering with or in any maner (sic) molesting her and her child that is with her; that your Oratrix my (sic) be entirely divorced from him and the marriage be dissolved (two lines marked out) that he may be compelled to deliver up her child to her and to surrender to her and them for the maintenance of herself and her children The property aforesaid mentioned; and for such other and further relief as her case requires, and to equity may seem meet; May it pleas (sic) your honor to grant & @ And your oratrix will ever pray & @

West Virginia Mason County to wit This day Sarah J. Clonch, personally appeared before me B. J. Redmond N.P. and made oath that the allegations in the above bill are true to the best of her remembrance information and belief.

Given under my hand this 18 day of July 1864
B. J. Redmond N.P.


Sarah J. Clonch
vs In Chancery
John W. Clonch

This cause came on this day to be heard upon the bill, the exhibits filed and examination of witnesses and was argued by council for the plaintiff. On consideration whereof the Court being of opinion that the plaintiff is ? ? ? ? ? ? ? (marked out: all the allegations in the bill mentioned against the defendant and fully ?) doth adjudge order and decreed that the marriage heretofor solemnized between Sarah J. Clonch and John W. Clonch be and the same is hereby dissolved and the said Sarah J. Clonch is forever divorced from her husband. The said John W. Clonch X (in the right margin: X and it is further a? ? that the complainant is entitled to the care and custody infant children in the bill mentioned and that) (text marked out: and all the right title and interest of the said John W. Clonch in or to the household and  kitchen furniture shall belong to the said Sarah J. Clonch and the two children in the bill mentioned shall remain in the care and custody of the said Sarah J. Clonch) the said John W. Clonch do surrender up the said William A. Clonch (marked out: infant son) to the care and custody of the  said Sarah J. Clonch and that the plaintiff recover from the defendant her costs by her expended in the prosecution of this Suit


Cover sheet for the depositions in the chancery record

Sarah J. Clonch
vs …….De?ed
John W. Clonch
Sept Term 1864

 

 

 

 

 



The depositions of Sarah Dewit and others taken before me Joseph S. Machin, a Master Commissioner for Chancery for the County of Mason and State of West Virginia pursuant to notice hereto annexed at the office of Wm. H. Tomlinson in the town of Point Pleasant on the 15th day of August (fold in document may have a missing line) and 6 o’clock p.m. to be read as evidence on behalf of Sarah J. Claunch in a certain suit in equity depending in the circuit court for the County of Mason wherein Sarah J. Claunch is plaintiff and John W. Claunch is defendant.
Present Wm. H. Tomlinson attorney for plaintiff, Sarah Dewit, being duly sworn on the Holy Evangelist of Almighty God, deposeth and saith as follows:
1st Question by Wm. H. Tomlinson for defendant. What is your age?
Answer – I do not knew exactly, but think I am about twenty four years of age.
2nd Question – By same. Do you know the parties to this suit?
Answer – Yes Sir, I do.
3rd Question – By same – Did you ever see the defendant, at your mother’s house in company with Rebecca Lemaster on or about the first day of July 1864, and if so, state how long they were together at that place and under what circumstances?
Answer – I saw them there together, they set up all night together.
4th Question – By same – While they were setting up together state whether he was laying


in her lap or her in his, and whether he was hugging her or what they even doing?
Answer – She was laying in his arms.
5th Question – By same – Was there a light in the house or was there note?
Answer – Sometimes there was a light and sometimes none.
6th Question – By same – Was it a light given by the fire or candle?
Answer – It was given by fire.
7th Question – By same – Who put out the light?
Answer – I do not know.
8th Question – By same – How often have they been there together at your mother’s house?
Answer – They were there together occasionally but do not remember how often.
9th Question – By same – Did you ever see them hugging and playing together at other times than the one answered?
Answer – Yes, I have seen them playing and romping together.
10th Question – by same – Was Mrs. Claunch his wife present at either of these times?
Answer – No Sir, she was not.
11th Question – By same – Did you ever see John W. Claunch and Mary Ellen Claunch, his sister-in-law passing by your mother’s house with his arms around her, and hers around him?
Answer – They were going along after dark, as well as I could see hugged up together, and this I think occurred during the Spring of 1864.
And further this deponent saith not.
………..her
Sarah + Dewit
……….mark


Peter Dewit, being duly sworn, on the Holy Evangelist of Almighty God, deposeth and saith as follows:
1st Question – By Wm. H. Tomlinson attorney for the Plaintiff. What is your age?
Answer – I am about thirty six years of age.
2nd Question – By same – Are you acquainted with the parties to this suit?
Answer – Yes Sir, I know them.
3rd Question – By same : Were you at your mother’s house at anytime when John W. Claunch and his brother’s wife were there together, and if so, state under what circumstances you saw them?
Answer – I think I never saw them there together.
4th Question – By same – Did you ever see John W. Claunch the defendant to this suit within the last year hugging and kissing any other other (sic) woman other than his wife?
Answer – I saw Rebecca Lemaster setting on his lap mighty close together and he was hugging her, and this happened after night.
And further this deponent saith not.
……..his
Peter x Dewit
…….mark

Lavinia Patterson, being duly sworn, deposeth and saith as follows:
1st Question – By Plaintiff’s Counsel. What is your age?

Answer – I am eighteen years of age.
2nd Question – Was you at home one night


within the last year while your brother John W. Claunch defendant to this suit was complaining of being unwell, and if so did you see Mary Ellen Claunch his sister-in-law go to bed to him?
Answer – I seen her lay down on the same bed with him, and they were then together about one hour.
And further this deponent saith not.
…………her
Lavinia x Patterson
………..mark

State of West Virginia
Mason County, to wit:
I, Joseph S. Machin, a Notary Public for the county and state aforesaid, so hereby certify that the foregoing depositions were duly taken, sown to and subscribed before me at the times and place mentioned therein.
Given under my hand, this 15th day of August 1864
Joseph S. Machin Master Commission
in Chancery

Costs:
Sarah Dewit witness 1 day 0.50
Peter Dewit witness 1 day 0.50
Lavinia Patterson witness 1 day 0.50
Ferriages each 10 cents 0.30
Jos. S. Machin Comm. charges 2.25
Total $4.05

This is a true statement of costs
Jos. S. Machin, Master Comm.
August 15/64


The Chancery case was recorded in the orders book of Mason County for the September Term of 1864.7

In Chancery
Sarah J. Clonch
vs
JohnW.Clonch

This cause came on this day to be heard upon the bill, the exhibits filed and examination of Witnesses and was argued by counsel for the Plaintiff on consideration whereof the court being of opinion that the plaintiff is entitled to the relief prayed for: doth adjudge order and decree that the marriage heretofore Solemnized between Sarah J. Clonch and John W. Clonch be and the same is hereby dissolved and the said Sarah J. Clonch is forever divorced from her husband the said John W. Clonch: and it is further ordered and decreed that the complainant is entitled to the care and custody of the infant children in the bill mentioned and that the said John W. Clonch do Surrender up the said William A. Clonch to the care and custody of the said Sarah J. Clonch, and that the plaintiff recover from the defendant her costs by her expended in the prosecution of the suit.


At the March term of 1865, Sarah J. CLONCH returned to court to have her son William A. CLONCH surrendered to her by his father John W. CLONCH.8

On Motion of Sarah J. Clonch and for reasons appearing to the Court it is ordered that John W. Clonch be summoned to appear here on the first day of the next term to shew cause if any he can [illegible] he shall not be find (sic, fined) and attached for refusing to surrender William A. Clonch his infant child to the custody of its mother in pursuance of a decree of this court rendered at the September term then of 1864.


Sarah J. FOSTER and her son William A. CLONCH

Following the divorce from John W. CLONCH, Sarah disappeared without a trace – at least in the census and records available. Her daughter remains unnamed. Her son William Alexander CLONCH was missing in the 1870 and 1880 census. He did not live with his father. Was he living with his mother who may have remarried?

In any event, the son William A. CLONCH married twice. First to Ellen FOWLER9 and second to his first cousin Emma Sidosa LEMASTER (also known as CLONCH).10 The marriage records do not include the names of parents. Emma was the daughter of Rebecca LEMASTER and Alexander CLONCH. He died in 1925 and left a will naming his wife Emma as his only heir.11 On the death record, his parents were listed as John Wm CLONCH and Sarah FORRESTER (sic).12

John William CLONCH

Following the divorce of Sarah and John, Alexander CLONCH and Mary Ellen LEMASTER separated. They had been married less than a year and did not have children. They were not divorced until March 1880.13

Mary Ellen (still married to Alex) went to live with the newly divorced John W. CLONCH. They had thirteen children between 1865 and 1892. Finally on 7 May 1895 John, 54, and Mary Ellen, 47, married in Gallia County, Ohio.14

In the name of all CLONCH descendants, I would like to thank Ralph L. Hayes for ferreting out the records to back up this CLONCH family story. It sounded fantastic and a bit unbelievable but the records he found in the old dusty unindexed boxes in the courthouse backed it up. How many more stories are hidden away, waiting for someone to tell them?

© 2019, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013” (index and images), FamilySearch (Digital images of originals housed at the county courthouses in Ohio.), Gallia > Marriage records 1862-1874 vol 3 > image 14 of 276. John W. Clonch and Jane Foster, 20 Feb 1862. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GRMD-SKRT?cc=1614804&wc=Q6SP-7R2%3A121350101%2C121498701 : accessed 18 Dec 2013). 
  2. West Virginia Vital Research Records Project (database and images), West Virginia Division of Culture and History (A collaborative venture between the West Virginia State Archives and the Genealogical Society of Utah to place vital records online via the West Virginia Archives and History Web site accessible at http://www.wvculture.org/vrr), Mason County, West Virginia, Birth Register, page 69, line 27. William Alexander Clonch birth record. (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=2955142&Type=Birth : accessed 15 March 2019). 
  3. Sarah J. Clonch vs John W. Clonch, September Term 1864, Chancery Records of Mason County, West Virginia. Digital images of photocopies of the original records found in the court house by Ralph L. Hayes. Received per email 22 February 2019 from Ralph L. Hayes with permission to share on Opening Doors in Brick Walls blog. 
  4. Daily intelligencer. (Wheeling, Va. [W. Va.]), 15 June 1863. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026845/1863-06-15/ed-1/seq-1/
  5. The weekly register. (Point Pleasant, Va. [W. Va.]), 26 May 1864. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026817/1864-05-26/ed-1/seq-6/
  6. The weekly register. (Point Pleasant, Va. [W. Va.]), 20 Aug. 1863. Chronicling America: Historic American Newspapers. Lib. of Congress. <https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026817/1863-08-20/ed-1/seq-1/
  7. “Mason County, West Virginia, Circuit Court, Chancery orders, 1831-1929” (database with images), FamilySearch (Microfilm of originals at the county courthouse, Point Pleasant, West Virginia.), Film 1861961, DGS 7615568, Chancery orders, Vols. 1-2 1843-1877 (1 from 469 & 4 to 401 – Back of v. 1 has separate pages of land records), Image 286 of 949, Folio 386, September Term 1864. 1864 Divorce of John Clonch from Sarah Ann Foster.(https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89VP-7KDF?i=285&cat=660659 : accessed 6 January 2019). 
  8. Ibid., Image 303 of 949, Folio 421, March Term 1865. 1864 Divorce of John Clonch from Sarah Ann Foster.(https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89VP-7KDF?i=285&cat=660659 : accessed 6 January 2019). 
  9. “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GRMD-SV7T?cc=1614804&wc=Q6SP-6T5%3A121350101%2C121651001 : accessed 23 March 2019), Gallia > Marriage records 1884-1890 vol 6 > image 132 of 338; county courthouses, Ohio. 
  10. Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9RMD-3J1F?cc=1614804&wc=Q6SP-6BY%3A121350101%2C121580101 : 15 July 2014), Gallia > Marriage records 1890-1895 vol 7 > image 159 of 339; county courthouses, Ohio. 
  11. “West Virginia Will Books, 1756-1971,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-C99Q-BS?cc=1909099&wc=Q816-MLC%3A179687901%2C179798901 : accessed 23 February 2019), Mason > Will book, v. 005 1916-1930 > image 153 of 240; citing Mason County, County Clerk, West Virginia. 
  12. WVCulture.org, William A. Clonch death record details (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_dcdetail.aspx?Id=2126490 : accessed 29 March 2019) and Death Certificate No. 8914 for William A. Clonch (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=2126490&Type=Death : accessed 29 March 2019) 
  13. “Mason County, West Virginia, Circuit Court, Chancery orders, 1831-1929” (database with images), FamilySearch (Microfilm of originals at the county courthouse, Point Pleasant, West Virginia.), Film 1861962 Item 1, DGS 7615569, Chancery orders, Vols. 4 1877-1880, image 321 of 899, Folio 274 and 275, March Term 1880. 1880 Divorce of Alexander Clonch from Mary Ellen Lemaster. (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99VP-2SNQ?i=320&cat=659762 : accessed 6 January 2019). 
  14. “Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013” (index and images), FamilySearch (Digital images of originals housed at the county courthouses in Ohio.), Gallia > Marriage records and index 1895-1899 vol 8. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-22447-41148-85?cc=1614804&wc=M94Q-VH7:315901437 : accessed 13 Nov 2013). 

Slave Name Roll Project: RELEASING: Harvey and Hariett

Last week Edmond‘s name was released from the last will and testament of Elizabeth Clark written in 1841 and recorded in 1844. Elizabeth mentioned Frances C. Harrison and her husband John in the will.1

As I tried to follow Edmond either forward in time or back, I found John Harrison was listed in the 1840 census of Mason County. In his household were one male 10 thru 14, one male 50 thru 59, one female 50 thru 59, one female 70 thru 79, and 4 slaves. The enslaved persons in the household were 2 males under 10, a male 24 thru 35, and a female 10 thru 23.2

Was the older woman in the household Elizabeth Clark? If this was the household Elizabeth was living in, would Edmond be the young man age 24 thru 35? Or was John Harrison the holder of all four slaves?

There is a reason I looked into the Elizabeth Clark will. In 1850 my 4th great-grandmother Nancy Beasley, widow of Dennis Clonch (also seen as Claunch), was enumerated as Nancy Clonch age 75 in the household of John W. Clark age 56. Also in the household was her 12 years old grandson Dennis Clonch.3 Nancy died in the 1850s. John W. Clark was seen in the household of her son William Clonch in 1860.4 Who was this John W. Clark and was there a family connection between him and the Clonch family? Could there be other records which would clear up the matter? Those were the questions I asked as I searched for other Clark persons in the county.

At this point, I found the will of Elizabeth Clark and the census record in which she may have been enumerated. Who were John Harrison and his wife Frances C. and why were they mentioned in the Clark will?

A marriage record was found in Mason County for John Harrison and Frances Oldakers. They were married by B. K. Craig in 1834.5 As both persons were in their 50s in the 1840 household, there was the possibility one or the other was widowed prior to 1834.

Off to the Will Book for another will

John Oldaker wrote his last will and testament in June 1833 and it was recorded in November 1833.6 Did he leave a widow?

The Last Will & Testament of John Oldaker of Mason County, Virginia – 1833

I John Oldaker of the county of Mason & State of Virginia do hereby make my last will & testament in manner & form following that is to Say.
I give and bequeath all my estate that shall remain after my Just debts are paid to be disposed of as hereinafter mentioned. I give and bequeath to my beloved wife Frances C. Oldaker all my estate real & personal (except Items hereinafter disposed of) for & during her natural life & after her deceas (sic) I give and bequeath the same to my grandaughter (sic) Frances J. McMullin (except Items hereinafter disposed of). I give & bequeath to my beloved wife Frances C. Oldaker in fee Simple to make any disposition of (during her natural life or at her Decease) she may think proper my negro man named Harvey & my Negro Girl named Hariett with her future of spring together with the sum of one Hundred Dollars.
I give and bequeath to my friend & brother in law Benjamin K. Craig my Rifle gun with the aparatus thereto belonging. In case my Grandaugher Frances J. McMullin should die under the age of twenty one years old & without a Servicing heir of her body, I give & bequeath all that otherwise would be her right & title in and to my estate to my friends Benjamin K. Craig & Polly A. Craig, his wife & their heirs. It is my will & I do hereby give & bequeath to my beloved wife Frances C. Oldaker the wright & power to convey by warrantee Deeds certain tracts of land sold by me viz. one tract to Carter Newcomb lying on Eighteen mile creek for which the said Newcomb holds my Title Bond with conditions, one other Tract to Robert Summers lying also on Eighteen mile creek for which the Said Summers holds my Title bond with conditions on their the Said Newcomb & Summers complying with the conditions in Said title bonds their Deeds are to be made. And Lastly I do hereby constitute and appoint my friends Benjamin K. Craig & Matthew D. Brower executors of this my last will & testament. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my Seal this 15th day of June 1833.
. . . . . his
John X Oldaker Seal
 . . . .mark
Signed Sealed published & declared by John
Oldaker, as & for his last will & testament
in the presence & hearing of us at his request and in his
presence here subscribed our names as witnesses.
Henry Harriss
R. Summers
Wiliam Wallace
At a court held for Mason county Nov. 4th 1833
The last will and Testament of John Oldaker decd was proved by the oaths of Henry Harriss and William Wallace subscribing witnesses thereto. And is ordered to be Recorded. Upon the motion of Benjamin K. Craig an executor named in the will of Jno. Oldaker decd who made oath thereto & together with James Craik his Securety who entered into & acknowledged their Bond in the penalty of Two thousand dollars conditioned as the law directs certificate is granted him for obtaining a probat of the Said will in due form of Law.
Teste
Thos. Lewis clerk

New Relationships

Frances C. Oldaker was the widow of John Oldaker. What was her maiden name? John Oldaker mentions his brother-in-law Benjamin K. Craig and his wife Polly A. Craig. Was this the same B. K. Craig who married Frances C. Oldaker and John Harrison in 1834?

Benjamin K. Craig married Mary A. Clark in 1826.7 If Benjamin was John’s brother-in-law, could his wife Polly A. (Mary A.) have been Frances’ sister?

This would explain Frances C. Harrison aka Frances C. Oldaker being mentioned in the will of Elizabeth Clark. There was no mention of children in the 1841 will nor did Elizabeth include a relationship descriptor for Frances other than her being the wife of John Harrison. Was Elizabeth an unmarried sister of Frances and Polly? Or an aunt or even their mother?

John Oldaker left Harvey and Hariett to his wife Frances C. in his will in 1833. Frances married John Harrison the following year. In 1840 enslaved persons were found in the household of John Harrison – a man and a woman along with two young boys. Could this couple be Harvey and Hariett whose fate was left in Frances’ hands per her first husband’s will? Or could the man be Edmond mentioned in Elizabeth’s will and the other three enslaved persons of Harrison?

The Census and Slave Schedules

No entry was found in the index of the will books of Mason County for John Harrison or Benjamin K. Craig. Neither were found in Mason the 1850 census.

Polly A. Craig died in Putnam County, West Virginia, on 10 November 1865. Her death was reported by her son Lewis Craig. He gave her deceased husband’s name as Benj. K. Craig and her parents as William & E. Clark. Polly, per her son’s information, was born in Culpepper County, Virginia.8

With this information I located the widowed Polly A. Craig in Putnam in 1850 with three children.9 She was also on the Slave Schedule with two children, an 8 yo male mulatto and a 6 yo female mulatto.10

While browsing the schedule I noticed the name John Harrison with a 32 yo black female, 11 yo black male, and a 3 yo black female. 11 Checking the census, I found John and Frances C. were living in Putnam County in 1850.12

There is a known anomality on the 1860 census of Putnam County. The enumerator recorded all persons with an initial instead of first name and middle initals. This makes it difficult to find persons when searching for first names. However by limiting the search to the surname only, I found Polly A. Craig with her children13 as well as John and Frances C. Harrison. 14 Polly and John were also on the slave schedule. Polly with a 15 yo female mulatto (possibly the 6 yo from 1850)15 and John Harrison with a 12 yo female black (possibly the 3 yo from 1850).16

The will of John Harrison was written 11 April 1867 and recorded 10 May 1867 in Putnam County.17 He mentioned his wife Frances C. Due to the lateness of this will he did not mention enslaved persons.

Edmond, who was supposed to be freed per the 1841 will of Elizabeth Clark, was not with either the Craig or Harrison families as a free person. There is no male old enough to be Edmond on the slave schedule for either Polly A. Craig or John Harrison.

From the numbers found on the slave schedules in 1850 and 1860 for John Harrison it is possible Harriet named in the Oldaker will was with John and Frances C. in 1850 with two children. She is not with them in 1860. As with Edmond, there were no males old enough to be Harvey.

Frances was found in the 1870 census in the household of her step-son Josiah Harrison.18 Frances’ first husband had given her in fee Simple to make any disposition of (during her natural life or at her Decease) she may think proper my negro man named Harvey & my Negro Girl named Hariett with her future of spring. It would seem that Harvey and Hariett were no longer with Frances C. at the time of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863.

One final note for anyone searching for Edmond, Harvey, and Hariett. The Craig and Harrison families likely did not move from the time of the above mentioned will until 1850 as Putnam County was created on 11 March 1848 from Kanawha, Mason and Cabell Counties.

True's statementFollowing my three-part series on the slaves of my 5th great grandfather James Sims during Black History Month in February 2015 I made a commitment to write a post on a monthly basis until I’ve RELEASED all of the names of slaves owned by my ancestors or owned by persons I’ve researched who were relatives or neighbors of my ancestors.

These posts are part of the Slave Name Roll Project (About the Project) administered by Schalene Jennings Dagutis who also blogs at Tangled Roots and Trees.

© 2019, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. “West Virginia Will Books, 1756-1971,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-HN9N-LP?cc=1909099&wc=Q8B7-1YB%3A179687901%2C179707301 : accessed 19 March 2019), Mason > Will book, v. 001 1834-1880 > image 36 of 206; citing Jackson County, County Clerk, West Virginia. 
  2. 1840 U.S. Federal Census, (index and images), Ancestry, citing Sixth Census of the United States, 1840 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C., NARA microfilm publication M704, 580 rolls, FHL Film 0029689; NARA Roll M704_571, Virginia, Mason; image 44+41 of 69, Sheet 232A+B, Line 9, John Harrison. ‎(http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 19 March 2019). 
  3. 1850 U.S. Federal Census, (index and images), Ancestry, citing Seventh Census of the United States, 1850 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration,Washington D.C., NARA microfilm publication M432, 1009 rolls, Roll: M432_959; Image 297; Virginia, Mason, District 38, image 47 of 165, Sheet No. 385A, Lines 28-30, HH #333-334, John W. Clark household. (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 January 2019). 
  4. 1860 U.S. Federal Census, (index and images), Ancestry, citing Eighth Census of the United States, 1860 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C., NARA microfilm publication M653, 1,438 rolls, Roll: M653_1361; FHL Film: 805361; Virginia, Mason County, District 2, image 25 of 68; Page No. 46, Lines 21-30, HH #345-316, Wm Claunch household. “.” (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 13 January 2019). 
  5. West Virginia Vital Research Records Project (database and images), West Virginia Division of Culture and History (A collaborative venture between the West Virginia State Archives and the Genealogical Society of Utah to place vital records online via the West Virginia Archives and History Web site accessible at http://www.wvculture.org/vrr), West Virginia Marriages 1853-1970. Marriage of John Harrison and Frances C. Aldakers (sic, spelling per index) (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=12175291&Type=Marriage : accessed 20 March 2019) 
  6. “West Virginia Will Books, 1756-1971,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-HN9F-9Z?cc=1909099&wc=Q8B7-1YL%3A179687901%2C179729801 : 22 June 2016), Mason > Will book, v. 001A 1833-1875 > image 26 of 165; citing Jackson County, County Clerk, West Virginia. 
  7. WVCulture.org, (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_mcdetail.aspx?Id=12175454 : accessed 24 March 2019) and http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=12175454&Type=Marriage : accessed 24 March 2019) 
  8. WVCulture.org, 1865 Death Record of Polly A. Craig (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_dcdetail.aspx?Id=4787281 : accessed 26 March 2019) and (http://www.wvculture.org/vrr/va_view.aspx?Id=4787281&Type=Death : accessed 26 March 2019) 
  9. Ancestry.com. 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Year: 1850; Census Place: District 46, Putnam, Virginia; Roll: M432_971; Page: 272A; Image: 213 
  10. Ancestry.com. 1850 U.S. Federal Census – Slave Schedules, Virginia, Putnam, District 46, page 8 of 8 
  11. Ancestry.com. 1850 U.S. Federal Census – Slave Schedules, Virginia, Putnam, District 46, page 3 of 8 
  12. Ancestry.com. 1850 U.S. Federal Census, Year: 1850; Census Place: District 46, Putnam, Virginia; Roll: M432_971; Page: 280B; Image: 230 
  13. Ancestry.com. 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Year: 1860; Census Place: District 4, Putnam, Virginia; Roll: M653_1373; Page: 893; Family History Library Film: 805373 
  14. Ancestry.com. 1860 U.S. Federal Census, Year: 1860; Census Place: Buffalo, Putnam, Virginia; Roll: M653_1373; Page: 794; Family History Library Film: 805373 
  15. Ancestry.com. 1860 U.S. Federal Census – Slave Schedules, Virginia, Putnam, District 4, page 3 of 4, right line 32 
  16. Ancestry.com. 1860 U.S. Federal Census – Slave Schedules, Virginia, Putnam, District 4, page 2 of 4, left, line 14 
  17. “West Virginia Will Books, 1756-1971,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:9392-H19H-5?cc=1909099&wc=Q816-MNG%3A179687101%2C179700701 : 21 June 2016), Putnam > Will book, v. 001 1847-1937 > image 45 of 204; citing Putnam County Clerk, West Virginia. 
  18. Ancestry.com. 1870 U.S. Federal Census, Year: 1870; Census Place: Buffalo, Putnam, West Virginia; Roll: M593_1698; Page: 248A; Family History Library Film: 553197