Time Out in the Black Forest

timeoutintheblackforest2

Äuszäit ✿ Time Out ✿ Auszeit

I’ve been blogging weekly and bi-weekly since I started my blog in January 2014. One blogger I follow let her readers know she was taking a Blogpause. Another completely disappeared for several months and returned to blogging by writing a moving post about genealogy addiction. I chose to take some time off and come back with a selection of photographs from the wonderful time we had on our vacation in the Black Forest.

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stblasius2016

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blackforestcollage2016Doesn’t my husband take the best photographs?

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© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 16 Comments

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #71 Chester Beryl LILLIE 1900-1921

Chester Beryl LILLIE (1900-1921) was the only son of George Wyte LILLIE (1874-1943) and his first wife Mary Belle Stafford (1878-1915). Chester and his family were living in Kalamazoo as early as 1915, the year his mother died. They resided there until about 1918 when they went to live in Chicago. This photograph was likely taken before the move to Chicago. He is the young man on the left. The other two were not identified.

MRIN21945 UNK3malesUNKChesterUNKmaybeGlassRoyaltyLillie Rooney collectionAbout the photography studio

Bradley J. Fuller, the oldest of nine children, was the proprietor of Fuller Studio on 409 North Burdick Street in Kalamazoo, Michigan, from 1916 to 1917. His youngest brother Dana Simon Fuller took over in 1919. Which of the Fuller brothers took this portrait of these young men is not known.

MRIN21945 UNK3malesUNKChesterUNKmaybeGlassRoyaltyLillieback Rooney collectionChester was identified on the back of the photograph. He is the same young man seen in this photograph shared in Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #6 George Wyte LILLIE (1874-1943).

lillieChester was a tuberculosis patient at Fairmont Hospital in Kalamazoo on 12 September 1918 per his WWI draft card. His permanent address was 1504 East 62 St. in Chicago.

In 1920 Chester was enumerated twice on the census. He was in Chicago with his father, step-mother, and his two sisters on a census sheet dated 2 January. Chester was listed as working as a switchman for the railroad, the same occupation as his father George and his cousin Samuel Royalty LILLIE. He was also found in the Oak Forest Institution, Bremen Township, Cook County, Illinois, as a patient on an undated census sheet. The institution was enumerated on 67 sheets, the first few were dated 26 January. Chester may have only been home for the holidays.

On Tuesday, 1 March 1920, Chester died in Chicago. His body was transported to Kalamazoo for burial in Riverside Cemetery where his mother was buried. She also died of tuberculosis. His older sister Pearl Eva LILLIE died four months later and was buried in Riverside Cemetery. I have not found a death record with the cause of her death but suspect she may have also succumbed to tuberculosis.

Getting back to the two young men in the photograph with Chester. They appear to be at least 5 years older than Chester. Could they be friends or relatives? Reese Gentry LILLIE and Samuel Royalty LILLIE would be about the right age but there are no photos of Reese to compare with. Roy’s eyes were darker than the young man on the right although he does resemble Roy due to the way his hair is combed.

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Posted in Old Photographs | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Behind the Scenes at Luxracines

Be still my impatient genealogy heart….

logo_klengMy new duties as treasurer and member of the board of Luxracines have kept me busy this summer.

Last year my genealogy association Luxracines bought a very large collection of German family books from Peter Daus of Wittlich, Germany. On 30 September 2015, we moved the library from Wittlich to a temporary storage area in Luxembourg.

Daus BiblioThe permanent location of Luxracines‘ new locale was not yet available. The Commune of Walferdange had agreed to provide a rent-free location which was to be repainted before we could furnish it and move in our new collection of books.

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Luxracines Club House (Vereinslokal)

The day the keys to our new locale were given to our president Rob Deltgen finally came. We held our first committee meeting there on June 14. There were a few tables and chairs but the rooms were otherwise bare. Plans were made for obtaining estimates and buying equipment, etc.

By mid-July lockers, computers, and bookshelves had been purchased. Locks were put on the doors to the three rooms we are using. A work plan was drawn up for July 19, 22, 26 and 27 to assemble the lockers for the conference room, the bookshelves for the library, and to set up the computers and printer in the computer room.

The conference room (below) will be shared with the ladies who run the child care center located on the first floor. As it is open in the mornings, Luxracines is only allowed to use the locale in the afternoons or when the center is closed.

conferenceroomThe books were transported from temporary storage to the basement of our building. On July 27 over a dozen members, including some spouses, came in to help carry the heavy boxes filled with books from the basement to the 2nd floor. Due to lack of space, all of the books were placed in the bookshelves as they came out of the boxes.

luxracinesentryOn August 3 several members came in to remove black marks on the floor, clean up and get rid of empty boxes, and hang posters on the empty walls of the computer and conference rooms. We wanted to be ready for our first official visitor the next day. Sara Bamberg of the Luxemburger Wort, Luxembourg’s daily newspaper, was coming to do an interview for an article on Luxracines and our new library.

2016-08-09 Peter Daus visitOn August 9 Peter Daus visited (above) and brought along more books and genealogical material he no longer needed (on the table). This particular item (below) caught my eye.

FamilySearch CD-RomAs more donations of books are expected from other members we bought more bookshelves and set them up in the computer room on August 17 (below). This will likely contain mostly Luxemburgensia. This term is used for all books and media published in Luxembourg, written by Luxembourgish authors, and/or about Luxembourg.

computerroombookshelvesOn August 18 Sara Bamberg’s article “Genealogy per Mouse Click” was published in the Luxemburger Wort. It was good advertisement for our club as many new members subscribed in the days following the piece.

2016-08-04 articlePeter Daus visited again on August 20 and 31 bringing more books and two NAS drives for our computer set-up.

2016-08-04 luxracines computer2016-08-27computer On August 27 we began sorting through the books and re-arranging them in the bookshelves.

beginningsortingAn afternoon’s work and we had A-C alphabetized, arranged in 1 1/2 bookshelves, and entered into an Excel document. It was similar to working one of those sliding tiles puzzles.

slidingtiles1On August 31 we continued our work. Two persons sorted out all the books by letters of the alphabetic, our secretary worked on the Excel document inputting the books from German towns beginning with D through H, while I alphabetized the books from D through P.

Things were busy that day as other workers were in the building including a firm that installed alarms, smoke detectors, and fire extinguishers.

luxracinesfireprotectionBy the end of the day, we had four bookshelves completely organized and inventoried and another four bookshelves sorted and ready for inventory.

2016-08-31AtoI2016-08-31JtoP 2016-08-31QtoZOn Saturday afternoon, September 3, we finished sorting of the German family books from R through Z and put some order in the remaining books. In the weeks to come, we will complete the inventory of the family books and begin to work out a system for the rest of the miscellaneous books.

slidingtiles3We will begin the printing unique call numbers for each book for easier access by our patrons as soon as the inventory is completed. And, the sliding tiles puzzle will finally be complete.

The driving force behind this project has been our president Rob Deltgen. Without his leadership, the committee, other members of the club and even spouses of some of the members would not have been as organized as we were to set up the library over the summer months when many people are usually off on vacation.

An official opening is in the planning. Luxracines Club House (Vereinslokal) will open its doors to members and the public on Saturdays from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. during the month of September.

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© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Posted in Genealogy, Luxembourg, Luxracines | Tagged , , , | 13 Comments

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #70 Bill BROWN

This photograph was identified on the back as Bill Brown. Nothing further was written to pinpoint where and when the photo was taken. A relationship to George H. Brown 1872-1929 featured last week is unlikely as both George and his brother John did not have sons or grandsons. BrownBill Rooney collectionThe rod iron fence in the background may help to identify the location the photograph was taken at. There are several two and three-story buildings behind the bare leaved trees. Was it fall or spring?

Bill isn’t wearing a coat over his suit and tie. His suit pants are wide in the hips and narrow down at his shoes. They appear to have a large cuff. Bill is posing with his hands in his pants’ pockets making it difficult to tell the length of his jacket or if it is double or single breasted.

BrownBillback Rooney collectionWhat time period do you think this was? Is the location familiar to anyone?

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Posted in Old Photographs | Tagged , , | 4 Comments

Slave Name Roll Project: RELEASING Jinney, Aaron, Hannah, James, Peggy and Abby

The enslaved family I wrote about in last month’s post Slave Name Roll Project: RELEASING Amy, Addison, Henry and his Enslaved Family was recognized by Ta Lee who wrote: “Such a surprise when True A Lewis shared your blog posting. I was totally in shock. These are my folks!!! I have more info on Henry Pack. The Halls are my family. Margaret Pack nee Hall was the sister to my grandfather’s grandmother.”

Ta (rhymes with day) and I did email. I told her I planned on sharing Henry Honaker’s will in my August post. She said, “These people are my people too!” It has been so rewarding to make a connection with a descendant of an enslaved person I’ve written about.

My 5th great-grandfather Hans Jacob HONEGGER was the father of 14 children with his second wife Maria GOETZ whom he married in 1753 after his 1749 arrival in America. The wife and son who travelled with him died at sea in 1749. Hans Jacob and Maria’s second son Henry was a slaveholder as were his sons and his grandson.

Generation 1:

Henry HONAKER b. 1756 d. 1830 (I don’t have the will, the excerpts below are from The Honaker Family in America, a book edited by Frieda Patrick Davison, 1998 © The National Association of Hans Jacob Honaker Families)

Henry bequeathed his two sons, Jesse and Henry, Jr., “…all my lands in Draper’s Valley which I am in possession of at this time to be divided between them in the following manner…” The manner directed that a partition line, designated in the will, be run north and south through the farm. The land on the west of the line went to Jesse, along with slaves Ephriam, Peter, Will and Reny. The land on the east of the line (on which sat the stone house) went to Henry, Jr., along with slaves Aaron, Jenney, Samuel, and Peter, Jr.
To his wife Edith, Henry left “…my negro man, Thomas, and all my stock of horses, cattle, sheep and pigs, and all my household and kitchen furniture not heretofore disposed of, also the stone house and one half the garden during her natural life, also at her death an equal division between my two sons, Jesse and Henry, of all the personal estate left to her, if any remains.

Generation 2:

1. Jesse Honaker (b. 1789 d. 1869) was the son of Henry and his first wife Ann Baker. Jesse had one son Henry and several daughters per supplements to the Honaker book. In addition to the slaves he had inherited from his father, Jesse owned at least two other slaves — Gilly, daughter of Arena, born in 1855, and probably Arena.

2. Henry Honaker Jr. (b. 1795 d. 1863) was the son of Henry and his second wife Edith Smith. He did not have children with his wife Sarah “Sally” Calfee. He left half of his estate to his grandnephew John Honaker, son of Henry Honaker Jr.*

Generation 3:

Henry Honaker (b. 1819 d. 1869) was the son of Jesse Honaker and the nephew of Henry Honaker Jr. He was also the husband of Rachel Byrnside Pack whose parents Samuel Pack and Sarah Wyatt were slaveholders in last month’s post. I don’t have his will which was written in 1867 per the Honaker Family Newsletter, Fall 1997, page 6. It is not abstracted in the Honaker book or newsletter. As Henry wrote it and died after the Civil War it would not have names of slaves.

*Note: After the death of the first Henry (b. 1756) in 1830, his grandson Henry (b. 1819) was known as Henry Honaker Jr. to distinguish him from the second Henry (b. 1795). The use of Junior caused a bit of confusion and is the reason I listed the three generations above.

RELEASING
Ephriam, Peter, Will, Reny, Aaron*, Jenney*, Samuel, Peter Jr., Thomas
Gilly and Arena
Jinney*, Aaron*, Hannah and her three children James, Peggy & Abby
* slave names seen in 1830 and 1863 wills.

Last Will and Testament of Henry Honaker (1795-1863)

HenryHonakerWillpage1I Henry Honaker of Drapers Valley in in (sic) the County of Pulaski
and State of Virginia, do hereby make, constitute and ordain
this my last will and Testament, hereby revoking all other and
former Wills heretofore made by me.
1st. I direct that so soon after my decease as my Executors (herein=
after Named) shall think is advisable, there as much of my live
stock, and if necessary of My other personal property not herein
otherwise particularly disposed of to be Sold as will be sufficient
to pay all my just debts expences (sic) of administration & a
2nd I give to my wife Sallie Honaker during her natural
life the plantation on which I now live in Drapers Valey (sic) and
all my land adjoining the same. I also give her during her life
as aforesaid the following Slaves (viz) Aaron, Hannah and her
three children James, Peggy & Abby and the increase of the females
if any.
3rd I give to my sd [said] wife Sally Honaker and her heirs and
assigns forever the following property (to wit) all of the lands I
purchased of Sam T. Calfee in the County of Wythe. Also 3 head
of Horses, six head of Cattle, twenty head of Sheep, twenty head of
hogs, three beds and bedsteads and bedding sufficient to make and
keep them comfortable, 1 Table, six chairs, one Secretary and ?
press, it is my will that my wife shall have the privelige (sic) of choos=
ing from all the stock and household furniture I may have at
the time of my decease the above mentioned stock and furniture.
I also give to my sd wife and her heirs forever such farming utensils
kitchenware, spring houseware and loom house fixtures as my
Executors shall think necessary for the conform and convenience of her
family. I also give to my sd wife my two clocks and desire her
to leave them to some person that she thinks will keep them together

HenryHonakerWillpage2+3
as they were imported from Germany to this Country together. And in
case any aforesaid wife shall die before I do then and in that
case I give the property I have given to her and her heirs forever to
the following persons, (to wit) I give the lands I bought of S. T. Calfee
to her Brother James D. Calfee and his heirs forever provided he will
pay to Joshua A. Holmes, James R. Holmes, John Holmes, William Holmes,
Wilson D. Holmes, one hundred dollars each and the heirs of Jane
Miller decd formerly Jane Holmes, one hundred dollars, and also pay
to James Calfee, Emily Calfee, Henry Calfee, Amanda J. Calfee, Wm Davis
Calfee, John H. Calfee, Calvin J. Calfee, Leander S. Calfee, Mary M. Calfee, Rhoda J.Calfee,
Augusta A. Calfee and Monroe H. Calfee, the children of Evelina Calfee
each two Hundred and twenty five dollars and the stock, household &
Kitchen furniture & a to be equally divided between the four daughters
of Nancy Howard (viz) Patsey Allison, Centhia, Rhoda & Shophia Howard
and I also wish my sd wife to take my little black boy Charles and
keep him as long as she lives and then he is to live with which
ever of My legatees he may choose without them paying anything
for him, more than to clothe him and pay any expences (sic) his may be
to them.
4th I give the land I own in the upper grid of Drapers Valley
known as the Olinger tract to George H. Comer and his wife, during
their lives and at their death to their children.
5th I give to the children of Jefferson R. Fugate, Bartram Galbreath,
and Joseph Shaffer and John Honaker, son of Henry Honaker junr.
the whole of my estate not otherwise disposed of. The same to be dis=
posed in the following manner (to wit) The children of Jefferson R.
Fugate to have one fourth part, the children of Bartrum Galbreath to
have one fourth part, the children of Joseph Shaffer to have one fourth part
and John Honaker to have the other fourth part.
6th I give to the children of J. R. Fugate the land I own in the County
of Raleigh which to be sold to them at two thousand dollars.
7th I give to the children of Bartram Galbreath my plantation on which
John Black now lives, known as Story(?) Battery which place is to be
sold to them at seven hundred dollars.
8th I give to John Honaker son of Henry Honaker Jr. at the death of my
wife, the plantation on which I now live and all my lands adjoining
the same and if the sd John Honaker should die without heirs then
his next oldest Brother to have it, which place I sale to him at ten
thousand five hundred dollars.
9th I wish my executors to rent out the land I have given to my wife
and her heirs forever and the land I give to the children of Bartrum
Galbreath until my wife’s decease, and that they the lands may _?_
be _?_ I wish them to be farmed according to the improved mode
of farming in this country that is, to be kept in grass at least four
years out of every six.
I wish them also to dispose of all my personal property ?
herein before disposed of other than the Slaves to the best advantage
either publicly or privately as they may choose and as I desire that
my slaves after my decease may fall into the hands of good trustees
I desire that my Executors may allow them to choose their own Mas=
ters, and if they choose any person who is unwilling to give the amount
they are appraised at, that they the executors reduce the ?
till they take off one third part, and ? such credit or credits
as they may think proper and I desire in any case ? the said slaves
may be sold to said person they desire to go to and I wish them
to be sold as much in families as possible, the mothers choosing for
their own children then under 18 years of age.
When the Executors have sold the property and collected the money

HenryHonakerWillpage4
and paid all just debts and expences then I I (sic) wish them to ret?
money enough in their hands to pay all expences of taking care of
my old black woman Jinney, during her life.
I desire my executors to hold the money in their hands or leave it
out as they may think best and pay to the children as they come of
age, so that each ones children may receive as much as another
and if the land I have given any of them is more than their
share they are to pay to the other as I wish my land that I
have given to J.R. Fugate, Bartram Galbreath and John Honaker
and my other property to be equally divided in four parts and
each part to be divided so as each ones children may fare equally
except the little boy of J. R. Fugate who is crippled, whose name
is Henry I wish him to have as much as either too of
brothers or sisters.
The Slaves I have herein given to my wife during her life I
wish to be disposed of, at her death in the said way as I have
directed for any other slaves to be disposed of.
I desire that the following Gentlemen be appointed to appraise
my property (viz) Robt D. Martin, Anthony Owens, Jas M. Crocket, Robt
Graham.
I desire the following gentlemen may be my Executors (viz)
John B. Baskerville, John S. Draper, Charles L. Fox, and John C. Graham
In witness whereof I have herewith _?_ my name and af=
fixed my seal this 24th day of May 1859.
Henry Honaker Sr. *Seal*
Witness
Robert D. Martin
William I. Martin
Margaret J. Vermillion

HenryHonakerWillpage5I Henry Honaker do make this codicil to my last will and testa=
ment namely. I give and bequeath to Henry Honaker Miller, (a son
of David Miller who married Margaret Honaker, daughter of Joseph
Honaker) the sum of two hundred dollars. Witness my hand and
seal this 12th day of February 1861.
Henry Honaker *Seal*
Signed, recorded, published and declared
in our presence who in the presence of
each other and of the testator and at
his request have hereunto subscribed and named
as witnesses
John B. Baskerville
James D. Calfee

I hereby revoke the above codicil and direct that the legacy given in
it to Henry Honaker Miller, be paid to his mother Margaret Miller
wife of David Miller, Given under my hand this 14th Nov 1861
Henry Honaker
Witness
Edmond P. Lyon
John Baskerville
Virginia At a Court held for the County of Pulaski the 5th day of Feb 1863
The last will and testament of Henry Honaker Decd was entered in
Court and the will was proven by Robert D. Martin and William I. Martin
two of the subscribing witnesses thereto and the first codicil was proven by Jno
B. Baskerville and James D. Calfee the two subscribing witnesses thereto and
ordered to be recorded. And the second codicil was proven by John B. Basker=
ville one of the subscribing witnesses thereto and continued for further
proof.                           A Copy             Teste
Lynch A. Cur? , C.
And at a Court held for the said County the 5th day of March 1863
The last will and testament of Henry Honaker Decd was again pre=

HenryHonakerWillpage6sented in Court and the last codicil was further proven by Edward
F. Lyon a subscribing witness thereto and ordered to be recorded.
A Copy
Teste
Copies                                           Lynch A. Cu? C.
Teste
Robt. D. Gardner, Clerk
Fees $2.50

[Transcribed by Cathy Meder-Dempsey, 12 August 2016 from images 145-151 found on the Library of Virginia site at link below]

Source:
Chancery Records Index
Locality: Pulaski County
Index Number: 1881-015
Plaintiff(s): Admr of William Hoge, Exrs of Henry Honaker
Defendant(s): Admr. of WIlliam Hoge Etc., Exrs of Henry Honaker Etc.
Surname(s) : Aaron~, Abby~, Allison, Breeding, Charles~, Comer, Draper, Fugate, Galbreath, Graham, Hannah~, Hoge, Honaker, James~, Jordan, Kirkner, Newman, Peggy~, Shaffer, Summers
Wills: 1863 Henry Honaker of Pulaski County, Virginia
Format: Scanned (228 images)
http://www.lva.virginia.gov/chancery/case_detail.asp?CFN=155-1881-015

bestwishescathy1

True's statementFollowing my three part series on the slaves of my 5th grand-father James Sims during Black History Month in February 2015 I made a commitment to write a post on a monthly basis until I’ve RELEASED all of the names of slaves owned by my ancestors or owned by persons I’ve researched who were relatives or neighbors of my ancestors. These posts are part of the Slave Name Roll Project which can be found on Schalene Jennings Dagutis’ blog Tangled Roots and Trees

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Posted in Black History, Brick Walls, Genealogy | Tagged , , , , , | 12 Comments

How a Surname Had Me Spiraling Down a Rabbit Hole

For the most part, we research our family trees from ourselves back one generation at a time, moving on and continuing back to the oldest known ancestor as the line is proven. To write about my children’s 5th great-grandparents, Johann MEDER (ca. 1720-1784) and Susanna LAMBERT (1729-1803) of Ettelbruck, I had to research the changes in their surnames in order to locate their baptismal records. This took me back another 100 years to the 1600s and sent me spiraling down a rabbit hole.

goingbackintimeWhen Did Mederhansen become Meder?

The surname MEDER evolved from MEDERHANSEN in the 1700s. During the 1600s, when the earliest church records were kept, the name was almost exclusively found as MEDERHANSEN. During the 1700s both versions of the name were found.

In the church records for Ettelbruck at FamilySearch.org, I found a register with extracted data from the baptismal records for the years 1640-1710, pages of families tree diagrams of the first families of Ettelbruck, and lists of marriages with numbers cross-referencing to the family trees. A treasure of information but a rabbit hole which had me looking up each baptismal record for children with surnames MEDERHANSEN.

lapsus calami
a slip of the pen

Extracted information of baptismal records from the 1600s was printed in 1896 or earlier and included in the register likely put together by the priest who was serving Ettelbruck before 1900. The person who transcribed the names for the printed version had difficulty with the handwriting in some documents and was not consistent with the second part of the name which resulted in MEDERHANSEN also being seen as MEDERHAUSEN.

hay

*Mader, Meder – a person who mows grain or hay.
(see comment below)

I consulted Luxemburger Familiennamenbuch by Cristian Kollmann, Peter Gilles and Claire Muller (2016), a book on family names in Luxembourg. MEDER is a surname derived from an occupation.* The author(s) also believed Mederhausen to be a copyist’s error as the name was not a toponym (place name) or a family name which is still in use. In 1611 the name MEDERT was found in the Feuerstattenverzeichnisse, a census of fireplaces or households in Luxembourg. In genealogical databases (church records) MEDERHANSEN evolved into MEDER around 1670. In the 1880 Luxembourg census there were 67 households in the country with the name MEDER, a whopping 0.35%. In 2009 only 24  (0.15%) listings were found in the Luxembourg telephone book for MEDER.

2016-08-27 10.44.48 EttelbruckFollowing the end of the Thirty-Years’ War in 1648, the population of Ettelbruck, Ettelbréck as it is known in Luxembourgish, was 281 per the table below. When Johannes MEDER and Susanna LAMBERT married in 1752 the population had likely surpassed the 763 seen in 1750.

BevölkerungstablleEttelbrück

“Luxembourg registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32461-2361-92?cc=2037955 : 9 January 2015), Ettelbruck > Baptêmes 1640-1710, tables généalogiques des premières familles > image 2 of 70; paroisses, Luxembourg (parishes, Luxembourg).

The wrong first name in the printed list for the father of Adam MEDERHANSEN (Johannes’ father) had me wondering if the others may contain errors as well. Adam’s father’s name was listed as Nic., short for Nicolas, in the printed list.

1696printedindex

“Luxembourg registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32461-2196-7?cc=2037955 : 9 January 2015), Ettelbruck > Baptêmes 1640-1710, tables généalogiques des premières familles > image 59 of 70; paroisses, Luxembourg (parishes, Luxembourg).

The baptismal record showed a son of Jacobus MEDERHANSEN and his wife Susanna was baptized on 24 August 1696 with godparents Adam MEDERHANSEN of Ettelbruck and Eva JACOBS of Warken. The name of the son was omitted but as it was tradition to name the child after the godparent of the same gender the omitted name had to be Adam.

1696AdamMederhansenBaptism

1696 Baptismal Record of the son of Jacobus MEDERHANSEN and his wife Susanna

After making a list of all MEDERHANSEN children born in Ettelbruck between 1645 and 1710 I gathered the baptismal records which included the names of the father, mother, and godparents. Once the list was complete an examination showed there were two families having children at the same time.

  • Henricus MEDERHANSEN and his wife Elisabeth
  • Nicolas MEDERHANSEN and his wife Margaretha

Both of the men and their wives had children from about 1645-1646 into the 1660s which leads me to believe they were about the same age and possibly brothers.

A large problem in analyzing the family connections this far back is the lack of death and marriage records for the period 1640 to 1725. Both MEDERHANSEN families had a son named Jacob. Nicolas’ son was born in 1646 and Henri’s son was born in 1655. To further complicate matters I found three women having children with men named Jacob.

  • Jacob and Maria had children in 1671, 1672, and 1674 (Nicolas)
  • Jacob and Eva had children in 1688 and 1690 (Nicolas or Henri)
  • Jacob and Susanna had children in 1696, 1698, and 1703 (my husband’s line)

Are all three Jacobs the same person, two persons, or even three – the last perhaps a grandson and not a son of one of the two first MEDERHANSEN families in Ettelbruck?

MRIN39230 MEDER Family Tree from 1600s to 1800s tiny

“Luxembourg registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32461-2471-13?cc=2037955 : 9 January 2015), Ettelbruck > Baptêmes 1640-1710, tables généalogiques des premières familles > image 12 of 70; paroisses, Luxembourg (parishes, Luxembourg).

Also found in the register were these diagrams of MEDER family trees including the MEDERHANSEN version of the name. Heinrich MEDER seen at the top of the diagram above was one of the two MEDERHANSEN men whose families were in Ettelbruck in the 1600s. Nicolas MEDERHANSEN in the diagram below was a son of Heinrich seen above.

MRIN39230 Nicolas MEDER Family Tree from 1600s to 1800s cropped

“Luxembourg registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32461-2316-29?cc=2037955 : 9 January 2015), Ettelbruck > Baptêmes 1640-1710, tables généalogiques des premières familles > image 13 of 70; paroisses, Luxembourg (parishes, Luxembourg).

The person who did these diagrams (mind-mapping on paper) would have greatly profited from today’s technology. Following all of the diagrams he included a list of marriages he used to create them. Many of the earliest marriages are “guesstimates” as a question mark was included before the year. How reliable are the early connection he made in the above diagrams? Further research may any this question.

As the births, marriages, and deaths for Ettelbruck appear to be complete from 1725 until 1815 in the church records, my next step will be to slowly go through all records beginning in 1725. It may be a while before I climb out of this rabbit hole or dig deeper into it.

Either way, I’m hopeful I will get additional help from my genealogy association in Luxembourg. Luxracines will soon be opening a library to the members and public. As treasurer and a member of the board, I’ve been helping set up the library and will be sharing some of the “behind the scenes” moments in next week’s post.

bestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Posted in Genealogy, Luxembourg | Tagged , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #69 George H. Brown 1872-1929

George H. BROWN was born on 11 March 1872 to Orilla C. SCHUCHARD and John R. BROWN. His mother passed away between 1872-1878. George resided in Columbus, Pope County, Illinois, in 1880 with his father, stepmother Maggie RUBLE, and half-brother John R. His father John R. passed away on 30 October 1884 at the age of 41. George married Anna Mary BARNES in 1894 when he was 22 years old. They had one child during their marriage. Their daughter Anna Idell was born on 2 March 1898 in Paducah, Kentucky, where the family resided in 1900 nad 1910. George lived in Carbondale, Illinois, in 1920. He died on 24 June 1929 in Detroit, Michigan, at the age of 57, and was buried in Carbondale, Illinois.

BrownGeorgebrotherofJohnfrontGeorge BROWN ca. 1890

BrownGeorgebrotherofJohnbackGeorge BROWN, brother of John “Pid”

This is how I identified George H. Brown

Written on the back of the photograph was the only information I had to identify the young man featured today. Since many of the actors in this mystery series (a.k.a. people who have been featured in Florence’s collection) were from Pope County, Illinois, I took the chance and searched for George Brown with a brother named John in Pope County in all collections on Ancestry. georgebrownresultThe top result was for George H. Brown b. abt. 1872 in Illinois, living in Columbus, Pope County, Illinois.

1880censusbrownpopeillOnly the persons highlighted in the image above were shown in the indexed household. They were not the only persons living in the same household as the Brown family. The head of household was a hotel keeper and dry goods merchant. A half brother of the head of household was also living with the family. The importance of looking at the images and following other persons in the household was seen as I continued the search.

It would appear that George H. age 8 and John T. age 2 were the sons of John R. Brown age 37 and his wife Maggie age 23. But wait, Maggie would have been 15 years old at the time of George’s birth. Is she his mother or not?

  1. I searched for George’s father in previous census listings. Since John T. Baldwin was listed as a half brother I used this information to narrow the search. This led to all census listings for John Baldwin from 1860 to 1930, his marriage to Ida Ellis who was seen on the same 1880 census listing, and his death record. George’s father was with John Baldwin in 1860. It is not possible to tell if the head of household was his stepfather or if the woman listed next was his mother as relationships are not given.
  2. I searched for George’s brother John T. Brown who turned out to be John R. Brown. He married Allie Steagall about 1902 and had several of her sisters in his household in 1910. One of the sisters was the widow of John Jay Hardin Hodge, a brother of Anna Mae Hodge. This looked promising. A connection to another person in Florence’s collection. John’s SS application (index) showed his parents were John R. Brown and Maggie Ruble.
  3. I searched for more information on Maggie Ruble Brown. A marriage record for John R. Brown and Maggie Ruble showed they married 1877 in Pope County, Illinois. This meant George Brown was most likely not a child of this marriage. John appears to have died and Maggie married William J. Reeves in 1894. By 1900 Maggie was once again widowed per the 1900 census. Her occupation was “Post Master” and boarding with her was Samuel L. ROYALTY. Another connection to the collection as Sam was Florence’s father.
  4. The fact that Maggie Ruble Brown was a postmaster led to the appointments of U.S. Postmasters database. This showed John R. Brown was appointed postmaster of Wool on 30 April 1872, his half-brother John T. Baldwin on 15 December 1884, and his wife/widow Maggie Brown on 2 Jan 1885. On 27 August 1892 Wool became Brownfield and Maggie Brown was still postmaster.
  5. Maggie Ruble Brown Reeves married Dr. Thomas Jefferson Rich about 1903 and lived in Anna, Union County, Illinois, in 1910 through 1940. She died in Anna in 1948.

I found information on George’s father, stepmother, half-brother, and uncle but what about George. Since the family lived in Wool, later known as Brownfield, I added this to the search criteria for George H. BROWN b. abt. 1872 in Brownfield.

top2hintsgeorgehbrownThis added a death certificate to the top matching records. The death record led to the Find A Grave memorial of George H. BROWN, his wife Anna Mary and his daughter Anna Idell. The daughter’s FAG page included this statement, “Next to her parents, G. H. Brown and Annie Brown. Besides her mother, she was also survived by her grandmother, Mrs. Rich of Anna, and an uncle John R. Brown of Benton.” This backed up the information I found while researching the family group and confirmed George H. BROWN was the right person even though his birth information on FAG did not match the death certificate.

1929georgehbrowndeathThe death certificate confirms George H. Brown was the son of John R. Brown of Brownfield and Ourell Schuhard of Gall (sic) County, Illinois. As I suspected, Maggie Ruble was not his mother.

George’s mother was seen as Orilla Schuchard in the household of John V. Schuchard and Catherine Young of Golconda in Pope County, Illinois.  She married John R. Brown on 1 June 1868 in Pope County.

georgehbrownfamilytreeGeorge H. BROWN’s only grandchild did not have children. His stepmother Maggie RUBLE married three times and had only one son, John R. BROWN who did not have children. There are no descendants to confirm the sad looking young man in the photograph above was George H. BROWN of Brownfield. Close in age to Florence born in 1868, she may have known George BROWN as the young boy who was orphaned at the age of 12 and lived with the postmaster, who was his stepmother, and his half-brother.  Am I grasping at straws or do you think I’ve identified this young man correctly?

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Posted in Old Photographs | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

The MEDER-LAMBERT Family of Ettelbrück (1753-1859)

Following the marriage of Johannes MEDER (1723-1784) and Susanna LAMBERT (1729-1803) on 27 December 1752[1] their first child was born eight months later. More children followed about every two years until the family included nine children in 1770. The baptisms of each child took place on the day of birth in Ettelbrück where the couple lived following their marriage in Mersch.

  • Ch 1: Margaretha on 30 August 1753. Her godparents were Nicolaus Flamman and Margaretha Eichorn, both of Ettelbrück.[2]
1753margarethamederbaptism

1753 Baptismal Record of Margaretha MEDER

  • Ch 2: Magdalena on 24 July 1755. Her godparents were Wilhelm Benderin and Magdalene Philips, both of Ettelbrück.[3]
1755magdelenamederbaptism

1755 Baptismal Record for Magdelena MEDER [3]

  • Ch 3: Pierre on 11 January 1757. His godparents were Petrus Kremer and Barbara Meder, both of Ettelbrück.[4]
1757petrusmederbaptism

1757 Baptismal Record for Petrus MEDER [4]

  • Ch 4: Nicolas on 13 August 1758. His godparents were Nicolaus Polfer and Anna Maria Meder, both of Ettelbrück.[5]
1758nicolasmederbaptism

1758 Baptismal Record for Nicolaus MEDER [5]

  • Ch 5: Joannes on 18 January 1761. His godparents were Joannes Wagener and Elisabetha Hoffman, both of Ettelbrück.[6]
1761joannesmederbaptism

1761 Baptismal Record for Joannes MEDER [6]

  • Ch 6: Agnès on 15 September 1762. Her godparents were Philippus Frisch of Ettelbrück and Agnes Schodeck of Mersch.[7]
1762agnesmederbaptism

1762 Baptismal Record for Agnes MEDER [7]

  • Ch 7: Elisabetha 5 October 1764. Her godparents were Théodorus Welter of Ettelbrück and Elisabetha Bettendorf of Warken.[8]
1764elisabethamederbaptism

1764 Baptismal Record for Elisabetha MEDER [8]

  • Ch 8: Joannes Nicolaus on 26 October 1766. His godparents were Joannes Nicolaus Bequinet and Barbara Wagner of Ettelbrück.[9]
1766joesnicolausmederbaptism

1766 Baptismal Record for Joannes Nicolaus MEDER [9]

  • Ch 9: Margaretha on 21 September 1770. Her godparents were Joannes Cames and Margaretha Flamand, both of Ettelbrück.[10]

1770margarethamederbaptism

1770 Baptismal Record for Margaretha MEDER [10]

One of my readers last week wrote, “So great to have such a wealth of records, not to mention being able to read them!” I admit that being fluent in several languages I forget sometimes that my readers not only may have difficulties reading the handwriting but also knowing the language it is writing in. The text of each baptismal record above was in Latin and reads:

Natus et baptimus est [child’s name] filius/filia legitimus/legitima [father] et [mother] conjugum ex [town], Susceptores fuerunt [godfather] ex [town] et [godmother] ex [town]

Born and baptized [child] legitimate son/daughter of married [parents] of [town], godparents were [godfather] and [godmother] of [town]

The paternal grandfather of the children lived long enough see all of them born. Adami MEDER also known as “Juckes” died at the age of 77 years on 9 March 1774 in Ettelbrück.[11] To date, no record of death has been found for his wife Elisabetha ESCH. An exhaustive search, viewing every page of the church death register from December 1771 when she was last seen as living, has not been done.

The first of Johannes and Susanna’s children Pierre MEDER married Anne Marie FABER (1755-1812) on 11 January 1779 in Ettelbrück.[12] It was to be the only marriage of a child attended by Johannes as he died at the age of 61 years on 13 February 1784 in Ettelbrück.[13]

Johannes’ widow Susanna saw four of their children marry in three years:

  • Ch 4: Nicolas MEDER married Marguerite BRACHTENBACH (1764-1823) on 27 December 1793 Ettelbrück[14]
  • Ch 8: Johann Nicolas MEDER married Apolonia WILMES (1769-1824) on 13 January 1794 Diekirch[15]
  • Ch 7: Elisabeth MEDER married Jacques BROCHMAN (1757-1831) on 23 May 1796 Diekirch[16]
  • Ch 9: Margaretha MEDER married Martin SCHMIDT (1750- ) on 9 September 1796 Ettelbrück[17] Note: Only the index card with marriage information was found for this couple. The church records appear to be missing pages (or they may be out of order) for May to November 1796. Civil marriages were first registered in the Republican Year 5, a week after this marriage took place.

No marriages or death records have been found for the oldest daughters Margaretha and Magdalena or for the third son Joannes. Did they die young or marry and live in a town other than Ettelbrück? I suspect Margaretha (b. 1753) died before the younger Margaretha was born in 1770. A complete search of the church records is still in progress.

The mother of the family, Susanna LAMBERT, died at the age of 74 years on 8 September 1803 in Ettelbrück. Her death was reported by her second oldest son Nicolas.[18]

Two of Johannes and Susanna’s children moved to Diekirch to raise their families while four of their children remained in Ettelbrück. Their daughter Agnès never married. The MEDER name was carried on by Pierre and Nicolas in Ettelbrück and by Johann Nicolas in Diekirch.

Death records were found for the following children:

  • Ch 3: Pierre MEDER , the oldest son, died 28 March 1812 Ettelbrück[19]
  • Ch 4: Nicolas MEDER died 9 March 1823 Ettelbrück[20]
  • Ch 7: Elisabeth MEDER died 29 November 1844 Diekirch[21]
  • Ch 8: Johann Nicolas “Jean Nicolas” MEDER died 22 December 1844 Diekirch[22]
  • Ch 6: Agnès MEDER who never married died 23 December 1844 Ettelbrück[23]
  • Ch 9: Margaretha MEDER died 14 December 1859 Ettelbrück[24]

The winter of 1844 was not a good year for the family. Three siblings died within a month, two of them a day apart.

Finding all of the above records was child’s play compared to what I went through to find the baptismal records of their parents Johann MEDER and Susanna LAMBERT. While doing the research for this family group I found myself slipping down a rabbit hole. I was pulled back in time to an era where family names were not the surnames we know today. Join me next week to see how I fared while exploring the rabbit hole.

bestwishescathy1

Sources:
[1] Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Mersch > Mariages 1749-1772 > image 13 of 88. 1752 Marriage Record (2nd entry on left page). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32461-2935-92?cc=2037955 : accessed 5 August 2016).
[2] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Baptêmes 1748-1792 > image 19 of 147. 1753 Baptismal Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32462-1207-63?cc=2037955 : accessed 5 August 2016).
[3] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Baptêmes 1748-1792 > image 25 of 147;. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32462-1236-98?cc=2037955 : accessed 5 August 2016).
[4] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Baptêmes 1748-1792 > image 30 of 147. 1757 Baptismal Record for Petrus Meder son of Joannis Meder and Susanna Lampert.. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32462-1074-98?cc=2037955 : accessed 5 August 2016).
[5] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Baptêmes 1748-1792 > image 35 of 147. 1758 Baptismal Record for Nicolaus Meder son of Joannis Meder and Susanna Lampert.  (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32462-1152-14?cc=2037955 : accessed 5 August 2016).
[6] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Baptêmes 1748-1792 > image 42 of 147. 1761 Baptismal Record for Joannis Meder son of Joannis Meder and Susanna Lambert. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32462-999-11?cc=2037955 : accessed 5 August 2016).
[7] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Baptêmes 1748-1792 > image 48 of 147. 1762 Baptismal Record for Agnes Meder daughter of Joannis Meder and Susanna Lambert. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32462-928-12?cc=2037955 : accessed 5 August 2016).
[8] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Baptêmes 1748-1792 > image 53 of 147. 1764 Baptismal Record for Elisabetha Meder daughter of Joannis Meder and Susanna Lampert. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32462-1107-60?cc=2037955 : accessed 5 August 2016).
[9] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Baptêmes 1748-1792 > image 59 of 147. 1766 Baptismal Record for Joannis Nicolaus Meder son of Joannis Meder and Susanna Lambert.  (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32462-751-39?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-ZJ4:1500939401,1501045912 : accessed 23 March 2015).
[10] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Baptêmes 1748-1792 > image 69 of 147. 1770 Baptismal Record for Margaretha Meder daughter of Joannis Meder and Susanna Lambert. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32462-831-96?cc=2037955 : accessed 5 August 2016).
[11] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Mariages 1732-1778, sépultures 1732-1782 > image 83 of 95. 1774 Death Record (bottom of left page). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32462-1343-92?cc=2037955 : accessed 5 August 2016).
[12] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 17 of 328. 1779 Marriage Record (left page, bottom entry). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32468-7375-53?cc=2037955 : accessed 7 August 2016).
[13] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Sépultures 1782-1793 > image 6 of 69. 1784 Death Record (bottom of right page).  (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32461-1116-41?cc=2037955 : accessed 5 August 2016).
[14] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Mariages 1780-1796 > image 48 of 59. 1793 Marriage Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32468-7595-91?cc=2037955 : accessed 19 August 2016).
[15] Ibid., Diekirch > Mariages 1743-1794 > image 116 of 122. 1794 Marriage Record (lower right). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32400-5311-96?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-B87:1500890501,1500891002 : accessed 28 June 2015).
[16] Ibid., Diekirch > Baptêmes 1791-1795, mariages 1794-1798, 1800-1803, sépultures 1794-1795 > image 110 of 243. 1796 Marriage Record (5 Prairial IV). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32467-4860-69?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-2JW:1500890501,1501017982 : accessed 23 June 2015).
[17] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Tables des mariages 1725-1799 Gevell-Z (index organisée par l’épouse) > image 603 of 809. 1796 Marriage Index Card. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32461-3829-99?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-2NB:1500939401,1501183702 : accessed 1 July 2015).
[18] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Ettelbruck > Mariages 1845-1890 Décès 1796-1826 > image 1012 of 1436. 1803 Death Record No. 51 (21 Fructidor XI). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12869-158460-11?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2L6:n238132716 : accessed 11 Apr 2013).
[19] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Mariages 1845-1890 Décès 1796-1826 > image 1131 of 1436. 1812 Death Record No. 29. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12869-150587-25?cc=1709358 : accessed 7 August 2016).
[20] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Mariages 1845-1890 Décès 1796-1826 > image 1350 of 1436. 1823 Death Record No. 15. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12869-152866-5?cc=1709358 : accessed 19 May 2011).
[21] Ibid., Diekirch > Décès 1825-1890 > image 335 of 1358. 1844 Death Record No. 54. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12147-167581-60?cc=1709358 : accessed 7 August 2016).
[22] Ibid., Diekirch > Décès 1825-1890 > image 335 of 1358. 1844 Death Record No. 56. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12147-167581-60?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2NH:n538876208 : accessed 17 February 2013).
[23] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Décès 1814-1881 > image 472 of 1379. 1844 Death Record No. 84. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11675-55724-76?cc=1709358 : accessed 19 August 2016).
[24] Ibid., Ettelbruck > Décès 1814-1881 > image 809 of 1379. 1859 Death Record No. 89. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11675-56883-78?cc=1709358 : accessed 8 August 2016).

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johannes MEDER
Parents: Adam MEDERHANSEN and Elisabetha ESCH
Spouse: Susanna LAMBERT
Parents of spouse: Joannis REINERS and Maria ERPELDING
Whereabouts: Ettelbrück and Angelsberg, Grand Duché of Luxembourg
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 4th great-grandfather of husband

  1. Johannes MEDER
  2. Jean Nicolas MEDER
  3. Theodore MEDER
  4. Franz “François” MEDER
  5. Johann Peter “Jean-Pierre” MEDER
  6. Marcel Mathias MEDER
  7. Cathy Meder-Dempsey’s husband Living MEDER

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Posted in Genealogy, Luxembourg | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

FamilySearch – First Batch of Luxembourg Civil Registration Records Now Searchable

Luxflag25pcWhat’s new on FamilySearch for Luxembourg? On Tuesday, 16 August 2016, records became searchable in the Luxembourg Civil Registration, 1662-1941 collection – 32,614.

FSLuxNewFrom time to time I do indexing for FamilySearch and found only one batch of Luxembourg records in the cue of current projects: Luxemburg, Esch Civil Registration, 1796–1923. “This project is a collection of birth, marriage, and death records from the city of Esch-sur-Alzette in south-western Luxembourg between 1796 and 1923.” Currently, 79% have been indexed and 71% arbitrated.

indexingIt looks like they are beginning to release the records which have been completed. If you have ancestors who were born, married or died in Esch-sur-Alzette you can now search by name instead of browsing the records.

Interested in doing indexing? Go to Find an Indexing Project. I’d love to see the Luxembourg records being done sooner than 2020!

bestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Posted in Genealogy, Luxembourg | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #68 Portrait of a Man with Beard

In the collection my cousin Joe Rooney sent to me there were two copies of the photograph I am sharing today of a bearded man. It took me a while to identify him. Bear with me while I work through this.

UNKGlassRoyaltyGBLTillie Rooney collectiontinyThe photographer Theodore C. Marceau per Wikipedia “pioneered the creation of a national chain of photographic studios in the United States in the 1880s.” I found an interesting biography of the photographer Marceau on Broadway Photographs. He lived in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1885-1886 and first went into a partnership with another photographer named Bellsmith around this time. Cabinet cards found online for the the studio in Cincinnati had Marceau Bellsmith as the photographer’s logo. I believe this photograph was one of Marceau’s early works and likely taken around 1885 before he partnered with Bellsmith.

The bearded man in this photograph was not a very young man and yet not old. The beard does not show any graying. The thinning of his hair would suggest he might have been in his 30s or 40s.

The backs of the photographs read:

Theo C. Marceau
The Leading Fotografer
Successor to Van Loo
148 West Fourth St.
Cincinnati

Also on the backs are dedications. The first reads, “To Uncle Sam – R.G.L.”

UNKPortraitmanbeardback Rooney collectionThe second, “To cousin Tillie R.G.L.” and a number “77030R” which could be for ordering duplicates.

UNKGlassRoyaltyGBLTillieback Rooney collectionBoth dedications were written by the same person, likely an adult. But who was R.G.L.?

Uncle Sam and cousin Tillie are a perfect fit for Samuel L. ROYALTY (1829-1902) and his daughter Mathilda J. “Tillie” (Royalty) WELLS (1859-1939). My problem is I don’t have a niece or nephew for Samuel with the initials R.G.L. The dedication on the back of the cabinet card to Uncle Sam would have to have been written before his death in 1902.

I slowly went through all the digital images of the fronts and backs of all photographs in the collection searching for the same handwriting. There are 250 items in the digital file.

carrieback2carrieback

These are the backs of two identical photographs of Caroline “Carrie” ENOCH, daughter of Ellen ROYALTY, oldest sister of Samuel L. ROYALTY. Sam’s niece and Tilly’s cousin.

When I shared Carrie’s portrait I had little information on her and was unable to locate her in any census after 1870. The backs of her photos suggested a marriage to a LANGLEY or LANGSTON. After writing about her photograph last November my cousin Joe posted several comments about her having been married at least three times. This led to the census enumerations in 1900, 1910, 1920 with her 2nd husband and in 1930 with her 3rd husband. I have not gone back to check on the 1940. All three of her marriages took place  in Hamilton County, Ohio:

Robert G. LANGSDALE 1851-1920

Carrie’s first husband’s initials were R.G.L. Here is a biographical sketch from the History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana, 1885.

1885historyofdearbornandohiocountiesp808-809R. G. LANGSDALE, M.D., a popular druggist and pharmacist, Rising Sun, is a native of Kentucky, born in 1851. He was educated at Moore’s Hill College, and for seven years was engaged in teaching “the young idea how to shoot.” In 1879 he entered the Ohio Medical College, of Cincinnati, and took a thorough course in the study of medicine, graduating March 4, 1881. He then sold out his interest in the drug business at Florence, Ind., and located in the same year in Rising Sun. In January, 1882, he purchased a stock of drugs of B.F. Buchanan, and, since that date, has done a good business in the drug line, keeping a full stock of goods peculiar to the trade. Dr. Langsdale began the study of medicine with Drs. Fairhurst & Mantle, of Vincennes, Ind., and later, with Dr. J.M.W. Langsdale, of Florence, Ind.  He now confines his professional services to city practice exclusively. In the fall of 1885 Dr. LANGSDALE was married to Miss Carrie Enochs, one of the most prepossessing young ladies of Rising Sun.
[Source: History of Dearborn and Ohio Counties, Indiana, 1885 online https://archive.org/stream/historyofdearbor00chic#page/n5/mode/2up]

Carrie and Robert’s marriage did not last. Carrie remarried in 1900 and Robert in 1906. Neither had children.

Before you leave, please take a moment to scroll back up to the top and meet Dr. Robert G. Langsdale.

RGLsignature
bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Posted in Old Photographs | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments