Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #56 Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE 1895-1979

With Memorial Weekend soon coming up I would like to share these old photographs over several days, although not daily, until Memorial Day. In my last post I gave a short explanation as to why I am posting a veteran’s military photos.

Today we see Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE in uniform wearing his winter coat, hat and holding a rifle in 1918.

roylilliewithrifleMore about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Posted in Old Photographs | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Slave Name Roll Project: RELEASING Nell, Hannah, and Harry

Following my three part series on the slaves of my 5th grand-father James Sims during Black History Month in February 2015 I made a commitment to write a post on a monthly basis until I’ve RELEASED all of the names of slaves owned by my ancestors.

✻ ✻ ✻ ✻ ✻

The Slave Name Roll Project page can be found on
Schalene Jennings Dagutis’ blog Tangled Roots and Trees

✻ ✻ ✻ ✻ ✻

While researching my Rupp emigrant who came to America in 1752 I found the names of several slaves owned by his grandson Adam Shower in 1833. How did Adam come to own slaves?

His father Johannes Schauer, also known as John Shower(s), made his last will and testament on 2 June 1802. It was sworn to in open court on 21 March 1810 in Baltimore County, Maryland.

Releasing the names of Nell, Hannah, and Harry

NellandHannahslaves

Last Will and Testament of John Showers (includes 2 slaves): “Maryland Register of Wills Records, 1629-1999,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-24150-7145-67?cc=1803986 : accessed 8 March 2016), Baltimore > Wills 1805-1811 vol 8 > image 266 and 267 of 279; Hall of Records, Annapolis.

I also will and bequeath to my said wife two Negroes, namely Nell and Hannah.

In the inventory of the estate of John Shower of Baltimore County, Maryland, dated 31 March 1810 the following slaves were named:

HarryandHannahslaves

Inventory of John Shower (includes 2 slaves): “Maryland Register of Wills Records, 1629-1999,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-24282-1624-18?cc=1803986 : accessed 9 March 2016), Baltimore > Inventories 1809-1811 vol 26 > image 198 of 337; Hall of Records, Annapolis.

1 negro boy named Harry about 7 years old 145.00
1 negro woman named Hannah abt. 17 yrs. old 200.00

Nell and Hannah were given to John’s wife per his will. No further information was given to identify them. In the inventory we see Harry and Hannah. Is Hannah the same person in the 1802 will and the 1810 inventory? She would have been 9 years old at the time the will was written. Harry being only 7 in 1810 was not yet born in 1802. Was Nell the mother of Hannah and Harry? Did Nell die between 1803-1810, perhaps after the birth of Harry?

In 1810 Mary Shower, the widow of John Shower and daughter of my immigrant ancestor Johann Jacob Rupp (aka Jacob Rupe), was found in the census with only one slave in her household. The slave was under 25 years of age. Was this Hannah age 17?

In 1833 Mary Shower died intestate. The inventory of her estate included one slave:

slavehannah

1833 Inventory of the estate of Mary Shower, Book 42 pages 353-355: “Maryland Register of Wills Records, 1629-1999,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-24259-44475-46?cc=1803986 : accessed 9 March 2016), Baltimore > Inventories 1833-1834 vol 42 > image 194 and 195 of 321; Hall of Records, Annapolis.

One negro woman named Hannah about 35 years old, a slave for life 125.00

Hannah may be the same person in the 1802 will of John Shower, the 1810 inventory of John Shower, and the 1833 inventory of Mary Shower. There is however a slight difference in age. Hannah was born about 1793 per the 1810 inventory and about 1798 per the 1833 inventory.

Questions remain: What happened to Nell after the 1802 will was written, to Harry after the 1810 inventory, and to Hannah after the 1833 inventory?

True's statementbestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Posted in Black History, Brick Walls | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #55 Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE 1895-1979

With Memorial Weekend soon coming up I would like to share these old photographs over several days, although not daily, until Memorial Day. You are probably wondering why I am featuring a veteran when Memorial Day is for those who lost their lives while serving in the military, particularly in battle or of wounds sustained in battle. Being the daughter of a man who died while on active duty and the sister of men who are retired from the military, I know the difference between Memorial Day and Veterans Day. However I feel much more attention is given to the day at the end of May than the day in November which marks the end of World War I. So why wait until then to share these photos Roy LILLIE was so proud of?

I know very little about the time Samuel Royalty LILLIE served as a private in the U.S. Army during the Great War, World War I as we call it today. He enlisted on 31 August 1918 and was released on 19 December 1918 following the end of the war on 11 November 1918. He had this portrait taken at Morrison Photo in Chicago perhaps soon after enlistment.

RoyLillieage23Another copy of this photograph without the frame.

roylillieage23fullMore about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Posted in Old Photographs | Tagged , , , , , | 6 Comments

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #54 Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE 1895-1979

With Memorial Weekend soon coming up I would like to share these old photographs over several days, although not daily, until Memorial Day. Many men and women lost their lives while serving in the military and Memorial Day is when they are remembered. Roy LILLIE was not one of these men, he served in the U.S. military and was a veteran.

On 5 June 1917 when the World War I Draft Registration Card was filled out Samuel Royalty LILLIE was 22 and still working for his father on the home farm in Jefferson Precinct, Pope County, Illinois.

A year later in 1918 at the age of 23 Roy had his picture taken standing in full uniform in Metropolis, Massac County, Illinois. The tall, slender man with grey eyes and dark hair, as he was described on the WWI draft card,  was quite handsome in his uniform. He’d enlisted as a private in the U.S. Army on 31 Aug 1918.

roylilliestandinguniformMore about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Posted in Old Photographs | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

The RUPP-FETZER Family of Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg

rupp1713

Den 21tn febr. seynd nach dreimaliger proclamation eingesegnet worden, Johann Jacob, Johann Barthol RUPP seel. gewesener burger zu Oberhoffen nachgelassener Sohn, und Maria Apollonia, Hans Paul FETZER burger zu Steinselz eheliche tochter.

On the 21st of February, after banns were proclaimed three times, Johann Jacob, the son of the deceased Johann Barthol Rupp, a former citizen of Oberhoffen, and Maria Apollonia, the legitimate daughter of Hans Paul Fetzer, a citizen of Steinseltz, were joined in marriage.

NOTE: Several birth, marriage and death records in this post may be accessed directly on the Bas-Rhin Archives’ site. On your first visit to the site, after you’ve clicked on one of the links below, you will have to scroll to the bottom of the pop-up window entitled License d’utilisation and click on Accepter to accept the terms and conditions.

The young couple, both 23 years old, were married on Tuesday, 21 February 1713 in Steinseltz, Bas-Rhin, Alsace, France.[1] The groom Johann Jacob RUPP was the son of Hans Barthol RUPP and his wife Anna Sybilla, both deceased at the time of the marriage. The bride Maria Apollonia FETZER was the daughter of Hans Paulus FETZER and his deceased first wife Apollonia. The marriage entry found at the bottom of page 368 of the register is four lines long and read as seen above. The names of the mothers of the bridal couple were not given.  Click here to see the image of the marriage record on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site.

Johann Jacob RUPP was born 27 April 1689[2] in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and baptized on 1 May 1689 in Steinseltz. These events were found on page 8, 2nd entry, of the church register. Click here to see the image of the birth record on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site. He had at least 9 siblings, 7 of whom married and 2 who lived long enough to be godparents. None of his siblings are known to have died at an early age. His father died[3] when Johann Jacob was 17 years old and his mother[4] when he was 22 years old.

Maria Apollonia FETZER was born 21 October 1689[5] in Steinseltz. Her birth was mentioned in a line and a half on the top of page 9 of the church register. Click here for birth/baptismal record on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site. She had at least 4 sisters, 3 of whom married, the fourth died before her first birthday. Maria Apollonia lost her mother[6] when she was 19 years old and saw her father remarry at least twice before he died at the age of 89.[7]

steinseltzDuring Johann Jacob’s adolescent years the church records include very few confirmations. Only those of his two younger siblings were recorded. However many of his older siblings were seen as godparents in birth/baptismal records. Young adults could only be godparents after they were confirmed. Before Johann Jacob married he was also the godfather of two children.

The first was quite unusual and the entry was on a piece of paper slipped into the church register. Click here to go to the image on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site. On 11 November 1709[8] an illegitimate child was presented for baptism. Johann Jacob, son of Barthel RUPP of Oberhoffen, and Anna Catharina, daughter of the deceased Hans Martin FETZER, were the godparents of the baby girl christened Anna Catharina. Her mother was Anna Maria, daughter of Michael SCHUHMACHER, a carpenter from Steinseltz. The father of the child was a regimental soldier. He may have gotten her with child without her consent or she offered her favors and ended up pregnant. The wording in German was: Anna Maria, Michael Schuhmachers seel.[ig] gew[esener] b.[ürger] u. Zimmermanns Zu St.[Steinseltz] ehelich nachgel.[assene] tochter, so mit einem soldaten beim regiment de Perry im Keüscher weiß Zugehalten, und durch Hurrerey schwanger worden. This statement suggests the young lady may have allowed the sexual intercourse as a virgin – at least in the eyes of the church.

The next time Johann Jacob was the godfather and namesake of a baby boy, son of Johann Martin PFÖRTER and his wife Anna Maria SCHUHMACHER of Steinseltz was on 11 October 1711.[9] The mother was the same lady who had the illegitimate child in 1709. The baby boy, Johann Jacob PFÖRTER, would marry Johann Jacob RUPP’s niece 21 years later in 1732.

Following their marriage in 1713 Johann Jacob and Maria Apollonia became the parents of their first child, a daughter. Anna Maria was born on 24 April 1714 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and baptized five days later on 29 April 1714 in the Protestant church in Steinseltz. Her godparents were Johann Michel, son of the deceased Michael SCHUHMACHER, and Anna Maria, daughter of the deceased Hans MÜLLER.[10] Anna Maria, the child, died a little more than three months later on 5 August 1714 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and was buried in the cemetery in Steinseltz the next day. Her death and burial were annotated on the birth/baptism record and not found under deaths and burials.

Johann Jacob RUPP and the deceased Michael SCHUHMACHER were mentioned in the same records in 1709, 1711, and 1713? Was this a coincidence or was there some kind of family relation? Was Michael’s wife a RUPP? Could she have been a sister of Johann Jacob’s father Hans Barthol RUPP? Or was Hans Barthol’s wife Anna Sybilla a SCHUHMACHER?

On 10 June 1715 Johann Jacob’s brother Johann Phillip presented his first child in the church in Steinseltz for baptism. The baby boy was named after his uncle Johann Jacob who was one of the two godfathers along with Johann Walter MÜLLER, the schoolmaster of Steinseltz, and a godmother Anna Maria, the wife of Johann [surname illegible].[11]The most interesting detail of this record was the word “Junior” seen for the first time beside the name of Johann Jacob RUPP. This was used to distinguish him from his cousin Johann Jacob RUPP who lived in Steinseltz and was two years his senior. From this time on the cousins were seen as Senior from Steinseltz and Junior from Oberhoffen (the full name of the town was not used in the parish records).

A few months later the second child of Johann Jacob and Maria Apollonia was born on 2 September 1715 in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and was baptized Anna Maria on 8 September 1715 in Steinseltz.[12] This birth was followed by Maria Margaretha on 14 November 1717, baptized a week later on 21 November 1717.[13] Places of birth and baptism of all of their children would remain the same from 1714 to 1732.

Before the next child was born Johann Jacob was once again stepping forward to be the godfather of another child of his brother Johann Phillip RUPP. Maria Margareta was born in early August 1719 in Oberhoffen and baptized in Steinseltz on 6 August 1719. Two married ladies were the godmothers.[14]

Maria Dorothea was born 13 October 1719 and baptized two days later.[15] Johann Peter, the first son, was born 7 December 1721, baptized 11 December 1721,[16] died two months later on 15 February 1722 and buried the next day.[17] A year later my 6th great-grandfather Johann Jacob RUPP was born on 8 March 1723 and baptized the next day.[18] The little family now included three daughters and a son. Click here to see the 1723 birth/baptism record (6th entry under 1723) for my 6th great-grandfather on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site.

Johann Jacob’s wife and the mother of his children, Maria Apollonia FETZER, was a godmother for Anna Catharina, daughter of Johann Jacob WENNER and his wife Anna Margareta RUPP, born on 16 March 1724 and baptized on 19 March 1724.[19] The mother of the child was the sister of Johann Jacob RUPP Junior.

Maria Apollonia was 36 years old when she gave birth to her 7th child, 5th living. Maria Magdalena was born 9 May 1725 and baptized on the 13th.[20] Anna Barbara followed on 31 October 1727 and was baptized on 3 November.[21] Maria Magdalena born in 1725 died on 13 August 1728 and was buried two days later.[22] The next child born on 5 October 1729 was given the same name, Maria Magdalena, when she was baptized on the 9th.[23]

Before Johann Jacob and Maria Apollonia’s last child was born, their two oldest daughters were of the age to be confirmed. The confirmation sacrament was usually received at the age of 14 or 15. Anna Maria was confirmed in 1730[24] and Maria Margaretha in 1731.[25]

The youngest child in the family was Eva Magdalena born on 27 September 1732 and baptized on the 30th.[26] A month after the birth of this child her father Johann Jacob RUPP died on 30 October 1732[27] and was buried two days later on 1 November 1732. Click here for his death record (5th entry) on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site.

With her husband’s death Maria Apollonia was left a widow at the age of 43 with 6 daughters and a son between the ages of one month and 17 years. The number of children decreased a little over a week later when the baby Eva Magdalena died on 9 November 1732 and was buried the next day in the cemetery near her father.[28]

Several events took place during the next decade and before the death of my 7th great-grandmother.

  • Her third oldest daughter Maria Dorothea b. 1719 was confirmed in 1733.[29]
  • Three years later Maria Apollonia FETZER was the godmother of a child named Anna Rebecca baptized on 13 December 1736 in Steinseltz.[30]
  • My 6th great-grandfather Johann Jacob RUPP was confirmed on 21 April 1737[31]
  • The second oldest daughter Maria Margaretha b. 1717 became a godmother on 19 October 1738.[32]
  • The youngest living daughter Maria Magdalena b. 1729 was confirmed in 1743.[33]

In 1743 all of the RUPP children were confirmed but none as yet married. Their only living grandparent, Hans Paulus FETZER, Maria Apollonia’s father, died on 28 March 1743 and was buried the next day in the Steinseltz cemetery.[7]

Maria Apollonia FETZER died six weeks later on 11 May 1743[34] in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg. Click here to view the death record (left page, 1st entry) on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site. She was 53 years old and left 5 daughters and a son. It is not known if the girls remained in Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg nor when they died. Of these children only two are known to have married.

Son Johann Jacob RUPP married Maria Barbara NONNENMACHER on 7 February 1746[35] in Kutzenhausen, a nearby village. Click here to view the marriage record (last two lines on left page and top half of right page) on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin site.

Daughter Maria Dorothea RUPP was 32 years old when she married Joseph EMINGER on 16 May 1752.[36] This marriage took place the year her brother Johann Jacob was preparing to leave for America with his family.

One of these day I will go through the Steinseltz and Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg records for the period after 1752 to find possible descendants of my 6th great-grandfather’s sisters. At this point the only known descendants of Johann Jacob RUPP Junior and his wife Maria Apollonia FETZER are those of their only son, my immigrant ancestor, who went to America in 1752.

bestwishescathy1
 Sources:
[1] Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67), browsable images of parish and civil records. Any utilization other than for private use, even non-commerical, is subject to a signed license agreement., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 191 of 268, left page, last entry. 1713 Marriage Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[2] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 15 of 268, left page, 2nd entry. 1689 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 1 June 2013).
[3] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 223 of 268, right page, last entry. 1707 Death Record (age 57). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[4] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 224 of 268, right page, last entry. 1711 Death Record (age 63). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[5] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 15 of 248, right page, first entry. 1689 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[6] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 224 of 268, left page, 1st entry in 1709. 1709 Death Record (age 52). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[7] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 239 of 268, right page, 4th entry under 1743. 1743 Death Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).
[8] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 31 of 268. 1709 Baptismal Record (godparents). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 14 June 2013).
[9] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 32 of 268, right page. 1711 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 11 February 2016).
[10] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 33 of 268, left side, 3rd entry under 1714. 1714 Baptismal Record includes annotation concerning her death. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).
[11] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 33, right page, 5th entry. 1715 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).
[12] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 33 of 268, right page, 9th entry. 1715 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[13] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 34 of 268, left page, 8th entry under 1717. 1717 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[14] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 35 of 268, left page, 6th entry. 1719 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).
[15] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 35 of 268, left page, 8th entry. 1719 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[16] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 36 iof 268, left page, 3rd entry. 1721 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[17] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 226 of 268, left page, 1st entry under 1722. 1722 Death Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[18] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 36 of 268, right page, 6th entry under MDCCXXIII. 1723 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[19] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 37 of 268, left page, 7th entry. 1724 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 14 June 2013).
[20] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 38 of 268, left page, 1st entry. 1725 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[21] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 39 of 268, left page, last entry. 1727 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[22] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 228 of 268, left page, 10th entry. 1728 Death Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[23] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 43 of 268, left page, bottom entry. 1729 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[24] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 166 of 268, right page, 8th entry. 1730 Confirmation Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[25] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 166 of 268, right page, 2nd to last entry. 1731 Confirmation Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 14 June 2013).
[26] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 51 of 268, left page, last entry. 1732 Baptismal Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).
[27] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 231 of 268, right page, 5th entry. 1732 Death Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).
[28] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 231 of 268, right page, last entry. 1732 Death Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 28 May 2013).
[29] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 167 of 268, right page, 4th entry under 1733. 1733 Confirmation Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 14 June 2013).
[30] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 61 of 268, left page, last entry. 1736 Baptismal Record (last entry). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 14 June 2013).
[31] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 169 of 268, left page, 3rd entry. 1737 Confirmation Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 16 June 2013).
[32] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 66 of 268, right page, 1st entry. 1738 Baptismal Record (godmother). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 14 June 2013).
[33] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 170 of 268, right page, 9th entry. 1743 Confirmation Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 14 June 2013).
[34] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 240 of 268, left page, first entry. 1743 Death Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 26 May 2013).
[35] Ibid., Kutzenhausen, Parroise protestante, BMS, 1737-1784, 3 E 253/13, image 14 of 54, bottom left and top right. 1746 Marriage Record (part 1). (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 27 May 2013).
[36] Ibid., Steinseltz, Paroisse protestante (réformée), BMS, 1685-1787, 3 E 4791/1, image 205 of 268, right page, 2nd entry. 1752 Marriage Record. (http://etat-civil.bas-rhin.fr/adeloch/index.php : accessed 2 June 2013).

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann Jacob RUPP
Parents:Hans Barthol RUPP and his wife Anna Sybilla
Spouse: Maria Apollonia FETZER
Parents of spouse: Hans Paulus FETZER and his wife Apollonia
Whereabouts: Oberhoffen-lès-Wissembourg and Steinseltz in Alsace, France
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 7th great-grandfather

  1. Johann Jacob RUPP junior
  2. Johann Jacob RUPP
  3. Henrich “Henry” RUPE Sr.
  4. James ROOP
  5. Gordon H. ROOP
  6. Gordon Washington ROOP
  7. Walter Farmer ROOP
  8. Myrtle Hazel ROOP
  9. Fred Roosevelt Dempsey
  10. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Posted in Brick Walls, Genealogy, Roop | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #53 Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE 1895-1979

With Memorial Weekend soon coming up I would like to share these old photographs over several days, although not daily, until Memorial Day.

We begin with a very young Samuel Royalty “Roy” LILLIE, son of Isaac Spencer “Ike” LILLIE and Florence ROYALTY. He was born 30 May 1895 in Azotus, Pope County, Illinois. In 1900 he was living with his parents and older brother Reese Gentry LILLIE in Jefferson Precinct in Pope County. His father owned the farm he worked. By 1910 the family had increased with the births of Raymond, Ruth and Ruby. Roy (14) and his brother Reese (17) were laborers on the home farm. Both of the boys could read and write but only Roy attended school after 1 September 1909.

This photograph was likely taken in the early 1910s soon after Roy finished school.

youngroylillieca1915More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Posted in Old Photographs | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Extra! Extra! – News from the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin

I mentioned in an earlier post that the images found on the Archives départementales du Bas-Rhin (67) site are under certain restrictions. Any utilization other than for private use, even non-commerical, is subject to a signed license agreement. What this means is I cannot share images of the records on my blog.

I’ve been working through my source citations adding as many layers as necessary to direct my reader to the actual document and had planned on writing a post on how to use the site. While putting the finishing touches to my latest post on the RUPP-FETZER family I discovered there have been changes made to their site. As I write this the news has been added to their site.

Bas-RhinNEWS

  1. The Adeloch (parish and civil records) and Ellenbach (census) applications are now available online on all supports including tablets or phones.
  2. More records have been added and can be viewed using their new and improved viewer. A function to embed images has been added as well as the collaborative indexation of images.
  3. More records have been added to their online inventory.
  4. A Personal Space has been added where you can register to help with indexation and save images.

The best part of these improvements to the site is the ability to embed images. This will allow users to upload to their website or on their blog, one or more images from the digitized collections. The image will be available in high quality with a built-in zoom. With the use of this technology, it will not be necessary to purchase a specific license for public display of images.

Warning: Some disruption may occur on 17 and 18 May 2016 relating to the updating of content and the higher traffic on the website.

I have not yet been able to embed an image. In the post I had planned to publish today the embedded code created a link to the image on the Archives site and not an embedded image in the blogpost. It will probably be a few days before the feature is live and working correctly.

bestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Posted in Genealogy | Tagged , , , | 9 Comments

Luxracines on Tour – A Visit to Bastogne, Belgium

logo_klengTwenty members of Luxracines, my genealogy association in Luxembourg, had a very enjoyable although cold and windy day visiting the town of Bastogne, Belgium, this past Saturday.

1964-09-021 BastogneBastogne, Baaschtnech in Luxembourgish, lies a stone’s throw from the Luxembourg border. In 1964 my first visit to Bastogne, at the age of 6, was to see the Mardasson Memorial, a monument honoring the memory of American soldiers wounded or killed during World War II’s Battle of the Bulge.

People visit Bastogne for the military as well as the cultural history of the area. While there are several military sites and museums, there are other sites worth visiting which have been around since earlier times such as the Church of Saint-Pierre (as early as 12th century) and the Gate of Trier (14th century).

As Luxracines members are genealogists and interested in all historical aspects, our visit to Bastogne took us to the Piconrue Museum housed in an old abbey. The museum invites visitors “on a journey to the heart of the Ardennes to explore the region’s culture through its rich tangible and intangible heritage.

The primary objective of the Piconrue Museum is the protection and conservation of objects and documents threatened by theft and neglect as well as oral legacy of memories, prayers, gestures, songs and legends of the region.

expoTheme of the exhibition, The Ages of Life – Birth, Life and Death in the Ardennes Region, takes the visitor back in time to the 1850 to 1950 period. The rites of passage of society from “the cradle to the grave” in the rural area of the Ardennes and Luxembourg were deeply marked by the Catholic faith as seen throughout the collection of items showcased.

cradlegravetinyThe museum director Sebastien PIERRE walked us through the exhibit giving interesting insight into the times and the stages in the lives of the inhabitants: Baptism, school days, Communion, military service, marriage, home life, work, social activities, to the inevitable – Death. Throughout the exhibit the visitor is reminded of the past and the many changes which have come during the postwar period. The people and culture of the Ardennes region have entered a modern time but their memories of days gone by live on.

muralThe exhibit begins with an introduction to the theme. A mural with photographs from today and yesterday of young to old resembles a family tree.schooltinyThe years at school and…

playtiny…at play were and are an important part of the development of our children.

communiontinyThe Catholic Church played an significant role in the children’s lives. From Baptism to Communion to Confirmation.

tradetinyAdolescence was a time of growing, learning trades, and discovering the opposite sex….

marriagetiny….in preparation for marriage or, in the case of some children, priesthood or convent life.

socialtinyFor those who married life continued with raising a family, work inside and outside the home, and social activities. deathtinyAnd in the end came old age and death.

The exhibit allows the visitor to pause and reflect on the good and the bad of the times as compared to today. For example, girls and boys were often separated in school and guided in their future rolls by the toys they were given or activities they were allowed to participate in. The roll of women and men was greatly influenced by society and the church and this has changed a great deal in the last decades.

We were not rushed through the tour of the museum and the impression it left on me has me planning to return as there was a deeper layer to it – the memories of the people and the heirlooms they shared make this collection all the more meaningful.

luxracinesgroupbastogne2016

Courtesy of Rob Deltgen

Our planned visit of the Church of Saint-Pierre had to be cancelled. Early in the morning a children’s musical group was practicing in the church and, after our visit to the museum, a funeral mass was being held. We therefore continued on to the Restaurant Wagon Léo where we had a wonderful lunch before returning home to Luxembourg.

leoIn 1946 following World War II a Bastogne farmer Léopold BERTHOLET and his wife bought a tram wagon and transformed it into a diner with a dozen places. Léo served pommes frites made from Bintje potatoes, the only good potato for french fries. The family enterprise has become a true institution in Bastogne. In 1950 he added a wooden annex to increase the number of seats to 42. For the last 70 years and three generations the Restaurant LEO has continued to expand for the comfort of its clients and now seats 250 and includes a bistro and hotel.

More impressions of our visit were shared here by our President Rob Deltgen

bestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Posted in Luxracines | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Taking On New Responsibility at Luxracines

You may have noticed it’s been a bit quiet here the past few weeks. May is always a busy month with holidays (1st of May, Assumption Day, Pentecost) and birthdays but events in April are another reason I’ve had to slow down a bit.

logo_klengLuxracines, my genealogy association in Luxembourg, held its General Assembly on 14 April 2016 at the Centre Becheler in Walferdange. President Rob DELTGEN welcomed Madame Eliane IRTHUM, a communal representative for Walferdange, the Luxracines members and Jean-Marie NEIERS, who represented the Cercle Généalogique de Yutz 3 Frontières, a French genealogy association.

The announcement that the commune of Walferdange will provide the association with a location to house the recently acquired Daus library with its almost 1300 family books from the border region was received with applause.

The president also announced the planned publication of the family book of Echternach for the years 1797-1923 compiled by Thomas WEAVER, a member of the association.

Jean-Pierre WEIDERT who manages the homepage of the association presented Luxracines‘ new GEDCOM project which is online and available to members.

Secretary Christiane OTH-DIEDERICH gave a review of the activities in 2015. These included several which I blogged about:

Following the financial report by the treasurer Tun JACOBY and the report of the auditors, the treasurer was granted discharge by applause.

My candidature for the executive committee was accepted and I was elected. Per the statutes the positions in the committee were distributed at the first meeting of the committee on 28 April 2016:

President: Rob DELTGEN
Vice-President: Claude BETTENDROFFER
Secretary: Christiane OTH-DIEDERICH
Treasurer: Cathy MEDER-DEMPSEY
Webmaster: Jemp WEIDERT
Jean-Paul HOFFMANN
Tun JACOBY
Nicole MATHIEU-POLFER

I’m looking forward to the new responsibilities and the upcoming activities. The agenda for 2016 may be viewed here.

bestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Posted in Genealogy, Luxracines | Tagged , | 24 Comments

Slave Name Roll Project: RELEASING Joseph, Jane, Sal, Pat, Isaac, Daniel, Ann, William, Elias

Following my three part series on the slaves of my 5th grand-father James Sims during Black History Month in February 2015 I made a commitment to write a post on a monthly basis until I’ve RELEASED all of the names of slaves owned by my ancestors.

April slipped by without my posting the names of these people I found while researching my Rupp emigrant who came to America in 1752. Johann Jacob Rupp did not own slaves nor did his youngest son, my 5th great-grandfather Henry Rupe. However while doing research on his other children I found his oldest daughter Anna Maria, also known as Mary, married Johannes Schauer, also known as John Shower, and had five children. Their son Adam Shower of Baltimore County, Maryland, died intestate in 1833. His inventory shows he owned nine slaves.

Joseph, Jane, Sal, Pat, Isaac, Daniel, Ann, William, and Elias.

slavesofadamshower

Inventory Book 42 pgs. 348-353 (images 192-194) “Maryland Register of Wills Records, 1629-1999,” images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-24259-41440-74?cc=1803986 accessed 1 May 2016), Baltimore > Inventories 1833-1834 vol 42 > images 192, 193, 194 of 321; Hall of Records, Annapolis.

One negro man named Joseph about 48 years old, a slave for life $40.00
One negro girl named Jane about 8 years old, a slave for life $65.00
One negro girl named Sal about 5 years old, a slave for life $45.00
One negro woman named Pat about 36 years old, a slave for life $125.00
One negro boy named Isaac about 18 years old, a slave for life $300.00
One negro boy named Daniel about 17 years old, a slave for life $300.00
One negro girl named Ann about 13 years old, a slave for life $180.00
One negro boy named William about 11 years old, a slave for life $155.00
One negro boy named Elias about 3 years of, a slave for life $50.00True's statementbestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Posted in Black History, Brick Walls | Tagged , , , , , , , | 9 Comments