The Ancestors: Nicolas Traudt and Maria Barbara Bill of Vianden

On Sunday, 22 January 1747, a young couple was married in Vianden, Luxembourg.

Castle of Vianden from a collection of 10 framed prints of castles in Luxembourg owned by our family.

The 1747 marriage record

The marriage index card

The marriage of Nicolas TRAUDT and Barbara BILL was recorded in the Vianden church register volume 2 page 105. It was the first entry for the year 1747.1

Nicolas TRAUDT was 25 years old. Barbara BILL, his bride was 23. The entry in the church register of Vianden included the names of their fathers, Henri TRAUDT and Theodor BILL.2 The three lines give no additional information not already abstracted on the marriage index card.

1747 Marriage Record of Nicolas TRAUDT and Maria Barbara BILL

The mother of the groom was Margaretha HEICKEL.3 The mother of the bride was only known as Maria.4 These names were not mentioned in the marriage record.

The children of Nicolas TRAUDT and Maria Barbara BILL

Nicolas and Barbe made their home in Vianden where all of their children were born. Nicolas made his living as a clothes tailor or tailleur d’habits. 

1766 Luxembourg census reflecting the family group before the birth of their last child.

Henri TRAUDT was born on 24 February 1748.5 He was listed as Nicolas Henri TRAUDT on the 1766 census.6 No marriage or death record has been found.

Nicolas TRAUDT was born on 13 January 1750.7 He was living at the time of the 1766 census. No marriage or death record has been found.

Théodore TRAUDT was born on 11 March 1752.8 He died on 11 October 1785 at the age of 33.9 He married Susanna WAGENER on 27 April 1777 in Vianden.10 Like his father, he was a clothes tailor.

Maria Magdalena TRAUDT was born on 17 June 1754.11 She married Michel WIRTZ on 13 May 1776.12 They were both living in January 1793 when their 8th child was born.13

Barbe TRAUDT was born on 19 March 1757.14 She died in der Unterstadt on 14 January 1794 at the age of 36.15 She married Johann MANDT on 7 April 1777 in Roth.16 They were the parents of nine children, all born in der Unterstadt.

Michael TRAUDT was born on 25 Jan 1759.17 He may have died before 1766 as he is not included in the household of Nicolas and Barbe in 1766.

Maria TRAUDT was born on 20 September 1761.18 A daughter named Anna Maria was with Nicolas and Barbe at the time of the 1766 census. No marriage or death record has been found.

Elisabeth TRAUDT (speculation!) was enumerated with Nicolas and Barbe on the 1766 census. She was listed in the under 14 years column. A baptismal record for this child needs to be found to prove she was a child of this couple with this name. It may have been an error on the census and meant to be Maria Clara, the next child born to the couple.

Maria Clara TRAUDT was born on 2 April 1764.19 She was not listed on the 1766 census with her parents although she is known to have lived. She married Jean METZ in Vianden on 6 May 1787.20 They had children who have not been researched. Clara died on 18 February 1828 at the age of 63.21

Margaretha TRAUDT was born on 8 August 1766.22 She died at the age of 43 on 30 November 1809.23 She married Jean-Népomucène SCHLOESSER (1764-1833) on 26 April 1790 in Vianden.24 Margaretha and Jean-Népomucène were my 4th great-grandparents.

Nicolas is widowed and remarries

After 22 years of marriage and giving birth to nine children, Barbe died on 18 May 1769 at the age of 45.25 Nicolas remarried on 1 October 1769 to Barbara KÖNIG.26 They did not have children. Nicolas died on 19 April 1799 in Vianden.27

Research Manager

I used the Familienbuch von Roth / Vianden 1718-1797 as a guide for this family. The family book includes the register number, page number, and entry number of church records (baptism, marriage, burial) of Vianden and Roth used by the compilers to determine the family groups. Vianden records are online at FamilySearch. The records for Roth are indexed on FamilySearch but access in Europe is limited to members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Kirchenbuch, 1718-1900 (Katholische Kirche Roth (Kr. Bitburg).

Jean-Paul Hoffmann’s Familienchronik der Stadt Vianden needs to be consulted for any further information available for this family group. A copy is available in the Luxracines archives in Walferdange.

A bit of history: Grafschaft Vianden

I wasn’t able to find records for individuals in this family group who were born, married, or died in der Unterstadt of Vianden. I had to study the history of the Grafschaft Vianden or County of Vianden to understand where the records were recorded.

Vianden lies on the Our River that divides the city into the upper town (on the left) and lower town (on the right).

During the Middle Ages, the fortified city of Vianden was the capital of the County of Vianden and included villages as far as Prum and Bitburg in present-day Germany. The county was as large as the present-day Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.

The way into Roth from the Luxembourg side.

In the first half of the 13th century, the Count of Vianden donated the parish church of Roth, the adjacent building, and land to the Order of the Templars.

St. Peter’s Church in Roth with the churchyard.
Entrance gate to Schloss Roth (Castle Roth), originally an outpost of Castle Vianden and adjacent to St. John’s Church of Roth.
Schloss Roth
The garden at Schloss Roth

In the middle of the 13th century, a dispute between the Templar knights and the Count of Vianden had to be settled by arbitration of the Archbishop of Trier. The Trinitarian monks ran the hospital for the count and had started building a church with a monastery and churchyard across from the hospital. This did not bode well with the Templars as Vianden was affiliated to the Templar parish of Roth as the city did not have its own church.

The city of Vianden was a divided city with a lower town (in der Unterstadt) and an upper town. Although residents of both sections of the town had the same rights, the lower town was more of a secondary town. This became more clear with the settlement of the dispute.

The dispute was resolved by attaching the lower town to the parish of Roth and creating a new parish assigned to the Trinitarian monks in the upper town.

The Templars built a small chapel on the parish boundary near the bridge in 1256 to accommodate the disgruntled lower town dwellers. The residents in der Unterstadt had to make do with a chapel with an open roof for their Sunday services.

Entrance of St. John’s Church in Roth

They were, however, required to celebrate holidays (Christmas, Easter, Pentecost) as well as the sacraments of baptism, the first communion, and marriage at the church in Roth. They have to trek down and up to the church to attend these high masses as well as transporting the corpses of their deceased to the Roth churchyard for burial.

Inside the St. John’s Church in Roth, Germany.

Thank you to my husband

We have two routes on our riding itinerary that take us through Roth, one on the German side and the other coming into Roth from the Luxembourg side.  My husband and I rode our bikes through Roth on Tuesday in search of the church and castle. I had located them on the map, off our usual paths.

I didn’t realize that the buildings were located on the top of a wooded hill. The road up to the church is not well paved and the last piece was a 17% climb. My husband rode to the top while I had to walk my bike for the last part. It was worth the effort. The photos of the church and castle are my husband’s contribution to this post. Villmols merci.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Nicolas TRAUDT
Occupation: Tailleur d’habits or clothes tailor
Parents: Henri TRAUDT and Margaretha HEICKEL
Spouse: Maria Barbara BILL
Parents of spouse: Theodorus BILL and Maria _____
Whereabouts: Vianden, Luxembourg
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 5th great-grandparents

1. Nicolas TRAUDT and Maria Barbara BILL
2. Margaretha TRAUDT and Jean-Népomucène SCHLOESSER
3. Jean Joseph SCHLOESSER and Anna Maria “Maria” CONSBRÜCK
4. Odile Lucie SCHLOESSER and André FOURNELLE
5. Jean Joseph FOURNELLE and Catharina FRANTZ
6. Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE and Nicolas WILDINGER
7. Living WILDINGER and Fred Roosevelt DEMPSEY
8. Catherine Ann “Cathy” DEMPSEY and Living MEDER
9. Our children

© 2021, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Vianden > Tables des mariages 1691-1803 Bettendorff-Z (index organisée par l’époux) > image 351 of 596. 1747 Marriage Index Card. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WS-9XZQ?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-N32%3A1501150301%2C1501195002 : accessed 14 December 2017). 
  2. Ibid., Vianden > Baptêmes 1705, 1739-1771, confirmations 1756-1769, communicants 1769-1770, mariages 1741-1770, sépultures 1742-1771 > image 107 of 166. 1747 Marriage Record (1st entry for 1747). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WS-9ZZ1?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-4WG%3A1501150301%2C1501398358 : accessed 14 December 2017). 
  3. Heinrich Wagner and Willibald Reichertz, Familienbuch von Roth / Vianden 1718-1797 (1991). Family Book of the Parish of Roth / Vianden (today Roth an der Our, Germany) including Bauler, Gaymühle, Obersgegen, Rodershausen, Roth, Scheuerhof, and the lower town of Vianden. A PDF of the book is available for download to members of Luxracines for a small fee. 
  4. Luxembourg Church Records, Vianden > Baptêmes 1679-1696, 1698-1739, mariages 1691-1707, 1721-1739, sépultures 1679-1706, 1721-1727, 1739-1741 > image 124 of 212. 1724 Baptismal Record (left page, first entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WS-9CDK?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-443%3A1501150301%2C1501348334 : accessed 24 August 2019). 
  5. Ibid., Vianden > Baptêmes 1705, 1739-1771, confirmations 1756-1769, communicants 1769-1770, mariages 1741-1770, sépultures 1742-1771 > image 28 of 166. 1748 Baptismal Record (left, 1st entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WS-9HFW?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-4WG%3A1501150301%2C1501398358 : accessed 13 December 2017). 
  6. Luxembourg, 1766 Dénombrement (census), (images), FamilySearch (Digitial copy of the microfilm of originals in the Archives Générales du Royaume, Bruxelles, includes localities now in Luxembourg and Liège, Belgium), Film 1781981 , DGS 008182018, Decanat de Mersch: Vianden, image 420 of 556. “.” Niolas Traudt household 120. (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS21-FQ8K-L?i=419&cat=1184675 : accessed 24 August 2019). 
  7. Luxembourg Church Records, Vianden > Baptêmes 1705, 1739-1771, confirmations 1756-1769, communicants 1769-1770, mariages 1741-1770, sépultures 1742-1771 > image 32 of 166. 1750 Baptismal Record (left, 2nd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WS-9CM4?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-4WG%3A1501150301%2C1501398358 : accessed 14 December 2017). 
  8. Ibid., Vianden > Baptêmes 1705, 1739-1771, confirmations 1756-1769, communicants 1769-1770, mariages 1741-1770, sépultures 1742-1771 > image 36 of 166. 1752 Baptismal Record (right, 2nd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WS-9CX8?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-4WG%3A1501150301%2C1501398358 : accessed 13 December 2017). 
  9. Wagner & Reichertz, Familienbuch von Roth / Vianden 1718-1797. 
  10. Luxembourg Church Records, Vianden > Baptêmes 1771-1774, 1779-1795, confirmations 1789-1794, mariages 1771-1778, 1787-1795, sépultures 1771-1797 > image 175 of 265. 1777 Marriage Record (right page, 5th entry).(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WS-9XPS?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-JWY%3A1501150301%2C1501252502 : accessed 19 June 2021). 
  11. Ibid., Vianden > Baptêmes 1705, 1739-1771, confirmations 1756-1769, communicants 1769-1770, mariages 1741-1770, sépultures 1742-1771 > image 41 of 166. 1754 Baptismal Record (right, 5th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WS-9CSR?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-4WG%3A1501150301%2C1501398358 : accessed 14 Decmeber 2017). 
  12. Ibid., Vianden > Baptêmes 1771-1774, 1779-1795, confirmations 1789-1794, mariages 1771-1778, 1787-1795, sépultures 1771-1797 > image 175 of 265. 1776 Marriage Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WS-9XPS?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-JWY%3A1501150301%2C1501252502 : accessed 14 December 2017). 
  13. Ibid., Vianden > Baptêmes 1771-1774, 1779-1795, confirmations 1789-1794, mariages 1771-1778, 1787-1795, sépultures 1771-1797 > image 122 of 265. 1793 Baptismal Record (right page, bottom entry).(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WS-9F81?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-JWY%3A1501150301%2C1501252502 : accessed 8 September 2021). 
  14. Ibid., Vianden > Baptêmes 1705, 1739-1771, confirmations 1756-1769, communicants 1769-1770, mariages 1741-1770, sépultures 1742-1771 > image 49 of 166. 1757 Baptismal Record (right, 4th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WS-9CD3?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-4WG%3A1501150301%2C1501398358 : accessed 13 December 2017). 
  15. Robert Deltgen, Genealogie Rob Deltgen, online http://www.deltgen.com/. I have been unable to confirm this date since the records in der Unterstadt of Vianden were recorded in Roth, a parish with restricted online images. 
  16. “Deutschland, Rheinland, Bistum Trier, katholische Kirchenbücher, 1704-1957”, database, FamilySearch (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:D6F6-4ZMM : 3 November 2020), Barbarae Bill in entry for Joannes Mandt, 7 Apr 1777; citing Marriage, certificate , Roth, Daun, Rheinprovinz, Preußen, Deutschland, Bistumarchiv (Diocese Archive), Trier, Germany. 
  17. Luxembourg Church Records, Vianden > Baptêmes 1705, 1739-1771, confirmations 1756-1769, communicants 1769-1770, mariages 1741-1770, sépultures 1742-1771 > image 57 of 166. 1759 Baptismal Record (right, 3rd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WS-9C6N?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-4WG%3A1501150301%2C1501398358 : 14 December 2017). 
  18. Ibid., Vianden > Baptêmes 1705, 1739-1771, confirmations 1756-1769, communicants 1769-1770, mariages 1741-1770, sépultures 1742-1771 > image 69 of 166. 1761 Baptismal Record (left, 1st entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WS-9H6K?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-4WG%3A1501150301%2C1501398358 : accessed 14 December 2017). 
  19. Ibid., Vianden > Baptêmes 1705, 1739-1771, confirmations 1756-1769, communicants 1769-1770, mariages 1741-1770, sépultures 1742-1771 > image 83 of 166. 1764 Baptismal Record (right, 2nd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89WS-9HZC?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-4WG%3A1501150301%2C1501398358 : accessed 13 December 2017). 
  20. Ibid., Vianden > Tables des mariages 1691-1803 (index organisée par l’épouse) > image 557 of 639. 1787 Marriage Index Card. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WS-98KZ?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-D5S%3A1501150301%2C1501221376 : accessed 14 December 2017). 
  21. Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Vianden > Mariages 1834-1890 Décès 1797-1866 > image 869 of 1406. 1828 Death Record No. 5. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DTQS-FW3?cc=1709358&wc=9RY9-DP8%3A130504801%2C130555401 : accessed 14 December 2017). 
  22. Luxembourg Church Records, Vianden > Baptêmes 1705, 1739-1771, confirmations 1756-1769, communicants 1769-1770, mariages 1741-1770, sépultures 1742-1771 > image 94 of 166. 1766 Baptismal Record, 2nd entry on left page. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32461-9066-76?cc=2037955 : accessed 18 November 2015). 
  23. Luxembourg Civil Records, Vianden > Mariages 1834-1890 Décès 1797-1866 > image 645 of 1406. 1809 Death Record, right page bottom entry. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11584-74474-75?cc=1709358 : accessed 29 August 2021). 
  24. Ibid., Vianden > Naissances, mariages, décès 1779-1793 > image 184 of 241. 1790 Marriage Record, top of left page. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12876-10821-89?cc=1709358 : accessed 18 November 2015). 
  25. Luxembourg Church Records, Vianden > Baptêmes 1705, 1739-1771, confirmations 1756-1769, communicants 1769-1770, mariages 1741-1770, sépultures 1742-1771 > image 139 of 166. 1769 Death Record (right, 3rd entry from bottom). Note: age at death 49 years.(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WS-9CR1?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-4WG%3A1501150301%2C1501398358 : accessed 14 December 2017). 
  26. Ibid., Vianden > Baptêmes 1705, 1739-1771, confirmations 1756-1769, communicants 1769-1770, mariages 1741-1770, sépultures 1742-1771 > image 122 of 166. 1769 Marriage Record (right page, first entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WS-9ZCP?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-4WG%3A1501150301%2C1501398358 : accessed 24 August 2019). 
  27. Diözesanarchiv Luxemburg / Archives diocésaines Luxembourg (images), Matricula Online, http://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/, Creative Commons License CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 (citing original records in the Luxembourg Diocesan Archives, Luxembourg City), GV.MF 316; GV.MF 351, Vianden, KB-01, Heiraten – Sterbefälle – Taufen – 1794 – 1807, image 71 of 164, last entry on page 77. 1799 Death Record. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/vianden/KB-01/?pg=71 : accessed 19 June 2021). 

The Ancestors: Johann Consbrück (1749-1796) of Echternach and Barbara Schmidt (1747-1829) of Koedange

My 5th great-grandparents Johann CONSBRÜCK (1749-1796) of Echternach and Barbara SCHMIDT (1747-1829) of Koedange celebrated their marriage in the hometown of the groom.1

One of several roads leading into Echternach.

In this direct line from myself to Johann’s parents, only two of the nine couples did not marry in Echternach. My great-grandparents married in Mamer in 1900 and my 3rd great-grandparents married in Metz, France, in 1835. My husband and I were married in Echternach in 1978, my parents in 1957, my grandparents in 1935, my 2nd great-grandparents in 1867, 4th in 1805,  5th in 1773, and 6th in 1735. My 7th great-grandparents likely married in Echternach or Mersch about 1705. After the death of my 7th great-grandfather, his widow, my 7th great-grandmother married again, in Echternach.

1773 Marriage Record

1773 Marriage Record

On Monday, 22 February 1773, in the presence of Johann HINCKES and Martin HERCKES, citizens of Echternach, Father LUCIUS solemnized the marriage between the respectable young Johann, the legitimate son of Johann Wilhelm CONSBRÜCK of Echternach, and Barbara, the legitimate daughter of Peter SCHMIDT of Koedingen, after prior review of the dismissal by the priest of the parish of Waldbillig.2

Barbara Schmidt’s hometown Koedange – Kéidéng in Luxembourgish.
A view of the few houses in Koedange.

The parish priest provided a dimissionis, a dismissal or nuptial certificate for the party (bride or groom) marrying in a different parish. In this document, the parish priest certified to his colleague who was to celebrate the marriage that the person in question was single (or widower/widower) and that the prescribed bans (public announcement of the marriage) had been correctly made.

Waldbillig

Barbara’s nuptial certificate came from Waldbillig as the hamlet of Koedingen (Kéidéng in Luxembourgish) was at the time attached to the parish of Waldbillig.

Riding our bikes through the ancestral villages in Luxembourg.

The CONSBRÜCK Children

Johann CONSBRÜCK (1749-1796) and Barbara SCHMIDT (1747-1829) made their home in Echternach. They were the parents of three known children born between 1775 and 1782.

Henri CONSBRÜCK was born on 5 April 1775 in Echternach.3 He died at the age of 75 years on 22 May 1850 in Echternach.4 He married Eva LANSER, daughter of Sébastian LANSER and Maria Catharina HASTERT, on 10 February 1805 in Echternach.5 Henri and Eva were my 4th great-grandparents. They were the parents of eight children, four of whom died between the ages of one and seven months. Three of the four surviving daughters never married but lived long lives working as seamstresses. Only one daughter, Anna Maria (1810-1897), my 3rd great-grandmother, married and continued this line.

Anna Maria CONSBRÜCK was born on 29 October 1779 in Echternach.6 She died on 10 September 1788 in Echternach at the age of 8.7

Matthias CONSBRÜCK was born on 3 June 1782 in Echternach.8 He died at the age of 54 years on 30 October 1836 in Trier, Germany.9 He was married twice. He married Katharina BASTIAN (1797-1831) on 9 January 1810 in St. Laurentius Church in Trier.10 They had four known children. After her death, he married Elisabetha RAMMES (1791-1861) on 8 June 1832 in Trier.11 Their marriage lasted only four years, ending with Matthias’ death. They had no children.

Twenty-three years of marriage

Johann CONSBRÜCK died on 21 July 1796 in Echternach at the age of 47.12 His wife of 23 years outlived him by 33 years. Barbara SCHMIDT died in Echternach in the rue de Luxembourg on 10 May 1829 at the age of 81 years.13

Research Manager

In May 2018, a photo was posted in a Facebook group taken during WWI. The text included two of my surnames associated with the CONSBRÜCK-SCHMIDT line. I commented on the post and received a private message from the lady who posted the photo. During our conversation, I learned she is my third cousin once removed, a descendant of Henri CONSBRÜCK’s daughter Anna Maria, the only child to marry and have children.

In 1894 Anna Maria CONSBRÜCK at the age of 84 years divided six pieces of land she owned between her two living daughters and their husbands by selling the land to them. The daughters were Odile Lucie SCHLOESSER, my 2nd great-grandmother, and Maria SCHLOESSER, my newfound cousin’s great-grandmother. My cousin had the original notary record of the sale and sent photos of the four pages. The plots were likely once owned by Anna Maria’s father Henri CONSBRÜCK and his parents before him.

On my to-do list is the transcription and analysis of the 1894 deed of sale for land owned by Anna Maria CONSBRÜCK, granddaughter of the CONSBRÜCK-SCHMIDT couple. It may help to determine the present-day address of the home of Johann CONSBRÜCK and Barbara SCHMIDT.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann CONSBRÜCK
Occupation:
Parents: Johann Wilhelm CONSBRÜCK and Maria Magdalene KLEIN
Spouse: Barbara SCHMIDT
Parents of spouse: Peter SCHMIDT sive CASPARS and Catharina CASPARS
Whereabouts: Echternach and Koedange
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 5th great-grandparents

1. Johann CONSBRÜCK and Barbara SCHMIDT
2. Henri CONSBRÜCK and Eva LANSER
3. Anna Maria “Maria” CONSBRÜCK and Jean Joseph SCHLOESSER
4. Odile Lucie SCHLOESSER and André FOURNELLE
5. Jean Joseph FOURNELLE and Catharina FRANTZ
6. Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE and Nicolas WILDINGER
7. Living WILDINGER and Fred Roosevelt DEMPSEY
8. Catherine Ann “Cathy” DEMPSEY and Living MEDER
9. Our children

© 2021, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Echternach > Tables des mariages 1706-1797 A-Lahr (index organisée par l’époux) > image 407 of 1598. 1773 Marriage Card. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32468-29388-23?cc=2037955 : accessed 19 November 2015). 
  2. Ibid., Echternach > Mariages, décès 1706-1778 > image 165 of 293. 1773 Religious Marriage Record (left page, 2nd entry).(https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32399-12108-26?cc=2037955 : accessed 19 November 2015). 
  3. Ibid., Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 73 of 131. 1775 Baptismal Record, bottom left page. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32399-12831-27?cc=2037955 : accessed 19 November 2015). 
  4. Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Echternach > Mariages 1887-1890 Décès 1796-1853 > image 1347 of 1463. 1850 Death Record No. 39. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12662-58715-84?cc=1709358 : accessed 18 November 2015). 
  5. Ibid., Echternach > Tables décennales 1823-1892 Registres paroissiaux 1779-1797 Naissances 1796-1808 > image 1343 & 1344 of 1446. 1805 (21 pluviose an 13) Marriage Record No. 100 (part 1). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11573-62479-92?cc=1709358 : accessed 19 November 2015) and 1805 (21 pluviose an 13) Marriage Record No. 100 (part 2). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11573-72489-87?cc=1709358 : accessed 19 November 2015). 
  6. Ibid., Echternach > Tables décennales 1823-1892 Registres paroissiaux 1779-1797 Naissances 1796-1808 > image 421 of 1446. 1779 Baptismal Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DRPS-GQG?cc=1709358&wc=9RY9-3TL%3A129623201%2C130776701 : accessed 8 October 2015). 
  7. Ibid., Echternach > Tables décennales 1823-1892 Registres paroissiaux 1779-1797 Naissances 1796-1808 > image 730 of 1446. 1788 Death Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DRPS-NZW?cc=1709358&wc=9RY9-3TL%3A129623201%2C130776701 : accessed 8 October 2015). 
  8. Ibid., Echternach > Tables décennales 1823-1892 Registres paroissiaux 1779-1797 Naissances 1796-1808 > image 510 of 1446. 1782 Baptismal Record (right page, last entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DRPS-F2B?cc=1709358&wc=9RY9-3TL%3A129623201%2C130776701 : accessed 27 May 2021. 
  9.   “Trier, Germany, Deaths, 1798-1950,” (index and images), Ancestry.com, citing “Zivil- und Personenstandsregister Sterberegister”, Stadtverwaltung Trier, Stadtarchiv, Trier, Germany. 1836 Death Record No. 540. (https://www.ancestry.com/ : accessed 28 May 2021). 
  10. “Trier, Germany, Baptisms, Marriages, and Burials, 1600-1798,” (index and images), Ancestry.com, citing Genealogische dokumentation des Dechanten Heinrich Wurringent anhand der Trierer Kirchenbücher vor 1798, Bestand 60. Stadtverwaltung Trier, Trier, Deutschland. 1810 Marriage Record. (https://www.ancestry.com/ : accessed 27 May 2021). 
  11. Ibid., 1832 Marriage Record. (https://www.ancestry.com/ : accessed 27 May 2021). 
  12. Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Tables décennales 1823-1892 Registres paroissiaux 1779-1797 Naissances 1796-1808 > image 946 of 1446. 1796 Death Record (left, 5th entry). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11573-62393-97?cc=1709358 : accessed 21 November 2015). 
  13. Ibid., Echternach > Mariages 1887-1890 Décès 1796-1853 > image 770 of 1463. 1829 Death Record No. 39. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-XSSS-H3C?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-L29%3A129623201%2C129958201 : accessed 8 October 2015). 

The Ancestors: Sébastian Lanser (1732-1804) of Echternach and Maria Catharina Hastert (1743-1808) of Steinheim

My fifth great-grandparents, Sébastian LANSER of Echternach and Maria Catharina HASTERT of Steinheim were married on 10 September 1760 in Steinheim. Sébastian’s father Jean LANSER was deceased. Maria Catharina’s father Jean Adam HASTERT was still living. The information was found on the card index in a collection that includes all church marriages in Luxembourg before 1767.1

Not noted on the index card are the names of the mothers of the bride and groom. Both were still living. Maria Catharina’s mother was Odilia FUNCK (1718-1778); Sébastian’s mother was Johanna FASS (1692-1774).

Card Index of the Marriage Record

At the bottom of the card index, the name of the parish, the volume number of the church register, and the page number are found. These help find the original entry.

Marriage Record

On FamilySearch in the church records for Echternach, I searched for the collection that would include marriages in 1760 and found Mariages, décès 1706-1778, that is to say, marriages and deaths for the years 1706-1778. The first image of the collection gives the volume number as well as a short table of content with page numbers.

The marriage record was found on page 248 of register 4. Two marriages took place on 10 September 1760 with the LANSER-HASTERT marriage being noted second.

The marriage entry in the register is in Latin.

On the same day (referring to the previous entry for the 10th) in the presence of Jean FUNCK of Bech and Jean Adam HASTERT of Steinheim, Father Constantine in Steinheim solemnized the marriage between the respectable young Sébastian, the legitimate son of the deceased Jean LANSER of Echternach, and Maria Catharina, the legitimate daughter of Jean Adam HASTERT of Steinheim. 

The second man present at the marriage was Maria Catharina’s maternal grandfather Jean FUNCK (1688-1773) of Bech.2

The Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Steinheim, Luxembourg.

The couple, in all likelihood, said their vows in Steinheim in the Church of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary in front of the 17th-century Baroque sandstone altar.

The LANSER children

Sébastian, a draper, and his wife Maria Catharina lived in Echternach where they raised their family of ten children.

Johann Adam was baptized on 25 March 17623 and died before 1766. This child was not enumerated on the census of 1766 with his parents, brother Heinrich, and his paternal grandmother Johanna FASS (1692-1774).4

Heinrich was baptized on 13 March 17645 and died on 19 November 1827 at the age of 63.6 He married Anne-Marie HERR on 20 September 1791.7

Anna Maria was baptized on 20 May 17678 and died on 7 July 1803 at the age of 36.9 She was never married.

Odilia was baptized on 10 January 177010 and died on 24 December 1828 at the age of 58.11 She was never married.

Catharina was baptized on 11 November 177212 and died on 15 January 1833 at the age of 60.13 She married Johann HERR on 20 September 1791.14

Catharina was baptized was 2 February 1774.15 No record of marriage or death has been found. [See Research Manager at the end of this post.]

Eva was baptized on 13 May 177716 and died on 19 March 1862 at the age of 84.17 She married Henri CONSBRÜCK, son of Johann CONSBRÜCK and Barbara SCHMIDT, on 10 February 1805.18 Eva and Henri were my 4th great-grandparents.

Margaretha was baptized on 24 March 178019 and died on 9 March 1852 at the age of 71.20 She married Johann SELM on 9 June 1811.21

Nicolas was baptized on 18 November 178222 and died on 23 October 1828 at the age of 45.23 He married Catharina Magdalena JOERG between 7 and 20 September 1813. The date was omitted from the marriage record. The record was found between a marriage on the 7th and on the 20th.24

Peter was baptized on 5 June 178525 and died on 3 February 1815 at the age of 29.26 He was never married. Per military records found for Peter, he was presumed to be a prisoner of war in Russia on 11 October 1812. He was in the same military unit as his 1C1R Sébastian LANSER and other men from the Echternach area.27 He came home to Echternach where he died a little over two years later.

Forty-four years of marriage

Sébastian died at the age of 72 on 13 June 180428, a few months before his 44th marriage anniversary. His widow Maria Catharina died on 10 March 1808 at the age of 65.29

DNA Matches

Two very low DNA matches for my mother lead me on a virtual trip to Danzig, England, and Australia. Nicolas, the middle child of Sébastian and Maria Catharina’s son Heinrich, went to Danzig, then a part of Prussia, where he married and raised a family of at least eleven children. One of these children, a son, went to Kent, England, where he raised a family of five sons with an English lady. Four of these sons eventually went to Australia. The matches, a 5th cousin (7 cMs > unweighted 10 cMs) and a 5th cousin once removed (10 cMs > unweighted 16 cMs), are descendants of two of the four Australian immigrants.

Research Manager

I see nothing wrong with sharing the things you are still uncertain about. 
~ Amy Cohen of Brotmanblog: A Family Journey

Update: A comment/question left by Amy yesterday on this post brought about a small change in the way I’ll be doing these posts. I’ve added one more section heading to the post: Research Manager, a place to add the things I’m not certain about and will be looking into in the future.

The LANSER-HASTERT couple had two daughters named Catharina. It is not unusual in Luxembourg families for children to have the same names. Others who’ve researched this line (including the compilers of both family books for Echternach) show the first daughter to be the one who married. I suspect this to be incorrect. I think it is possible that Catharina b. 1772 died before the birth of Catharina b. 1774. I searched for a death/burial entry in the church records from 1772-1778 without results. Records that would show the age of Catharina who married in 1791 need to be checked to prove/disprove when she was born, in 1772 or 1774.

Thanks to Amy’s question about the two daughters with the same name, this new section will include things I am planning to research. Hopefully, this will lead to answers from readers who may have already looked into the points in question.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Sébastian LANSER
Occupation: Draper, a person who sells cloth, clothing, etc.
Parents: Johann Peter LANSER and Johanna FASS
Spouse: Maria Catharina HASTERT
Parents of spouse: Jean Adam HASTERT and Odilia FUNCK
Whereabouts: Echternach and Steinheim
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 5th great-grandparents

1. Sébastian LANSER and Maria Catharina HASTERT
2. Eva LANSER and Henri CONSBRÜCK
3. Anna Maria “Maria” CONSBRÜCK and Jean Joseph SCHLOESSER
4. Odile Lucie SCHLOESSER and André FOURNELLE
5. Jean Joseph FOURNELLE and Catharina FRANTZ
6. Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE and Nicolas WILDINGER
7. Living WILDINGER and Fred Roosevelt DEMPSEY
8. Catherine Ann “Cathy” DEMPSEY and Living MEDER
9. Our children

© 2021, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Echternach > Tables des mariages 1706-1797 Lahr-Westmon (index organisée par l’époux) > image 29 of 1627. 1760 Marriage Index Card. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WS-HHFD?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-T36%3A1500937901%2C1501202802 : accessed 17 December 2017). 
  2. Ibid., Echternach > Mariages, décès 1706-1778 > image 131 of 293. 1760 Marriage Record (left, 7th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-8971-16N3?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-PYM%3A1500937901%2C1501028848 : accessed 17 December 2017). 
  3. Ibid., Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 10 of 131. 1762 Baptismal Record (left, 4th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-8971-1X8Y?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-PY3%3A1500937901%2C1501065634 : accessed 17 December 2017). 
  4. Luxembourg, 1766 Dénombrement (census), (images), FamilySearch (Digitial copy of the microfilm of originals in the Archives Générales du Royaume, Bruxelles, includes localities now in Luxembourg and Liège, Belgium), Film/DGS 1781975 > Film # 008198977 > Decanat de Bittbourg v. 1 A-K: > Echternach > Image 222 of 753. Lanser and Metzdorf families. (https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSLL-M7DK-L?i=221&cat=1184675 : accessed 17 December 2017). 
  5. Luxembourg Church Records, Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 19 of 131. 1764 Baptismal Record (right, 4th entry from bottom). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-8971-1XDP?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-PY3%3A1500937901%2C1501065634 : accessed 17 December 2017). 
  6. Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Echternach > Mariages 1887-1890 Décès 1796-1853 > image 733 of 1463. 1827 Death Record No. 74. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-XSSS-H6C?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-L29%3A129623201%2C129958201 : accessed 19 December 2017). 
  7. Ibid., Echternach > Tables décennales 1823-1892 Registres paroissiaux 1779-1797 Naissances 1796-1808 > image 825 of 1446. 1791 Marriage Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DRPS-DW2?cc=1709358&wc=9RY9-3TL%3A129623201%2C130776701 : accessed 28 Jan 2013). 
  8. Luxembourg Church Records, Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 33 of 131. 1767 Baptismal Record (right, 5th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G971-1X83?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-PY3%3A1500937901%2C1501065634 : accessed 17 December 2017). 
  9. Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Naissances, mariages, décès 1796-1803 > image 510 of 517. 1803 Death Record No. 64 (18 messidor an XI). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-997J-T4WV?cc=1709358&wc=9RTY-RMC%3A129623201%2C130672801 : accessed 19 December 2017). 
  10. Luxembourg Church Records, Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 46 of 131. 1770 Baptismal Record (right, 2nd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-9971-1X6K?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-PY3%3A1500937901%2C1501065634 : accessed 17 December 2017). 
  11. Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Mariages 1887-1890 Décès 1796-1853 > image 754 of 1463. 1828 Death Record No. 61. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-XSSS-HS7?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-L29%3A129623201%2C129958201 : accessed 19 December 2017). 
  12. Luxembourg Church Records, Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 60 of 131. 1772 Baptismal Record (right, 4th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L971-1X6J?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-PY3%3A1500937901%2C1501065634 : accessed 17 December 2017). 
  13. Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Mariages 1887-1890 Décès 1796-1853 > image 865 of 1463. 1833 Death Record No. 3. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-XSSS-4Z7?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-L29%3A129623201%2C129958201 : accessed 19 December 2017). 
  14. Ibid., Echternach > Tables décennales 1823-1892 Registres paroissiaux 1779-1797 Naissances 1796-1808 > image 825 of 1446. 1791 Marriage Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DRPS-DW2?cc=1709358&wc=9RY9-3TL%3A129623201%2C130776701 : accessed 28 Jan 2013). 
  15. Luxembourg Church Records, Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 67 of 131. 1774 Baptismal Record (right, 5th entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L971-1XX8?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-PY3%3A1500937901%2C1501065634 : accessed 17 December 2017). 
  16. Ibid., Echternach > Baptêmes 1761-1797 > image 83 of 131. 1777 Baptismal Record (left, 4th entry from bottom). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-8971-1X4C?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-PY3%3A1500937901%2C1501065634 : accessed 17 December 2017). 
  17. Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Décès 1856-1862 > image 181 of 205. 1862 Death Record No. 17. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11022-10289-61?cc=1709358 : accessed 18 November 2015). 
  18. Ibid., Echternach > Tables décennales 1823-1892 Registres paroissiaux 1779-1797 Naissances 1796-1808 > image 1343+1344 of 1446. 1805 (21 pluviose an 13) Marriage Record No. 100 (part 1). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11573-62479-92?cc=1709358 : accessed 19 November 2015) and Marriage Record No. 100 (part 2). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11573-72489-87?cc=1709358 : accessed 19 November 2015). 
  19. Luxembourg Church Records, Echternach > Baptêmes, mariages, décès 1779-1783 > image 47 of 177. 1780 Baptismal Record (right, 3rd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WM-M6QZ?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-YWT%3A1500937901%2C1500939202 : accessed 17 December 2017). 
  20. Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Mariages 1887-1890 Décès 1796-1853 > image 1402 of 1463. 1852 Death Record No. 16. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-XSSS-HY9?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-L29%3A129623201%2C129958201 : accessed 19 December 2017). 
  21. Ibid., Echternach > Mariages 1809 > image 111 of 1462. 1811 Marriage Record No. 13. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-D1MW-76P?cc=1709358&wc=9RYS-C68%3A129623201%2C129776101 : accessed 9 August 2021). 
  22. Luxembourg Church Records, Echternach > Baptêmes, mariages, décès 1779-1783 > image 125 of 177. 1782 Baptismal Record (right, 2nd entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WM-MDR4?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-YWT%3A1500937901%2C1500939202 : accessed 17 December 2017). 
  23. Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Mariages 1887-1890 Décès 1796-1853 > image 751 of 1463. 1828 Death Record No. 48. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-XSSS-7FG?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-L29%3A129623201%2C129958201 : accessed 19 December 2017). 
  24. Ibid., Echternach > Mariages 1809 > image 178 of 1462. 1813 Marriage No. 19. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-D1MW-QS4?cc=1709358&wc=9RYS-C68%3A129623201%2C129776101 : accessed 11 May 2021). 
  25. Luxembourg Church Records, Echternach > Baptêmes, mariages, décès 1784-1788 > image 49 of 172. 1785 Baptismal Record (left, last entry). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9WM-MDJG?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-Y4W%3A1500937901%2C1500960252 : accessed 17 December 2017). 
  26. Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Mariages 1887-1890 Décès 1796-1853 > image 411 of 1463. 1815 Death Record No. 11. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-XSSS-Q12?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-L29%3A129623201%2C129958201 : accessed 19 December 2017). 
  27. Matricules Napoléoniens 1802-1815 (index and images), Mémoire des hommes, Registres de matricules de l’armée Napoléonienne (garde impériale et de l’infanterie de ligne) pour la période 1802-1815. (Entry point for database https://fr.geneawiki.com/index.php/Matricules_Napol%C3%A9oniens_1802-1815/Mode_op%C3%A9ratoire), Number/Source: SHD/GR 21 YC 783, 108e régiment d’infanterie de ligne, 3 frimaire an XIV [24 novembre 1805]-25 novembre 1808 (matricules 3 001 à 6 000), Matricule: 3279, image 48 of 557. Matricule: 3279; Nom: LANSER; Prénoms: Pierre; Prénoms père: Sébastien; Prénoms mère: Marie Catherine; Nom mère: HASTERT; Lieu de naissance: Echternach; Département de naissance: Les Forêts, Luxembourg; Date de naissance: 05 juin 1785. (https://www.memoiredeshommes.sga.defense.gouv.fr/fr/ark:/40699/e0052a8c4b390c4b/52a8c4b45cad3 : accessed 11 May 2021). 
  28. Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Tables décennales 1823-1892 Registres paroissiaux 1779-1797 Naissances 1796-1808 > image 1245 of 1446. Death Record No. 152 (24 Prairial an 12). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-DRPS-DBH?cc=1709358&wc=9RY9-3TL%3A129623201%2C130776701 : accessed 25 Jan 2013). 
  29. Ibid., Echternach > Mariages 1887-1890 Décès 1796-1853 > image 220 of 1463. 1808 Death Record No. 32. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-XSSS-QBS?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-L29%3A129623201%2C129958201 : accessed 8 October 2015). 

The Ancestors: A New Approach

The Ancestors series is taking on a new look and perspective.

I finished writing about all of my children’s 5th great-grandparents in January of 2018. Those posts were part of Amy Johnson Crow’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge. I’d planned to continue with the next generation, their 6th great-grandparents, with my series The Ancestors but dropped the ball several times.

Family history research will never be finished or ready to publish. Share what you have, make corrections and additions, write about your ancestors. Yes, it probably will remain a work in progress or a draft of a family book. By sharing what you think is incomplete, you may reach someone who has the missing information or the key to open the door in your brick wall.

This closing paragraph from my final post on my children’s 5th great-grandparents, 52 Ancestors: #47 Michel Trausch and Catharina Hames of Mamer, is my new approach for the posts I’ll be doing on their 6th great-grandparents.

The Ancestors – 9th Generation
6th Great-grandparents

The list of 6th great-grandparents is LONG. I’ve spent a lot of time researching a few of them, as seen in the number of posts I’ve written for the maternal ancestors (my side of our children’s tree) at the end of the list. Ancestor numbers in bold indicate those that have been featured on this blog.

(256 & 257) Adami MEDER and Elisabetha ESCH
(258 & 259) Joannes REINERS and wife Maria (parents of Susanna REINERS aka LAMBERT)
(260 & 261) Michaelis WILMES and Barbara JACQUEMIN
(262 & 263) Mr. SCHEID (SCHOOD) and Anna Maria FETH
(264 & 265) BRICK WALL (paternal grandparents of Théodore REIFFER)
(266 & 267) BRICK WALL (maternal grandparents of Théodore REIFFER)
(268 & 269) Joannes CLOOS and Anne Marie KLAREN
(270 & 271) Nikolaus THEWES and Gertrud LESSEN
(272 & 273) Joannis ADAM and Margaritha (first married to THOMMES)
(274 & 275) Jacobi WOLTER and Marie Elisabeth MEYERS
(276 & 277) Joannes SCHENTEN x KOECHER and Catharina KOSTERS
(278 & 279) Parents of Cathérine OBERECKEN
(280 & 281) Mathias LORENS and Eva FRENTZ
(282 & 283) Petri STENGENFORT and unknown wife
(284 & 285) Joannis PREISER and Anna Maria FETH
(286 & 286) Petrus SCHRANTZ and Anne Marie HAMEN
(288 & 289) Jean “Joannis” SCHWARTZ and Maria HEINZ
(290 & 291) Mathia HALER and Angela ALENTS
(292 & 293) Johann Gerard TRIERWEILER and Elisabeth KERSCH
(294 & 295) Carl HOFFMANN and Angela ROSPORT
(296 & 297) Philippi SCHMITT and Apollonia MATTES
(298 & 299) Matthias PLEIN and Margaretha VALERIUS
(300 & 301) Johann WOLLSCHEID and Anna Maria WILLWERT
(302 & 303) Johann BARTHELMES and Eva BARZEN
(304 & 305) Johann Peter GORGES and Anna Maria HORSCH
(306 & 307) Nikolaus RODENS and Anna SCHUE
(308 & 309) BRICK WALL (parents of Caspar BOTZ)
(310 & 311) BRICK WALL (parents of Magdalena MASEN)
(312 & 313) Nicolaus SCHERFF and Helena OTTO
(314 & 315) Dominique STEIMETZ and Helena “Magdalena” KOCH
(316 & 317) Daniel and Elisabetha CLEMENS
(318 & 319) Matthias WEBER and Anna Margaretha FEILEN
(320 & 321) Henri and Magdalena  CREMERS
(322 & 323) Joannes VENANDI and Maria HOSINGER
(324 & 325) Johann THIVELS alias FRIEDERICH and Catharina FEDERSPIEL
(326 & 327) Martin HUNTGES and Marguerite MAY
(328 & 329) Johann Heinrich “Henri” MERKES and Anna ROSS
(330 & 331) Anton WAGENER and Catharina PIRSCH
(332 & 333) Mathias HASTERT and Anne NIEDERKORN
(334 & 335) Jean SCHMIDT and Maria LENTZ
(336 & 337) Leonard GRITIUS and Marie NEIEN
(338 & 339) Jean SCHETTERT and Anna Catharina SCHAACK
(340 & 341) Jean Baptiste SCHAEFFER and Catherine SCHAACK
(342 & 343) Nicolas GREISCH and Susanne ROLLINGER
(344 & 345) Michel WECKERING and Anna Maria DALEYDEN
(346 & 347) BRICK WALL  (parents of Marguerite LASCHEID)
(348 & 349) Jacob BERNARD and Jeanne CAPPUS
(350 & 351) Valentin GREBER and Christina STEFFEN
(352 & 353) Dominique PEFFER and Marguerite SINTGEN
(354 & 355) Nicolas PIERRET and Anna Maria ROBINET
(356 & 357) Nicolas GRASSER vulgo REUTERS and Elisabetha WINANDY
(358 & 359) Léonard HOSCHEID and Marie Catharina REULAND
(360 & 361) Pierre ZWANG and Anne Marie HUSCHET
(362 & 363) Johann WELTER and Anna Maria FELTES
(364 & 365) Jean DHAM and Marie WELTER
(366 & 367) Nicolas KIMES and Anna Maria STRENG
(368 & 369) Peter MERTES and Marguerite BIVER
(370 & 371) Johann DONNEN and Barbara CHRITOPHORY
(372 & 373) Casparus ERPELDING and Gertrudes JEHNEN
(374 & 375) Peter CONRADT and Anna Catharina ROEDER
(376 & 377) Petrus RUCKERT and Anna Catharina SPEYER
(378 & 379) Petrus MICHELS and Susanna MARTIN aka MERTES
(380 & 381) Peter SCHMIT and Rosa CLEMENS
(382 & 383) Nicolas WEICKER and Anne Margarethe HARTMANN
(384 & 385) BRICK WALL (great-grandparents of William A. W. DEMPSEY)
(386 & 387) BRICK WALL (great-grandparents of William A. W. DEMPSEY)
(388 & 389) BRICK WALL (great-grandparents of William A. W. DEMPSEY)
(390 & 391) BRICK WALL (great-grandparents of William A. W. DEMPSEY)
(392 & 393) Bailey WOOD and Nancy, his wife (8 January 2020)
(394 & 395) Martin McGRAW and Margaret “Polly”, his wife (22 January 2020)
(396 & 397) Hans Jacob HONEGGER and Maria GOETZ:
The Ancestors: Hans Jacob HONEGGER and Maria GOETZ (396+397) (29 January 2020)
The Ancestors: Hans Jacob HONEGGER and Maria GOETZ (Part II) (6 February 2020)
(398 & 399) Isaac WISEMAN and Elizabeth DAVIS:
The Ancestors: Isaac WISEMAN (1738-1818) and Elizabeth DAVIS (1738-1807) (10 March 2020)
(400 & 401) Ester INGRAM – an assumption
(402 & 403) John KINCAID and Elizabeth Hannah GILLESPIE
(404 & 405) William JOHNSON Sr. and Amy NELSON
The 1806 Administrator Bond for the Estate of William Johnson Sr. (1755-1805) (13 September 2019)
(406 & 407) James SIMS and Phebe (see the link to the page with all posts for James SIMS) (April to September 2018)
James SIMS (1754-1845) Pioneer of Nicholas County, West Virginia (biography written in 2002)
(408 & 409) Susannah (maiden name unknown) DEMPSEY and her BRICK WALL husband
(410 & 411) James LANDRUM and his unknown wife
(412 & 413) Phillip GOING and Judith POTTER
(414 & 415) William CRISP and his wife Lucy
(416 & 417) Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL
Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ The Early Years in Maryland (1765-1793) (19 March 2016)
Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ The Years in Rockbridge (1793-1801) (26 March 2016)
Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ At Home on the Old Henry Roop Place (3 April 2016)
Henry RUPE and Catherine Barbara NOLL ~ Family Life in Montgomery County, Virginia (9 April 2016)
The Last Will and Testament of Henry RUPE 1765-1845 (16 April 2016)
Henry RUPE’s Estate and his Widow Catherine’s Last Days (23 April 2016)
A Date of Death for Catherine Barbara NOLL (1768-1859) (1 March 2017)
(418 & 419) Robert CARROLL and his wife Anne
(420 & 421) John LESTER II and Mary Ann TERRY
(422 & 423) Owen SUMNER and Sarah NEWTON
(424 & 425) John PETERS and wife – Can this be proven with DNA?
(426 & 427) Joseph LIVELY and Mary L. CASH
(428 & 429) Augustin PROFFITT and Elizabeth “Betsy” ROBERTSON
(430 & 431) Edward COCKRAM and his wife Mary
(432 & 433) Jeremiah CLAUNCH and his wife
(434 & 435) BRICK WALL (parents of Nancy BEASLEY)
(436 & 437) BRICK WALL (paternal grandparents of Mary E. DOSS)
(438 & 439) James DOSS Jr. and Elizabeth LESTER
(440 & 441) BRICK WALL (paternal grandparents of John COOLEY)
(442 & 443) BRICK WALL (maternal grandparents of John COOLEY
(444 & 445) Edward TREDWAY and Nancy MAGNESS
(446 & 447) BRICK WALL (maternal grandparents of Sarah Ann TREADWAY)
(448 & 449) Michel WILTINGER and Margaretha DIESBURG
(450 & 451) Michael WELTER and Katharian KLEIN
(452 & 453) Matthias SCHRAMEN and Anna Barbara LEIBRICH (BURG)
(454 & 455) Sebastian SCHMITT and Maria LORANG
(456 & 457) Nikolaus WEYMAN and Maria Katharina HUSS
(458 & 459) Gerard MALAMBRÉ and Barbara BIESDORF
(460 & 461) Johann Bernard WELTER and Maria BRIMERS
(462 & 463) Johann HENNES and Magdalena MÜLLER
(464 & 465) Peter BUBELREITER and Gertrud LAMBERTI or BOSEN
(466 & 467) Johann BOMMES and Anna Maria Luzia THIELEN
(468 & 469) Peter MERTSCHERT and Susanna “Anna”SCHNEIDER
(470 & 471) Theodor MERGEN and Gertrud THELEN
(472 & 473) Johann Nicolaus WAGNER and Anna Maria KLEIWER
(474 & 475) Johann HARTERT and Elisabeth HEINZ
(476 & 477) Peter KERSCHT and Eva SCHMIDS
(478 & 479) Gerhard EWEN and Barbara THEILEN
(480 & 481) Pierre FOURNELLE and Jeanne NEU
(482 & 483) Jean SCHMIT and Eve DUCKER
(484 & 485) Jacques PHILIPPART and Catherine SINGER aka KETTER
(486 & 487) Henri MEUNIER and Margaretha KILBOUR
(488 & 489) Joseph SCHLOESSER and Catherine ARENDT
(490 & 491) Nicolas TRAUDT and Barbe BILL
(492 & 493) Johann CONSBRÜCK and Barbara SCHMIDT
(494 & 495) Sébastian LANSER and Maria Catharina HASTERT
(496 & 497) Nicolas Frantz and Angélique Bartel of Semming, Rodemack, France (10 May 2021)
UPDATE to The Ancestors: Nicolas Frantz and Angélique Bartel of Semming, Rodemack, France (18 May 2021)
(498 & 499) Nicolaus Küffer and Susanna Schiltz of Mamer, Luxembourg (3 May 2021)
(500 & 501) Joannes FRISCH (1713-1759) and Margaretha ZEIMES (1727-1792) of Huncherange (25 April 2021)
(502 & 503) Peter HUBERTY (1718-1794) of Mamer and Anna BERNARD (1742-ca1763) of Nospelt (14 April 2021)
(504 & 505) Jean MAJERUS and Margretha BREGER
A Hidden Index for Luxembourg City’s Parishes and Garrison (24 May 2019)
How the Jean MAJERUS Brick Wall Crumbled – The Keys and Doors Which Made It Happen! (2 June 2019)
The Farm Where the Majerus Family Lived in the 1700s (11 June 2019)
Jean MAJERUS and Margretha BREGER from Gronn to Strassen (21 June 2019)
Proving the True Identity of Jean Baptiste BREGER 1738-1805 (28 June 2019)
(506 & 507) Hubert CORNELY and Margaretha EVEN
Hubert CORNELY and Margaretha EVEN of Wickrange, Luxembourg (4 May 2019)
The Key that Opened the Door in the Schintgen Brick Wall (4 May 2019)
Luxracines’ Marriage Database Helps Solve the Confusion of John Monner’s Marriage(s) (19 May 2019)
(508 & 509) Remacle TRAUSCH and Theresia BRAUN (COLLING)
Part I: Remacle Trausch (1761-1804) and Theresia Braun (1766-1798) of Colmar (26 July 2019)
Part II: Why was Theresia BRAUN also seen as Theresia COLLING? (2 Ausgut 2019)
Part III: “Maison dite” Leads to Parents and Grandparents of Magdalena SCHMIDT (1743-1782) (9 August 2019)
Part IV: The Parents and Siblings of Remacle TRAUSCH (1761-1804) (16 August 2019)
Part V: A Horrific Crime in the Fortress City of Luxembourg (23 August 2019)
Part VI: Tying up the loose ends (30 August 2019)
Was the Verdict in the 1816 Murder Case a Miscarriage of Justice? (6 September 2019)
(510 & 511) Johannes HAMES and Agnes BOUR alias HEITZ (8 July 2019)

128 sets of 6th great-grandparents

Fourteen couples are brick walls, i.e. names are not known, and fifteen couples have already been featured. That leaves 99 known couples who have been looked into (some research done) who still need to be written up.

Blogging has helped me to improve my research skills. As I worked on the posts, I found that I was doing deeper and more thorough research into all couples’ children, siblings, and parents. This was taking up a lot of time as I documented each new piece of evidence. New research questions came up as the records were analyzed. Interesting facts were found and asked to be researched further – taking me down some very interesting rabbit holes.

At a rate of one post a week, it would take two years to get this generation of ancestors done. Researching, analyzing documentation, citing sources, and putting everything together to write the post (as I have been doing them) now takes much longer than a week.

The length of my posts has also become an issue. I need to choose between too much information in one post, writing multiple posts, or trying a new concept.

I’ve decided that for the 3/4 of my children’s tree that is Luxembourgish, I will be featuring the marriage record of each couple and a list of known children. The records will be more easily located for their maternal side as they are from the mid-1700s to about 1800. For their paternal side, these will be records from the early to mid-1700s. If they are non-existent, I will have to use substitutes to “prove” the marriage. The Genealogy Sketch box will be included at the end of each post, bringing together all articles written for the direct line of the ancestral couple to my children.

I’m thinking of working my way up the list from the bottom to the top, starting with ancestors 494 & 495: Sébastian LANSER and Maria Catharina HASTERT. Hopefully, this will get me back to blogging and give me a little more time for the other important things in my life.

© 2021, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Focusing on William A. W. Dempsey’s DNA Using Chromosomes Analysis and Segment Maps

I took a break from blogging to give myself time to work on a DNA problem. It was only supposed to be for a few weeks, a month tops. Except for my article on the flooding in our part of Europe, I haven’t posted any new content to my blog in two and a half months.

As many of my readers know, I’ve been doing genealogy for nearly three decades and blogging in my eighth year. Writing for my blog has taught me to be a better researcher and writer.

DNA is complicated

This may be one of the reasons people who have their DNA tested are more interested in their ethnicity than in looking into who they got their DNA from. Many are not into genealogy or have the time to spend hours analyzing match lists or creating quick bare-bones trees (also known as Q&D or quick-and-dirty trees) for matches. In writing this post, I hope to reach some of my many distant cousins who could help me with my search.

Understanding where the DNA comes from

I’ve been working with my brother’s autosomal DNA results for over five years, my own for nearly two years, and my mother’s for a year and a half. All three were done with AncestryDNA.

Maternal Matches

Mom’s test has helped sort the maternal matches but wasn’t really necessary. My brother and I have few matches who are descended from our maternal lines as our mother is Luxembourgish – with all known ancestors coming from Luxembourg or parts of France, Germany, and Belgium that were once part of a greater Luxembourg. Close cousins (4th cousins or closer) on AncestryDNA total 375 compared to the circa 3,000 that my brother and I have. Many of the 275 are descendants of Luxembourg emigrants who settled in America. Our mother is their link back to Luxembourg and helps anchor their DNA.

Paternal Matches

My brother’s and my autosomal DNA results have confirmed the paper trail we have for our known paternal ancestors for at least six generations. For some branches in the tree, we have confirmation for nine generations or more.

Color groups on AncestryDNA

To better understand where the DNA comes from, I worked out a color/group system on AncestryDNA that goes back to the 6th generation ancestors (my paternal 4th great-grandparents). This helps to sort new matches.

Screenshot courtesy of AncestryDNA.

As the parents of my 2nd great-grandfather, William A. W. DEMPSEY are unknown, the first group is for the 4th generation ancestors. This allowed me to split the HONAKER-WISEMAN matches into two sub-groups: HONEGGER-GOETZ (as HONAKER was previously written) and WISEMAN-DAVIS of the 7th generation. As can be seen by the numbers in parenthesis, these are large clusters of matches.

Abbreviations:
PGF – paternal grandfather (blue)
PGM – paternal grandmother (green)
MGF – maternal grandfather (pink)
MGM -maternal grandmother (yellow)

Using colors in the family tree

The colors I use on AncestryDNA for the groups match the colors used in genealogy software charts.

The pedigree chart courtesy of Ancestral Quest 16

Mapping the DNA segments with GDAT

The same color system has been used to map our known DNA segments using the Genealogical DNA Analysis Tool or GDAT.

Genealogical DNA Analysis Tool (GDAT)

Becky Mason Walker’s Genealogical DNA Analysis Tool (GDAT) is the repository I use to manage my DNA tests.

The database is stored locally on my computer and has no connection to the internet. I can import DNA matches from the different testing companies, do triangulation and in common with (ICW) comparisons, map the chromosomes of common ancestors, mark the most recent common ancestors (MRCA), add Ahnentafels (tress) of the matches, and do analysis work that helps with the family tree research. The tool provides easier-to-see patterns and clues to solve the genetic genealogy questions with all information in one place.

Segment Maps

I’ve mentioned the color groups, Shared Clustering, and GDAT in previous posts.

Look Who’s Finally Taken the Autosomal DNA Test

Unraveling the Mystery of George W. Dempsey, son of Seaton Y. Dempsey and Clementine Gowing (Part 3)

Mapping DNA segments is something I haven’t written about.

GDAT automatically maps DNA segments when the MRCA (parental/maternal side and group name) is identified. GDAT chooses the color for the segment but allows the user to change it using a color picker.

Autosomal DNA Segment Map courtesy of the Genealogical DNA Analysis Tool (GDAT). Group names on right for MRCAs for surnames B-J.
Autosomal DNA Segment Map courtesy of the Genealogical DNA Analysis Tool (GDAT). Group names on right for MRCAs for surnames K-W.

The DNA segment map shows the paternal (top) and maternal (bottom) sides of each chromosome. In the examples, the maternal side is mostly dark gray as we share WILDINGER-FOURNELLE (our grandparents/Mom’s parents) with our mother.

Although many of the maternal matches on AncestryDNA have been identified, very few segments can be added to the map as chromosome information is not available on Ancestry. Those seen are from FTDNA, MyHeritage, or GEDmatch.

This post is about my paternal matches and therefore only the top bar of each chromosome is of interest.

Comparing sibling DNA

The color groups on AncestryDNA as well as those in the family tree are used to map the DNA segments. For the example, below, the green, pink, and yellow groups have only two shades. I’ve kept these groups simple to show that siblings don’t share all of the same DNA. They share about 50% of the same DNA. Less color makes it easier to see the four groups of the grandparents.

My paternal grandfather’s paternal ancestry, the blue groups, include purple for first cousins who share all four color groups and red to highlight our DEMPSEY brick wall. A darker blue is used for second cousins and lighter blues for more distant cousins.

The maps show all segment matches that have been assigned a most recent common ancestor (MRCA).

Side by side comparison of siblings’ DNA segment maps for all generations.

On chromosome 1, my DNA segments are from my father’s paternal side: PGF (blue and red) and PGM (green). My brother received mostly DNA from our father’s maternal side: MGF (pink) and MGM (green). On chromosomes 5, 10, 17, and 19 we share more DNA from the same groups. Still, there are gaps – chromosomes segments that have not been identified (light gray, see chromosomes 6, 7, and 9). These are segments that could lead to several of the brick walls in our tree including the ancestry of William A. W. DEMPSEY.

The segment map in GDAT can be filtered by generation making it easy to see where segments are coming from.

Generation 2 (1st cousins)

Cathy’s segment map for 2 generations.

Purple segments are 1st cousins who share our paternal grandparents, Fred Rothwell DEMPSEY and Myrtle Hazel ROOP – the generation 2 ancestors. These include 1st cousins once removed (1C1R), matches from the younger generation. Seven of the 24 grandchildren of Fred and Myrtle are represented in this map. More would be ideal but I am happy to work with what I have.

Generation 3 (2nd cousins)

Cathy’s segment map for 3 generations.

The dark blue and pink segments cover the purple segments as they represent one generation further back.

Dark blue segments are 2nd cousins who share William Henderson DEMPSEY and Laura Belle INGRAM. Matches have been found for six of their eight children who had descendants.

Pink segments are 2nd cousins who share Walter Farmer ROOP and Rebecca Jane CLONCH. Three of their six children have tested descendants.

Generation 4 (3rd cousins)

Cathy’s segment map for 4 generations.

Red, more easily distinguishable from the rest of the blue groups, is for 3rd cousins who share MRCA William A. W. DEMPSEY (parents unknown) and Sarah Ann WOOD.

Green segments are the 3rd cousins who share Irvin Lewis INGRAM and Mary M. DEMPSEY (no known relationship to William A. W. DEMPSEY).

Pink segments are the 3rd cousins who share Gordon Washington ROOP and Milla Susan PETERS.

Yellow segments are the 3rd cousin matches back to Alexander CLONCH and Tabitha Ann COOLEY.

Chromosome Analysis

Adding another generation to the map further breaks down the larger segments shared with 1st and 2nd cousins and adds identification to some blank segments.

In the example for the 4th generation, the middle section of chromosome 1 now shows red where previously no color was seen. These are 3rd cousins who share the DEMPSEY-WOOD ancestors. This red section is not visible in the map showing all generations (see the first segment map earlier in this post) as it is a segment shared with matches who have more distant ancestors in common – ancestors of Sarah Ann WOOD, the wife of William A. W. DEMPSEY.

On this breakdown of the segments on Chr. 1, the red segment identified as generation 4 is also shared by matches who have HONAKER-GOETZ of generation 7 as MRCA. I received this DNA from Frederick HONAKER, father of Rachel HONAKER who married Elijah WOOD. This segment cannot be used to find more distant ancestors of my brick wall William A. W. DEMPSEY as the DNA is from his wife Sarah Ann WOOD, daughter of Rachel and Elijah.

Focusing on my father’s paternal grandfather’s side using the blue groups

What have I been doing these past two-plus months? I’ve been populating my DNA database with matches, trees, and notes. I’ve been focusing on my father’s paternal grandfather’s side using the blue groups. More specifically, I’ve been concentrating on the matches that, I hope, will lead to the parents of my 2nd great-grandfather William A. W. DEMPSEY (1820-1867) of Rockbridge County, Virginia, and Fayette County, West Virginia (then part of old Virginia).

The amount of DNA we receive from a particular ancestor decreases with each generation. There is a chance that very little or no DNA was inherited from a specific ancestor. An ancestor did not pass on the same DNA to each of his children. Those children, with their different combinations of their parent’s DNA, passed on different combinations to each of their children. The more descendants tested, the more DNA can be matched to the ancestor.

I need more RED! I need 3rd cousins who descend from William A. W. DEMPSEY to transfer their raw data from AncestryDNA to FTDNA, MyHeritage, or GEDmatch so that I can analyze the DNA using a chromosome browser.

By paying close attention to the MRCAs and the segments shared with cousins, I’ve been able to eliminate those who are related to me through Sarah Ann WOOD’s ancestors. Those are the lighter blue segments that overlap the red segments.

Sarah’s ancestors came from lines where many descendants have tested. The Wood, McGraw, Honaker, and Wiseman families were large and intermarried. All four lived in Monroe County, West Virginia (then still part of Virginia) at the time it was created from Greenbrier County in 1799.

While I have large clusters of matches for these four families, the mysterious clusters that are associated with William A. W. DEMPSEY are confusing. I hope that some of his descendants may share one or the other of the light gray segments (non-assigned DNA). This would help to identify the area that I need to research to open the door to this brick wall.

Light gray segments (non-assigned DNA)

  • The gaps on the chromosome map have plenty of matches but the common ancestors in my tree haven’t been identified.
  • Some of the matches have ancestors in common with each other but these aren’t names found in my tree.
  • Many matches have small or no trees to work with.
  • I need confirmed cousins on the segment to help figure out where the mystery ancestors may fit in my family tree.

I’ve identified 87 3rd cousin matches descended from William A. W. DEMPSEY through my great-grand aunts and great-grand uncles. Of these 87, only 17 have their tests on sites with a chromosome browser. Do any of the others share non-assigned DNA segments with my brother or me?

What further complicates my William A. W. DEMPSEY brick wall is the fact that his descendants have more than one connection to me due to marriages of grandchildren and great-grandchildren to spouses who descend from other common ancestors, i.e. Wood, McGraw, Honaker, Wiseman, Sims, Johnson, Kincaid, Ingram, and my other Dempsey line.

Why not try Y-DNA?

My connection to William A. W. DEMPSEY is through my father (Fred), his father (Fred), his father’s father (William H.), his father’s father’s father (William A.W.). This would make the males in our family good candidates for Y-DNA testing. I have a paternal uncle, three brothers, and nine male first cousins who are descendants of William A. W. DEMPSEY. My grandfather Fred Rothwell DEMPSEY had six brothers; his father William Henderson DEMPSEY had three brothers.

I don’t feel comfortable asking relatives to do DNA tests, either autosomal or Y-DNA. I don’t have the time or want to put the effort into a Y-DNA project. However, if a direct-male descendant of William A. W. DEMPSEY has done the Y-DNA test or is planning on taking it, I would be happy to work with them on the genealogy side. I have a feeling the Y-DNA surname is not going to be DEMPSEY. Maybe someone can prove me wrong!

Why I wrote this post

When I write my ancestors’ stories, weaving the facts into the story and checking off the sources used, I usually find unanswered questions. Writing actually helps me think through things. So this post was primarily for me, to see if I am on the right track with the system and procedure I use for analyzing the DNA. If I can explain it and it makes sense (to me), I hope it also makes sense to my readers.

I know this is beyond beginner DNA. This might give you an idea of how, maybe a bit further down the road, you can work with your results. You might also be more advanced and able to give me some feedback on how you would treat a similar brick wall. Comments are always appreciated.

Lastly, I’d like to thank the cousins who’ve given me guest access to their DNA. I hope this will help them see how very helpful their data has been to me.

© 2021, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

We Are Safe after Severe Flooding in Western Europe

Our family and friends have been sending messages, emails, and calling to find out how we are doing. Looking back, we can say that we were very lucky this time around.

No fatalities were reported in Luxembourg but the devastation is terrible.

We’ve been through flooding before and have learned to take steps to be somewhat prepared. In 1993 we were flooded twice, again in 1995, and in 2003. After the 2003 flooding, when we had 167 cm of water in our basement, we had an electrician come in and move all the light switches and sockets up above the water level.

The flood levels recorded during those years are still in the top 5 recorded for the Sauer River in the town of Bollendorf, 7 km upriver from Echternach. The flooding this summer surpassed the 2003 record and was 635 cm.

13 Jan 1993: 579 cm
21 Dec 1993: 608 cm
23 Jan 1995: 570 cm
03 Jan 2003: 615 cm
15 Jul 2021: 635 cm at 16:30

If you have not experienced something similar to the images you’ve been seeing in the news, you cannot imagine what it is like when your home is filling with water with no end in sight.

In previous years our part of town was the first to be flooded. People still come to check our street whenever it looks like it the Sauer River may flood. About 15 or so years ago they set up a pump station across the street from our house. It pumps the floodwater from the Osweiler Bach, a stream coming down from the nearby village of Osweiler, under the main road that serves as a natural dike between the pump station and the Sauer River.

Osweiler Bach (stream) looking down toward the bridge in our street.

Wednesday, July 14, 2021

Our daughter called to check up on us in the late afternoon. When she heard how serious things were getting, she said they would come right away. It took longer than expected for them to get here as several routes they tried were closed due to flooding or trees and debris blocking the roads.

Our son also called and said he would come with the cargo cart that we needed to move the heavy appliances. He and our son-in-law moved our freezer, refrigerator, washer, and dryer out of our basement and onto our back porch where we were able to keep the freezer and refrigerator running. We put our bikes upstairs in the front hallway and parked the car on a higher street. Around midnight water started filling the basement.

The barrier in the Osweiler Bach before it was raised.

The pump system is set up to raise a barrier into the stream and pump the flood water through a 2-meter diameter pipe when the river is at a certain flood level. This time the stream flooded faster than the river, the barrier wasn’t closed, and water wasn’t pumped. We got about 20 centimeters of water in the basement. They were able to manually close the barrier. The pump had to be re-started time and time again during the night. This emptied out our basement and we remained dry afterward.

Thursday, July 15, 2021

Our street to the right of our house
Our street where the Osweiler Bach runs under the bridge. One row of sandbags in our driveway. Another was added later.

Our son called us at 8 o’clock to see how things were. We had been up several hours in the early morning after the pump started working and had not yet gotten up. When we looked out the window, we saw the street was flooding up onto the sidewalk. Water was gushing up from the canal lids, the pavement of the street raised up about 5-10 cm, water was bubbling up between the street and the bricks bordering the parking spots and the sidewalk. It looked like the street drains couldn’t handle all of the water and, without the pumping system that was emptying them, flooding in the street would get worse. We got sandbags to keep the water from running down our driveway into the basement which is also our garage.

The bridge between Echternach, Luxembourg, and Echternacherbruck, Germany that crosses the Sauer River.

In the meantime, the flood level in Bollendorf climbed above the record high bringing the water level to a critical point. The river kept rising and several campers along the banks were pulled in. They floated down river and got stuck under the bridge in Wasserbillig about 20 kilometers further down the river from us. A special crane had to be brought in from France to get them out as they were completely blocking the flow and backing up the river. The floodwall on the other side of Echternach where the train station used to be was threatening to overflow.

The stream at the other end of our street with its floodwalls.

At one point it looked like the river might rise enough to flood the main road that runs between our house and the river. The overflow would have quickly filled up the area we live in. We decided to clear everything out of our basement before the expected flooding.

View from the main road that runs between our house and Sauer River

The fire department was ready for the worst and told us to pack a bag and be ready to evacuate as there were plans to run off excess water from the reservoir in northern Luxembourg to keep it from overflowing. Fortunately, they were able to hold it back long enough while the bridge was cleared in Wasserbillig. In the meantime, the flood walls in town overflowed flooding the other end of town and into the center. People had to be evacuated as they didn’t have electricity and/or water.

Although the river was still rising, it hadn’t rained all day. We went to our son’s house around 4 in the afternoon with plans to spend the night there. Our granddaughter was ready for her afternoon nap, so our son and I took her out in the stroller for a walk while my husband rested at the house. We enjoyed the time with our granddaughter, son, and daughter-in-law but were only able to relax a bit. After supper, my husband talked to one of our neighbors who had stayed in his house. The campers had been removed and the level of the river had gone down below the critical point. We decided to go back home instead of staying the night at our son’s.

When we got to our house, no change could be seen. But there were a lot of gawkers!

Friday, July 16, 2021

When we got up on Friday, the water in the street had begun to recede. There wasn’t any in front of our house but it was still bubbling up through the canal lids. Next door, the house closest to the stream, the street was still flooded. The pavement had nearly lowered back to normal. There is a crack from one side of the street to the other by the bridge. The person who came to look at it didn’t think it would affect the concrete bridge’s stability. We’ll have to wait and see. We don’t have to drive across it to get out of our street.

On the positive side, even though we had only a small amount of water, we got an opportunity to deep clean the basement. After the flooding in 2003, we had the walls tiled which made it easier to wipe everything down. We cleaned up the pantry floor and got all of the foodstuff and wine back on the shelves. We were too tired to clean up the rest of the basement/garage floor.

Saturday, July 17, 2021

We made plans with our daughter to have pancakes for breakfast before she would help us with the rest of the cleanup and putting everything back in place. Slowly my dining room and living room were cleared. Our son-in-law came after work to help put the appliances back. Then all we had were the bikes and a few odds and ends to put away. Our son was helping out at his wife’s grandmother’s house. She also lives in Echternach, in one of the streets that had the worst flooding.

Sunday, July 18, 2021

We spent the day with our daughter and son-in-law at their house. We were still tired but glad that the pump station did its job and kept our basement empty of floodwaters. Without the pumping station, we would have had about 185 cm of water in our garage/basement – very close to the ceiling.

Monday, July 19, 2021

We thought we would begin the new week without any more issues. We’d planned on having our son and daughter-in-law over for lunch and then some playtime with our granddaughter. An ant invasion changed those plans. It was winter the other times we were flooded and didn’t have this problem. We set a new date with the kids. We ended up running the vacuum cleaner on and off all morning, sprinkled baking powder and baking soda all along the ants’ pathway. A day later, we still had a few strays.

My husband took the photos you see here on Thursday morning before things became critical. He only went as far as the end of our road. We’ve only seen photos of the rest of Echternach and haven’t visited in person. We believe the only reason people should be visiting the damaged areas is to offer their help. The others times we experienced the terrible flooding, nosy people walked down our driveway nearly into our basement to get a good look while we were cleaning up. I would not wish this on anyone!

We were very lucky this time around. Compared to others in our town we had only minor issues.

© 2021, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Lëtz Research: The Hidden Villages of Luxembourg

Luxembourg genealogy research may seem daunting to new and even experienced researchers. With a country the size of Rhode Island, the smallest US state, one might assume Luxembourg research would/should be easier.

I learned a lot through trial and error when I first began searching for vital records for my Luxembourg ancestors. I browsed the records to figure out which communes the villages belonged to. When I got far enough back in time, I went through the same time-consuming trial and error system with the parish records.

Today, I use two online lists created by Jean THOMA to check for the commune and the parish a village belonged to at different points in time:

The Communes in Luxembourg during four centuries
(includes the year when a village changed commune)

The Parishes in Luxemburg about 1803

Still, even with these lists, there are records for some villages that are not easily found.

I received a query from Shirley who was searching for an 1813 marriage record for ancestors who married in Buschdorf.

  • She had the date that had been abstracted by a volunteer at Luxracines from the Tables Décennales (later referred to as TD in this post) or ten-year tables for births, marriages, and deaths.
  • She knew that Buschdorf was part of the commune of Boevange-sur-Attert.
  • The marriage record was not found in the collection of marriages for the years 1796-1890 where she thought it would be.

She wanted to know if records for Buschdorf might be found in a different commune.

Thoma’s list of communes indicates that Buschdorf was its own commune until 1823. This means that they kept their own TD, birth, marriage, and death records before 1823.

I went to the FamilySearch catalog and looked up Buschdorf. The catalog showed civil records for Buschdorf are in the Boevange-sur-Attert collection.

FamilySearch screenshot.

For more information, I clicked on the link (see arrow above) to open up the catalog entry for the collection.

FamilySearch screenshot.

This is the top of the page for the collection of records for the commune of Boevange-sur-Attert. There is a link that will take you directly to the civil records for all locations in Luxembourg. Stop. Don’t use this yet. Scroll down further on the page to view all films included in the collection for this commune.

FamilySearch screenshot.

If you aren’t familiar with entries in the catalog, there are a few things you need to know.

  1. The camera icon with a key indicates some kind of restriction. Before becoming discouraged, check to see if you are signed in to FamilySearch. Very often, as in this case, the key will disappear indicating the collection is not restricted.
  2. In the column with the film number, Item numbers may also be included. These will help you navigate an entire film with more than one item included. Images identifying the beginning of new items are easily found when scrolling through the collection.

In the above screenshot, the title of the collection/film Naissances 1841-1880 — BUSCHDORF: Naissances 1798-1822 — Mariages 1796-1890 indicates that part of this collection includes births for the years 1798-1822 for Buschdorf. As Buschdorf was keeping their own records up to 1823 there should also be marriage and death records for the town, not just births.

Going into the collection by clicking on the camera icon will take you to the film.

FamilySearch screenshot.

Although all information is included in this screenshot, I find it more useful to go to the Luxembourg Civil Registration, 1796-1941 collection…

FamilySearch screenshot.

…scroll down in the Information box at the bottom to the citation and copy/paste the link into your browser to go to the image below.

FamilySearch screenshot.

Here the name of the collection is Naissances 1841-1880, 1798-1822 Mariages 1796-1890 and doesn’t indicate the records for 1798-1822 are only for Buschdorf. The title Naissances 1841-1880 — BUSCHDORF: Naissances 1798-1822 — Mariages 1796-1890 in the catalog suggests that there are three items in this collection. When you look at the collection using thumbnails you can see where each item begins and ends. (see end of item 2 and beginning of item 3 in image above)

FamilySearch screenshot.

Births for 1841-1880 were filmed in two batches and are under Item 1 and Item 2. Item 3 is named Naissances (or births) 1798-1822.

FamilySearch screenshot.

Item 4 is Marriages for 1796-1890. This is where Shirley searched without results for the 1813 marriage.

Going back to Item 3, a closer look at the records shows that this part of the collection not only has births but also the TDs, marriage, and death records for Buschdorf for the period it was a commune. This is the entire collection of records for the now extinct commune of Buschdorf.

Other “Hidden Villages”

About a half-dozen years ago, I had the same problem with Osweiler, a village that is part of the commune of Rosport. Sometime after 2011 and before 2015 FamilySearch “reworked” the Luxembourg, Civil Registration, 1662-1941 collection. They have a link with the known issues in the collection that included this statement in 2015:

At the recent rework of this collection, the town/hamlet names were combined into the Commune/municipality level. The records are still there, but the search is different.

After much searching, I accidentally found that the Osweiler records to 1822 were included in Rosport in the collection titled “Naissances, mariages, décès 1800-1815.”  The title deceived me and I didn’t take the time to view the records more closely. If I had, I would have found the births and marriages for Osweiler for the years 1816-1822 in this misnamed collection. The FamilySearch catalog gives the correct year range for the Osweiler records:

Other examples are:

Alzingen, a commune until 1823, then part of Hesperange

Brandenburg, a commune until 1823, then part of Bastendorf

Berbourg, a commune until 1823, then part of Manternach

…and the list goes on.

The commune or municipal system was adopted in Luxembourg in 1795 during the French occupation to mirror the systems employed in the rest of the French Republic. Many villages kept their own records until they became part of a larger commune in 1823 when the system was overhauled. These smaller villages that were municipalities or communes until 1823 are easily found on Thoma’s list of communes by searching for the year 1823.

The moral of the story is…

Shirley was happy to learn where she could find the record. She wrote, “I have so many “missing” records.  Not always sure if they’re truly missing from FamilySearch, or if I’m just not looking in the right place.” Hopefully, this post will help her and others find their “missing” records.

If you are having problems finding your ancestors’ records, check Jean THOMA’s list of Luxembourg communes as well as the FamilySearch catalog for the location you are researching.

© 2021, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

UPDATE to The Ancestors: Nicolas Frantz and Angélique Bartel of Semming, Rodemack, France

Last week I wrote about my 5th great-grandparents Nicolas FRANTZ and Angélique BARTEL of Semming, Rodemack, France.

While researching for the post, I was in touch with the compiler of Les Familles de Rodemack et ses annexes Semming, Faulbach, Esing de 1682 à 1904 (Cercle Généalogique du Pays des Trois Frontières, 2004) about some of the dates for the FRANTZ individuals in the book. Jean-Marie offered to go to the Archives Municipales de Rodemack to look up several records.

I was particularly interested in the entry I found on the Tables Décennales for Semming:

Tables Decénnales of Semming. Image courtesy of Archives départementales de la Moselle (57).

Angélique BARTHEL died on 30 Brumaire an XI or 21 November 1802 per the entry in this list of death records for the decade 1802-1812.1  If possible, I wanted the information verified as the death record is not available online. On the Archives Départementales de la Moselle site, Semming is listed – à numériser, voir RODEMACK- indicating not all records have been digitized and those available are under Rodemack.

This morning I received digital copies of three records courtesy of the municipal archives of Rodemack. Anyone can visit the office but copies are not normally made due to the fragile state of the old documents.

The Death Record of Angélique BARTEL

The death record of my 5th great-grandmother was not recorded on 30 Brumaire XI nor did her death take place on that date as indicated on the tables décennales seen above.

1803 Death Record of Angélique BARTEL. Courtesy of the Archives Municipales de Rodemack.

The death record is dated 28 Nivôse XI (in the 11th year of the Republic) or 18 January 1803. Angélique BARTEL died on 27 Nivôse XI or 17 January 1803 at 3 heures du soir. This translates to 3 o’clock in the evening which is not correct and doesn’t make sense. The term du soir is still used by the older generation of French speakers and is similar to our use of p.m. Therefore, Angélique died at 3 o’clock in the afternoon. Her occupation was sage-femme or midwife. She was 65 years old at the time of death placing her birth at about 1738. Michel BARTEL her son-in-law was the informant and gave Elling as her place of birth. The second informant or witness to the record was Michel BAUER, a friend of the deceased. Angélique lived in Simming and both of the witnesses were residents of the commune of Simming and Faulbach. Michel BARTEL could not write and signed with an X. The mayor of the commune, François ERNST signed his name Frantz Ernst, mayor.

Elling was also the place of birth of Angélique’s son-in-law Michel who shared the surname BARTEL or BARTHEL with her. As canon law forbade the marriage of close relatives, it might be assumed that the two were distantly related as they came from the same town. Baptismal records for Ellange (Elling) are on FamilySearch under Elling, Ellange, and Dalheim. They are lacking for the years 1716-1739 when Angélique’s baptismal record would be expected.

It is possible that Michel confused his birthplace with his mother-in-law’s when reporting her death. Michel’s baptismal record was found in the Dalheim collection and notes his birth in Ellange. The research will have to be broadened to include all towns between Ellange and Rodemack. Sierck-les-Bains which is halfway between the two but more to the east has several BARTHEL couples having children at the time Angélique was born but she was not one of them.

The Baptismal Record of Paul FRANTZ

The records for Semming on the departmental archives site for the Moselle are labeled as being available for the years 1682-an X. I found that they are missing from mid-1745 to 1802 (an X). Therefore I requested Paul’s baptismal record and the death record of his sister Marie Marguerite or Maria Margareta as seen in the Latin entry.

1765 Baptismal Record of Paul FRANTZ. Courtesy of the Archives Municipales de Rodemack.

My 4th great-grandfather Paul FRANTZ was baptized on 11 August 1765. He was the son of Nicolai FRANTZ, bubulci or a farm laborer, and Ang… a married couple from Faulbach. His godfather was Paulus STROPPERS from Luxembourg and Margarita PIRMES of Faulbach. The godfather signed his surname: STROPERS. An unusual surname that hopefully will lead to a family connection. Note: The left side of the record including the date and the mother’s full name was not captured in the scan by the archivist. Jean-Marie only noticed this after he had arrived back home. 

1765 Death/Burial Record of Maria Margareta FRANTZ. Courtesy of the Archives Municipales de Rodemack.

Eight months later, on 9 April 1766 Maria Margareta FRANTZ, daughter of Nicolai FRANTZ, bubulci, and Angelica BARTEL, a married couple from Faulbach, died. The interment was in the Summingen or Simming cemetery. Maria Margareta’s age is not mentioned but as this was only eight months after Paul’s birth she was likely born before the end of 1765 and at least 17 months old. Her date of birth is not cited in the Rodemack family book. Either the records are missing or she wasn’t born in Faulbach or Simmingen where the FRANTZ family lived in 1765-1766.

Geographical area to be researched

The distance between Ellange and Simming (Semming on the Google map) is a short drive of fewer than 20 minutes. Nicolas and Angélique’s older daughter Marie, the wife of Michel BARTHEL, was born in Beyren-lès-Sierck, a village that lies between Ellange and Simming, according to information furnished at the time of their civil marriage ceremony in 1816.

Although the distance is small, all villages in the area will have to be researched to learn more about the FRANTZ and BARTHEL connections in the area. Research for another day…

Special thanks to Jean-Marie and the secretary at the Archives Municipales de Rodemack for looking up and scanning the records I was most interested in.

© 2021, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. Archives départementales de la Moselle (57), browsable images of microfilm collection of parish and civil records (online http://www.archivesnumerisees57.com/mdr/index.html), 9NUM/8E591/2 Semming – Tables décennales ( An XI-1812 ) Semming FRAD057_8E591_2_0002.jpg, image 2 of 6. 1802 Death Entry in Tables Décennales. (http://num.archives57.com/visualiseur/index.php/docnumViewer/calculHierarchieDocNum/699698/698861:703275:699698/900/1600 : accessed 9 May 2021). Images from this site are free to use by the public per conditions viewed on 26 May 2019. 

The Ancestors: Nicolas Frantz and Angélique Bartel of Semming, Rodemack, France

In the search for my ancestors, I have some brick walls that are high and wide with no door in sight. The parents of my 4th great-grandfather Paul FRANTZ (1763-1847) were one of these brick walls.

As all genealogists know, there aren’t really brick walls in our research or our family tree. Still, I call my blog Opening Doors in Brick Walls as there’s always a way around or through the “I’m stuck!” point in our family tree research.

When I began working on this post I had very little information about the parents of Paul FRANTZ. They were names extracted from a marriage record I had not been able to access. What I did not know was that I had two records that could have opened the door in this brick wall if only I had paid closer attention.

A Contrived Brick Wall: when we build our own brick walls

The parents of my fourth great-grandfather Paul FRANTZ were named in his 1794 marriage record.

I knew the marriage record existed by searching the Tables des mariages 1700-1798 (index organisée par l’époux/l’épouse).1 The Luxembourg Association of Genealogy and Heraldry (ALGH) founded in 1984 launched a huge project when the association was still young. A team of volunteers extracted all marriage information from the 156 old parish registers from before 1800 onto index cards. The project took years to finish. FamilySearch microfilmed the marriage index cards in 1995 and included them in the church records collection for Luxembourg when they were digitized in 2012 and finally went online in 2015. The cards included the name of the parish, the register, and the page number the marriage entry was found.

1794 Marriage Index Card. Image courtesy of FamilySearch.

The marriage of Paul FRANTZ and Susanne KEIFFER was recorded in Volume 1 of the Mamer parish records. This volume was not part of the collection filmed by FamilySearch.

I knew who the parents of Paul FRANTZ were from the information on the index card. I did not know if they were from the residence given for Paul or from the town he was born in or from a different place. Since their location was unknown, it was impossible to search for them.

The digital version of the register in the archives of the Catholic church archives is now available on MatriculaOnline.

The handwriting on the marriage record on Matricula is legible but in Latin.2 I was able to translate most of the words in the record. However, not being a Latin scholar, I had problems with the meaning of some phrases in the record.

1794 Marriage Record of “Paulus Franz” and “Susanna Küffer” with the names of his parents “Nicolai Franz” and “Angelica Bartel” of Semmingen. Image courtesy of MatriculaOnline.

I posted to the Luxembourg Genealogy group on Facebook asking for help. Was only his father deceased as indicated on the index card or both of his parents? What did “ratione decennis commorationis in Bergem, parochianum de Schifflingen” mean? Who was it referring to? The parents or to the groom?

Kevin, the moderator in the group, told me to pay attention to the parentheticals. By removing the part about Paul being the son of the late Nicolas and Angela, I was left with: Paul FRANZ, linen weaver, by reason of a ten years’ residence in Bergem, a parishioner of Schifflingen… Accordingly, Paul had been living in Bergem since about 1784.

Linda has helped me several times with Latin translations. I’d tagged her in the Facebook query in the group. She sent me a short email pointing out an error I made reading the marriage record. Paul’s parents were from Semmingen and not Senningen as I had thought.

I had read Senningen as the place of birth for Paul FRANTZ on the 1843 census.3 Linda removed my blinders and I was able to get past this brick wall.

1843 Luxembourg Census sheet for the household of two families: Paul FRANTZ and his step-grandson Pierre REDLINGER’s family with Paul’s birthplace: “Semingen.” Image courtesy of FamilySearch.

Even more embarrassing is that Paul’s death record included his town of birth as well as the country!4

1847 Death Record No. 28 for Paul FRANTZ with his place of birth: Semmingen in Frankreich (France). Image courtesy of FamilySearch.

Paul FRANTZ was born in Semming now part of the municipality of Rodemack in the Moselle department of France. Ancient forms of the village name Semming: Suningen (750), Sunungen (768), Sumungen (907), Sommange (14th century), Sinningen (1572), Simmingen (1685), Zinimgen (17th century), Sinumingen (1749), Simingen (1756), Simming (1793), Seming (1801).5

Over the years I had looked for the parents of Paul FRANTZ in all the wrong places: in Senningen and the parish of Schuttrange and in Bergem and the parish of Schifflange, both in Luxembourg.

A Visit to Rodemack

My husband and I visited Rodemack in October 2014, not knowing that my FRANTZ ancestors hailed from the area.

After the Emancipation Charter of 1236, the village residents of Rodemack erected the city walls to protect themselves. Today, 700 meters of walls and various towers remain.

The Sierck Gate, formerly called The Franchise Gate, was built in the XIVth century. The gate was defended by two round towers. In 1944 the Americans destroyed the upper part of the gate consisting of a covered way and loopholes to make passage for their tanks when Rodemack was liberated. It was rebuilt in 1989 to its original state.

The Medieval Garden is made up of seasoning and medical plants, fruit, vegetables, and flowers. The garden met the daily requirements of the people of the village: to feed, cure, and entertain themselves.

Lavoir, a public place set aside for the washing of clothes. These communal wash-houses were common in Europe until people were introduced to domestic washing machines. I remember going to the local lavoir with my mother when we lived in Aulnois-sur-Seille, only 80 kilometers south of Rodemack, from 1962 to 1966.

As early as 1745 there were several mills in use in Rodemack for grinding wheat, walnut oil, and bark. Oak and birch bark was ground to obtain tanning bark. The mills functioned up until 1920.

Listed among the most beautiful villages in France, Rodemack showcases a typical medieval atmosphere. It was difficult to choose only a few of the 238 photos we took while walking around and through the village.

A Visit to Rodemack photos courtesy of Egon Meder ©2014.

Nicolas FRANTZ and Angélique BARTEL of Semming, an annexe of Rodemack

Nicolas FRANTZ and Angélique BARTEL were shepherds or bergers in Semming. They were the parents of three known children. Marie was baptized 26 February 1762, Paul was baptized 11 August 1765, and Marie Marguerite died 9 April 1766.6

Records for Semming for the years that children would have been born to Nicolas and Angélique were not found online. On the Archives Départementales de la Moselle site, Semming is listed – à numériser, voir RODEMACK- indicating not all records have been digitized and those available are under Rodemack. The records for Semming are labeled as being available for the years 1682-an X. I found that they are missing from mid-1745 to 1802 (an X).

Marie first married Jean ERNST on 5 January 1779 in Semming. They had several children before Jean died in 1795.7

Paul went to live and work as a linen weaver in Bergem in the parish of Schifflange in Luxembourg about 1784. After living there for about a decade, he married Susanne KIEFFER in Mamer on 7 January 1794. At the time of the marriage, Paul and Marie’s father Nicolas FRANTZ was deceased.

On 20 November 1796, Marie FRANTZ married Michel BARTHEL in a religious marriage ceremony in Semming. Two and a half months later their only known son, Michel was born.

Tables Decénnales Semming. Image courtesy of Archives départementales de la Moselle (57).

Marie and Paul’s mother, Angélique BARTHEL died on 30 Brumaire an XI or 21 November 1802. The death record is not available online and was only referenced in the Tables Décennales of Semming.8

In 1816 Marie FRANTZ and Michel BARTHEL’s son Michel was planning to marry. As the records needed for the marriage were gathered, the civil servants did not find a civil birth record for Michel nor a civil marriage record for his parents. Their religious union that took place during the French Revolutionary period was considered invalid by the state. His parents were not legally married. This was not unusual for the times. Many couples dealt with the problem by marrying in a civil ceremony many years later when absent civil records were needed.

Marie, 62 years old, and Michel, 48 years old, were married in a civil ceremony on 30 January 1816 in Rodemack.9

1816 Marriage Record No. 8 (partial clipping). Image courtesy of Archives départementales de la Moselle (57).

Dame Marie Frantz agée de soixante deux ans native de Beyren, domiciliée au dit Simmingen, veuve de defunt Jean Ernst, laboureur au dit lieu, fille legitime des defuns Nicolas Frantz et d’Angelique Bartel, vivans bergers au dit Simming y décédés

Dame Marie Frantz aged sixty-two, a native of Beyren, domiciled in said Simmingen, widow of the deceased Jean Ernst, plowman at the said place, legitimate daughter of the deceased Nicolas Frantz and Angelique Bartel, shepherds in said Simming before their death.

The marriage record proved Marie was the daughter of Nicolas FRANTZ and Angélique BARTEL, both of Semming and deceased at the time of the  1816 marriage.

1816 Marriage Record No. 8 (partial clipping). Image courtesy of Archives départementales de la Moselle (57).

…Michel Bartel et dame Marie Frantz sont unis par the mariage et aussitot les dits époux ont declaré qu’il y a vingt ans qu’ils se sont marié de bonne foi devant un pretre et qui’il est né d’eux un enfant mâl qui ne se trouve pas inscrit sur les Registre de l’État Civil, né le cinq fevrier l’an mil sept cent quatre vingt dix sept, tenu sur les fons de baptieme par le Sr. Michel Ernst, laboureur à Faulbach, qui lui donne le nom de Michel, le quel ils reconnaissent pour leur fils…

As soon as they were united in marriage, Marie and Michel declared that twenty years earlier they had married in good faith before a priest and that a male child had been born to them and was not recorded in the civil register. The child born on 5 February 1797 was baptized Michel as witnessed by his godfather Michel ERNST, a farmer from Faulbach, who was present at the 1816 marriage. This act legitimized their son Michel’s birth.

Following his parents’ marriage, the younger Michel’s banns were read on the 11th and 18th of February. He married Elisabeth DREES on 22 February 1816 in Rodemack.10

Marie FRANTZ died on 16 August 1821 in Semming at the age of 66 years. Her husband was the main informant on the death record.11  Her age at death places her birth at about 1755.

At the time of her marriage in 1816, Marie was 62 years old or born about 1754. Marie’s place of birth was noted as Beyren on the 1816 marriage record. Is it possible that Marie is not the same child of Nicolas and Angélique who was baptized on 26 February 1762? Could this mean the FRANTZ-BARTEL family lived in Beyren prior to coming to Semming? Beyren-les-Sierck is part of Gandren and there are no records at the departmental archives (pas d’actes aux archives départementales).

Michel BARTHEL died on 2 April 1837 in Faulbach, the neighboring village of Semming. He was described as the widower of the deceased Marie FRANTZ.12

As well as his sister Marie and her husband, Paul FRANTZ outlived his wife Susanne KIEFFER (1754-1808) who died on 9 October 1808 in Mamer.13 He died on 27 July 1847 in Mamer at the age of 81 years or 83 years per his step-grandson who reported the death. He left twin sons Nicolas and Johann, two stepchildren, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren.

I hope you’ve enjoyed visiting Rodemack and reading about how I finally was able to open the door in my FRANTZ-BARTEL brick wall.

© 2021, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Mamer > Tables des mariages 1779-1804 (index organisée par l’époux) > image 41 of 238. 1794 Marriage Index Card. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WS-431Q?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-2NY%3A1500941501%2C1501133556 : accessed 20 December 2017). 
  2. Diözesanarchiv Luxemburg / Archives diocésaines Luxembourg (images), Matricula Online, http://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/, Creative Commons License CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 (citing original records in the Luxembourg Diocesan Archives, Luxembourg City), GV.MF 356-443, Mamer, KB-01, image 79 of 128, page 150 (stamped), first entry. 1794 Marriage Record. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/mamer/KB-01/?pg=79 : accessed 28 April 2021). 
  3. Luxembourg, Volkszählungen 1843-1900 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Mamer > 1843 > image 73 of 291. Households of Paul Frantz and his step-grandson Pierre Redlinger. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-997B-2YDZ?cc=2037957&wc=M9MV-928 : accessed 3 May 2021). 
  4. Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Mamer > Mariages 1838-1890 Décès 1796-1880 > image 1002 of 1497. 1847 Death Record No. 28. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12143-120450-0?cc=1709358 : accessed 24 March 2010). 
  5. Wikipedia, “Semmingen,” rev. 03:03, 12 juin 2020 (https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Semming : accessed 5 May 2021). Contributor’s sources: Bouteiller – Dictionnaire topographique de l’ancien département de la Moselle, rédigé en 1868 and Memoires de L’Academie Imperiale de Metz XLV (1865) 
  6. Jean-Marie Neiers and Jacques Watrin, Les Familles de Rodemack et ses annexes Semming, Faulbach, Esing de 1682 à 1904 (Cercle Généalogique du Pays des Trois Frontières, 2004). Note: Not having access to this book, I emailed the author to confirm the dates. 
  7. Ibid. 
  8. Archives départementales de la Moselle (57), browsable images of microfilm collection of parish and civil records (online http://www.archivesnumerisees57.com/mdr/index.html), 9NUM/8E591/2 Semming – Tables décennales ( An XI-1812 ) Semming FRAD057_8E591_2_0002.jpg, image 2 of 6. 1802 Death Entry in Tables Décennales. (http://num.archives57.com/visualiseur/index.php/docnumViewer/calculHierarchieDocNum/699698/698861:703275:699698/900/1600 : accessed 9 May 2021). Images from this site are free to use by the public per conditions viewed on 26 May 2019. 
  9. Ibid., Registres paroissiaux et d’état civil : RODEMACK > 9NUM/1MIE591/2 Baptêmes, mariages (1764-1792), sépultures (1758-1792). Naissances, mariages, décès, tables (1792-1832) > images 1130-1131 of 1594. 1816 Marriage Record No. 7. (http://num.archives57.com/visualiseur/index.php/docnumViewer/calculHierarchieDocNum/876009/605804:771391:876009/900/1600 : accessed 5 May 2021). Images from this site are free to use by the public per conditions viewed on 26 May 2019. 
  10. Ibid., Rodemack > 9NUM/1MIE591/2 Baptêmes, mariages (1764-1792), sépultures (1758-1792). Naissances, mariages, décès, tables (1792-1832) > image 1134 of 1594. 1816 Marriage Record No. 15. (http://num.archives57.com/visualiseur/index.php/docnumViewer/calculHierarchieDocNum/876009/605804:771391:876009/900/1600 : accessed 5 May 2021). Images from this site are free to use by the public per conditions viewed on 26 May 2019. 
  11. Ibid., Rodemack > 9NUM/1MIE591/2 Baptêmes, mariages (1764-1792), sépultures (1758-1792). Naissances, mariages, décès, tables (1792-1832) > images 1266+1267 of 1594.  1821 Death Record No. 33. (http://num.archives57.com/visualiseur/index.php/docnumViewer/calculHierarchieDocNum/876009/605804:771391:876009/900/1600 : accessed 5 May 2021). 
  12. Ibid., Rodemack > 9NUM/1MIE591/3 Naissances, mariages, décès, tables (1833-1871) > image 182 of 1162. 1837 Death Record No. 39.(http://num.archives57.com/visualiseur/index.php/docnumViewer/calculHierarchieDocNum/876010/605804:771391:876010/900/1600 : accessed 6 May 2021). 
  13. Luxembourg Civil Records, Mamer > Mariages 1838-1890 Décès 1796-1880 > image 595 of 1497. 1808 Death Record No. 21. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12143-119238-21?cc=1709358 : accessed 23 March 2010). 

The Ancestors: Nicolaus Küffer and Susanna Schiltz of Mamer, Luxembourg

My 5th great-grandparents Nicolaus KÜFFER (1734-1796) and Susanna SCHILTZ (ca. 1737-1807) were likely not married in Mamer where they lived and raised their family. The baptisms of their children were found in Baptêmes 1718-1940, familles alphabétique. This compilation of all baptisms in Mamer from 1718 to 1940 by family groups was filmed in 1962. The records of baptism from 1779-1793 are available on FamilySearch while the same and those from 1790-1804 and 1817-1911 are available on Matricula. I have had to rely on this Family Register of the Parish of Mamer for all children born to the KÜFFER families before 1779.

As the records are not available, I can only assume the compiler of the register used KÜFFER as the spelling of the surname as this is how it was written in the church records he consulted. Five of the eight children born to Nicolaus and Susanna were found in later records. The records show the surname’s various spellings, including Küffer, Küfers, Kiefer, Kieffer, Kifers, and Kiffer. The house they lived in was known as Kiefers house or Kéfisch in Luxembourgish.

The home, as well as the house name, was passed down several generations. In 1842 the King of the Netherlands and Grand Duke of Luxembourg, William II owned land in Mamer. In 1849, when some of the lands were sold, the king’s administrator Baron Ziegesar donated a piece of land to Pierre REDLINGER of Kéfesch for his faithful services.1 Pierre was a great-grandson of the KÜFFER couple. As the oldest living child of Margaretha KOLBACH he had inherited the homeplace from her. It had been passed on to Margaretha from her mother Susanne KIEFFER who’d taken it over from her parents Nicolaus KÜFFER  and Susanna SCHILTZ.

The parents of Nicolaus KÜFFER

Christophorus KÜFFER and Angelica PROBST, the parents of Nicolaus, were married on 7 November 1731 in Mamer. They were the parents of five children baptized in Mamer. Caecelia was baptized on 24 October 1732, Nicolaus on 31 March 1734, Theodorus on 24 September 1736, Petrus on 21 January 1739, and Martinus on 16 October 1742.2

Three months after the birth of Martinus, Angelica, mother of five, married Michael GOERGEN on 21 January 1743. It can only be assumed that her first husband Christophorus died after Martinus was conceived and before Angelica remarried. With her second husband, she had three children: Wilhelmus in 1744, Margaretha in 1747, and Joannes in 1753.3

Of the eight children born to Angelica, only my ancestor Nicolaus was found to have married and had children in Mamer. His brother Petrus is noted as having gone to Monnerich (Mondercange, Luxembourg) and married however no record has been found of such or of children. When Nicolaus’ fourth child was baptized in 1760, Petrus  KÜFFER was named as the godfather. No other KÜFFER or GOERGEN children were godparents of Nicolaus’ children. Could this mean none other than Nicolaus and Petrus survived to adulthood? Deaths and burials were not considered when the family register was compiled. Annotations were made concerning some persons who did not remain in the parish of Mamer but not all.

Angelica PROBST died on 29 April 1786 in Mamer.4 She was widowed for the second time. As her second husband’s death was not found in the deaths/burials from 1779-1786, it is assumed that he died before 1779.

The parents of Susanna SCHILTZ

Susanna SCHILTZ’s parentage is not mentioned in the family register of Mamer. There is no annotation concerning her former place of residence.

Susanna died in the house called Kéfisch in Mamer on 4 August 1807. Her civil death record includes the names of her parents as well as their residence. They were Johannes SCHILTZ and Anna Maria SIMON of Menster (Mensdorf, Luxembourg).5 No records have been found for this couple.

Nicolas KÜFFER and Susanna SCHILTZ become parents

Nicolaus and Susanna were the parents of eight children all baptized in Mamer. They are assumed to have married before the birth of their first child Susanne baptized on 25 March 1754. Their second child and first son, Joannes was baptized on 24 July 1756. His godparents were Joannes SCHILTZ and Anna Elisabeth SIMON. They could have been the maternal grandfather and a maternal aunt but without the record that may give their residence or relationship to the child, this cannot be determined.

The third child of Nicolaus and Susanna was also named Joannes and baptized on 2 October 1757. He was followed by Elisabeth baptized on 25 June 1760. Her godfather was Peter KÜFFER, likely her paternal uncle who went to Monnerich. The fifth child, Peter Nicolas was baptized on 4 August 1763.

In 1766-1767 when the census and cadaster of Marie-Thérèse were taken, Nicolaus and Susanna had five children. The census for Mamer is lost. It would have been a good source for this couple’s living children as all household members were named and placed in age categories. As far as can be determined, from later records, the first four children were likely living in 1766.

Regime A, section 14: cadastre de Marie-Thérèse 1767 — liasse 77 (Mamer) Nicolas Küffers. FamilySearch.

The cadaster of Marie-Thérèse for Mamer from 1767 survived and “Nicolas Kiefers” is enumerated as Hirt or a shepherd in Mamer. The acreage and value of the land he used and its income were calculated on the sheet. The handwriting is hard to read. It may include interesting information on how the family lived. I don’t have the patience needed at this time to sit down and decipher all of the details. What I have been able to figure out is that Nicolaus was using or owned 9 Morgens of farmland, some fallow farmland, a garden and fruit tree orchard, and 3 1/2 Morgens of meadows. I wasn’t able to decipher what he was cultivating and the reason for a deduction made to the total payable tax.6

A gap of nearly 8 years followed the birth of the fifth child. On 5 February 1771, a daughter Margaretha was baptized. Maria was baptized on 22 November 1772 and finally Nicolas on 26 December 1775.

The children begin to marry and start their own families

Of the eight children of Nicolaus and Susanna, three have been found to have married. […the 3rd marriage and family only as I was writing this post!]

Susanne KIEFFER (1754-1808) of Kéfesch house in Mamer, Luxembourg, was my 4th great-grandmother. I wrote about her, both of her husbands, and her children in my post, 52 Ancestors: #44 Legendary Two-Time Tour de France Winner’s Second Great-Grandparents. In January 2018 I was very busy and had little time for format citations for the post. Now over three years later, I noticed this omission and will try to get to the source list when I publish this post. [4 May 2021 Update: Done!]

Susanne KIEFFER married Michel KOLBACH (1784-1838) on 17 February 1783.7 Susanne’s father Nicolaus KÜFFER served as the godfather of their first child Margaretha born and baptized on 4 January 1784.8 With the birth of her daughter Margaretha, they were living in a four-generation house. As the oldest child, Susanne would take over the family home after the deaths of her parents.

1784 Baptismal Record of Margaretha COLBACH aka KOLBACH. FamilySearch.

Joannes KIEFFER married Barbara THIES on 21 January 1785 in Schoenberg.9 The marriage was witnessed by Joannes KIEFFER of Mamer who, if it is not an error in name, was his brother of the same name. Without any further information, it is impossible to tell which Joannes was the groom and which was the witness: Joannes b. 1756 or Joannes b. 1757. This marriage was only discovered when I looked more closely at the godparents of the KOLBACH children and found Barbara THIES wife of Joannes KIEFFER serving as the godmother of a child in 1789.

On 31 March 1785, Elisabeth KIEFFER served as godmother for her nephew Michel KOLBACH, son of her sister Susanne.10

Angelica PROBST, the mother of Nicolaus KÜFFER, died on 29 April 1786 in Mamer and was buried in the town cemetery the following day.11 The Kéfesch house now had only three generations living in it.

Nicolas KÜFFER again served as a godfather for his grandson Nicolaus KIEFFER, son of Joannes and Barbara, born and baptized on 17 September 1786 in Kehlen.12 Young Nicolas was the first of three known children of Joannes and Barbara. Michael KIEFFER was born and baptized on 13 July 1788 in Kehlen. His uncle Michel KOLBACH, husband of Susanne, was his godfather.13 Peter KIEFFER (1789-1849) was born and baptized on 29 December 1789.14

During this time, Susanna was still having children with Michel KOLBACH. Catherine was born and baptized on 29 Nov 1786 in Mamer15 and Petrus was born and baptized on 9 January 1789 in Mamer.16 His godmother was Barbara THIES of Kehlen. It was this record that added an entire branch to the KIEFFER family tree.

1789 Baptismal Record of Petrus COLBACH aka KOLBACH with Barbara THIES uxor Joannes KÜFER ex Kehlen. FamilySearch.

Elisabeth was the last of the three KIEFFER children to marry. She married Nicolas CHRISTOPHORY (1743-1803) on 11 May 1789 in Mamer.17 Their first child Michael CHRISTOPHORY (1790-1856) was born on 2 October 1790 in Mamer. His godfather was his uncle by marriage, Michel KOLBACH.18

Anna Maria, the youngest child of Susanne KIEFFER and Michel KOLBACH, was born on 14 May 1791 and baptized the same day.19

Joannes KIEFFER, the only known son of Nicolaus KIEFFER and Susanna SCHILTZ to marry, died in Kehlen on 26 January 1793.20 Four months later their son-in-law Michel KOLBACH died on 30 May 1793 in Mamer leaving his wife Susanne KIEFFER with 5 small children.21 Less than a year later, Susanne married Paul FRANTZ (1763-1847) on 7 January 1794 in Mamer.22

1794 Marriage Record of Paulus FRANTZ and Susanne KÜFFER aka KIEFFER. MatriculaOnline.

On 18 April 1794 Elisabeth gave birth to her second son Jean CHRISTOPHORY and named her younger sister Maria KIEFFER his godmother.23 Maria was 21 years old at the time. Neither marriage nor a death record has been found for her. However, the baptismal record was a good clue that she was still living in 1794.

Susanne KIEFFER and her new husband Paulus FRANTZ became the parents of twin boys, Nicolas and Johann, on 21 November 1794. The maternal grandfather Nicolaus KÜFFER was chosen to be the godfather of Nicolas.24 The second twin Johann was my 3rd great-grandfather.

1794 Baptismal Record for twins Nicolas and Johann FRANTZ. MatriculaOnline.

A year and a half after the birth of the twins, their maternal grandfather Nicolaus KÜFFER died on 1 May 1796 and was buried the following day. He left a widow, Susanna SCHILTZ.25

The following year brought two births but also two deaths. Susanne and Paul’s son Henri was born on 10 January 1797.26 Less than two months later, Anna Maria KOLBACH, Susanne’s youngest daughter from her first marriage, died on 6 March 1797 at the age of 5.27 Three months later baby Henri died on 6 June 1797 at the age of 5 months.28 Two days later, Susanne’s sister Elisabeth gave birth to her third child, Mathias CHRISTOPHORY.29

Following the turn of the century, the first of the grandchildren married. Margaretha KOLBACH the oldest child of Susanne who would later take over the house Kéfesch married Leonard RÖELINGER on 18 November 1802 in Mamer.30

The last grandchild was born on 31 March 1803 in Mamer when Elisabeth gave birth to Catharina CHRISTOPHORY.31 The child would not grow up knowing her father as Nicolas CHRISTOPHORY died nine months later on 16 December 1803.32 His widow Elisabeth married again on 7 May 1806 to Theodore HELLESCH (1756-?).33

Susanna SCHILTZ, the widow of Nicolaus KÜFFER, died in Kéfesch house on 4 August 1807. Her death was reported by her son-in-law Paul FRANTZ. Her death record, as noted earlier in this post, included the names of her parents. A little over a year later, Paul was back at the city hall reporting the death of his wife Susanne KIEFFER who died on 9 October 1808.34

Two grandsons fought at Waterloo

Battle of Waterloo 1815
William Sadler, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

My 3rd great-grandfather Johann and his twin brother Nicolas FRANTZ joined the 6th Infantry Regiment in Phalsbourg, France on 5 November 1813 and served alongside each other in the regiment. They participated in campaigns of 1814 and 1815 in France and Belgium. Nicolas was wounded in the shoulder by a gunshot received on 10 February 1814 in Montmirail. Johann was wounded in the right arm by a saber cut received on 18 June 1815 at Waterloo.35 After the final fall of the Empire, the brothers returned to Luxembourg. They would marry and have children as did their four KOLBACH half-siblings.

Elisabeth, the last living child of the KÜFFER-SCHILTZ couple

Elisabeth KIEFFER was the only child of Nicolaus KÜFFER and Susanna SCHILTZ still living when her FRANTZ nephews returned from the Battle of Waterloo. Three of her four children married. Her second son, Jean became a Catholic priest serving the parish of Steinheim from 1830 to 184436 and the parish of Bous from 1844 to 1863.37 On 5 July 1872, he was granted honorary dismissal and retirement at his request and because of old age.38 He passed away on 16 November 1873 in Reckange where his older brother Michael had married and raised his family.39

Catholic Church in Steinheim. © 2021, copyright Egon Meder.

Elisabeth was living in the parsonage in Steinheim with her son Jean when she died on 28 April 1838.40 She had been living there since at least 1830 when her oldest son Michael married. She was not present at the marriage in Hesperange but her permission was given by letter from a notary of Echternach.41

A decade after Elisabeth’s death her youngest child and only daughter Catharina went to America with her husband Theodore SAUBER and their seven children. They departed from Antwerp, Belgium on the John Holland and arrived in the port of New Orleans on 18 May 1848.42 They settled in Kenosha County, Wisconsin, where Catharina was last seen in the 1880 census.43

Who said family history has to be boring?

Nicolaus KÜFFER (1734-1796) and Susanna SCHILTZ (ca. 1737-1807) were the parents of eight children. Only three are known to have married and had children. Their grandchildren led interesting lives. Twin grandsons fought at the Battle of Waterloo, a grandson was a Catholic priest, a granddaughter emigrated to America, and their grandson Nicolas FRANTZ (1794-1879) was the great-grandfather of the legendary two-time Tour de France winner Nicolas FRANTZ (1899-1985).

What of the two children who were mentioned in records, Joannes and Maria? Did they marry and have families? Do they have stories left to be told?

© 2021, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.


  1. Wikipedia, “Kulturzentrum Kinneksbond,” rev. 19:59, 8 Januar 2021 (https://lb.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kulturzentrum_Kinneksbond : accessed 30 April 2021). Contributor’s source: “Op Nofro, Erklärunge vum Centre Culturel Mamer, op Basis vun engem Dokument vum Ralph Letsch.” 
  2. Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Mamer > Baptêmes 1718-1940, familles alphabétique > image 135 of 375. Family register entries for Küffer-Probst and Küffer-Schiltz. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32402-77-6?cc=2037955 : accessed 28 November 2015). 
  3. Ibid., Mamer > Baptêmes 1718-1940, familles alphabétique > image 83 of 375. Family register entry for Goergen-Probst. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WM-SS2?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-3TY%3A1500941501%2C1500941502 : accessed 28 November 2015). 
  4. Diözesanarchiv Luxemburg / Archives diocésaines Luxembourg (images), Matricula Online, http://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/, Creative Commons License CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 (citing original records in the Luxembourg Diocesan Archives, Luxembourg City), Mamer, KB-18 neuer Einband, Paginierung übernommen, Taufen, Heiraten, Sterbefälle [1779-1793] S. 1-349, image 78 of 172, page 159, 7th entry. 1786 Death Record. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/mamer/KB-18/?pg=78 : accessed 26 April 2021). 
  5. Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1662-1941 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Mamer > Mariages 1838-1890 Décès 1796-1880 > image 585 of 1497. 1807 Death Record No. 17 (age 70). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6XPQ-65D?cc=1709358&wc=9RY3-VZ9%3A130065401%2C130130201 : accessed 20 December 2017). 
  6. Cadastre de Marie-Thérèse (1752-1772), Dénombrements des feux, aides et subsides 1473-1806, FamilySearch, Film 2271574 DGS 8014693, Regime A, section 14: cadastre de Marie-Thérèse 1767, liasse 77 (Mamer), image 506+507 of 657, sheet no. 136. 1767 cadastre sheet of Nicolas Kuffers in Mamer.(https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSXW-1WK7-P?i=506&cat=1152016 : accessed 26 April 2021). 
  7. Luxembourg registres paroissiaux 1601-1948, Mamer > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 46 of 168. 1783 Marriage Record (top of left page). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32401-17711-69?cc=2037955 : accessed 29 November 2015). 
  8. Ibid., Mamer > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 51 of 168. 1784 Baptismal Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32401-18408-0?cc=2037955 : accessed 29 November 2015). 
  9. Ibid., Schoenberg > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1754-1759, 1778-1793 > image 175 of 329, page 429. 1785 Marriage Record. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9WS-9V3C?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-K6J%3A1501137301%2C1501248302 : accessed 1 May 2021). 
  10. Ibid., Mamer > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 62 of 168. 1785 Baptismal Record (top of left page). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32401-18173-83?cc=2037955 : accessed 29 November 2015). 
  11. Diözesanarchiv Luxemburg, Mamer, KB-18 neuer Einband, Paginierung übernommen, Taufen, Heiraten, Sterbefälle [1779-1793] S. 1-349, image 78 of 172, page 159, 7th entry. 1786 Death Record. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/mamer/KB-18/?pg=78 : accessed 26 April 2021). 
  12. Ibid., GV.MF 172-285, Kehlen, KB-06, Taufen 1760-1796, image 91 of 167, page 179, entry no. 38. “.” 1786 Baptismal Record No. 38. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/kehlen/KB-06/?pg=91 : accessed 1 May 2021). 
  13. Ibid., GV.MF 172-285, Kehlen, KB-06, Taufen 1760-1796, image 103 of 167, page 202, entry no. 28. 1788 Baptismal Record. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/kehlen/KB-06/?pg=103 : accessed 2 May 2021). 
  14. Ibid., GV.MF 172-285, Kehlen, KB-06, Taufen 1760-1796, image 113 of 167, page 220, entry no. 43. 1789 Baptismal Record. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/kehlen/KB-06/?pg=113 : accessed 2 May 2021). 
  15. Luxembourg registres paroissiaux 1601-1948, Mamer > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 73 of 168. 1786 Baptismal Record (top of left page). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32401-17555-71?cc=2037955 : accessed 29 November 2015). 
  16. Ibid., Mamer > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 100 of 168. 1789 Baptismal Record (top of right page). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32402-806-79?cc=2037955 : accessed 29 November 2015). 
  17. Diözesanarchiv Luxemburg, Mamer, KB 18: neuer Einband, Paginierung übernommen, Taufen, Heiraten, Sterbefälle [1779-1793], image 108 of 172, page 217, entry at top of page. 1789 Marriage Record. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/mamer/KB-18/?pg=108 : accessed 1 May 2021). 
  18. Ibid., GV.MF 356-443, Mamer, KB-01, image 6 of 128. 1790 Baptismal Record. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/mamer/KB-01/?pg=6 : accessed 26 April 2021). 
  19. Luxembourg registres paroissiaux 1601-1948, Mamer > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 122 of 168. 1791 Baptismal Record (top of left page). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32402-540-56?cc=2037955 : accessed 29 November 2015). 
  20. Diözesanarchiv Luxemburg, GV.MF 172-285, Kehlen, KB-06, Taufen 1760-1796, image 100 of 167, page 197. “.” 1793 Death Record (right page, 1st entry). (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/kehlen/KB-07/?pg=100 : accessed 1 May 2021). 
  21. Luxembourg registres paroissiaux 1601-1948, Mamer > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 167 of 168. 1793 Death and Burial Record (right page, 7th entry). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32402-335-60?cc=2037955 : accessed 29 November 2015). 
  22. Diözesanarchiv Luxemburg, GV.MF 356-443, Mamer, KB-01, image 79 of 128, page 150 (stamped), first entry. 1794 Marriage Record. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/mamer/KB-01/?pg=79 : accessed 28 April 2021). 
  23. Ibid., GV.MF 356-443, Mamer, KB-01, image 25 of 128. 1794 Baptismal Record. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/mamer/KB-01/?pg=25 : accessed 26 April 2021). 
  24. Ibid., GV.MF 356-443, Mamer, KB-01, image 29 of 128, page 52, bottom. 1794 Baptismal Record for twins Nicolas and Johann Frantz. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/mamer/KB-01/?pg=29 : accessed 28 April 2021). 
  25. Ibid., Mamer, KB-01, image 118 of 128, page 227 (stamped). 1796 Death Record. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/mamer/KB-01/?pg=118 : accessed 25 April 2021). 
  26. Ibid., GV.MF 356-443, Mamer, KB-01, image 40 of 128, page 52, bottom. 1797 Baptismal Record. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/mamer/KB-01/?pg=40 : accessed 28 April 2021). 
  27. Luxembourg registres paroissiaux 1601-1948, Mamer > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1790-1804 > image 28 of 30. 1797 Death Entry (index). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99WM-SDQ?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-C6V%3A1500941501%2C1501074474 : accessed 23 December 2017). 
  28. Luxembourg Registres d’état civil 1662-1941, Mamer > Mariages 1838-1890 Décès 1796-1880 > image 521 of 1497. 1797 Death Record (18 Prairial V) (right page). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12143-121172-9?cc=1709358 : accessed 26 March 2010). 
  29. Diözesanarchiv Luxemburg, GV.MF 356-443, Mamer, KB-01, image 42 of 128. 1797 Baptismal Record. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/mamer/KB-01/?pg=42 : accessed 26 April 2021). 
  30.   Luxembourg Registres d’état civil 1662-1941, Mamer > Naissances 1834-1890 Mariages 1796-1837 > image 1185 of 1504. 1802 Marriage Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12585-49719-87?cc=1709358 : accessed 29 November 2015). 
  31. Diözesanarchiv Luxemburg, GV.MF 356-443, Mamer, KB-01, image 62 of 128. 1803 Baptismal Record. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/mamer/KB-01/?pg=62 : accessed 26 April 2021). 
  32. Ibid., GV.MF 356-443, Mamer, KB-01, image 127 of 128, page 244 (stamped), 4th entry. 1803 Death Record. (https://data.matricula-online.eu/de/LU/luxemburg/mamer/KB-01/?pg=127 : accessed 26 April 2021). 
  33. Luxembourg Registres d’état civil 1662-1941, Mamer > Naissances 1834-1890 Mariages 1796-1837 > image 1195+1196 of 1504. 1806 Marriage Record (part 1). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-61F9-RCL?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-FM9%3A130065401%2C130365601 : accessed ‎21. ‎August ‎2011) and 1806 Marriage Record (part 2). (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-61F9-G1N?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-FM9%3A130065401%2C130365601 : accessed ‎21. ‎August ‎2011). 
  34. Ibid., Mamer > Mariages 1838-1890 Décès 1796-1880 > image 595 of 1497. 1808 Death Record No. 21. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12143-119238-21?cc=1709358 : accessed 23 March 2010). 
  35. Charles Schaack, Les Luxembourgeois soldats de la France 1792-1815. Tome I, (Luxembourg 1909), page 130. 
  36. Diözesanarchiv Luxemburg, GV.MF 444-525, Steinheim, KB-02, Jean Christophory was the priest entering events from 1844 to 1863. 
  37. Ibid., GV.MF 628 – 719, Bous, KB-08, Firmungen – Heiraten – Kommunion – Sterbefälle – Taufen – 1834 – 1865, Jean Christophory was the priest entering events from 1844 to 1863. 
  38. “II. Entlassungen.” Kirchlicher Anzeiger für die Diözese Luxemburg, 2. Jg., nº 12 (01.10.1872), p. 64. [Digitised by the National Library of Luxembourg, https://persist.lu/ark:70795/3xvqsv2v2/pages/4/articles/DTL50 : accessed 1 May 2021) 
  39. Luxembourg Registres d’état civil 1662-1941, Reckange-lès-Mersch-sur-Mess > Naissances 1867-1890 Mariages 1796-1890 Décès 1796-1883 > image 1422 of 1497. 1873 Death Record No. 20. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HT-6FW9-WZ1?cc=1709358&wc=9RY3-PTL%3A130234801%2C130234802 : accessed 1 May 2021). 
  40. Ibid., Rosport > Naissances 1889-1890 Mariages 1797-1890 Décès 1797-1853 > image 1224 of 1410. 1838 Death Record No. 23. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DY3D-SB?cc=1709358&wc=9RY4-3TL%3A130314401%2C130555301 : accessed 25 April 2021). 
  41. Ibid., Hesperange > Naissances 1869-1890 Mariages 1797-1823, 1796-1868 > image 1122 of 1492. 1830 Marriage Record No. 2. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:S3HY-DKRX-B8?cc=1709358&wc=9RYW-7M9%3A129747201%2C130056301 : accessed 2 May 2021). 
  42. “New Orleans, Passenger List Quarterly Abstracts, 1820-1875” Ancestry.com, citing Quarterly Abstracts of Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New Orleans, Louisiana, 1820–1875. M272, 17 rolls. Records of the U.S. Customs Service, Record Group 36. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C. 
  43. 1880 U.S. Federal Census, (index and images), Ancestry, citing Tenth Census of the United States, 1880 population schedule, National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C., NARA microfilm publication T9, 1,454 rolls, Roll: 1431, Wisconsin, Kenosha, Kenosha, Enumeration District 76, page 23A, HH#6-6, lines 19-27, Paul Sauber household. The official enumeration day of the 1880 census was 1 June 1880. (https://www.ancestry.com/imageviewer/collections/6742/images/4244754-00239 : accessed 26 April 2021).