James Sims (1754-1845), Gunsmith of Nicholas County

Happy 4th of July!

Although my 5th great-grandfather James SIMS’ service during the Revolutionary War was not accepted as proof for a pension, the DAR (Daughters of the American Revolution) accepted his “providing supplies” and approved him as a Revolutionary War patriot.

Early in 2002 I wrote the biography of James SIMS (1754-1845) with the help of several cousins. On 25 March 2013 I posted an updated version of the biography on my blog. In May Mark Smith of Hampshire County Long Rifles requested permission to run the biography on his blog.

I was thrilled at the request to share my work. But I had a different idea. I suggested my writing, as a guest blogger, a shorter piece on James Sims and his sons discussing gun-making with a link back to my blog with the full biography.

Sims Rifle from Rose Mary Sims RudyThis was a great opportunity to focus on an aspect of my ancestor’s life that I did not know very much about. Please take a moment to read James Sims (1754-1845), Gunsmith of Nicholas County and visit Mark’s blog.

Many thanks to Mark Smith for letting me be a guest blogger and to Jeff Prechtel, a wonderful artist, for the drawings used to illustrate my post.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

 

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Slave Name Roll Project: RELEASING Willobey and Plimoth

Following my three part series on the slaves of my 5th grand-father James Sims I made a commitment to write a post on a monthly basis until I’ve RELEASED all of the names of slaves owned by my ancestors. Today I’m RELEASING Willobey and Plimoth.

I’m sorry to say I cannot give credit to the person who found the document I am using to release Willobey and Plimoth. While cleaning out my files I found three images of pages from Essex County. At the time I saved them I did not make a note of the source of the document. I believe it may have been attached to a tree on ancestry.com. I found it referenced as: Essex County Deeds and Wills 1711-1714 p. 79. I am sharing this transcript I made from the image as no transcription of the will was found online.

James LANDRUM may have been my 7th great-grandfather. His connection to my 5th great-grandfather of the same name, James LANDRUM, has not been researched or proven by me. Landrum Brick Wall

James LANDRUM born abt. 1671 in Turriff, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, married in Essex  (Old Rappahannoch) County, Virginia, on 10 August 1696 Mary BROWNE, daughter of William and Elizabeth BROWNE. He died after 11 April 1738 when he wrote his will and before 18 December 1739 when his will was presented to court by his widow and the executors mentioned.

In the name of God Amen I James Landrum of
the County of Essex and parish of St. Anne being perfect sound sence and
memory do ordain Constitute and appoint this my last will and Testa=
ment first I bequeave my soul to God who gave it me and my Body to this
Earth to be decently Buryed by my Excutors Impes I give and Bequeave
to my son Saml Landrum that tract of Land Whereon he now lives with
all Impurtenances there unto belonging to him and his Heirs forever
Item I give my son James Landrum that tract of Land where on he now
lives with all appurtenances there unto belonging to him and his heirs
forever Item I Lend this tract of land whereon I now live to Mary my
Loving wife During her Natural life with all my other Estate goods and
Chattles that I now am possest with and after her deceas I give this said Land
to my son Patrick Landrum with all Impurtenances there unto belonging
with my Negrow Man Willobey to him and his Heirs forever Item I give
and bequeave to my Daughter Darcos Landrum my negrow boy Plimoth to
her and her heirs Lawfuly Begotten of her body for ever Item I give Charles
Dhisson Sen. twelve Acres of Land out of James and Saml Landrum tracts
of land to him and his heirs foever Item all the rest of my Estate give to Mary
my Loving wife to Dispose of as She thinks proper Item I also appoint
William Clark and Henry Beazley or Either of them my whole and Sole Ex=
ecutors of this my Last will and Testament In Witness here of I have hereunto
set my hand and fixt my Seal this 11th day of April in the year of our Lord
God one Thousand Seven hundred thirty and Eight
Signed Sealed and published
in presents of us                                             his
William Clark                                     James X Landrum
            his                                                       mark
Henry X Beazley
         mark

Essex County, Virginia [added to the bottom of the image]. The next two images had page numbers 220 and 221 at top which could mean the above was page 219.

Note: Seen as X above, the mark left by Henry Beazley was an H and by James Landrum was an E rotated once clockwise.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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52 Ancestors: #26 Halfway: The MEDER-WILMES Family of Diekirch

Week 26 (June 25-July 1) – Halfway: This week marks the halfway point in the year — and the 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge! What ancestor do you have that you feel like you’ve only researched halfway? What ancestor do you feel like takes up half of your research efforts?

Halfway finished with 2015 and this year’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge. What better time to switch gears and begin on a new generation. The 3rd great-grandparents will take me through to the end of the year. Sixteen paternal and maternal sets for my husband and 8 maternal sets for myself.  My paternal sets were discussed during the first year of the challenge in 2014.

This generation of ancestors will be take me into a time period which has only been researched halfway. Civil record keeping in Luxembourg began ca. 1796 while the country was under Napoleonic rule (1795- 1812). During the first half of this year I featured many state-gathered records (births, marriages, deaths). The church records (baptisms, marriages, burials) for Luxembourg went online at Family Search at the beginning of this year. At the time I made a resolution to focus on the planned families each week and not check for church records for earlier generations and families until it was time to write about them.

I admit it was hard to keep this resolution, knowing the database was there for the pickings. I went in a few times to check on this or that ancestor and I told myself it was only a practice run. The family I’m doing this week gave me the first opportunity to really dig in and work with the church records. I was only halfway done when I began cleaning up source citations, etc. and adding records for this family.

The MEDER-WILMES Family of Diekirch

Jean Nicolas (Johann Nicolaus) MEDER and Apolonia (Apolline) WILMES were my husband’s 3rd great-grandparents. Due to the nature of the civil and church records in Luxembourg their names were spelled differently over time. It is hard to choose the correct spelling as records were in German, French and Latin. The different spellings, however, did not make it difficult to find the records as I have become familiar with  FamilySearch’s browse-only databases.

1766 Baptism of Johann Nicolaus MEDER

1766baptism

Baptismal record of Johann Nicolaus MEDER [1]

Johann Nicolaus MEDER was born and baptized on 26 October 1766 in Ettelbrück. His parents were Joannis MEDER and Susanna LAMBER. His godparents were Johann Nicolaus BEQUINET and Barbara WAGENER.[1] In later records the father’s name was seen as Johannes and Jean and the mother’s maiden name was spelled LAMBERT.

1769 Baptism of Apolonia WILMES

1769baptism

Baptismal record of Apolonia WILMES [2]

Apolonia WILMES was baptiszed on 27 February 1769 in Diekirch. Her parents were Gangolphe WILMES and Anna Marguerite SCHODEN. Her godparents were Nicolas THEYS and Apolonia SCHOLTES, both of Diekirch.[2]

1794 Marriage of Jean Nicolas MEDER and Apolonia WILMES

1794marriage

Marriage record of Jean Nicolas MEDER and Apolonia WILMES [3]

Normally I don’t have much trouble reading the old handwriting in these documents however this marriage record for Jean Nicolas MEDER and Apolonia WILMES was an exception.[3] I knew the date of marriage as it was found in the Family Book of Diekirch compiled by Rob Deltgen, Komplettes Familienbuch der Gemeinde 1796-1923. The names of the bride and groom were underlined which helped me find the record. I can make out the names of the bride and groom’s parents and witnesses however a complete transcription would take more time.

Births, Baptisms, Marriages, Deaths, Burials of Children

1794birth

Baptismal record of Elizabeth MOEDERS, sic MEDER [4]

1795death

Burial record of Elizabeth MEDER [5]

Jean Nicolas and Apolinia’s first child was a daughter Elizabeth born and baptized on 16 November 1794 in Diekirch.[4] Her godparents were her grandfather “Gangolphus” WILMES and her aunt Elisabeth MEDER, wife of Jacques BROCHMAN, all of Diekirch. The record has the surname spelled MOEDERS instead of MEDER. Little Elizabeth lived only two months, dying at midnight from the 27th to the 28th of January 1795. She was buried on the 29th.[5]

1795birth

Baptismal record of Christina MEDER [6]

1795birth2

Baptismal record (continued) of Christina MEDER [6]

The second daughter of Jean Nicolas and Apolonia was born on 3 December 1795 at 7 in the evening and was baptized the next day. Christina MEDER’s godparents were Pierre GOSSENS and Christine MOCHY, both of Diekirch.[6]

1798birth

Birth record of Antonius (Anton) MOEDER [7]

The first son of Jean Nicolas and Apolonia was born on 30 Pluviose year VI.[7] Antonius MOEDER, as the name was written, was born during the Napoleonic rule when the Republican calendar was in effect. The date was 18 February 1798. No baptismal record was found however his name is on a list of baptisms performed in 1798. The church did not use the Republican calendar and his date of baptism was seen as 17 February 1798.[8] Was this an error on the list of baptisms or on the part of the civil servant using the Republican calendar? In any case he could not have been baptized the day before he was born.

1799death

Death record of Christina MEDER [9]

Three year old Christina MEDER died on 7 March 1799. Her death record filled an entire page of the register.[9]

1800civilbirth

Birth record of Mathias MOEDER [10]

1800birth

Baptismal record of Mathias MEDER [11]

Mathias MEDER, the second son and fourth child of Jean Nicolas and Apolonia was born and baptized on 30 December 1800. In the civil record his surname was spelled MOEDER[10] while in his baptismal record it was spelled MEDER.[11]

1804baptism

Baptismal record of Elisabeth MEDERT [12]

Elisabeth MEDER was born on 10 Pluviose year 10 to Jean Nicolas and Apolonia. Her baptismal record shows she was baptized the same day and gives both dates: 30 January 1804 and 10 Pluviose year 10. Her godparents were Mathias WILMES and Elizabeth WILMES, both of Diekirch.[12]

1807baptism

Baptismal record of Theodore MEDERT[13]

The third son of Jean Nicolas and Apolonia was born and baptized on 14 July 1807 in Diekirch.[13] Theodore MEDER’s godparents were Theodore RITSCHDORFF and Eva KNEIP, both of Diekirch.

1810birth

Birth Record of Anne Marie MEDER [14]

Jean Nicolas and Apolonia’s youngest child Anne Marie was born 12 September 1810.[14] No baptismal record was found for Anne Marie MEDER. Baptismal records for 1810 were not available at FamilySearch as of 23 June 2015.

1821marriagepublication

Marriage publication for Antoine MEDER and Maria Catharina WAGENER [15]

At the end of 1821 the first of Nicolas and Apolonia’s children made plans to marry. The marriage of Antoine MEDER married Maria Catharina WAGENER was “published” on the 23rd and 30th day of December 1821.[15] The civil marriage took place on 8 January 1822 in Diekirch.[16]

1824mathiasdeath

Death record of Mathias MEDER [17]

The year 1824 was not a happy year for the MEDER-WILMES family. Son Mathias MEDER died at the age of 23 years on 29 July 1824 in Diekirch.[17]

1824apoloniadeath

Death record of Apollonia WILLMES [18]

Four months later Apolonia WILMES died at the age of 55 years on 26 November 1824. Her death record however gives her age as 62.[18] At the time of her death she left a husband, two sons, two daughters, and two grandchildren.

1833marriagepublication

Marriage publication for Theodore MEDER and Susanna REIFFER [19]

On the 20th and the 27th of December 1832 the marriage of Theodore MEDER and Susanna REIFFER was published – read out loud and posted on the door of the city hall.[19] They married a month later on 31 January 1833 in Diekirch.[20]

1838marriage

Marriage record of Elisabeth MEDER and Mathias BOCK [21]

Nicolas and Apolonia’s oldest living daughter Elisabeth married 24 January 1838 to Mathias BOCK.[21] Elisabeth had been an unmarried mother since 22 June 1829 when her son Mathias MEDER was born.[22] Mathias BOCK had the permission of his reserve regimental commander to marry. The publication of the marriage was noted on the marriage record and not on a separate document as seen when Antoine and Theodore married.

1843census

1843 Census [23]

In December 1843 Jean Nicolas MEDER was seen on the Luxembourg census in the household of his married son Theodore. This census sheet included dates of births of the persons in the household. Jean Nicolas’ birthdate was incorrectly listed as 1 April 1763.[23]

1844marriage

Marriage record of Anne Marie MEDER and Heinrich KNOPS [24]

On 28 August 1844 the youngest child of this family married. Anne Marie MEDER married the widowed Heinrich KNOPS who was 21 years older.[24]

1844death

Death record of Jean Nicolas MEDER [25]

When Jean Nicolas MEDER died on 22 Dec 1844 he had seen all four of his children marry. His son Theodore was the informant on his death record. Nicolas’ age on the death record was 75 although he was actually 78 as calculated from his birth record.[25]

1861death

Death record of Elisabeth MEDER [26]

Elisabeth MEDER died on 7 December 1861 in Diekirch.[26] She was survived by her husband Mathias BOCK, son Mathias MEDER and possible a daughter Anne Marie BOCK (last seen with her parents in 1858 on census, no marriage record or further trace of her found).

1866death

Death record of Anton MEDER [27]

On 6 Sep 1866 the oldest child of this family, Anton MEDER, died in Diekirch.[27] He was survived by his wife, two sons, two (?) daughters, and four grandchildren. The daughters were last seen 10 years prior to his death and no further information on them has been found.

1890death

Death record of Anne-Marie MEDER [28]

The youngest child of this family, Anne Marie MEDER died on 15 April 1890 in Diekirch.[28] She remained childless and had been widowed for 30 years.

1898death

Death record of Theodore MEDER [29]

Theodore MEDER, the last of living child of Jean Nicolas MEDER and Apolonia WILMES, died on 29 July 1898 in Diekirch at the age of 91 years.[29] Theodore had been widowed for 20 years and left 5 known children. Two daughters have not been traced further and may have also still been living.

As can be seen by the records above and the sources cited below, nearly half of the records used came from the Luxembourg Church Records, 1601-1948 which have only been online since the beginning of the year. I can honestly say this family was only researched halfway before I got everything ready for this blogpost.

Sources:
[1] Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Ettelbruck > Baptêmes 1748-1792 > image 59 of 147. Jean Nicolas Meder baptismal record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32462-751-39?cc=2037955&wc=STH8-ZJ4:1500939401,1501045912 : accessed 23 March 2015).
[2] Ibid., Diekirch > Baptêmes 1743-1790, confirmations 1768-1789 > image 149 of 373. 1769 Baptismal record, entry 4 left page. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32421-7593-86?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-ZNL:1500890501,1500918030 : accessed 22 June 2015).
[3] ibid., Diekirch > Mariages 1743-1794 > image 116 of 122. 1794 Marriage Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32400-5311-96?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-B87:1500890501,1500891002 : accessed 28 June 2015).
[4] Ibid., Diekirch > Baptêmes 1791-1795, mariages 1794-1798, 1800-1803, sépultures 1794-1795 > image 59 of 243. 1794 Baptismal record No. 84. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32467-5084-87?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-2JW:1500890501,1501017982 : accessed 23 June 2015).
[5] Ibid., Diekirch > Baptêmes 1791-1795, mariages 1794-1798, 1800-1803, sépultures 1794-1795 > image 103 of 243. 1795 Death Record, left page 5th entry. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32467-4892-39?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-2JW:1500890501,1501017982 : accessed 23 June 2015).
[6] Ibid., Diekirch > Baptêmes 1791-1795, mariages 1794-1798, 1800-1803, sépultures 1794-1795 > image 95 of 243. 1795 Baptismal Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32467-5031-88?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-2JW:1500890501,1501017982 : accessed 23 June 2015).
[7] Ibid., Diekirch > Naissances 1796-1802 > image 82 of 311. 1798 Birth Record No. 36 (30 Pluviose an VI).  (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32401-14704-80?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-MNP:1500890501,1500941302 : accessed 23 June 2015),.
[8] Ibid., Diekirch > Baptêmes 1797-1805, mariages, décès 1797-1807 > image 10 of 133. 1798 Baptismal Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32401-10780-42?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-1XS:1500890501,1500998368 : accessed 23 June 2015).
[9] Ibid., Diekirch > Décès 1796-1803 > image 71 of 203. 1799 Death Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32401-15764-70?cc=2037955&wc=STH6-4WY:1500890501,1500953084 : accessed 23 June 2015).
[10] Ibid., Diekirch > Naissances 1796-1802 > image 261 of 311. 1800 Birth Record No. 30 (9 Nivose IX). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32401-16888-72?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-MNP:1500890501,1500941302 : accessed 23 April 2010).
[11] Ibid., Diekirch > Baptêmes 1797-1805, mariages, décès 1797-1807 > image 19 of 133. 1800 Baptismal Record, right page last entry. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32401-10802-46?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-1XS:1500890501,1500998368 : accessed 23 June 2015).
[12] Ibid., Diekirch > Baptêmes 1797-1805, mariages, décès 1797-1807 > image 34 of 133. 1804 Baptismal Record, left page 6th entry. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32401-10492-39?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-1XS:1500890501,1500998368 : accessed 23 June 2015).
[13] Ibid., Diekirch > Baptêmes 1805-1807 > image 25 of 29. 1807 Baptismal Record, right page, 3rd entry.(https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32401-10382-45?cc=2037955&wc=STHC-16Y:1500890501,1501023134 : accessed 23 June 2015).
[14] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1793-1923 (images), <i>FamilySearch</i> (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Diekirch > Tables décennales 1803-1892 Naissances, mariages, décès 1797-1800 Naissances 1800-1823 > image 1036 of 1493. 1810 Birth Record No. 102. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11030-124370-89?cc=1709358&wc=9RYM-W38:129628901,130575701 : accessed 24 April 2010).
[15] Ibid., Diekirch > Naissances 1879-1890 Mariages 1796-1842 > image 1064 of 1492. 1821 Marriage Publication (lower left). (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11618-98975-97?cc=1709358&wc=9RY4-W38:129628901,130301801 : accessed 21 April 2010).
[16] Ibid., Diekirch > Naissances 1879-1890 Mariages 1796-1842 > image 1093 of 1492. 1822 Marriage Record No. 2. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11618-97291-62?cc=1709358&wc=9RY4-W38:129628901,130301801 : accessed 21 April 2010).
[17] Ibid., Diekirch > Mariages 1843-1890 Décès 1797-1824 > image 1483 of 1493. 1824 Death Record No. 16. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12052-48739-34?cc=1709358&wc=9RYC-929:129628901,129848701 : accessed 29 April 2010).
[18] Ibid., Diekirch > Mariages 1843-1890 Décès 1797-1824 > image 1487 of 1493. 1824 Death Record No. 32. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12052-49769-12?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2ND:n1913802954 : accessed 04 Apr 2013).
[19] Ibid., Diekirch > Naissances 1879-1890 Mariages 1796-1842 > image 1300 of 1492. 1832 Marriage Publication, upper left. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11618-104226-22?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2N2:1627336735 : accessed 01 Apr 2013).
[20] Ibid., Diekirch > Naissances 1879-1890 Mariages 1796-1842 > image 1312 of 1492. 1833 Marriage Record No. 9. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11618-99298-93?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2N2:1627336735 : accessed 01 Apr 2013).
[21] Ibid., Diekirch > Naissances 1879-1890 Mariages 1796-1842 > image 1400 of 1492. 1838 Marriage Record No. 5. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11618-102794-77?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2N2:1627336735 : accessed 21 April 2010).
[22] Ibid., Diekirch > Naissances 1823 > image 152 of 1507. 1829 Birth Record No. 32. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-11681-26885-70?cc=1709358&wc=9RY4-BZ9:129628901,130131601 : accessed 17 April 2010).
[23] Luxembourg, Volkszählungen 1843-1900 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Diekirch > 1843 > image 332 of 444. Meder-Reiffer household (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32349-22719-47?cc=2037957&wc=M5LR-MJ4:345999901,345863501 : accessed 25 January 2015).
[24] Luxembourg Civil Records, Diekirch > Mariages 1843-1890 Décès 1797-1824 > image 34 of 1493. 1844 Marriage Record No. 7. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12052-49245-53?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2ND:n1913802954 : accessed 17 Feb 2013).
[25] Ibid., Diekirch > Décès 1825-1890 > image 335 of 1358. 1844 Death Record No. 56. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12147-167581-60?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2NH:n538876208 : accessed 17 Feb 2013).
[26] Ibid., Diekirch > Décès 1825-1890 > image 640 of 1358. 1861 Death Record No. 64. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12147-160895-71?cc=1709358&wc=9RYC-2NL:129628901,129628902 : accessed 23 May 2011).
[27] Ibid., Diekirch > Décès 1825-1890 > image 820 of 1358. 1866 Death Record No. 303. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12147-169081-69?cc=1709358&wc=9RYC-2NL:129628901,129628902 : accessed 22 May 2011).
[28] Ibid., Diekirch > Décès 1825-1890 > image 1342 of 1358. 1890 Death Record No. 30. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12147-163369-82?cc=1709358&wc=9RYC-2NL:129628901,129628902 : accessed 23 May 2011).
[29] Ibid., Diekirch > Mariages 1895-1923 Décès 1895-1902 > image 550 of 661. 1898 Death Record No. 53. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32038-1425-70?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2NF:21518491 : accessed 17 Feb 2013).

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Jean Nicolas MEDER
Parents: Johannes “Jean” MEDER and Susanna LAMBERT
Spouse: Apolonia “Apolline” WILMES
Parents of spouse: Gangolf “Gangolphe” WILMES and Anne Marguerite SCHODEN
Whereabouts: Diekirch, Grand Duché of Luxembourg
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 3rd great-grandfather of husband

  1. Jean Nicolas MEDER
  2. Theodore MEDER
  3. Franz “François” MEDER
  4. Johann Peter “Jean-Pierre” MEDER
  5. Marcel Mathias MEDER
  6. Cathy Meder-Dempsey’s husband Living MEDER

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.

Posted in 52Ancestors 2015, Luxembourg, Luxracines | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #17 John Quincy ROYALTY 1866-1918

This is a spin-off of my 52 Ancestors: #14 Albert Spencer LILLIE (1848-1913) ~ Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can blogpost in which I featured a few photos from a collection of old photographs my 4C1R Joe Rooney shared with me. I asked Joe about using the photos and he kindly wrote, Please use them at your will.  I feel it is keeping it in the family and don’t need credit.  If anything, I appreciate your evaluations, identifications and detective work.  I’m hopeful you and yours enjoy them.  On a blog, in a book, above a cloud.”

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls@pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

Links to previous posts in this series may be found in Old Photographs

#17 John Quincy ROYALTY 1866-1918

John Quincy ROYALTY was the third son of Samuel L. ROYALTY and Joanna PALMER. He never married.

john

A young John Quincy ROYALTY during his days as a schoolmaster in Kansas.

During his earlier years John was a schoolmaster in Kansas and Missouri. Later he became a detective and, according to his obituray, was a trusted employee of a leading firm doing this sort of work. His duties took him to various places in the West and he resided at times in Colorado, New Mexico and California.

In 1898 while in Albuquerque, New Mexico, he enlisted in Company E, First Territorial U.S. Volunteer Infantry, and served during the Spanish War until mustered out at Albany, Georgia, in 1899.[1] Officially designated as the First Territorial Volunteer Infantry, the regiment became known as the “Western Regiment;” the “Big Four” from the four territories: Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Indian Territory; or “McCord’s Infantry.”

johnstanding

John Quincy ROYALTY in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

After a visit to his old home in Pope County, Illinois, he returned to the West. In 1900 he was once again in Albuquerque, living in the household of his brother-in-law John R. BOSWELL and his youngest sister Olive ROYALTY, and working as a watchman for the railroad.

By 1903 he became a resident of Los Angeles, California. He was working as a watchman on patrol per the 1910 census.

“While employed as private watchman during Nov. 1917, he suffered an attack of acute appendicitis, and in spire (sic) of heroic efforts of the surgeons during a prolonged illness, complications arose, and his weakened vitality at last succumbed to death.”[2]

lyinginstate

John Quincy ROYALTY, lying in state.

Sources:
[1] “United States Index to Service Records, War with Spain, 1898,” Database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QK7J-YKK8 : accessed 26 June 2015), John Q Royalty, 1898; citing NARA microfilm publication M871 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm .
[2] “Pedigree Resource File,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/2:2:3W51-L4J : accessed 2015-06-26), entry for John Quincy /Royaltey/, Submission ID MMDF-H5K.

Joe Rooney kindly gave me permission to use these photographs on my blog.

Joe ROONEY wrote on 15 February 2015: This collection of photographs was scanned at 300 dpi color by me. The original photos were sent by Sandra Lillie about ten years ago after she found them cleaning out a relative’s garage in Southern Illinois, finding no other takers (suckers). She believes they were a collection by L Vance Lillie. Many of the pictures seemed to be removed from frames or were in albums evidenced by fading characteristics and may have been from other’s collections. I scanned the reverse if there was laboratory advertising or writing. Some of the authors’ identification may be figured out of the handwriting matches. I did not scan the reverse of photos where there was only a three digit number that I believe to be sequence numbers on a roll of film. I didn’t spot any obvious helpful commonalities.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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A Visit to the Landeshauptarchiv in Koblenz

logo_klengLast Thursday I participated in another interesting visit organized by my genealogy society Luxracines. This time we went to Koblenz, Germany, and visited the Rhineland Archives (Landeshauptarchivs).

signOur group of 23 genealogists was divided into two groups for a guided tour of the premises. Currently the Landeshauptarchivs preserves 56 kilometers of documents. The tour began in an area normally not accessible to non-authorized persons.

Archives

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The new addition to the archives, at right, allows very little daylight to enter the area where the archives are kept.

co2

Entrance to the CO2 storeroom.

Our group was first shown the storeroom with the most precious books and documents. It is climate controlled and equipped with a CO2 extinguishing system. Old documents and books have several enemies. As light accelerates the aging of parchment, vellum, and paper, the building in which the archives reside has only very small windows. The storeroom is kept at a constant temperature as changing temperatures and humidity can also cause damage. The precious treasures in the storeroom are preserved in archival safe boxes or bindings. Anyone who has ever experienced flooding or fire knows water and books do not mix.  If a fire should break out, the storeroom is flooded with CO2 which, by displacing oxygen, smothers the fire.

To protect document surfaces from marks made by oily or sweaty hands our guide used thin cotton gloves while showing us several objects.

She removed a vellum document from the 12th century from its protective sleeve, unfolded it and allowed us to examine the seal hanging from it on a ribbon and make a guess about the purpose of the document and who may have had it drawn up. Usually seals are made of wax – this one was made of lead. It was a lead papal bull on a document drawn up by a pope.

She also showed us the Codex Balduini Trevirensis, a book made in 1341 telling of Henry VII’s expedition to Italy from 1310 to 1313 to obtain a papal imperial coronation. The Codex is best known for the illustrations once found in the front of the book and removed due to their historical importance. Blank pages were added in place of the illustrations which were on exhibition in the Landesarchiv in 2000.

Document Restoration and Bookbinding Department

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Dry sponges and soft brush

I found this part of the tour the most interesting. It began with the first steps in cleaning up paper material. Dry sponges are used like erasers to remove dirt and grime, a soft brush is used to remove dislodged materials before the object is placed in a dusting unit where air is circulated and dust is removed by a suction system.

repair

Damaged (upper) and restored (lower) documents

Once a document has been cleaned the damage caused over the years needs to be brought to a halt. In the background of the above photo is a document with ragged edges. In the foreground is document that has been filled in where areas where missing. On the damaged document at the top, what looks like dark smears (see arrow on right), are scraps of very lightweight Japanese papers.  They are made from long, strong, flexible fibers that produce a lasting repair. Japanese paper does not discolor or become brittle and is translucent making it suitable to repair text areas in documents.

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Miniature screen

The technique used to repair missing areas on paper documents is similar to paper making. The damaged paper is placed on a screen (miniature at left used for explanation) and lowered into a water bath of the leaf casting machine. Paper or fiber scraps of similar color to the item being repaired are mixed in a blender with water and pumped over the screen. The suction is turned on and the water level recedes and the holes are filled with pulp. The sheet is then slid off of the screen onto a draining area. Covered with a blotter sheet the paper is flipped and covered with another blotter sheet and dried under pressure in a paper press. Blotter sheets are replaced on a daily basis until the document is completely dry. To stiffen and protect the paper it is then treated with a glutenous paste which is applied with a wide short-bristled brush similar to those use when wallpapering.

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Draining area with sheets in process of restoration covered with blotter

Seals attached to documents with ribbons are also restored in this department. After cleaning, they fill the cracked areas with same colored wax, molding it to blend in but without reproducing the missing design. It sounds very simple but from the looks of the work space it is a slow process. Colors need to be matched and seals are hung to dry during each step before continuing the miniscule work.

book

Manual bookbinding equipment

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Sample of a bound book with wooden cover

A short demonstration on how books are bound was given. I had recently watched a video on the subject but seeing it in person is even more fascinating, especially for a book lover.

Reading Room

Our next stop was the reading room where patrons are allowed to view the material they are interested in. Everything you bring into the building has to be locked up in a locker near the reception area. Laptops are allowed in the reading room as well as pencil and paper for taking notes. Images of documents can be saved to a flash drive purchased in the reading room.

The documents in the archives are open to persons with a legitimate interest in, for example, academic research of the past or for genealogical and private research. However you cannot drop in and request to see records. If you plan to do research in Koblenz please check out the Rheinland Archives’ very informative website which is unfortunately only in German.  Any document collection you want to view needs to be requested per email at least two weeks in advance. 

Lunch and Afternoon Activities

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Historiensäule

Following our visit to the archives we took a short walk to the Josef-Görres Square (Josef-Görres Platz) which is noted for its 13 meter high history column, Historiensäule, that tells the history of Koblenz.

DSCN2402We had lunch at a restaurant on the square before once again dividing up into two groups. The largest group went on a sightseeing tour of the city fortifications. I joined the group of five who went back to the archives to do research.

We were taken to the back room of the reading room where the microfilm readers are located. All records requested were brought in on a cart and were soon spread out on the table. I had requested birth, marriage, and death records for the towns of Ernzen and Ferschweiler. For the period I was interested in there are no civil records and the church records are housed in Trier in the Catholic archives.

As I couldn’t do research I helped one of the others in my group. He had ordered marriage records from 1900 to 1910 for Welschbillig. It was fun to see his reaction when he found a record he was searching for. As he was not familiar with the handwriting I read the important facts from the documents: names, dates and places of birth, parents’ names and residences, date of marriage, while he inputted them into his computer. The more experienced researcher (in me) cringed at his entering the data without citing the source of each fact. He did note the number of the marriage document and I hope he takes time to add a full citation.

While I was busy helping my new friend, an archive employee reviewed the list of requested material and made a note of microfilm with ten-years lists of births, marriages, and deaths for Ernzen and Ferschweiler and other material that could be ordered in advance if and when I plan on going back.

Our time ran out too soon and we had to meet our bus for the return trip home. As always the trip was well organized and everyone enjoyed a wonderful day of sightseeing and/or research.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

 

Posted in Genealogy, Luxracines | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

52 Ancestors: #25 The Old Homestead: From Weaving Linen to Farming in Mamer

Week 25 (June 18-24) – The Old Homestead: Have you visited an ancestral home? Do you have photos of an old family house? Do you have homesteading ancestors?

Homesteading, Ancestral Home, and a Famous Cousin

None of my American ancestors took advantage of the Homestead Act. But homesteading is not restricted to settling on goverment land and farming it. Homesteading was and is a lifestyle of self-sufficiency. The farther back we go in our families trees the more independent our ancestors were. They provided for themselves through farming, hunting, home preservation of foodstuffs, and, in the case of my 2nd great-granfather Jean FRANTZ, a linenweaver, the production of textiles.

While we are on the subject of homesteading and ancestral homes, when I was a child we visited a FRANTZ family in Mamer, Luxembourg, to watch a bicycle race. I have no idea if the house was lived in by my FRANTZ ancestors, i.e. an ancestral home.

At the time I was also unaware of the significance and the connections between FRANTZ, the town of Mamer and cycling. Family tradition, once we genealogists get involved, is often debunked. However the story of my grandmother being a cousin of the famous Tour de France winner was proven true. My grandmother Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE (1909-2005) and Nicolas FRANTZ (1899-1985) were 3rd cousins – not quite as close as the story told.  Their common ancestors were Paulus FRANTZ (1763-1847) and his wife Susanne KEIFFER (1754-1808).

Nicolas FRANTZ took second place in the Tour de France in 1924 and 1926 and was the winner of the tour in 1927 and 1928. In 1928 Nicolas was the first, and to date only winner of the Tour de France, to wear the maillot jaune, the yellow jersey, during the entire 20 days of the race, from the first day, due to his being the previous year’s winner, to the last day.

Having a Tour de France winner as a cousin is amazing. Even more so is I actually enjoy the same sport he excelled in. This is quite a statement for a girl who did everything to get out of doing sports while growing up.

bike

Posing with my bicycle when I hit the 5,000 km mark last year. I was so pleased it happened at this particular spot – a reminder of my “other” hobby – genealogy.

Jean “Johann” FRANTZ and Marie “Maria” MAJERUS

My 2nd great-grandfather Jean FRANTZ was born in Mamer on 3 December 1837 to Jean FRANTZ (1794-1880) and his wife Elisabeth “Elise” FRISCH (1800-1880).[1] On 16 February 1870 he married Marie MAJERUS.[2] Marie was born in Mamer on 19 June 1850 to Jean MAJERUS (1817-1887) and his wife Marie TRAUSCH (1820-1875).[3]

The young couple lived with Marie’s parents in 1871[4] and with her widowed father in 1875.[5] Census records indicate Marie was the only child of the MAJERUS-TRAUSCH couple. By 1880 Jean FRANTZ and his wife had their own household. Marie’s widowed father lived with them in 1880[6], 1885[7], and 1887[8]. Jean and Marie continued to be enumerated as a family in Mamer in the census in 1890[9], 1895[10], and 1900[11]. From 1858 to 1900 Jean’s occupation was a linen weaver. They lived in the “Brücke bis Weweschgâss” area of Mamer. At the time mostly farm land, today this is a residential area.

When Jean and Marie’s children married the occupation of the parents was consistently listed as farmers, Ackerer or Ackerleute, on the marriage records for the period 1892 to 1916.

plowWhen Jean died on 24 February 1929 in his 92nd year his occupation was farmer or cultivateur in his obituary.[12] His wife Marie died two years later, on 13 September 1931 in her 82nd year.[13]

1931obit

Escher Tageblatt [13]

1929obit

Luxemburger Wort [12]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean was survived by his wife Mrs. Jean FRANTZ, née Marie MAJERUS; his children Mrs. Jos. FOURNELLE, née Cath. FRANTZ; Mrs. Paul GERSTEL, née Joséphine FRANTZ; Jean FRANTZ; Mrs. François VESQUE, née Pauline FRANTZ; Jean-Pierre FRANTZ; Mrs. Théophile HILBERT, née Marguerite FRANTZ; and Joseph FRANTZ. For Jean’s widow Marie the same children were listed. Missing in both obituaries is the oldest daughter Marie FRANTZ who predeceased her parents. Suzanne MIETTE and Guy HOSTERT, listed after the children of Jean and Marie, were Marie FRANTZ’s children.

The FRANTZ Children

1. Marie FRANTZ 1871-bef. 1929

Marie FRANTZ was born 11 January 1871 in Mamer.[14] She lived at home with her parents and siblings until about 1885 when she went to Metz, France, to work as a servant. In February 1887 she was still in Metz and by the next year she took a position in Reims, France, where she was working in 1890. By 1895 she was no longer mentioned in her parents’ household on the census suggesting she married between 1891-1895. Her marriage to Eugène Léon MIETTE was found in the 2e Arrondissement of Paris. They were married on 21 June 1892 and divorced on 16 July 1906.[15] They had a daughter Suzanne Léonide Jeanne Marie MIETTE born in 1895.[16] After her divorce Marie married Mr. (given names unknown) HOSTERT and had a son Guy HOSTERT who was photographed in Paris, France, at the time of his Communion in 1921. Marie died before 24 February 1929.

1921guy

Guy HOSTERT, son of Marie FRANTZ, 1921

2. Catharine FRANTZ 1872-1934

Catharine FRANTZ, my great-grandmother, was born on 17 November 1872.[17] She lived at home with her parents and siblings until about 1889 when she went to Arlon, Belgium, to work as a servant. Soon after December 1890 she began working in Reims, France, where she lived when the census was enumerated in December 1895. She was back home in Mamer on 9 July 1900 when she married Jean Joseph FOURNELLE, my great-grandfather.[18] She went with her newlywed husband to live in Echternach where she raised three children. She died 16 March 1834 in Echternach.[19]

fournelle6

The FOURNELLE-FRANTZ family (ca. 1906) before my grandmother was born. The children André (left) and Lucie (right) with (from left to right) Joseph FOURNELLE, his wife Catherine FRANTZ and her sister Pauline FRANTZ.

3. Catharina Joséphine “Joséphine” FRANTZ 1874-aft. 1945

Catharina Joséphine FRANTZ was born 25 September 1874.[20] She went by Joséphine. She lived at home with her parents and siblings until about 1893 when she went to work in Reims, France. She married Paul GERSTEL in 1900 and had two sons, Pierre and Jean. Her husband died before 24 February 1929. The family lived in Paris, France. Joséphine was living with her younger son Jean and his family on 1 January 1946.[21] It is not known when she died.

gerstel

From left to right: Jean GERSTEL, Pierre GERSTEL, and their mother Joséphine FRANTZ

4. Johann “Jean” FRANTZ 1876-1946

Johann FRANTZ was born 22 July 1876.[22] He lived at home with her parents and siblings until about 1894 when he went to work in Reims, France. In December 1900 he had been in Esch-sur-Alzette for three months. A half a dozen years later he married Pauline VESQUE on 27 August 1906 in Contern.[23] They had one daughter Daisy. Jean died 20 May 1946 in Dudelange. He was a retired postal worker decorated with the Order of the Oak Crown (l’Ordre Grand Ducal de la Couronne de Chêne).[24] His wife Pauline died on 29 November 1956 in Hastière-Lavaux, Belgium.[25]

Daisy

Daisy, daughter of Jean FRANTZ and Pauline VESQUE

5. Jean Pierre FRANTZ 1878-1879

Jean Pierre FRANTZ was born on 28 June 1878[26] and died 8 February 1879 at the home of his parents. He died at the age of 2/3 year per his death record.[27]

6. Paulina “Pauline” FRANTZ 1880-1966

Paulina FRANTZ was born on 29 June 1880.[28] In December 1880 when the census was enumerated she was listed as a son named Paul. She went by Pauline. She lived at home with her parents and siblings until about 1897 when she went to work in Reims, France. She may have lived with her sister Catharine and her family in Echternach around 1906 as she was included in a family portrait (seen above under #2). On 15 May 1910 Pauline married Johann Peter François “Franz” VESQUE.[29] Franz worked for the railroad, Chemins de Fer Luxembourgeois. Pauline and Franz had one daughter Maisy who served time in prison for killing a man and never married. The family lived in Oetrange in the commune of Contern. Franz died 11 Feb 1964 in Oetrange[30] and Pauline died 27 December 1966 in Luxembourg City.[31] Their daughter Maisy died in April 1969.[32]

vesquehome

The VESQUE-FRANTZ hom ein Oetrange ca. 1954

7. Johann Peter FRANTZ 1882-1970

Johann Peter FRANTZ was born 14 October 1882.[33] Johann Peter married Hélène KILL on 2 April 1913 in Mamer.[34] They were the parents of three children: Jos[35], Paul[36], and Anna Maria.[37] Their son Paul continued the family tradition of cycling. In 1936 he participated in the Olympic Games in Berlin, representing Luxembourg along with three other cyclists in the individual and team road race events. Johann Peter died 1 December 1970 in Luxembourg City.[38] His widow Hélène died 12 October 1972, also in Luxembourg City.[39]

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Johann Peter FRANTZ and Hélène KILL

8. Maria Margaretha “Marguerite” FRANTZ 1885-1977

Maria Margaretha FRANTZ was born 12 March 1885 in Mamer.[40] She went by Marguerite. She married Johann Theophile “Théo” HILBERT on 25 October 1908 in Mamer.[41] In 1915 their only daughter Margot Thea was born.[42] Marguerite’s husband Théo was the driver of the car owned by Nicolas Frantz I (Tour de France winner) involved in two accidents in 1927, the first resulting in the death of a young boy and the second in the death of Nicolas Frantz II. Théo died 3 January 1946 in Mamer.[43] His widow Marguerite died 22 March 1977 in Mamer.[44]

margot

Marguerite FRANTZ with her daughter Margot Thea HILBERT

9. Nicolas FRANTZ 1886-1886

Nicolas FRANTZ was born 16 April 1886.[45] He lived only a month, dying on 18 May 1886 at his parents’ home in Mamer.[46]

10. Johann-Joseph “Jos” FRANTZ 1888-1940

Johann-Joseph FRANTZ was born 4 September 1888.[47] He married Marguerite BERWICK on 24 April 1916 in Mamer.[48] They were the parents of two sons, Erny[49] and Germain[50], born in Dudelange where the family lived. Johann-Joseph, also known as “Jos” was a teacher. He died 23 April 1940 in Dudelange.[51] His widow Marguerite died seven months later on 28 November 1940.[52]

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Marguerite BERWICK, wife of Jos FRANTZ

New Lessons Learned

Without the photographs, newspaper clippings, thank you notes, funeral cards and other memorabilia saved by my maternal grandmother I would not have been able to tell their story in such detail.

Questions remain and may lead to new stories. I want to know more about Maisy VESQUE who served time in prison for killing a man. I’ve found newspaper articles about the deaths caused by Theo HILBERT when he was driving the car owned by Nicolas FRANTZ. A third question, I was able to answer and in doing so learned a new lesson.

I don’t know how many times I have asked myself who are “Mr Eugène Raymond, Mme, née Suzanne Miette et leur(s) enfant(s)” mentioned in Jean and Marie FRANTZ-MAJERUS’ obituaries? I knew Guy Hostert was the son of their deceased oldest daughter Marie. Eugène or Suzanne had to be their grandchild and, since great-grandchildren were also mentioned, he or she had to have been born to one of the oldest daughters.

I don’t give up easily and the question took me to the online archives of the cities of Reims and Paris, France. Finding records in large cities is daunting. My persistence paid off. I found the records I needed to prove the relationship of Suzanne MIETTE and in doing so also learned how to use the Archives of Paris database.

If anyone is interested, feel free to leave a comment and I may write a post on how to use the Archives de Paris site.

Sources:
[1] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1793-1923 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Mamer > Naissances 1834-1890 Mariages 1796-1837 > images 76  of 1504. 1837 Birth Record No. 58. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12585-49242-69?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-L31:496689502 : accessed 09 Feb 2013).
[2] Ibid., Mamer > Mariages 1838-1890 Décès 1796-1880 > image 310 of 1497. 1870 Marriage Record No. 5. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12143-120441-3?cc=1709358&wc=9RY3-VZ9:130065401,130130201 : accessed 6 September 2014).
[3] Ibid., Mamer > Naissances 1834-1890 Mariages 1796-1837 > image 311 of 1504. 1850 Birth Record No. 30. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12585-50928-75?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-FM9:130065401,130365601 : accessed 27 March 2010).
[4] Luxembourg, Volkszählungen 1843-1900 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Mamer > 1871 > image 518 of 840. Majerus-Trausch household No. 56. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32379-26802-46?cc=2037957&wc=M5G9-SPN:345860401,345869501 : accessed 18 June 2015).
[5] Ibid., Mamer > 1875 > image 462 of 795. Johann Majerus household No. 29. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32374-4220-81?cc=2037957&wc=M5LB-K6V:345860401,345870501 : accessed 18 June 2015).
[6] Ibid., Mamer > 1880 > image 231 of 803. Frantz-Majerus household No. 65. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32391-9005-98?cc=2037957&wc=M5G7-16N:345860401,345872201 : accessed 18 June 2015).
[7] Ibid., Mamer > 1885 > image 41 of 829. Frantz-Majerus household No. 11. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32390-5896-81?cc=2037957&wc=M5G7-GP8:345860401,345873701 : accessed 18 June 2015).
[8] Ibid., Mamer > 1887 > image 715 of 828. Frantz-Majerus household No. 30. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32393-787-37?cc=2037957&wc=M5GC-Y4J:345860401,345875201 : accessed 18 June 2015).
[9] Ibid., Mamer > 1890 > image 352 of 822. Frantz-Majerus household No. 24. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32393-2887-86?cc=2037957&wc=M5G4-PT1:345860401,345876401 : accessed 18 June 2015).
[10] Ibid., Mamer > 1895 > image 820 of 841. Frantz-Majerus household No. 34. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32395-6413-90?cc=2037957&wc=M5G6-L27:345860401,345878001 : accessed 18 June 2015).
[11] Ibid., Mamer > 1900 (n 1662) > images 332 of 564. Frantz-Majerus household No. 33. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32398-5686-98?cc=2037957&wc=M9MV-9T2:1997661504 : accessed 21 June 2015).
[12] Luxemburger Wort, digitized by the Bibliothèque nationale de Luxembourg, http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu (Verlage der St-Paulus-Druckerei, Luxembourg), No. 56, February 25, 1929, p. 4 column 5. Avis mortuaire for Jean Frantz. (http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu/webclient/DeliveryManager?application=DIRECTLINK&custom_att_2=simple_viewer&pid=1360603&search_terms=Frantz#panel:pp|issue:1360603|article:DTL341|query:Frantz : accessed 20 June 2015).
[13] Escher Tageblatt, digitized by the Bibliothèque nationale de Luxembourg, http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu (Verlag Editpress S.A., Esch-sur-Alzette), No. 243, Monday, 14 September 1931, p. 4 column 5. Avis Mortuaire for Madame Jean Frantz née Marie Majerus. (http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu/webclient/DeliveryManager?application=DIRECTLINK&custom_att_2=simple_viewer&pid=510394&search_terms=Frantz#panel:pp|issue:510394|article:DTL278|query:Frantz : accessed 20 June 2015).
[14] Luxembourg Civil Records, Mamer > Naissances 1834-1890 Mariages 1796-1837 > image 713 of 1504. 1871 Birth Record No. 4. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12585-52216-6?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-FM9:130065401,130365601 : accessed  23 March 2010).
[15] Registres d’actes d’état civil 1860-1902 (images), Archives de Paris (original records in the Archives de Paris, Paris, France. Images from this site are not allowed to be shared with others, used on the internet, or for commercial purposes without permission), Mariages, 2e arr., 21/06/1892. V4E 5486 image 67 of 141. 1892 Marriage Record No. 396. (http://canadp-archivesenligne.paris.fr/archives_etat_civil/1860_1902_actes/ : accessed 20 June 2015).
[16] Ibid., Naissances, 3e arr., 14/08/1895. V4E 8167 image of  66 of 159. 1895 Birth Record No. 1164. (http://canadp-archivesenligne.paris.fr/archives_etat_civil/1860_1902_actes/ : accessed 20 June 2015).
[17] Luxembourg Civil Records, Mamer > Naissances 1834-1890 Mariages 1796-1837 > image 746 of 1504. 1871 Birth Record No. 57. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12585-52481-73?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-FM9:130065401,130365601 : accessed 23 March 2010).
[18] Ibid., Mamer > Naissances, mariages 1895-1923 > image 547 of 819. 1900 Marriage Record No. 18. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32045-16170-78?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-LQS:415858536 : accessed 6 March 2015).
[19] Lettre de faire-part, Mme. Joseph Fournelle, née Catherine Frantz, 16 March 1934
[20] Luxembourg Civil Records, Mamer > Naissances 1834-1890 Mariages 1796-1837 > image 788 of 1504. 1874 Birth Record No. 53. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12585-48262-71?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-FM9:130065401,130365601 : accessed 17 August 2011).
[21] Postcard dated 1 January 1946 signed by Joséphine Frantz
[22] Luxembourg Civil Records, Mamer > Naissances 1834-1890 Mariages 1796-1837 > image 828 of 1504. 1876 Birth Record No. 42. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12585-51331-4?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-FM9:130065401,130365601 : accessed 23 March 2010).
[23] Ibid., Contern > Mariages 1895-1923 > image 80 of 195. 1906 Marriage Record No. 7. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32037-2967-13?cc=1709358&wc=9RTB-MNB:129626701,129649201 : accessed 7 March 2015).
[24] Luxemburger Wort, digitized by the Bibliothèque nationale de Luxembourg, http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu (Verlage der St-Paulus-Druckerei, Luxembourg), No.142, Wednesday, 22 May 1946, p. 3 column 2. Avis mortuaire for Jean Frantz. (http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu/webclient/DeliveryManager?application=DIRECTLINK&custom_att_2=simple_viewer&pid=798376&search_terms=jean%20frantz#panel:pp|issue:798376|article:DTL479|query:jean frantz : accessed 20 June 2015).
[25] Collection of newspaper clippings in the possession of Marie Marcelle Fournelle (dec’d).
[26] Luxembourg Civil Records, Mamer > Naissances 1834-1890 Mariages 1796-1837 > image 867 of 1504. 1878 Birth Record No. 25. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12585-48039-70?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-FM9:130065401,130365601 : accessed 23 March 2010).
[27] Ibid., Mamer > Mariages 1838-1890 Décès 1796-1880 > image 1466 of 1497. 1879 Death Record No. 4. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12143-119884-11?cc=1709358&wc=9RY3-VZ9:130065401,130130201 : accessed 23 March 2010).
[28] Ibid., Mamer > Naissances 1834-1890 Mariages 1796-1837 > image 911 of 1504. 1880 Birth Record No. 35. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12585-49264-59?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-FM9:130065401,130365601 : accessed 23 March 2010).
[29] Ibid., Mamer > Naissances, mariages 1895-1923 > image 659 of 819. 1910 Marriage Record No. 4. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32045-18508-90?cc=1709358&wc=9RTB-L2D:130065401,130400801 : accessed 7 February 2013).
[30] Collection of newspaper clippings in the possession of Marie Marcelle Fournelle (dec’d).
[31] Ibid.
[32] Ibid.
[33] Luxembourg Civil Records, Mamer > Naissances 1834-1890 Mariages 1796-1837 > image 960 of 1504. 1882 Birth Record No. 47. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12585-52416-80?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-FM9:130065401,130365601 : accessed 23 March 2010).
[34] Ibid., Mamer > Naissances, mariages 1895-1923 > image 693 of 819. 1913 Marriage Record No. 3. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32045-18126-68?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-LQS:415858536 : accessed 20 June 2015).
[35] Ibid., Mamer > Naissances, mariages 1895-1923 > image 350 of 819. 1914 Birth Record No. 1. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32045-17474-71?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-LQS:415858536 : accessed 21 June 2015).
[36] Ibid., Mamer > Naissances, mariages 1895-1923 > image 375 of 819. 1915 Birth Record No. 29. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32045-17296-67?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-LQS:415858536 : accessed 21 June 2015).
[37] Ibid., Mamer > Naissances, mariages 1895-1923 > image 403 of 819. 1917 Birth Record No. 15. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32045-16310-62?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-LQS:415858536 : accessed 21 June 2015).
[38] Collection of newspaper clippings in the possession of Marie Marcelle Fournelle (dec’d).
[39] Ibid.
[40] Luxembourg Civil Records, Mamer > Naissances 1834-1890 Mariages 1796-1837 > image 1012 of 1504. 1885 Birth Record No. 15. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12585-49798-98?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-FM9:130065401,130365601 : accessed 23 March 2010).
[41] Ibid., Mamer > Naissances, mariages 1895-1923 > image 641 of 819. 1908 Marriage Record No. 21. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32045-18301-7?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-LQS:415858536 : accessed 7 February 2013).
[42] Ibid., Mamer > Naissances, mariages 1895-1923 > image 379 of 819. 1915 Birth Record No. 41. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32045-16366-78?cc=1709358&wc=9RTB-L2D:130065401,130400801 : accessed 21 June 2015).
[43] Collection of newspaper clippings in the possession of Marie Marcelle Fournelle (dec’d).
[44] Ibid.
[45] Luxembourg Civil Records, Mamer > Naissances 1834-1890 Mariages 1796-1837 > image 1037 of 1504. 1886 Birth Record No. 25. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12585-52526-85?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-FM9:130065401,130365601 : accessed 23 March 2010).
[46] Ibid., Mamer > Décès 1881-1890 > image 75 of 144. 1886 Death Record No. 17. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12699-120456-21?cc=1709358&wc=9RY8-GPF:130065401,129686301 : accessed 20 August 2011).
[47] Ibid., Mamer > Naissances 1834-1890 Mariages 1796-1837 > image 1092 of 1504. 1888 Birth Record No. 56. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12585-49208-71?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-FM9:130065401,130365601 : accessed 23 March 2010).
[48] Ibid., Dudelange > Mariages 1910-1920 > image 313 of 548. 1916 Marriage Record No. 14. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32026-13839-79?cc=1709358&wc=9RTY-JWG:129625901,129908301 : accessed 5 March 2015).
[49] Ibid., Dudelange > Naissances 1915-1923 > image 273 of 611. 1919 Birth Record No. 102. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32040-5639-58?cc=1709358&wc=9RTB-4W1:129625901,130608101 : accessed 21 June 2015).
[50] Ibid., Dudelange > Naissances 1915-1923 > image 406 of 611. 1921 Birth Record No. 86. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32040-5586-45?cc=1709358&wc=9RTB-4W1:129625901,130608101 : accessed 5 March 2015).
[51] Collection of newspaper clippings in the possession of Marie Marcelle Fournelle (dec’d).
[52] Ibid.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Jean “Johann FRANTZ
Parents: Johannes “Jean” FRANTZ and Elisabeta “Elise” FRISCH
Spouse: Marie “Maria” MAJERUS
Parents of spouse: Johann MAJERUS and Maria TRAUSCH
Whereabouts: Mamer, Grand Duché de Luxembourg
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 2nd great-grandfather

  1. Jean “Johann FRANTZ
  2. Catharina FRANTZ
  3. Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE
  4. Living (Mom) WILDINGER
  5. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.

Posted in 52Ancestors 2015, Luxembourg, Luxracines | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #16 Charles W. ROYALTY (1861-1922)

This is a spin-off of my 52 Ancestors: #14 Albert Spencer LILLIE (1848-1913) ~ Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can blogpost in which I featured a few photos from a collection of old photographs my 4C1R Joe Rooney shared with me. I asked Joe about using the photos and he kindly wrote, Please use them at your will.  I feel it is keeping it in the family and don’t need credit.  If anything, I appreciate your evaluations, identifications and detective work.  I’m hopeful you and yours enjoy them.  On a blog, in a book, above a cloud.”

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls@pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

Links to previous posts in this series may be found in Old Photographs

#16 Charles W. ROYALTY (1861-1922)

charlesttTintype, a cheaper form of photography, were not produced from a negative. Images were reversed, as if looking in a mirror. Notice in the above Charles’ jacket is buttoned left on right and hair parted on the left while in the photo below the jacket is buttoned right on left and his hair is parted on the right.

charlesfamilyCharles with his wife Lizzie M. WALTER and their son Alnie born in February 1888. Alnie appears to be about 5 which helps to date this photograph at around 1893-94.

Lizzie’s dress must have been made by a very experienced seamstress. I remember learning in my Home Ec sewing classes about placing patterns on the grain and marking patterns so plaids or stripes would match up. It seemed complicated at the time and plaids were usually avoided. The sleeves and bodice of Lizzie’s dress appear to have been bias cut to mould to the body.

On the 1900 census Charles was listed as a farmer and owned a mortgaged farm. By this time the family included a new member, daughter Fay who was born in 1897.

charleskimball

Charles with his horse “Kimball”

The photo (above) was labelled with the name of his horse Kimball on the back (below).

charleshorsebackWhile researching the timeline of this family to date these photographs I learned Charles and Lizzie’s must have separated and divorced by 1910. Their daughter Fay ROYALTY age 12 was found with John B. and Elizabeth M. SCHULTE in Paducah, McCracken County, Kentucky. Fay was listed as stepdaughter of John who had married “Elizabeth” less than a year earlier. It was a second marriage for both of them.

Son Alnie was living in Monett, Barry County, Missouri, with his wife of 0 years, Theresa RICE. His father Charles has not been located in 1910 or 1920.

charlesalnieCharles (middle) with his son Alnie (left); unknown man on right. This was taken 1916 or earlier as Alnie was killed in a train accident on 14 July 1916. Just seeing things. So you can see us. Will try and send you a good picture soon.

charlesalniebackMy or Pa’s adress for his mail is delivered to me. 817 4th St., Monett, MO. This message would suggest that Charles may have been moving around quite a bit. Beeing a horse lover he may have travelled around and worked as a blacksmith or farrier.

charlesblacksmithCharles (far right) in front of Greathouse Horse Shoeing with three unidentified men.

Following the death of his son Alnie, Charles may have moved to Iowa (after 1920) to be closer to his married daughter Fay. His ex-wife Lizzie was not mentioned in the obituary of son Alnie and may have died before 1916. Charles died 25 January 1922 in Oneida, Delaware County, Iowa, and is buried in the Fairview Cemetery in Earlville, Delaware County, Iowa. His daughter Fay died in 1925 and is buried in the same cemetery.

 Joe Rooney kindly gave me permission to use these photographs on my blog.

Joe ROONEY wrote on 15 February 2015: This collection of photographs was scanned at 300 dpi color by me. The original photos were sent by Sandra Lillie about ten years ago after she found them cleaning out a relative’s garage in Southern Illinois, finding no other takers (suckers). She believes they were a collection by L Vance Lillie. Many of the pictures seemed to be removed from frames or were in albums evidenced by fading characteristics and may have been from other’s collections. I scanned the reverse if there was laboratory advertising or writing. Some of the authors’ identification may be figured out of the handwriting matches. I did not scan the reverse of photos where there was only a three digit number that I believe to be sequence numbers on a roll of film. I didn’t spot any obvious helpful commonalities.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #15 Mathilda J. “Tillie” ROYALTY (1859-1839)

This is a spin-off of my 52 Ancestors: #14 Albert Spencer LILLIE (1848-1913) ~ Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can blogpost in which I featured a few photos from a collection of old photographs my 4C1R Joe Rooney shared with me. I asked Joe about using the photos and he kindly wrote, Please use them at your will.  I feel it is keeping it in the family and don’t need credit.  If anything, I appreciate your evaluations, identifications and detective work.  I’m hopeful you and yours enjoy them.  On a blog, in a book, above a cloud.”

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls@pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

Links to previous posts in this series may be found in Old Photographs

#15 Mathilda J. “Tillie” ROYALTY (1859-1839)

tomtilliefannie

Tillie with her husband Tom and daughter Fannie ca. 1895

Tillie ROYALTY, daughter of Samuel ROYALTY and Joanna PALMER and sister of Florence ROYALTY, married Charles Thomas “Tom” WELLS about 1886, most likely in Pope County, Illinois. They were the parents of Charles Edgar WELLS b. 1886 and Frances “Fannie” WELLS b. 1892, both in Pope County. After the births of their children they were seen in Bedford County, Tennessee, in 1900 and in Johnson County, Illinois, in 1910.

tom+tillie

Tom and Tillie in early 1910s

 

tillieolder

Tillie by herself ca. early 1910s, taken before move to California

Tom, Tillie and their children moved to California in the early 1910s, before 1915 when Tillie’s sister Florence visited them. They lived in San Luis Obispo County, California, in 1920 and 1930 when the census was taken.

Joe Rooney kindly gave me permission to use these photographs on my blog.

Joe ROONEY wrote on 15 February 2015: This collection of photographs was scanned at 300 dpi color by me. The original photos were sent by Sandra Lillie about ten years ago after she found them cleaning out a relative’s garage in Southern Illinois, finding no other takers (suckers). She believes they were a collection by L Vance Lillie. Many of the pictures seemed to be removed from frames or were in albums evidenced by fading characteristics and may have been from other’s collections. I scanned the reverse if there was laboratory advertising or writing. Some of the authors’ identification may be figured out of the handwriting matches. I did not scan the reverse of photos where there was only a three digit number that I believe to be sequence numbers on a roll of film. I didn’t spot any obvious helpful commonalities.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

Posted in Old Photographs | Tagged , , , , , , | 4 Comments

52 Ancestors: #24 The Heirloom: The FOURNELLE-SCHLOESSER Family (Part II)

Week 24 (June 11-17) – Heirloom: What heirloom do you treasure? Who gave it to you? What heirloom do you wish you had?

Yesterday I wrote about The Heirloom: The 1866 Military Accounts Book and want to continue with the story of my 2nd great-grandfather André FOURNELLE and his family in this second part.

The FOURNELLE-SCHLOESSER Family

andre

My 2nd great-grandfather André FOURNELLE ca. 1900-1909

1838birth

1838 Birth Record No. 17 [1]

André FOURNELLE, my 2nd great-grandfather, was born at 11 o’clock on the morning of 25 August 1838. The following day his father André FOURNELLE (1799-1866), 40 years old and a farmer, went to the records office of Rodange, Canton of Messancy, Province of Luxembourg, at 8 o’clock in the morning to inform the officials of the birth. Marie Catherine PHILIPPART (1801-1843), 38 years old and without an occupation, was the mother of André.[1]

odile

Odile Lucie SCHLOESSER (ca. 1900-1911)

Odile Lucie SCHLOESSER, my 2nd great-grandmother, was born on 16 February 1840 in Metz, Department Moselle, Region Lorraine, France. She was the daughter of Johann Joseph SCHLOESSER (1807-1841) and Anna Maria CONSBRÜCK (1810-1897). Odile’s father was from Vianden (Luxembourg) and her mother from Echternach (Luxembourg). They may have met while working in Metz as this is where they married in 1835. Following her father’s death Odile moved to Echternach with her mother and sisters to live with their CONSBRÜCK family.

It is not known how André and Odile came to meet. Since Echternach is a border town it is possible André was stationed there for a time as a border guard. From his military accounts book, we know he saved a man’s life on 25 June 1866 from drowning in the Sauer River which is the border between Luxembourg and Germany and passes by Echternach.

1867marriage

1867 Marriage Record No. 25 [2]

When André and Odile married on 28 September 1867 in Echternach the groom was a resident of Surré (Syr or Sarre) a village belonging to the commune of Boulaide, a town in northern Luxembourg. André was 29 years old and his parents were both deceased. Odile was 27 years old and her date and place of birth were listed on the marriage record. Her father’s death in Metz was mentioned; her mother was living, present, and consenting to the marriage. The banns had been read in Boulaide and in Echternach on four consecutive Sundays: the 1st, 8th, 15th, and 22nd of September. The four witnesses present, Laurent KIESEL, Mathias Gaspard SPOO, Johann HERR, and Peter LANSER, were cousins of the bride. All persons present signed the marriage record.[2]

1867census

1867 Luxembourg Census [3]

A little over two months later on 3 December 1867 the census was enumerated in the village of Surré in the commune of Boulaide where André and Odile were living as newlyweds in a house known as Hannes. André signed the census slip in the lower right corner.[3]

1869maria

1869 Birth Record No. 3 [4]

On 17 February 1869 André went to the records office of Boulaide to have the birth of his first child recorded. It was 6 in the evening when he met with the mayor Johann Reding to have the birth record filled out. Maria was born only an hour earlier to André’s wife Odile. He must have been anxious to get the formalities taken care of![4]

1871johannjoseph

1871 Birth Record No. 6 [5]

On 20 Feb 1871, two years and 3 days later, André was once again meeting with Johann Reding to register the birth of his son Johann Joseph. The child was born at 6 in the morning to Lucie SCHLOESSER in Surré. Lucie being Odile’s second name. André waited a bit longer than he did following the birth of Maria, until 1 in the afternoon, to go to Boulaide.[5]

1871census

1871 Luxembourg Census [6]

On 1 December 1871 the entire family was auf Besuch (visiting) in Elsaß (Alsace, France) when the census was enumerated in Surré. André’s wife’s name was incorrectly listed as Louise Schneider by Mr. Thilmani who gave the information. Beside André’s name in the second column he noted as the father of the family group and in Alsace. I have not been able to decipher the word before Elsaß.[6]

1875census

1875 Luxembourg Census [7]

In 1875 the family was in Surré. The person who recorded the names used the German spelling. Andreas, Audile, Maria, Joseph FOURNELLE as well as Odile’s sister Anna SCHLOESSER were in the household. In line 4 my great-grandfather Joseph, who was 4 years old, is listed as normally NOT being a member of the household and had been auf Besuch (visiting) for 10 days. I believe the recorder meant for this to be in line 5 for Odile’s sister Anna.[7] She was also listed on the census with her mother in Echternach.[8]

1877birth

1877 Birth Record No. 19 [9]

A year and a half later André and Odile’s third child Marie Josephine was born on 29 May 1877 in Winseler, Wiltz, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. Both of the parents are listed as 39 years old although Odile was only 37 years old at the time. The birth record helps to place the family in Winseler in 1877.[9] André was still working as a border guard but we do not know when the family made the move to Winseler or how long they stayed there.

Because of André’s occupation the family may have moved around more than I know of. I did not find them on the control lists for the commune of Winseler in 1880. They were not in Winseler or Echternach in 1890. In 1895 and 1900 they were found in Echternach. This leaves a gap of 16 years between 1877-1895 which I haven’t found records for.

1895census

1895 Luxembourg Census [10]

In 1895 André was living in Echternach with his wife and their three single children. His wife Odile was now using her middle name Lucie. André was now retired from his job as a border guard.[10]

1900census

1900 Luxembourg Census [11]

In 1900 André and Lucie’s oldest daughter Marie was missing from the household. Johann Joseph had married during the year and was living with his wife Catharina FRANTZ in his parents’ household along with his youngest sister Josephine. The home the FOURNELLE family lived in during these years was in the Luxemburger Strasse and known as Mühlenacht or Millenoacht.[11]

1902wedding

Aloyse BAUER and Marie Josephine FOURNELLE wedding portrait (1902)

When Marie Josephine married in 1902 to Aloyse BAUER her brother Johann Joseph and her brother-in-law Émile MONNIER were witnesses.[12] Émile was from Lille, France, and was the husband of the oldest FOURNELLE daughter Marie. Did Marie leave Luxembourg to work in a city in France? Did she meet Émile and marry him in Lille where she raised a family of 4 sons?

marie

Marie MONNIER-FOURNELLE (1869-1952)

article

Luxemburger Wort [13]

André FOURNELLE didn’t sit back and do nothing after his retirement. He had several fruit orchards in Echternach which he cared for after he was pensioned. He entered is prize fruits in the local agricultural exhibition which took place in Echternach on 28 September 1904. André received honorary mentions for his table apples and a second place with a silver medal, for his table pears.[13]

 

1908andre

1908 Death Record No. 68 [14]

On 21 November 1908 at 11 a.m. André was one of four witnesses at the marriage of his niece Maria-Josephine MAAS and her groom Johann MISCHAUX. That evening at 6 p.m. he died at his home. I wrote about this in The Very Last Signature of André FOURNELLE. My great-grandfather Johann Joseph FOURNELLE and Johann MAAS, father of the bride, were the informants on André’s death record.[14]

1911death

1911 Death Record No. 54 [15]

Less than three years later André’s widow  died at nine in the evening at home in Millenoacht. Her son Johann Joseph FOURNELLE and her nephew-in-law Johann MISCHAUX were the informants on her death. Odile SCHLOESSER was the name seen on her death record. She was seventy-one years old.[15]

The prayer cards printed after her death had the name favored by my 2nd great-grandmother Lucie.

1911funeralcard

Prayer Card for Lucie Schloesser

Sources:
[1] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1793-1923 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Pétange > Naissances 1796-1877 > image 442 of 944. 1838 Birth Record No. 17. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12404-68196-32?cc=1709358&wc=M9QN-BM6:1617650175 : accesssed 14 Jun 2011).
[2] Ibid., Echternach > Mariages 1809 > image 1179 of 1462. 1867. Marriage Record No. 25. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11670-170986-66?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2VL:n1115540467 : accessed 12 Jan 2013).
[3] Luxembourg, Volkszählungen 1843-1900 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Boulaide > 1867 > image 85 of 254. André Fournelle household. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32382-3499-61?cc=2037957&wc=M9MJ-18C : accessed 29 December 2014).
[4] Luxembourg Civil Records, Boulaide > Naissances 1838-1890 Mariages 1798-1823, 1798-1835 > image 434 of 1498. 1869. Birth Record No. 3. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12330-121132-22?cc=1709358&wc=M9QN-T56:1193074600 : accessed 23 Mar 2010).
[5] Ibid., Boulaide > Naissances 1838-1890 Mariages 1798-1823, 1798-1835 > image 459 of 1498. 1871 Birth Record No. 6. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12330-116084-50?cc=1709358&wc=M9QN-T56:1193074600 : accessed 23 Mar 2010).
[6] Luxembourg Census, Boulaide > 1871 > image 517 of 544. André Fournelle household. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32378-22188-47?cc=2037957&wc=M5GM-FMC:346039301,345869501 : accessed 14 June 2015). See also images 515 and 516 for front matter.
[7] Ibid., Boulaide > 1875 > image 465 of 539. André Fournelle household. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-32378-15565-49?cc=2037957&wc=M9MJ-1D3 : accessed 5 February 2015). See also images 464 and 466 for front and back matter.
[8] Ibid., Echternach > 1875 (n 774) > image 557 of 582. Maria Consbrück, veuve Schloesser household.(https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32378-38082-39?cc=2037957&wc=M9MV-MCW:953316563 : accessed 01 Mar 2013). See also images 556 and 558 for front and back matter.
[9] Luxembourg Civil Records, Winseler > Naissances 1797-1881 > image 778 of 831. 1877 Birth Record No. 19. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12346-212348-12?cc=1709358&wc=9RYQ-N3D:130596701,130692901 : accessed 12 June 2015).
[10] Luxembourg Census, Echternach > 1895 > image 895 of 1611. André Fournelle household. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32393-6414-73?cc=2037957&wc=M5G8-W3K:345970601,345878001 : accessed 11 June 2015). See also images 894 and 896 for front and back matter.
[11] Ibid., Echternach > 1900 > image 362 of 1660. André Fournelle household. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1942-32397-16708-34?cc=2037957&wc=M9S1-MY1:1893305075 : accessed 15 January 2015). See also images 361 and 363 for front and back matter.
[12] Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Naissances 1903-1923 Mariages 1895-1905 > image 536 of 604. 1902 Marriage Record No. 14. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32040-9966-3?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2V1:n702239153 : accessed 20 Jan 2013).
[13] Luxembourger Wort, digitized by Bibliothèque nationale de Luxembourg; online (http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu/BnlViewer/view/index.html?lang=en#panel:pp|issue:1057913|article:DTL62|query:fournelle%20echternach : accessed 15 June 2015)
[14] Luxembourg Civil Records, Echternach > Mariages 1906-1923 Décès 1895-1912 > image 584 of 675. 1908 Death Record 68. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32043-12126-76?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2VR:n1397300048 : accessed 11 Jan 2013).
[15] Ibid., Echternach > Mariages 1906-1923 Décès 1895-1912 > image 644 of 675. 1911 Death Record No. 54. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32043-11951-69?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-2VR : accessed 12 March 2015).

Genealogy Sketch

Name: André FOURNELLE
Parents: André FOURNELLE and Marie Catharine PHILIPPART
Spouse: Odile Lucie SCHLOESSER
Children: Marie, Jean Joseph, and Marie Joséphine
Whereabouts: Rodange, Esch-sur-Alzette, Boulaide, Strasbourg, Echternach
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 2nd great-grandfather

  1. André FOURNELLE
  2. Jean Joseph FOURNELLE
  3. Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE
  4. Living (Mom) WILDINGER
  5. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.

Posted in 52Ancestors 2015, Luxembourg, Luxracines | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

52 Ancestors: #24 The Heirloom: 1866 Military Accounts Book (Part I)

Week 24 (June 11-17) – Heirloom: What heirloom do you treasure? Who gave it to you? What heirloom do you wish you had?

The Heirloom: 1866 Military Accounts Book

What is an heirloom? A valuable object which has belonged to a family for several generations. This book has been in our family for 5 generations, 149 years, and the information found in it is valuable to us and, hopefully, the many generations to come.

On 11 May 1857 André FOURNELLE became a militiaman for a period of six years during the 1857 recruitment of the Petange No. 6 Ersatz (replacements) in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg.

  • On 6 April 1858 he was on active duty.[p. 2]
  • On 29 September 1860 he committed himself for 2 years and 9 months according to Article 10 of the act of 22 Jun 1845. Article 10 stipulated the voluntary enrollment of young men over 14 and under the age of 25. This was most likely a commitment to serve until he turned 25 years of age.[p. 2]
  • On 1 January 1862 he was named Corporal (Korporal tituliert).[p. 2]
  • On 16 June 1862 he became a Corporal (Korporal).[p. 2]
  • On 15 May 1863 according to Article 10 of the 18 April 1836 instructions of the war department his time as a militiaman ended and his service became voluntary.[p. 2]
  • His time of duty was extended another six years on 30 June 1863.[p. 2]
  • On 20 June 1866 he was assigned an account book as a militiaman in 5th Company of the Luxemburgisches Jäger-Bataillon (Luxembourg’s Rifle Battalion).[p. 2]
  • On 25 June 1866 he risked his own life saving Bugler 3rd Class WAGNER from death of drowning in the Sauer River.[p. 4]
  • He received his first honors on 1 October 1866. [p. 4] Was this for his heroic deed a few months earlier?
  • He became a Sergeant on 11 October  1866.[p. 2]
  • He was a border guard until his retirement.[BMD and census]

André FOURNELLE was the son of André FOURNELLE and Catherine PHILIPPART and born in Rodange on 26 August 1838. His last residence (most likely at the time the book was issued to him) was Esch-sur-Alzette. He was 1 meter 62 centimeters tall, round eyes, smooth forehead, brown eyes, pointed nose, small mouth, round chin, brown hair and eyebrowns. He was vaccinated in 1839. I believe this would have been a smallpox vaccination. [p. 5]

MRIN00166 1866 Fournelle book 1

Front cover

No. 28. The Luxembourg Rifle Battalion. 5th Company. Accounting book of FOURNELLE André. Issued to him by the undersigned chief officer. Diekirch, 20 June 1866, Captain (signature)

MRIN00166 1866 Fournelle book 2

Title page: No. 28. Luxemburgisches Jäger-Bataillon. 5ten Kompagnie. Abrechnungs-Buch des FOURNELLE André. An ihn abgegeben durch mich unterzeichneten Kompagnie-Chef. Diekirch, den 20 Juni 1866 der Hauptmann (signature)

Page 2 of the books lists information on the “how & why” he was admitted to the corps, as mentioned in the first paragraph above. Page 3, for previous service and dismissals is blank.

MRIN00166 1866 Fournelle book 3

Page 2 gives information on his military time.

Page 4 lists campaigns, wounds, and deeds at top and honors on the lower half.

More personal information is given on page 5.

MRIN00166 1866 Fournelle book 4

Page 5 gives his information and physical description

Complete list of equipment and clothing on page 6.

MRIN00166 1866 Fournelle book 5

Accounts section pages 6-7

MRIN00166 1866 Fournelle book 6

Accounts section pages 8-9

MRIN00166 1866 Fournelle book 7

Accounts section pages 10-11

MRIN00166 1866 Fournelle book 8

Accounts section pages 12-13

MRIN00166 1866 Fournelle book 9

Last page 28 and inside back cover

MRIN00166 1866 Fournelle book

Back and front cover

My mother owns my 2nd great-grandfather André FOURNELLE’s original account book (above) from his time with the Luxemburgisches Jäger-Bataillon. When I scanned it in 2006 I did not realize I needed to use a higher quality scan to be able to zoom in on the text for easier transcription and translation. I need to go through it more carefully to extract all information but the most important has been discussed above.

This was to be a post on my 2nd great-grandparents André FOURNELLE and Odile Lucie SCHLOESSER with the usual information on births, marriages, census and deaths in the family. But the theme for this week had me scrambling to figure out how to share this wonderful heirloom and tell the family story. I did not realize the wealth of information contained in this book until I began to write about it. André and Odile’s story will have to wait…..until tomorrow.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: André FOURNELLE
Parents: André FOURNELLE and Marie Catharine PHILIPPART
Spouse: Odile Lucie SCHLOESSER
Children: Marie, Jean Joseph, and Marie Joséphine
Whereabouts: Rodange, Esch-sur-Alzette, Boulaide, Strasbourg, Echternach
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 2nd great-grandfather

  1. André FOURNELLE
  2. Jean Joseph FOURNELLE
  3. Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE
  4. Living (Mom) WILDINGER
  5. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.

Posted in 52Ancestors 2015, Luxembourg, Luxracines | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments