Adding 3 Generations to the Family Tree

logo_klengI was on duty a week ago Saturday at my genealogy society’s library in Walferdange, Luxembourg. This new library is open to the public on Saturday afternoons from 2 to 5. Three members of the board of Luxracines were present and six visitors dropped in to research and to become familiar with our collections.

As it was not yet too busy, I was able to get some research done while on duty.

  • I opened up my genealogy software (AQ14), went to my maternal grandfather’s pedigree and checked for the closest unknown sets of ancestors. One by one I pulled the family books of the towns they were from and looked up the families.
  • I used Evernote’s Scannable app on my iPhone to scan the images of the pages of the German family books concerning the families I was interested in.
  • I attached the names of 5 sets of NEW ancestors to my family tree, as placeholders. I did not input any further information.
  • To the Research Manager of AQ14, I added a To Do/Research Item for each placeholder person:
    Check the images from the [name of town] family book taken at Luxracines library on 29 Oct 2016
  • I included a red tag for good measure.
  • At home, I sent the images to Evernote. Each image became a note which I titled with the town name, page number, family number(s), surname. The notes were filed in a temporary notebook.

The next step was to begin inputting the information, citing sources, and adding the cropped images to my database. I began with the Familienbuch der Pfarrei Messerich, Dekanat Bitburg, 1720-1900 compiled by Werner Naumann. It covers the towns of Messerich, Birtlingen, Niederstedem, and Oberstedem.

messerich2015Last year I wrote 52 Ancestors: #45 The WAGNER-KERSCHT Family. My third great-grandmother Anna Maria KERSCHT, wife of Johann WAGNER, was the daughter of Mathias KERSCHT (1759-1841), a sheep herder, Schäfer, and Anna EVEN (1766-1828) who were married 26 November 1785 in Messerich in the Eifel. Anna Maria’s parents, my 4th great-grandparents, would be the next logical couple to write about. The Mettendorf FB entry M1158 for them indicated that they had not always lived in Mettendorf. Their first six children had only estimated years of birth indicating the information was not to be found in Mettendorf. Their seventh child, born in 1809, was documented as being born in Mettendorf.

My fourth great-grandmother’s name was seen as Anna EVEN in the Mettendorf FB (Family Book). Since Anna and Mathias married in Messerich this was the logical place to look further for this family line.

To put this in perspective, Nicolas WILDINGER was my maternal grandfather. His line back to Anna is through his mother Catherine PÖPPELREITER, her mother Magdalena WAGNER, her mother Anna Maria KERSCHT, her mother Anna EWEN.

nicolaswildingerpedigreeThe first thing I noticed when I looked up EVEN, the name found in the Mettendorf FB, was that the name was spelled EWEN in the Messerich FB. I had suspected this may be the case as I had found Anna’s parents listed as Gerardus EWEN and Barbara THILIEN on Thomas A. Pick’s Homepage for Eifel Birth and Marriage Data. The data was transcribed from an unknown source and the town of Messerich is seen as Mefserich (clearly a transcription error). This made me question the correctness of Pick’s use of the names EWEN and THILIEN.

In the Messerich FB, Mr. Naumann included the book number, page number, and record number of the church records he viewed. He also mentions other spellings of names or name changes. Although records will have to be obtained as proof, I will, for now, go with the spelling found by Mr. Naumann.

The parents of Anna EWEN (1766-1828) were Gerhard EWEN and Barbara THIL, also seen as THIELEN. Anna had nine siblings born between  1761 and 1780. Not only did I find her parents but also her paternal grandparents, maternal grandfather, and both sets of paternal great-grandparents. The new names in the family tree are seen below in generations 8 and 9 in white.

annamariakerschtpedigreeWhen I finish all of the towns scanned, I will go into AQ14 and re-set the standard ancestral colors so that these new ancestors on my mother’s paternal line will also be pink.

An interesting name change was seen for Anna EWEN’s parents. Her father Remigius was born EUPERS. At the time of his marriage to Margaretha EWEN in 1733 he lost his surname as they lived in the EWEN home and their children were all baptized EWEN. He was known as Remigius EUPERS vulgo EWEN. Vulgo means “alias” or “also known as” and shows his association to the EWEN family and property.

The Mathias KERSCHT and Anna EWEN family group were included in the Messerich FB. However, there are still discrepancies. My Anna Maria KERSCHT is in the Mettendorf FB with birth being circa 1793. She had five siblings born between 1786 and 1794 in Messerich but she was not in the Messerich FB.

When I wrote 52 Ancestors: #45 The WAGNER-KERSCHT Family I discussed my doubts about Anna Maria being born abt. 1793 which would mean she was nearly 50 when her last child, my 2nd great-grandmother Magdalena WAGNER, was born. I didn’t have the WAGNER-KERSCHT family’s entry from the Mettendorf FB when I wrote the post a year ago. At the time the theme of the post was “nur nicht verzweifeln” or don’t despair due to all the missing information. I still don’t have the entry and have added it to the Research Manager as a To Do/Research Item for my next visit to the library.

Messerich, Germany

The first documented mention of the town Messerich, Miezriche, was in the year 1066. In 1852 remains of Roman settlements were found thus proving that the place existed nearly one thousand years before it was first mentioned. In 1473 Messerich had 15 Feuerstellen, or houses which were lived in; in 1525 there were 12; in 1541 there were 14; and in 1624 there were only 5. The Thirty Years’ War (1618-1648), one of the deadliest conflicts in European history, and the Black Death, which repeatedly struck the Nimstal area in 1620-1633, were the cause for the decline in population. Today there are over 400 residents and 100 houses in Messerich.

messerichinrelationtoluxembourg
Map courtesy of maps.google.lu

On the map above Messerich is a bit south of Bitburg. The closest towns to Messerich are Masholder, Birtlingen, Oberstedem, and Bitburg. Echternach, Luxembourg, the town where I live, lies 17.5 km or 10 miles to the south.

luxembourgpartitionsmap_english
By Spanish_Inquisition (LuxembourgPartitionsMap_english.jpg) [GFDL or CC BY-SA 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0], via Wikimedia Commons
Until the end of the 18th century, Messerich belonged to the Bitburg Provost District of the Duchy of Luxembourg. The borders of Luxembourg, before 1659, are seen above as black lines including areas of present-day France, Belgium, and Germany. The area where Messerich lies belonged to the Duchy of Luxembourg until the dark green area went to Prussia in 1815.

Although Messerich today lies in Germany, during the time my ancestors lived there it was part of the Duchy of Luxembourg. Now I am curious to find out which of my other “German” ancestors were actually Luxembourgers.

The entries from the Messerich FB have all been inputted and cited in my family tree. Schankweiler, Mettendorf, Neuerburg/Eifel, Mürlenbach, and Fliessem family books remain to be done. Hopefully I will have finished them by November 26th when it is once again my turn to be on library duty.

bestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Mom’s 80th Birthday Party

A little over two weeks ago the Dempsey family got together at our house to celebrate Mom’s 80th birthday. Normally I don’t blog about living persons but this is a milestone in Mom’s and our lives which deserves to be written about while she is still with us.

We had two family photographers and several others with their cell phones taking pictures but the only way to get a great family group photo is to have someone else do the job. Many thanks to Anne-Ly Mertens-Prott for the wonderful photos and for working over the Luxembourgish translation with her husband Nic for the local online newspaper at mywort.lu.

Photo courtesy of Anne-Ly Mertens
Photo courtesy of Anne-Ly Mertens-Prott

80ten Gebuertsdaag vum Josette Sassel-Wildinger

Freides, de 29. Mee 1936 kruten d’Marie Marcelle Fournelle an den Nicolas Wildinger vun Iechternach Nowuess. D’Josette, hirt eenzegt Kand, huet deen Daag zu Iechternach d’Liicht vun der Welt erbléckst. Seng Mamm huet dacks vum spéide Schnéi, deen et um Päischtweekend no senger Gebuert gouf, geschwat. E puer Woche virun sengem véierte Gebuertsdaag huet d’Josette materlieft wéi déi Däitsch Lëtzebuerg besat hunn. D’Joer duerno ass säi Papp un der Tuberkulos gestuerwen. Den 10. Oktober 1944, war hatt eent vu villen déi aus Iechternach evakuéiert goufen. Zu Fouss ass hatt mat senger Mamm an dem 73 Joer ale Grousspapp iwwer Uesweller, Bech, Hielem an d’Luerenzweiler Géigend gaangen, wou si bis an de Mee 1945, bei Frënn ënnerkomm sinn.

Den 2. Mäerz 1957 huet d’Josette en amerikanesche G.I., de Fred Roosevelt Dempsey vu Victor, West Virginia, deen zu Bitburg stationéiert war, bestuet. Si goufen Eltere vu fënnef Kanner, déi si am Laaf vun de Joren am Georgia, Frankräich, Idaho, West Virginia, Spuenien, South Carolina an Texas, opgezunn hunn. 1974 ass säi Mann Freddy gestuerwen, an d’Joer drop koum d’Josette mat de Kanner Cathy, Debby, Marc, Mike an André zréck op Iechternach. Nodeems hatt d’Kanner während méi wéi enger Dose Joer eleng grouss gezunn hat, huet hatt sech den 28. August 1987 mam Francis Sassel bestuet.

Fir dem Josette säin 80. Gebuertsdaag, si seng Kanner fir déi éischte Kéier zanter 1979 nees all zu Iechternach zesummekomm. Et gouf gefeiert mat sengem Mann, de Kanner, den Eedemen a Schnaueren, a véier vun de néng Enkelkanner: Sheila, Brian, Jenny, Duane. Gefehlt hunn fënnef Enkelkanner: Cindy, Erin, Mike, André an Ian, souwéi zwee Urenkel Savannah an Taylor, déi mat engem schéine Video der Bomi gewënscht hunn.

MomBDay180th Birthday for Josette Sassel-Wildinger

On Friday 29 May 1936 Catherine Josette Wildinger was born in Echternach to Marie Marcelle Fournelle and Nicolas Wildinger. She would remain their only child. Her mother often told of the late snow which fell on Pentecost weekend following her birth. A few weeks before her fourth birthday Josette saw the Germans occupy Luxembourg. The following year her father died of tuberculosis. On 10 October 1944 she was one of many who were evacuated from Echternach, going on foot to Osweiler, Bech, Helmdange, and the Lorentzweiler area with her mother and 73 years old Grandpapa, only returning in May 1945.

On 2 March 1957 Josette married an America G.I., Fred Roosevelt Dempsey from Victor, West Virginia, while he was stationed in Bitburg, Germany. They became the parents of five children and raising them in Georgia, France, Idaho, West Virginia, Spain, South Carolina, and Texas. In 1975 Josette returned to Echternach with her children Cathy, Debby, Marc, Mike, and André following the death of her husband Freddy the previous year. After raising her children on her own for more than a dozen years she married François Sassel on 28 August 1987.

For Josette’s 80th birthday her children came together for the first time since 1979. She celebrated with her husband, her children and their spouses, and four of her nine grandchildren: Sheila, Brian, Jenny, and Duane. Missing were five grandchildren Cindy, Erin, Mike, André, and Ian, and her two great-grandchildren Savannah and Taylor, who sent a wonderful video with birthday wishes for their grandmother/great-grandmother.

The Day in Retrospect

Following a huge round of applause and a presentation of a large bouquet, a gift from two of her grandchildren, Mom and the rest of us enjoyed watching the video sent by the grandchildren and great-grandchildren who could not be here. It was very moving and there was not a dry eye in the room afterwards.

We were able to sit out on the back porch and in the back yard where a tent had been set up to enjoy our plates filled from the cold buffet. After everyone had had their fill and before the cake was brought out, Anne-Ly came by to take the group photos. Mom did not know what was going on when she and her five children were being set up on the steps of the back porch.

80thBirthdayCollage
Photo on right courtesy of Anne-Ly Mertens-Prott

We reproduced a photo of Mom with the kids taken Easter Sunday in 1969 when Dad was on duty in Thailand. The photo was also used on her cake, a gift from the other two grandchildren who were present.

MomBDay5

MomBDay2Mom getting ready to cut the cake with her grown up children.

MomBDayCollagetinyEveryone had a great time, memories were shared and new ones were made. Hopefully it will not be 37 years before we can all get together again.

bestwishescathy1

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Tuesday’s Child’s Family Heirlooms: Bomi’s Sewing Stuff

heirloomsewing1tinyMy Bomi, Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE, was a seamstress. Bomi is Luxembourgish for grandmother. Bomi was always working in her sewing room whenever we visited her. It was her livelihood. After the death of her husband of six years, she used the trade she learned to feed her daughter and herself.

heirloomsewing7tinyAfter her death I wanted to have some of the tools of her trade. I didn’t take any of her sewing machines as I already had her sister-in-law’s. I chose small things, her irons, scissors, thimbles, darning eggs.

heirloomsewing3tinyThe tiny iron in the middle of the above photo was the one my mother used to “iron” her doll’s clothes. When she was old enough to help in the sewing room she used it to iron open seams for her mother.

heirloomsewing4tinyHow many people still darn their socks today? Bomi had a darning egg with a teeny tiny crochet hook to pick up runs in stockings and knitted clothing. Do you remember when you used nail polish to stop a run? We used a bit of soft soap so that the run could be picked up and fixed.

heirloomsewing2tinyBomi could turn an old coat or dress into a new piece of clothing worthy enough to visit a queen. When the Grand Duchess of Luxembourg visited Queen Elizabeth in England she took along her attending physician Dr. Emile Gretsch. His daughter accompanied him and in preparation for the trip she brought clothes to Bomi to be turned into new outfits. When they were in London the doctor’s daughter sent Bomi a postcard telling her jokingly “haute couture Fournelle” was well received in London.

heirloomsewing5tinyheirloomsewing6tiny

Bomi was always prepared to fix a fallen hem or sew on a loose button with this cute leather sewing purse with embroidery scissors and a thimble.

I wish I had been able to keep many things from her large house, including her old front door, but we did not have the room for everything.

treePlease take a moment to visit Jessica’s blog Cutesy Crafts. She wrote Homemade Christmas Ornaments from Grandma’s Doilies, a post that fits right into our Heirlooms theme. I first discovered her blog and Family Tree Art Tutorial back in April 2013.

 © 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

Jeanne Bryan Insalaco of Everyone Has A Story suggested doing posts on heirlooms in a discussion in the Genealogy Bloggers Facebook group and wrote Now Where Did I Put That? Several bloggers have taken her up on the challenge to write about their heirlooms and we hope more will follow our lead.

Other bloggers doing Family Heirloom stories:

Amy Johnson Crow’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks theme for 2015 Week 24 was Heirlooms. Visit her 52 Ancestors Challenge 2015: Week 24 Recap for the links to more posts in the comments.

Tuesday’s Child’s Family Heirlooms: Bomi’s Christmas Cactus

Heirloom1tinyI received this cactus from Bomi, my maternal grandmother, in 2002. She’d raised it from cuttings from one of her older plants. I suspect she had been doing this for years and may have gotten her original plant from her mother.

She told me to water it once a week by filling the saucer under the flower pot with “standing” water. As soon as she watered he plants she would fill the watering can and let it stand at least a day before using it. Once a month I was to add a few grains of engrais rose, a fertilizer for strong growth and abundant flowering, to the saucer. The pink colored grains would dissolve and feed the plant as it was watered. She didn’t tell me the secret to getting it to flower.

But as you can see by my photos I haven’t had any problems with it blooming.

Heirloom2tinySometime after Bomi died in 2005 the cactus began making one darker pink flower. Over the years one became two and two became three. I don’t have any idea why the plant is doing this or if it’s normal.

Heirloom3tinyMy mother also has one of Bomi’s cacti. She puts hers outside during the summer and  doesn’t worry about windy weather breaking off branches of the plant. She says this keeps it from getting too big.

We began doing the same with ours. One time it was blown over the side railing of the porch by high winds and a large piece was broken off. It looked a little lopsided so I stuck a few of the broken off pieces into the soil where the piece had broken off. Surprisingly they took and today the cactus is no longer lopsided. It has only been re-potted once since we’ve had it and pssst hasn’t had fertilizer in ages.

Heirloom4tinyAfter the success of my planting the cuttings next to the “mother” plant I tried planting six cuttings in a small flowerpot. The “cuttings” were branches that had been broken or knocked off. All six took and the new plant flowered about three years later.

We keep the old and new plants outside until just before the first frost. They do not fail to begin budding a week after being moved indoors. Although we call the older one Bomi’s Christmas Cactus it usually blooms first around Thanksgiving and twice more before the spring, reminding us of her.

 © 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

My Blogger_lu blogging friend Claudine shared her grandmother’s geraniums on her blog yesterday. The over 40 years old geraniums’ future are insured by her husband, also know as Monsieur Merlanne, who plants cuttings each August.

Jeanne Bryan Insalaco of Everyone Has A Story suggested doing posts on heirlooms in a discussion in the Genealogy Bloggers Facebook group and wrote Now Where Did I Put That? Several bloggers have taken her up on the challenge to write about their heirlooms and we hope more will follow our lead.

Other bloggers doing Family Heirloom stories:

Amy Johnson Crow’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks theme for 2015 Week 24 was Heirlooms. Visit her 52 Ancestors Challenge 2015: Week 24 Recap for the links to more posts in the comments.

Tuesday’s Child’s Family Heirlooms: Bomi’s Spéngelskrich Amulette

My grandmother Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE married Nicolas WILDINGER, a German whose family had been living in Luxembourg since the first World War, on the 26th of July 1935. A month later she made a declaration to preserve her Luxembourgish nationality. In May 1936 her only child was born. When her daughter was five years old Marcelle’s husband died of tuberculosis. She had at least one offer of marriage but remained a widow from 1941 until her death in 2005 at the age of 95 years, 7 months, 10 days.

Bomi, as her grandchildren called her, was a fearless female during World War II (1939-1945). On May 10th, 1940, the German Wehrmacht invaded Luxembourg. On the eve of this invasion the Prime Minister of Luxembourg and his government decided to go into exile. From abroad, they lead the resistance against the Nazi regime in Luxembourg. Grand Duchess Charlotte followed the government and eventually moved to London, the headquarters of the allies. Thanks to her, the resistance movement in Luxembourg developed strongly.

Bomi’s Spéngelskrich Amulette, a Family Heirloom

Amulette from WWII 1 front
Bomi’s Spéngelskrich or
“War of the Pins” amulette
(front view)
Amulette from WWII 2 back
Bomi’s Spéngelskrich or
“War of the Pins” amulette
(back view)

The people of Luxembourg had their own ways to resist the German occupation of their country during World War II. They used passive resistance. They refused to speak German and participated in the Spéngelskrich or the “War of the Pins.” The people wore badges, pinned to their coats or jackets, which bore patriotic emblems such as the Red Lion or the head of Grand Duchess Charlotte, cut from a coin. My Bomi, Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE, wore this amulette, a profile of the Grand Duchesse with the initial C for Charlotte, on a chain around her neck until her death in 2005. This family heirloom is now in the possession of my mother.

amulette
Bomi’s Spéngelskrich or
“War of the Pins” amulette
owned by a great-granddaughter

Resistance Amulette

This post was adapted from a previous post. After publishing it in March 2014 I learned Bomi owned several of these and gave one to her oldest great-granddaughter C. who did not know there was a story behind the amulette she owned until she read my post. This is one of the reasons this series of posts on family heirlooms is being written – to tell the stories surrounding the treasures.

Bomi told us several stories about her life during this time. Once on the evening of January 23rd all of the neighbors met in her house to celebrate the birthday of Grand Duchess Charlotte. The windows were covered so that no light could be seen from the street but the German patrol could hear the celebrating. They knocked on the door and asked what was going on. Bomi told them they were celebrating her birthday. It’s a good thing they didn’t check her identification as her birthday was June 17th. She asked the Germans to join them in a glass of wine. She would laugh when she told us how the Germans raised their glasses to the birthday girl, not knowing that they were toasting the Grand Duchess.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

Jeanne Bryan Insalaco of Everyone Has A Story suggested doing posts on heirlooms in a discussion in the Genealogy Bloggers Facebook group and wrote Now Where Did I Put That? Several bloggers have taken her up on the challenge to write about their heirlooms and we hope more will follow our lead.

Other bloggers doing Family Heirloom stories:

Amy Johnson Crow’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks theme for 2015 Week 24 was Heirlooms. Visit her 52 Ancestors Challenge 2015: Week 24 Recap for the links to posts in the comments.

52 Ancestors: #43 The WEIMANN-WELTER Family of Ernzen

Week 43 (October 22-28) – Oops. An ancestor who made an “oops,” or one that you made while researching one of them. (We’ve all done it, believe me!)

ernzen1Ernzen, Eifelkreis Bitburg-Prüm, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany

Hubert WEIMANN of Ernzen

My third great-grandfather Hubert WEIMANN (1805-1872) was born on 13 July 1805 in Ernzen, Eifelkreis Bitburg-Prüm, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany.[1], [2] His parents were Bernard WEYMANN (1763-1809) and Susanna MALAMBRE (1772-1848), both of Ernzen. Hubert had two sisters, Anna Maria born 28 January 1796[2] and Elisabeth born on 20 August 1807,[2] both in Ernzen. Elisabeth was born seven months after the death of her father Bernard WEYMANN who died on 2 January 1807[2] in Ernzen. His widow Susanna remarried on 13 February 1809[3] to Matthias WELTER (1772-1830). They had four children, only one lived to adulthood and married.[3]

Elisabeth WELTER of Ernzen

Elisabeth WELTER, my third great-grandmother, was born on 31 January 1807[1], [4] in Ernzen. She was the daughter of Anton WELTER (1773-1849) born on Ernzerhof near Ernzen and Anne Catherine HENNES (1779-1845) born in Holsthum. They were married on 23 March 1803[4] in Ernzen. This was just before the beginning of the Napoleonic Wars (18 May 1803- 13 Sep 1815) during which time their first four of six children were born (§ denotes end of line):

  • Child 1: Bernard WELTER (1805-1855) born in 1805. He married Katharina WEBER (1795-1875) on 2 April 1837 in Aach in the Eifel. Bernard died on 1 February 1855 in Ernzen.[4], [5]
  • Child 2: Elisabeth WELTER (1807-1877), my third great-grandmother
  • § Child 3: Katharina WELTER (1810-1812) born 21 July 1810 in Ernzen. She died 5 December 1812 in Ernzen.[4]
  • § Child 4: Peter WELTER (1814-1815) born 4 April 1814 in Ernzen. He died 6 February 1815 in Ernzen.[4]
  • § Child 5: Peter WELTER (1817-1819) born 10 August 1817 in Ernzen. He died 12 May 1819 in Ernzen.[4]
  • Child 6: Anna Maria WELTER (1822-1861) born 3 April 1822 in Ernzen. She made her First Communion in 1834. Anna Maria married Peter STEIL 18 February 1846 in Ernzen. She died on 9 January 1861 in Ernzen where she was buried two days later.[4], [6]

A Marriage Takes Place in Sankt Markus Catholic Church

Hubert WEIMANN married Elisabeth WELTER on 11 February 1835[1] in Ernzen. A religious marriage ceremony took place the next day on 12 February 1835[1] in Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen. Peter LINKELS who was at Sankt Markus from 1806-1835 most likely performed the ceremony.

Ernzenchurch tinySankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen

As mentioned earlier Hubert’s mother Susanna MALAMBRE was married(2) to Matthias WELTER. Susanna and Mathias’ children, Hubert’s half-siblings, were his wife Elisabeth’s second cousins. Matthias and Elisabeth were first cousins once removed. Confused? I love looking at the bigger picture!

A New Priest for Sankt Markus

Richard Schaffner’s Familienbuch der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel as well as FamilySearch‘s Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 (index) have helped to add dates and places to this family’s story. Mr. Schaffner viewed the civil and religious records while compiling the information on all families of Ernzen however neither his book nor FamilySearch‘s database have images of the records. To make up for the missing records my photographer-husband and I visited Ernzen earlier this month to illustrate the stories with photos of the town today.

When I wrote this post a key figure in the lives of the family was missing (oops) but I did not know this until I took a very close look at the photos we took that day. On the side and behind the Sankt Markus church is the cemetery. Graves with the surnames WEIMANN, MALAMBRE, and WELTER were seen in the cemetery. Behind the church we found a plot reserved for the the priests who had served Sankt Markus.

ernzenpriests1 tinyOn the left the parrish priests of Ernzen are listed with the years they served at Sankt Markus (1803-2001). The priests are included in Mr. Schaffner’s Family Book of Ernzen. They were an important part of families’ lives and I did not think to look for them in the compilation. Oops, a mistake I will have to remedy when I work on families in other towns with family books.

Ernzenpriests2 tinyPhilipp MEYER was born 9 November 1804 in Heispelt. He became a priest on 28 May 1831 in Trier, was chaplain in Daun before becoming the new pastor in Ernzen from 29 September 1835 until his death on 10 June 1868. He was buried in the church cemetery on 13 June 1868.[7] The grave is marked with this stone.

ernzenpriests3 tinyHere lie the bones of the deceased
Pastor MEYER
from Ernzen. Died on 10 June 1868 aged 64 years. Born in
Heispelt in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg in 1804. He joined the
pastors of the parrish of Ernzen and tended his sheep for nearly 33 years.
He was a good shepherd and a good shepherd gives his life for his flock
which he did for that he will hopefully receive the crown of eternal life.

R I P

Father MEYER was the priest who performed baptisms, marriages, and burials for the WEIMANN-WELTER family from 1835 to 1868.

Hubert and Elisabeth’s Children

Hubert and Elisabeth’s first child came along a little over nine months after their marriage. Bernard was born and baptized on 30 November 1835[1], [8] in Sankt Markus. His godparents were his uncle Bernard RAUSCH, husband of the father’s sister, and his maternal grandmother Katharina HENNES, both of Ernzen.[1] Custom was for a male child to have the godfather’s name. I wonder if they may have chosen Bernard RAUSCH as the godfather in honor of the paternal grandfather. Baby Bernard died less than a month later, on the day after Christmas.

Their second child was born on 2 January 1837[1] and was baptized a day later in Sankt Markus.[9] His godparents were his uncle Bernard WELTER and Katharina CLASEN of Ernzen.[1] The child was given the name Bernard. Given the godfather’s name but did his parents want him to carry the name of his paternal grandfather and/or his deceased older brother?

Hubert and Elisabeth’s third child was a daughter, my 2nd great-grandmother. She was born on 18 June 1839[1], [10][11] and was baptized the next day in Sankt Markus.[12] Her godparents were Maria WELTER and Anton PROMMENSCHENKEL of Ernzen.[1]

Johann the fourth child was born and baptized on 1 August 1841.[1][13] The godparents who stood up for him in Sankt Markus were Johann HEINZ and Magdalena WELTER of Ernzen.[1]

Bernard, the oldest of the three living children died on 28 July 1842 and was buried two days later in Ernzen.[1]

Two years later Elisabeth gave birth to her 5th child Katharina on 28 June 1844[1] in Ernzen. Katharina was baptized the next day[14] in Sankt Markus in the presence of her godparents Katharina CLASSEN and Johann RAUSCH of Ernzen.[1]

Elizabeth’s mother Anne Catherine HENNES died on 9 March 1845 in Ernzen and was buried there two days later on 11 March 1845.[4]

Hubert and Elisabeth did not give up hope of having a son name Bernard. On 23 May 1847[1] their third son and sixth child was born in Ernzen. Two days later[15] he was baptized in Sankt Markus and was given the name Bernard. His godparents were Bernard and Katharina CLASSEN of Ernzen.

Five months later their two youngest children died. Katharina died on 31 October 1847 and was buried on 2 November.[1] Three days later baby Bernard died on 5 November and was buried on 7 November.[1]

Maria, 9 years old, and Johann, 7 years old, did not remain the only children as their mother Elisabeth gave birth to a seventh child. After losing three sons named Bernard they must have decided to choose another name for their son born on 29 October 1848[1] and baptized the next day[16] in Sankt Markus. His godparents were Peter STEIL and Elisabeth HENNES of Ernzen and he was given the name Peter.[1]

About a week later the family was back in church for a funeral. Hubert’s mother Susanna MALAMBRE died on 5 December 1848 and was buried two days later on 7 December 1848.[2], [3]

Two months later another funeral was being held in Sankt Markus. Elisabeth’s father Anton WELTER died on 26 January 1849 in Ernzen and was buried there two days later on 28 January 1849.[4]

The Grown Children Begin to Marry

Following the deaths of the grandparents the WEIMANN children, Maria, Johann and Peter continued to grow to adulthood. The oldest, Maria, was the first to marry on Thursday, 25 January 1866[10][11] to Bernard WILDINGER. Isn’t it strange she would choose a man with the name her parents had given to three sons who died young? Maria and Bernard were married in a religious ceremony over a week later on Saturday, 3 February 1866 in Sankt Markus Catholic Church.[17]

Maria and Bernard gave Hubert and Elisabeth their first grandchild on 23 December 1866.[10][11] He was baptized in Sankt Markus the day after Christmas. His godparents were his maternal grandfather Hubert WEIMANN of Ernzen and his paternal grandmother Catherine SCHRAMEN of Ferschweiler. Sadly Hubert died at the age of nine months on 20 September 1867.

The oldest son of Hubert and Elizabeth WEIMANN, Johann married Maria REUTER (1839-1907) on 27 November 1867[13] in a civil ceremony in Bollendorf. The marriage was also celebrated in a religious ceremony on 30 November 1867 in Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[18]

On 10 June 1868[7] Father MEYER who had served the WEIMANN family and the parrish of Ernzen died. He was replaced by Father Eduard WITTUS on 15 September 1868.

On 29 October 1872[1] Hubert WEIMANN died at the age of 67 years in Ernzen where he was born, grew up and raised his family. Father Eduard WITTUS who came to pastor at Sankt Markus after the death of Father MEYER may have been the priest who said mass for Hubert’s burial.

A year after Hubert’s death his youngest son Peter married Katharina HANSEN (1848-1914) on Tuesday, 23 September 1873[19] in a civil ceremony in Bollendorf. They were married in a religious ceremony in Sankt Markus on Monday, 29 September 1873.[20]

The mother of this family, Elisabeth WELTER died on Monday, 24 September 1877 in Ernzen and was buried there three days later on Thursday, 27 September 1877.[1]

Hubert and Elisabeth’s children raised their families in Ernzen. They witnessed the beginning of World War I. Peter, the youngest of the three, died on 27 November 1914[19] and was followed less than a year later by his sister Maria on 2 September 1915.[10][11] Johann, the last living child, died a little over a year after the end of the Great War on 3 December 1919.[13]

Take a Walk Through Ernzen

Ernzenvisit4tinyErnzenvisit3tinyErnzenvisit1tinyErnzenvisit2tiny

Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 (compiled in 2000), p. 232, Family #822. Weimann-Welter.
[2] Ibid., p. 243, Family #858. Weymann-Malambre.
[3] Ibid., p. 239, Family #844. Welter-Malambre.
[4] Ibid., p. 234, Family #830. Welter-Hennes.
[5] Ibid., p. 235, Family #832. Welter-Weber.
[6] Ibid., p. 203, Family #719. Steil-Welter.
[7] Ibid., p. 152, Person #510. Meyer (priest).
[8] Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 / Deutschland Geburten und Taufen, 1558-1898, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462714. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NFD4-XNL : accessed 23 October 2015), Bernardus Weimann, 30 Nov 1835; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[9] Ibid., FHL microfilm 462714. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NFD4-XN5 : accessed 23 October 2015), Bernardus Weimann, 03 Jan 1837; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[10] Familienbuch Ernzen, p. 245-246, family #867. Wildinger-Weimann.
[11] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei Sancta Lucia Ferschweiler mit: Diesburgerhof (ab 1803) und L(a)eisenhof (ab1830) 1680-1899, PDF (Kordel, 1999), p. 349, family #1624. Wildinger-Weimann.
[12] Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898 / Deutschland Geburten und Taufen, 1558-1898, (index), <FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462,714. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NFD4-54C : accessed 23 February 2015), Maria Weiman, 19 Jun 1839; citing Sankt Lucia Katholisch, Ferschweiler, Rheinland, Prussia.
[13] Familienbuch Ernzen, p. 232-233, Family #823. Weimann-Reiter.
[14] Germany Births and Baptisms, FHL microfilm 462714. (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NFD4-KMB : accessed 23 October 2015), Catharina Weimann, 29 Jun 1844; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[15] Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N2CB-NBL : accessed 23 October 2015), Bernardus Weimann, 25 May 1847; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[16] Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N2CB-2VM : accessed 23 October 2015), Petrus Weimann, 30 Oct 1848; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[17] Germany Marriages, 1558-1929 / Deutschland, Heiraten, 1558-1929, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462714. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JH8P-DXT : accessed 23 February 2015), Bernardus Weldinger and Maria Weimann, 03 Feb 1866; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[18] Ibid., (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JH8P-DM5 : accessed 23 October 2015), Joannes Weimann and Maria Reuter, 30 Nov 1867; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[19] Familienbuch Ernzen., p. 233, Family #825. Weimann-Hansen.
[20] Germany Marriages, (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JH8P-DJT : accessed 23 October 2015), Petrus Weimann and Cath. Hansen, 29 Sep 1873; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Hubert WEIMANN
Parents: Bernard WEYMANN and Susanna MALAMBRE
Spouse: Elisabeth WELTER
Parents of the Spouse: Anton WELTER and Anne Catherine HENNES
Whereabouts: Ernzen, Germany
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 3rd great-grandfather

  1. Hubert WEIMANN
  2. Maria WEIMANN
  3. Johann “Jean” WILDINGER
  4. Nicolas WILDINGER
  5. Living WILDINGER
  6. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.

52 Ancestors: #42 The WILDINGER-SCHRAMEN Family of Ferschweiler

Week 42 (October 15-21) – Proud: Which ancestor did something that made you proud? Which ancestor are you proud of finding?

I’m proud to be able to share photos taken last week of the road into Ferschweiler, the town sign, the catholic church, and the Luzienturm (tower) from the year 1538. It was wonderful to walk the church grounds where my ancestors are buried and see the church they were baptized and married in. The graves are no longer there but their spirits remain.

The WILDINGER-SCHRAMEN Family of Ferschweiler

My third great-grandfather Nicolas WILDINGER was born on 29 September 1798  in Ernzen, Eifelkreis Bitburg-Prüm, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany.[1] He was the son of Wilhelmus WILTINGER (1770-1849) born about 1770 in Ettelbrück, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg[2], and Margaretha WELTER (1777-1833) born 18 Apr 1777 in Ernzen.[2] It is not known at this time when his parents married.

Note: The compiler of the Ernzen Family Book wrote Ehe nachprüfen (check marriage) followed by oo vor 1798 (married before 1798).[2]

Nicolas was most likely the oldest of 4 children. His three younger siblings were born during the Napoleonic Wars (18 May 1803-13 Sep 1815):

  • Elizabeth WILDINGER (1805- ) born 21 August 1805 in Ernzen.[2] She married Dominik WEBER on 13 December 1831. As a widow with 4 children she immigrated to America in 1857.[3]
  • Franciscus “Franz” WILDINGER (1810-1812) born 6 August 1810 in Ernzen and died 8 December 1812 in Ernzen.[2]
  • Bernardus WILDINGER (1813- ) born 12 May 1813 in Ernzen.[2] Immigrated to America in 1857.[3]

Nicolas’ mother Margaretha WELTER died 8 January 1833 in Ernzen[2] too early to see her oldest son Nicolas marry.

The Road to Ferschweiler

DSC_0023 Ferschweiler edited tinyNicolas WILDINGER married Catherine SCHRAMEN on 18 Jan 1834 in Ferschweiler. Their religious marriage took place on 21 January 1834 in the Sankt Lucia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler.[1]

Catherine SCHRAMEN was born 23 Oct 1812 in Ferschweiler and was baptized the next day on 24 October 1812 in the Sankt Lucia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler.[4] She was the daughter of Michael SCHRAMEN (1786-1833) born 5 October 1786 in Ferschweiler[4] and Elisabetha SCHMITT (1790-1869) born 4 March 1790 in Ferschweiler.[4] They were married on 27 Nov 1811 in Ferschweiler. They had six known children, Catherine the eldest and:

  • Johann “Joannes” SCHRAMEN (1817-1894) born 14 January 1817 in Ferschweiler.[4] He married Katharina ADAM (1823- ) on 15 November 1852 in Ernzen. Joannes died on 20 January 1894 in Ferschweiler.[5]
  • Catherine “Katharina” SCHRAMEN (1820- ) born 21 February 1820 in Ferschweiler and was baptized the next day on 22 February 1820 in the Sankt Lucia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler.[4] She married Johann MARX ( – ) in 1842.
  • Margaret SCHRAMEN (1821-1822) born and baptized on 7 November 1821 in Ferschweiler.[4] She died on 22 October 1822 in Ferschweiler.[4]
  • Nicolaus SCHRAMEN (1824-1852) born and baptized on 31 October 1824 in Ferschweiler.[4] Nicolaus Schramen went to America about 1852 and may have lived in Illinois from 1855-1880.

Catherine’s father Michael SCHRAMEN died 20 September 1833 in Ferschweiler[4] four months before she married Nicolas WILDINGER.

Ferschweiler, The Birthplace of the WILDINGER Children

DSC_0016 Ferschweiler edited tinyCatherine and Nicolas had the following children:

Ch 1: [–?–] WILDINGER (1835-1835) born and died on 25 March 1835  in Ferschweiler.[1]
Ch 2: Elisabetha WILDINGER (1836-1882) born 10 July 1836 in Ferschweiler.[1]
Ch 3: Bernard “Bernhard” “Bernardus” WILDINGER (1838-1893) born 7 November 1838 in Ferschweiler, baptized two days later on 9 November 1838 in the Sankt Lucia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler.[1]
Ch 4: Elisabeth WILDINGER (1844-1867) born 11 August 1844 in Ferschweiler.[1]
Ch 5: Peter WILDINGER (1852- ) born 5 August 1852 in Ferschweiler and baptized three days later on 8 August 1852 in the Sankt Lucia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler. Per the Ferschweiler Family Book he was fled from military service – “militärflüchtig laut Anzeiger z. Amtsbl. Trier 1873, Seite 243.[1]

Nicolas’ father Wilhelmus WILTINGER died 28 September 1849 in Ernzen and was buried two days later on 30 September 1849 in Ernzen.[2] He did not live to see his youngest grandson Peter WILDINGER’s birth or baptism.

St. Luzia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler, first built in the years 1826-28 and rebuilt in 1947-49.

DSC_0025 Ferschweiler edited tiny

Two of Nicolas and Catherine’s children married:

  • Elisabetha WILDINGER married Nikolaus ROOS (1831-1879) on 8 January 1861 in Ferschweiler.[6]
  • Bernard WILDINGER married Maria WEIMANN (1839-1915) on 25 January 1866 in Ernzen. They were married in a religious ceremony on 3 February 1866 in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[7], [8]

Following these marriages at least 14 grandchildren were born, two of the six ROOS grandchildren[6] and four of the eight WILDINGER grandchildren[7] died very young.

And There Were More Funerals

Nicolas and Catherine’s second daughter Elisabeth, not to be confused with her older sister Elisabetha, died at the age of 23 on 28 December 1867 in Ferschweiler and was buried two days later on 30 December 1867 in Ferschweiler.[1] Hardly a year and a half later Catherine’s mother Elisabetha SCHMITT died 20 May 1869 in Ferschweiler at the age of 79. She was buried two days later on 22 May 1869 in Ferschweiler.[3] Less than six months later at the age of 57 years, Catherine SCHRAMEN died 2 November 1869 in Ferschweiler and was buried two days later on 4 Nov 1869 in Ferschweiler.[1]

Nicolas WILDINGER lived a little over four years as a widower before dying on 3 June 1874 in Ferschweiler at the age of 75.[1]

He left two children, the elder Elisabetha and my 2nd great-grandfather Bernard. It is not known if his youngest son Peter was still living. Elisabetha died 29 September 1882 in Ferschweiler[6] and Bernard died 14 October 1893 in Ernzen.[7]

View of Luzienturm in Ferschweiler from the Church

DSC_0035 Ferschweiler edited tinySources:
[1] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch der Pfarrei Sancta Lucia Ferschweiler mit: Diesburgerhof (ab 1803) und L(a)eisenhof (ab1830) 1680-1899, PDF (Kordel, 1999), p. 349, Family #1625. WildingerSchramen.
[2] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 (compiled in 2000), p. 246, Family #869. Wiltinger-Welter.
[3] Familienbuch Ernzen, p. 225, Family #800. Weber-Wildinger.
[4] Familienbuch Fershcweiler, p. 295, Family #1378. Schramen-Schmitt.
[5] Familienbuch Ferschweiler, p. 294, Family #1374. Schramen-Adam.
[6] Ibid., p. 250, Family #1167. Roos-
Wildinger.
[7] Familienbuch Ernzen, p. 245-246, family #867. Wildinger-Weimann.
[8] Familienbuch Fershcweiler, p. 349, family #1624. Wildinger-Weimann.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Nicolas WILDINGER
Parents: Wilhelmus WILTINGER and Margaretha WELTER
Spouse: Catherine SCHRAMEN
Parents of Spouse: Michael SCHRAMEN and Elisabetha SCHMITT
Whereabouts: Ernzen and Ferschweiler, Eifelkreis Bitburg-Prüm, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 3rd great-grandfather

  1. Nicolas WILDINGER
  2. Bernard “Bernhard” “Bernardus” WILDINGER
  3. Johann “Jean” WILDINGER
  4. Nicolas WILDINGER
  5. Living WILDINGER
  6. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.

Happy Mother’s Day – My Mitochondrial DNA Line

Yes, where I live this Sunday is Mother’s Day. Luxembourg is the only country to celebrate Mother’s Day on the 2nd Sunday in June. What better day to honor my direct matrilineal line since it goes back 10 generations in the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg?

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Anna Catharina RONAS alias BOUR
Parents: Unknown
Spouse: Dominique MAMER and Nicolai HERTZ(*) (also seen as HEITZ, HEURTZ)
Children: (*)twins: Agnes and Maria Catharina HERTZ
Whereabouts: Septfontaines, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 6th great-grandmother

1. Anna Catharina RONAS ca.1710-aft. 1785
2. Agnes HERTZ 1755-1836
3. Catharina HAMES 1789-1864
4. Maria TRAUSCH 1820-1875
5. Maria MAJERUS 1850-1931
6. Catharina FRANTZ 1872-1934
7. Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE 1909-2005
8. Living WILDINGER
9. Catherine Ann DEMPSEY
10. Living MEDER

As you can see in the Genealogy Sketch box my given name is nearly the same as my 6th great-grandmother’s, only reversed. Catherine (and other spellings) is a name I share with at least 27 ancestors. Fearless Females: 27 Female Ancestors Share My First Name!

Happy Mother’s Day to all Mother’s in Luxembourg!

Generation 1:

My 6th great-grandmother Anna Catharina RONAS (Ronnas, Rones) is my oldest known direct matrilineal ancestor. She was born around 1710 to unknown parents. She gave birth to ten children between 1741-1755, all in Septfontaines or Siebenbüren. This village name translates to Seven Fountains or Seven Wells. Since all modern Europeans are classified into seven mitochondrial haplogroups it seems fitting that my mitochondrial line goes back to a place with SEVEN in the name.

1755marriage
My 6th great-grandmother Anna Catharina RONAS’ marriage record shows her with her deceased husband’s house name, BOUR. Her parents are not listed.[1]
When Anna Catharina married my 6th great-grandfather Nicolaus HEITZ in 1755 she was the widow of Dominique MAMER alias BOUR alias FRIDGES and mother of 8 children. With her second husband she had twin daughters, my 5th great-grandmother Agnes and her sister.

1755twins
1755 baptismal records of Maria Catharina and Agnes. Even the person who record the baptisms was confused about which surname or house name was used for the daughters of Nicolai Bour alias Heitz and Anna Catharina Bour alias Ronas.[2]
She was living in Koerich in January 1785 when her daughter Agnes HERTZ married in Mamer.

Generation 2:

My 5th great-grandmother Agnes HERTZ’s marriage record show’s her mother’s name: Catharina RONAS

1785marriage
1785 Marriage Record of Agnes Hertz and Joannes Hames [3]

Generation 3:

My 4th great-grandmother Catharina HAMES’ marriage record show’s her mother’s name: Agnes HERTZ

1817marriage
1817 Marriage Reocrd of Michel Trausch and Catharina Hames [4]

Generation 4:

My 3rd great-grandmother Maria TRAUSCH’s marriage record shows her mother’s name: Catharina HAMES

1849marriage
1749 Marriage Record of Johann Majerus and Maria Trausch [5]

Generation 5:

My 2nd great-grandmother Maria MAJERUS’ marriage record shows her mother’s name: Maria TRAUSCH

1870marriage
1870 Marriage Record of Johann Frantz and Maria Majerus [6]

Generation 6:

My great-grandmother Catherine FRANTZ’s marriage record shows her mother’s name: Maria MAJERUS

1900marriage
1900 Marriage Record of Johann Joseph Fournelle and Catharina Frantz ¨[7]
1934preggrmother
My great-grandmother Catherine FRANTZ

Generation 7:

My grandmother Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE’s marriage record shows her mother’s name: Catherine FRANTZ

1935marriage
1935 Marriage of Nicolas WIldinger and Marie Marcelle Fournelle noted in the Wildinger-Fournelle Family Book, Commune d’Echternach Nr. 13/1935 [8]

Generation 8:

My mother’s marriage record to my father Fred Roosevelt DEMPSEY shows her mother’s name: Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE. I have a copy of the record but will not share as she is still living.

1942mom+bomi
Mom with her mother Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE

Generation 9:

My marriage record lists my mother’s name.

1958cathy
Yours truly!

Generation 10: 

Through my daughter, the matrilineal line continues.

1988daughter
Our daughter

Sources:
[1] Luxembourg, registres paroissiaux, 1601-1948 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Septfontaines > Baptêmes 1735-1797, confirmations 1774-1791, mariages 1738-1797, sépultures 1738-1788 > image 155 of 208. 1755 Marriage Record, 1st entry on left page. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32463-3700-90?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-4WR:1501152901,1501459884 : accessed 7 June 2015).
[2] Ibid., Septfontaines > Baptêmes 1735-1797, confirmations 1774-1791, mariages 1738-1797, sépultures 1738-1788 > image 34 of 208. 1755 baptismal records for twins Agnes and Maria Catharina, 3rd and 4th entries on left page. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32463-3785-56?cc=2037955&wc=STHD-4WR:1501152901,1501459884 : accessed 7 June 2015).
[3] Ibid., Mamer > Baptêmes, mariages, sépultures 1779-1793 > image 65 of 168. 1785 Marriage Record. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1961-32401-17714-18?cc=2037955&wc=STHZ-C6G:1500941501,1500913302 : accessed 6 June 2015).
[4] Luxembourg, Registres d’état civil, 1793-1923 (images), FamilySearch (original records at Luxembourg National Archives, Plateau du Saint-Esprit, Luxembourg), Mamer > Naissances 1834-1890 Mariages 1796-1837 > image 1283 of 1504. 1817 Marriage Record No. 3. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12585-51831-91?cc=1709358&wc=9RY7-FM9:130065401,130365601 : accessed 22 August 2011).
[5] Ibid., Mamer > Mariages 1838-1890 Décès 1796-1880 > image 114 of 1497. 1849 Marriage Record No. 19. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12143-120796-17?cc=1709358&wc=9RY3-VZ9:130065401,130130201 : accessed 6 September 2014).
[6] Ibid., Mamer > Mariages 1838-1890 Décès 1796-1880 > image 310 of 1497. 1870 Marriage Record No. 5. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12143-120441-3?cc=1709358&wc=9RY3-VZ9:130065401,130130201 : accessed 6 September 2014).
[7] Ibid., Mamer > Naissances, mariages 1895-1923 > image 547 of 819. 1900 Marriage Record No. 18. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-32045-16170-78?cc=1709358&wc=M9M6-LQS:415858536 : accessed 6 March 2015).
[8] Commune d’Echternach Nr. 13/1935, Wildinger-Fournelle Family Book. This is an official document given to the bride and groom at the time of their civil marriage. It is used to record births, christenings, and deaths of children as well as death of one or the other spouse. Scanned copy of the original, in possession of their daughter.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52 Ancestors: #22 A New Beginning for my German Genealogy Research

Week 22 (May 28 – June 3) – Commencement: Countless schools will be having their commencement ceremonies around this time. Think not only about school, but also about commencement meaning “a beginning.”

A New Beginning

Nearly two and a half years ago a visit of an exposition by Luxracines at our local mall was a new beginning for my genealogy research. Soon afterwards I joined Luxracines, a genealogy society in Luxembourg, and was making plans for my first field trip, Luxracines on Tour 2013 Part I. The Luxracines on Tour 2013 (Part II) field trip in May 2013 was a great success.

boat
Roman ship on the Mosel River

Following a cruise of the Mosel River on a Roman ship and lunch at a typical German “Gasthaus” we visited Peter Daus’ private library above the Restaurant Daus in the Haus Daus in Wittlich.

daus
Restaurant Daus in Haus Daus in Wittlich, Germany

The library had about 2000 Familienbücher (family books) for towns in Rheinland-Pfalz, Pfalz and Saarland. Ortsfamilienbücher or Familienbücher are compilations of information extracted from civil and parish registers for all families of a town or village and arranged in alphabetical order. Information on occupations, military service and emigration can also be found in these books.

I pulled the books on the villages my ancestors came from and began taking pictures of the covers/title pages and all entries for surnames that matched mine with my Nikon Coolpix (macro and without flash). Although time was short and work space a bit cramped, I took nearly 120 photos – some (below) came out a bit blurry but still useful for citing sources.

ferschcover
Familienbuch Ferschweiler[1]
The WILDINGER-WEIMANN family was the very first family I looked up. I knew Bernard WILDINGER was born in Ferschweiler and found him in Richard Schaffner’s 1999 compilation Familienbuch Ferschweiler.[1]

ferschweiler
Page 249, entries for families no. 1624 and 1625[1]
My second great-grandfather Bernard WILDINGER is listed under family number 1624 with his wife Maria WEIMANN. Next to Bernard’s name the number <1625.3> links him to family number 1625 (his parents and siblings) in the same book (next entry) and as the 3rd child of the couple.

Abbreviations used in family books:
   geboren / born
~    getauft / christened
+     gestorben / born
bgr or ¨    begraben / buried
oo    Ehe / marriage
o-o     außerehelich / extramarital
S    standesamtlich / civil
   kirchlich / religious
?    fraglich / questionable
   vermutlich / presumably
   errechnet / estimated
NN    Name(n) unbekannt / unknown name
P.    Paten / godparents
Q.    Quelle / source
u.    und / and
zw.    zwischen / between
lu    lutherisch / Lutheran
rk    römisch-katholisch / Roman Catholic

ernzen
Familienbuch Ernzen[2]
Not only were Bernard and Maria listed in Ferschweiler[1] but also in Ernzen[2] where they were married and had their children. These entries helped me to write the following story of this family.

The WILDINGER-WEIMANN Family of Ernzen, Germany

Bernard WILDINGER was born on 7 November 1838 in Ferschweiler to Nikolaus WILDINGER und Catharina SCHRAMEN.[1] He was baptized Bernardus on 9 November 1838 in Sankt Lucia Catholic Church in Ferschweiler.[3]

Bernard married Maria WEIMANN on 25 January 1866 in a civil ceremony [Source: St.A. (Standesamtliche=civil) Heirats-Act Nr. 5] in Bollendorf/Ernzen.[2] They were married on 3 February 1866 (Source: Kirchenbuch 4/152/2)[2] in a religious ceremony in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[4]

Maria WEIMANN was born on 18 June 1839 in Ernzen to Hubert WEIMANN and Elisabeth WELTER.[2] She was baptized on 19 June 1839 in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[5] Her godparents were Maria WELTER and Anton PROMMENSCHENKEL, both of Ernzen.[2]

Bernard and Maria had eight known children:

  1. Hubert was born on 23 December 1866 in Ernzen. After Christmas, on St. Stephen’s Day, 26 December 1866 he was baptized in the catholic church. His godparents were Hubert WEIMANN from Ernzen and Kath. SCHRAMEN from Ferschweiler. He died at nine months on 20 September 1867 and was buried two days later in Ernzen.[2]
  2. Peter was born 19 October 1868 in Ernzen.[2] He was baptized on 21 October 1868 in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen.[6] His godfather was Peter WILDINGER. Peter did not marry and died at the age of 31 years on 11 May 1899 in Ernzen.[2]
  3. Elise was born unknown and died 14 May 1870 in Ernzen.[2]
  4. Peter was born 7 August 1871 in Ernzen. He was baptized 8 August 1871 in the Sankt Markus Catholic Church in Ernzen[7] in the presence of his godparents Peter STEIL and Marg. DEUTSCH. He was deaf and dumb (taubstumm), never married and died in 1952 in Ernzen.[2]
  5. Johann was born on 25 February 1874 in Ernzen. He was baptized in the catholic church in the presence of his godparents Johann WEIMANN and Elis. WILDINGER. He was a mason (Maurer), married Katharina PÖPPELREITER on 16 September 1874 in Mettendorf where the family moved in 1904.[2] Johann and Katharina were my great-grandparents.

    wildinger
    My great-grandfather, Johann “Jean” WILDINGER 1874-1924
  6. Nikolaus was born 3 May 1876 in Ernzen. He was baptized in the catholic church in the presence of his godparents Nik. ROOS and Elis. SCHRAMEN. He died in 1948 in Ernzen.[2]
  7. Anna Maria was born 25 November 1878 in Ernzen and was baptized in the catholic church. She married Michael RAIER, an ironworker (Hüttenarbeiter) from Bollendorf on 3 September 1907.[2]
  8. Bernhard was born on 19 June 1881 in Ernzen. He was baptized in the catholic church in the presence of his godparents Bernard SCHRAMEN and Kath. HANSEN. He married Marg. HANSEN on 30 January 1908. His wife was born 20 May 1888 and died in 1915. Bernhard and his family lived in Ernzen and had six children between 1908-1921.[2]

Bernard WILDINGER was a stonemason (Steinhauer). He died at the age of 55 years in Ernzen on 14 October 1893 in Ernzen.[2] His wife Maria was a widow for 22 years before dying on 2 September 1915 in Ernzen.[2]

The Next Step

Although Mr. Schaffner has facilitated my research of this family this is only the beginning for German families. I still need to obtain the records he used for his compilations. The next step is to visit the Rhineland Archives (Landeshauptarchivs) in Koblenz where I hopefully will be able to access the original or digital copies of the church and civil records.

Thanks to my Luxracines membership I’ll be making the trip to Koblenz, Germany, to visit the archives of Rhineland on June 25th. When I registered to participate on this trip I had to give advance notice of the records I’m interested in seeing – birth, marriage, and death records for Ernzen and Ferschweiler for the years (range) the WILDINGER-WEIMANN and the WILDINGER-SCHRAMEN families lived in those towns.

The original documents ordered by researchers are made available for viewing four times a day. The information from the documents may be copied (transcribed) or the page(s) can be scanned on their in-house scanner and saved to a USB flash drive. The use of digital cameras is not permitted.

I am looking forward to this trip to the Landeshauptarchivs in Koblenz and will definitely be blogging about it!

Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 1 der Pfarrei Sancta Lucia Ferschweiler 1680-1899, mit: Diesburgerhof (ab 1803) und L(a)eisenhof (ab1830) (compiled in 1999), p. 349, family #1624. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[2] Richard Schaffner, compiler, Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 (compiled in 2000), p. 245-246, family #867. [Pages of book photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013].
[3] “Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898”, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 463,565. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NDZ1-H61 : accessed 23 February 2015), Bernardus Wildinger; citing Sankt Lucia Katholisch, Ferschweiler, Rheinland, Prussia.
[4] “Deutschland, Heiraten, 1558-1929,”, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462,714. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JH8P-DXT : accessed 23 February 2015), Bernardus Weldinger and Maria Weimann, 03 Feb 1866; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[5] “Germany Births and Baptisms, 1558-1898”, (index), FamilySearch, FHL microfilm 462,714. (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NFD4-54C : accessed 23 February 2015), Maria Weiman, 19 Jun 1839; citing Sankt Lucia Katholisch, Ferschweiler, Rheinland, Prussia.
[6] Ibid, (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N2CB-2JL : accessed 23 February 2015), Peter Wildinger, 21 Oct 1868; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.
[7] Ibid, (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NFD4-V9B : accessed 23 February 2015), Petrus Wildinger, 08 Aug 1871; citing Sankt Markus Katholisch, Ernzen, Rheinland, Prussia.

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Bernard WILDINGER
Parents: Nicolas WILDINGER and Catherina SCHRAMEN
Spouse: Maria WEIMANN
Parents of spouse: Hubert WEIMANN and Elisabeth WELTER
Whereabouts: Ferschweiler and Ernzen, Germany
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: 2nd great-grandparents

  1. Bernard WILDINGER and Maria WEIMANN
  2. Johann “Jean” WILDINGER
  3. Nicolas WILDINGER
  4. Living WILDINGER
  5. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.

52 Ancestors: #9 Close to Home and Close to My Heart

Week 9 (Feb 26-Mar 4) – Close to Home. Which ancestor is the closest to where you live? Who has a story that hits “close to home”?

The WILDINGER- PÖPPELREITER Family (1874-1984)

The Wildinger-Pöppelreiter Family (ca. 1909). From left to right: mother Catherine Pöppelreiter, daughter Marie, son Jean-Pierre, and father Johann Wildinger. The little boy in front of Marie and Jean-Pierre is their son Nicolas, my maternal grandfather.

The WILDINGER-PÖPPELREITER family couldn’t get any closer to home. They lived in Echternach, Luxembourg, my hometown, the place I’ve lived for the past 40 years.

My great-grandfather Johann WILDINGER was born on 25 February 1874 in Ernzen, Eifel, Rheinland, Preußen (Germany) to Bernard WILDINGER (1838-1896) and Maria WEIMANN (1839-1915). Johann’s godparents were his maternal uncle Johann WEIMANN and his paternal aunt Elisabeth WILDINGER.[1][2]

My great-grandmother Catherine PÖPPELREITER was born on 16 September 1874 in Mettendorf, Eifel, Rheinland, Preußen (Germany) to Mathias PÖPPELREITER (1843- aft. 1891) and Magdalena WAGENER (1842-1884).[1]

1901marriageJohann WILDINGER and Catherine PÖPPELREITER were married in Ernzen on 4 June 1901.[1] Nine months later their first child, a daughter Marie, was born on 21 March 1902 in Ernzen[3] were the bridal couple lived after their marriage. Almost a year later, on 16 March 1903 Marie’s brother Jean-Pierre was born, also in Ernzen.[4]

The family moved from Ernzen to Mettendorf in 1904.[1] That is where their third child, a son Nicolas, my grandfather, was born on 25 August 1906.[5]

When Nicolas was 8 years old times were getting harder and harder for his father Johann, a mason. In July 1914 the family moved to Echternach, Luxembourg. Johann found a job in Wasserbillig and worked as a mason for ten years in Luxembourg until his death in 1924.

Johann WILDINGER died on 11 January 1924 in Echternach in their house in the Neigass. He was only 49 years old. Two of his neighbors were the informants on his death.[6] His children at the time were 21, 20, and 17 — old enough to support their mother who was also 49.

1924death
Photocopy of original death record in Echternach.

After Johann’s death, life went on and in the 1930s his sons married. Jean-Pierre married Suzanne WAGNER before 1933 and went to live and work in Esch-sur-Alzette and then Schifflange. Nicolas married Marie Marcelle FOURNELLE on 26 July 1935[7] and lived next door to his mother and sister Marie.

Jean-Pierre and Suzanne had a daughter F. in 1933. Nicolas and Marcelle had a daughter J. in 1936. These are the only grandchildren born to this family.

010 Papa (back) et Josette (front)
Nicolas WILDINGER playing with his niece Felicie (middle) and his daughter Josette (front)
MRIN01117 1941 Nicolas Wildinger death
1941 Death Record

Wartime came to Europe and Luxembourg in 1939. In 1940 the Germans occupied Luxembourg.

And while life was getting more and more difficult, Catherine PÖPPELREITER, the mother of this family, watched her youngest son get weaker and weaker from tuberculosis. Nicolas WILINDINGER died on 25 October 1941[8] in the hospital in Echternach leaving his widow Marcelle, their daughter J., his mother Catherine, his sister Marie, his brother Jean-Pierre, his sister-in-law Suzanne, and his only niece F.

During World War II Catherine’s oldest child Marie was seriously thinking about renouncing her German citizenship and becoming a Luxembourg citizen. She wrote to family in Germany asking for information on the genealogy of the family and received a reply in July 1942 from her mother’s half-sister Regina. There is one word in the letter that I am not quite sure about and have marked it with question marks in the transcription.

regina1
Photocopy made in 1996. Need to scan the original!

Mettendorf den 17.7.42
Liebe Verwandte!
Euern lb. Brief haben wir dankend und mit Freuden erhalten. Wir hätten Ihnen schon länger geschrieben wir wußten die Adresse nicht richtig. Uns geht es noch sehr gut was wir ja auch von Euch hoffen und auch bestens wünschen. Jetzt will ich Ihnen schnell das schreiben was Sie wissen wollen, von Vater seinen Eltern und Großeltern haben wir gestern noch von ?Steuerbuch? bekommen.
Geburturkunde             Standesamt Körperich
Mathias Pöppelreiter ist am 22 Juni 1843
in Mettendorf geboren.
Vater: Theodor Pöppelreiter, Taglöhner
Mutter: Maria Katharina Groelinger.
Geburturkunde                    Standesamt Körperich
Magdalena Wagener ist am 21 März 1842
geboren in Mettendorf.
Vater: Johann Wagener, Schäfer
Mutter: Anna Maria Kaerscht

regina2
Photocopy made in 1996.

Sonst kann ich Ihnen ja nicht viel schreiben. Hoffentlich ist der Krieg bald zu Ende.
Also seid hiermit recht herzlich gegrüßt von uns allen besonders von Regina.

In the letter Regina, who was 45 at the time, greets her relatives saying how happy she and the family were to hear from them. She would have written sooner if she had had an address to write to. She says that they are doing very well (which surprised me) and wishes and hopes the same for her relatives in Luxembourg. She gives information on her father and his first wife (Regina was from his marriage to his second wife). She goes on to say that she doesn’t have much to talk about but hopefully the war will soon end. She sends heartfelt greetings from all especially from Regina. Imagine! Regina wrote to her sister Catherine’s family living in German occupied Luxembourg and this letter survived the war and was saved by Marie all these years.

1950death
1950 Death Record[9]
Johann WILDINGER’s widow Catherine Pöppelreiter died in Echternach in house number 24 in the rue André Duchscher on 4 September 1950 at 6 in the evening after a short and painful illness. She was 76 years old.[9]

MRIN01118 Catherine Wildinger-Pöppelreiter obit
Obituary from the Luxemburger Wort 6 September 1950[10]
The funeral service was held Thursday the 7th  at 9:30 a.m.. She was survived by her daughter Marie, her son Jean-Pierre and his wife and daughter, and her widowed daughter-in-law Marcelle Fournelle and daughter. Catherine’s deceased husband’s name is seen as Jean instead of Johann as French names were more commonly used following World War II.

On 17 October 1950 the family placed an announcement in the Luxemburger Wort thanking everyone for the prayers, flowers and cards of condoleance received following her death.[11]

After the death of her mother, Marie continued to take steps to become a naturalized Luxembourg citizen. By the law of 18 December 1950, naturalization was granted to Miss Marie WILDINGER, born on 21 March 1902 in Ernzen, Germany, and a resident of Echternach. The naturalization was accepted on 23 December 1950, as noted in a report drawn up the same day by the mayor of the town Echternach. This became effective three days after publication on 6 January 1951.[3]

In 1962 Marie’s brother Jean-Pierre WILDINGER who was living and working in Schifflange was also naturalized.[4]

In 1957 when my mother married my father Fred Roosevelt DEMPSEY she was the first of the grandchildren of Johann and Catherine WILDINGER-PÖPPELREITER to marry. Her cousin F., the older of the two granddaughters, married the following year in 1958 to Jean-Joseph “Ernest” HOFFMANN (1932-2002).

Everyone in the family was now married except Marie, the oldest child and only daughter of Johann and Catherine. Marie or Tata, as we called her, was never married. She was the person in this family who was closest to my heart and close to home as she lived in the same street we lived.

sewing
Tata’s well-used treadle powered Singer sewing machine.

Tata, my mother’s aunt and my grandaunt, became a seamstress and made her living by making, mending, and altering clothes, sheets, tableclothes, napkins, anything made of fabric. She was skilled enough to make coats, suits, and dresses for women from her own patterns. When times were hard she would take apart old pieces of clothing and make a new outfit out of the scraps for clients who needed new clothes but did not have the money to buy new fabric. She had a young woman apprentice, Margarete, who worked for her from a very young age until 1984.

1957 003
Marie WILDINGER standing in the doorway of her home, house number 24 in the Rue André Duchscher in Echternach in 1957.

She turned the living room of her house into her atelier where she sewed for and fitted her clients. It was a long, narrow room with only one window (on the left of Marie in photo above) which looked out on the street. Two Singer sewing machines with treadle power were set up by the window, facing each other. Near the door that opened into the front hallway was a coal stove that was used to heat the room. Different sized irons used to iron open seams, more fragile fabrics, and press suits and coats were heated up on the top of the stove. Along the opposite wall was a long table that she used as an ironing board as well as a workspace to lay out, pin the patterns, and cut out the material. Against the back wall was a small bench usually filled with bolts of material. In the back corner of the room she had a little closet to hang the clothes that were being worked on or were finished and waiting to be picked up by their owners.

irons
Irons, scissors, thimbles and darning eggs.

During the many years that Marie worked as a seamstress there were plenty of people who were happy to pay for her services. Enough for her to support herself and her mother even though her sister-in-law Marcelle, who lived next door, also worked as a seamstress.

From 1962-1966 when my siblings and I were young and living in France we would visit Tata whenever we were in Luxembourg. While she sewed and visited with Mom, she would let us play with her collection of buttons on the floor in front of the oven. Wooden buttons, metal buttons, covered buttons, glass buttons, pearly buttons, sew through buttons, shank buttons, old buttons, plain buttons, pretty buttons, even ugly buttons – none were thrown away. To keep us busy she would also give us a large magnet. We would crawl around her work area picking up pins and needles that had fallen on the wooden floor and into the cracks.

In 1973 Jean-Pierre’s wife Suzanne WAGNER died and was buried in the cemetery of Echternach in the WILDINGER family plot where her parents-in-law and brother-in-law Nicolas were buried.

Tata did not like to have her picture taken. I think this was because she was always working, wearing her apron which was usually covered with pieces of thread, pins and threaded needles, or lint from running the sewing machine. Here she was all dressed up, even wearing a brooch, when she came by for coffee and the traditional Bûche de Noel, at Christmastime in 1978.

1978-12 Tata_edited
Coffee and the traditional Bûche de Noel at Christmastime in 1978
1984-03-22 Marie Wildinger
Clipping from the Luxemburger Wort

My grandaunt Marie WILDINGER died the day after her 82nd birthday. The funeral service was held at the basilica in Echternach on Saturday, 24 March 1984 at 4 in the afternoon. She was buried in the cemetery in Echternach. She was survived by a brother, two nieces, 3 grandnieces and 5 grandnephews.

1984-10 Jean Pierre Wildinger
Clipping from the Luxemburger Wort

The last surviving child of this couple, my granduncle Jean-Pierre WILDINGER died in October 1984. His funeral service was held in the church of Schifflange on Tuesday, 23 October 1984, at 4 in the afternoon. He was survived by his only daughter, his son-in-law, three grandchildren, a niece, 2 grandnieces and 3 grandnephews.

Although his name is on the plaque with the WILDINGER family, he is not buried in Echternach.

MRIN01117 Wildinger grave closeup
Closeup of Wildinger family gravemarker.
MRIN01117 Wildinger grave
Wildinger family grave in cemetery of Echternach, Luxembourg.
Sources:
[1] Richard Schaffner from Kordel, compiler, Familienbuch 2 der Pfarrei St. Marcus Ernzen bei Irrel, Daten bis 1798 aus den Kirchenbüchern der Pfarrei Echternach (damals fur Ernzen zuständig); mit: Ernzen-Hof, Fölkenbach und teilweise auch Prümzurlay (Häuser der rechten Flußseite) 1680-1899 (compiled in 2000), page 245-246, family #867. Book viewed and pages photographed in Archiv Peter Daus (Wittlich) on 4 May 2013.
[2] “Deutschland, Geburten und Taufen, 1558-1898,” index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NFD4-6LB : accessed 23 February 2015), Joh. Wildinger, 25 Feb 1874; citing ; FHL microfilm 462,714.
[3] Mémorial (Journal Officiel) du Grand-Duché de Luxembourg, A N° 1, Samedi, le 6 janvier 1951, online http://www.legilux.public.lu/leg/a/archives/1951/0001/a001.pdf
[4] Mémorial (Journal Officiel) du Grand-Duché de Luxembourg , A N° 40, 24 juillet 1962, pg. 617, online http://www.legilux.public.lu/leg/a/archives/1962/0040/a040.pdf
[5] Commune d’Echternach Nr. 13/1935, Wildinger-Fournelle Family Book. This is an official document given to the bride and groom at the time of their civil marriage. It is used to record births, christenings, and deaths of children as well as death of one or the other spouse. Scanned copy of the original, in possession of their daughter.
[6] 1924 Death Record No. 12, photocopy of original page in the death register at the records office at the city hall in Echternach obtained 10 July 1996.
[7] 1935 Marriage Record No. 13, photocopy of original page in the marriage book at the records office at the city hall in Echternach obtained 21 Jun 1996.
[8] 1941 Death Record No. 49, photocopy of original page in the death register at the records office at the city hall in Echternach obtained 10 July 1996.
[9] 1950 Death Record No., photocopy of original page in the death register at the records office at the city hall in Echternach obtained 10 July 1996.
[10] Luxembourger Wort, digitized by Bibliothèque nationale de Luxembourg; online http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu/webclient/DeliveryManager?application=DIRECTLINK&custom_att_2=simple_viewer&pid=833934&search_terms=catherine%20wildinger#panel:pp|issue:833934|article:DTL387|query:catherine wildinger
[11] Luxembourger Wort, digitized by Bibliothèque nationale de Luxembourg; online http://www.eluxemburgensia.lu/webclient/DeliveryManager?application=DIRECTLINK&custom_att_2=simple_viewer&pid=835266&search_terms=catherine%20wildinger#panel:pp|issue:835266|article:DTL332|query:catherine wildinger

Genealogy Sketch

Name: Johann WILDINGER
Parents: Bernard WILDINGER and Maria WEIMANN
Spouse: Catherine PÖPPELREITER
Parents of Spouse: Mathias PÖPPELREITER and Magdalena WAGENER
Whereabouts: Ernzen and Mettendorf, Germany, and Echternach, Luxembourg
Relationship to Cathy Meder-Dempsey: Maternal Great-grandparents

  1. Johann WILDINGER and Catherine PÖPPELREITER
  2. Nicolas WILDINGER
  3. Mom
  4. Cathy Meder-Dempsey

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

52ancestors-2015This is my weekly entry for Amy Johnson Crow’s challenge:
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks – 2015 Edition. It was so successful in 2014 that genealogists wanted to continue or join in on the fun in 2015. Be sure to check out the other great posts by visiting Amy’s blog No Story Too Small where she’ll be posting the weekly recap on Thurdays and allowing all participants to leave a link to their post(s) in the comments.