Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #90 Charlie LILLIE and and his Mrs. (Part 2)

Last week I featured this photograph of an unidentified couple in Brookport, Massac County, Illinois.

mrin39470-1970s-charlie-lillie-with-wife
Charlie LILLIE with a woman I believe was his wife in the 1970s

I compared it to this photograph (below) in which Charlie was identified with his wife. I also included a link to the 2014 obituary online of the woman seen as Charles Newton LILLIE’s wife on his death record in 1984.

mrin39470-lillie-charlie-and-wife-cutout
Charlie Lillie and Mrs. cutout of group photo taken around September 1966.
What my readers thought…

Several of my readers noticed differences in the women. Amy thought Fannie May Sides Lillie’s smaller nose and more delicate features in the obituary photo did not match the women above. Vera also said the nose looked totally wrong as noses get bigger with age, not smaller.

Is it an old wives’ tale that a person’s nose and ears continue to grow? I checked around and learned it’s a misconception that cartilage continues to grow as you age. The skin of the nose and ears starts to sag making them more prominent while cheeks cave in a bit. It’s more of an optical illusion we can blame on gravity.

More help came from Joe…

My cousin Joe Rooney sent a genealogy source that couldn’t be ignored. His Mom’s address book. He didn’t send me the actual book but took the time to type up all the addresses for me. Charles & Evelyn Lillie had a P.O. box number in Dallas, North Carolina. This is the town Charlie was living in when he died in 1984. To keep this in perspective, Joe’s mother Ruby died in 1981 so the address is pre-1981.

Who was Evelyn?
1984charlesnewtonlilliedeath
“North Carolina Deaths, 1931-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FG42-CMT : accessed 14 February 2017), Charles Newton Lillie, 13 Dec 1984; citing Lincolnton, Lincoln, North Carolina, v 49A cn 49094, State Department of Archives and History, Raleigh; FHL microfilm 1,985,160.

We know Fannie May SIDES was the name of Charles Newton LILLIE’s wife from his 1984 death transcript from FamilySearch’s collection North Carolina Deaths, 1931-1994.

Who was Evelyn seen in Ruby’s address book?

On Ancestry I found a marriage in the Kentucky, Marriage Index, 1973-1999 collection.  Evelyn P. HILL married Charles N. LILLIE on 26 October 1974 in McCracken County, Kentucky. The bride was 60 and the groom 65. Both had been previously married and the marriages had ended with the death of a spouse. The number of previous marriages was not included.

I searched North Carolina Deaths, 1931-1994 for a death record for Evelyn and found she died on 8 June 1980. Her home address was the same as Charles’ in the 1984 death record at right. Her maiden name was PIERCE.

Evelyn and Charles were married from 1974 until her death in 1980. Charles married again, before his own death in 1984, to Fannie May SIDES.

The featured photo at top must be Charles Newton LILLIE (1908-1984) and Evelyn Loraine PIERCE (1914-1980).

How many times was Charles actually married?

I’m figuring at least four times as I found an early marriage for him in 1933 in Sikeston, Scott County, Missouri. I am confident this is Charles as he was living in Sikeston with his mother Geneva and his sisters Emma Roxie and Alberta Editha at the time of the 1930 census. Charles married Muriel Hurt on 1 July 1933. Although both were from Scott County, they obtained the license in Mississippi County and were married the same day by a Baptist minister in Sikeston.

I couldn’t find either of them in the 1940 census. Charles’ mother Geneva was in Detroit with her oldest married daughter.

On Missouri Digital Heritage I found a single young girl named Muriel Hurt born in 1915 and died in 1937. Was this the same girl who married Charles? Did the marriage not last? The marriage license was signed and returned but the names of their parents were not included.

Who was Mrs. Charles Lillie in 1966?

This leaves me with a void between 1933 and 1974 filled only by Mrs. Charles LILLIE seen in the photo from 1966. Was she the only unknown Mrs. Lillie? I’m beginning to think a newspaper subscription might be helpful.

Until next week, when I’ll be sharing a series of brick wall photographs.

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #90 Charlie LILLIE and his Mrs.

There were only three color photographs in this collection. Two of them were from the 1970s and shared in Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #73 Ruth Joanna LILLIE, Part 2.

The last of the three is of an unidentified couple in Brookport, Massac County, Illinois. The location was recognized by my cousin Joe Rooney when he labeled it years ago.

mrin39470-1970s-charlie-lillie-with-wife

The man’s plaid jacket and turtleneck, the woman’s blouse with long pointed collar and button up vest, and their glasses – these point to the 1970s. In the background at the left, behind the man, is a light colored car with a black top. Very little can be seen of it but I believe it’s the same car as in the post mentioned above. [See the photo of Ruth Lillie in front of her car at her home in Brookport, Massac County, Illinois.]

mrin39470-lillie-charlie-and-wife-cutout
Cutout of group photo taken around September 1966.

Cousin Joe shared photos from his private collection of family photos with me when he saw my interest in the old photographs. Joe’s mother Ruby was Ruth’s sister. In the private collection I found a group photo of six. In the group were a man and woman I believe are the couple in the first photo. (see cutout above)

Look at the way the man holds the woman in both photos. How the woman’s shoulder fits in under the man’s arm. Compare the man’s nose and smile. He is wearing glasses in one and has glasses in breast pocket in the other. I think, at least, the man is the same in both pictures.

Who were they? This is the group photo taken in 1966.

mrin39470-lillieroxieraymondrubyruthcharlieandwife
Group photo from Joe Rooney’s private collection.

It was labeled on the back with the following names.

mrin39470-lillieroxieraymondrubyruthcharlieandwifeback
Back of group photo from Joe Rooney’s private collection.

Who were all these LILLIEs? Raymond b. 1904, Ruby b. 1909, and Ruth b. 1907 were siblings and children of Florence ROYALTY (1868-1946) and Isaac Spencer “Ike” LILLIE (1872-1932)

Roxie b. 1905 and Charlie b. 1908 were also siblings and the same age as Raymond, Ruby, and Ruth. Ike’s father Albert Spencer LILLIE (1848-1913) remarried after the death of his wife Pernecia Elizabeth GLASS (1852-1899) and had three children with his second wife Geneva Elyse MASON.

I was confident with the man in the top photograph being Charlie LILLIE because he, along with his sisters, were mentioned (without names) in the 1966 obituary of Ike’s brother John Calvin “Jack” LILLIE (1883-1966). Jack was the last living child of Albert and Pernecia.

My 52 Ancestors: #14 Albert Spencer LILLIE (1848-1913) ~ Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can was the very first in what became this series. I mentioned Albert’s marriage to Geneva MASON but did not include the fact that she gave him three more children making him the father of fourteen. Since there were no known photos of his children from his second marriage in this collection, I did not bother to research them in-depth. Their children were Emma Roxie, Charlie, and Alberta Editha.

Was his son Charlie married? Could this be his wife? No name was given for her on the back of the group photo so I had to go back to the beginning. Check census records from birth until 1940. Search for possible marriage records. Check for a death record.

I found a death record for Charles Newton LILLIE who died in 1984 in North Carolina on Ancestry.com in the North Carolina, Death Indexes, 1908-2004 collection. The abstracted information (there was no image) was not enough to confirm it was the same man. FamilySearch had more abstracted information in their collection North Carolina Deaths, 1931-1994.

1984charlesnewtonlilliedeath
“North Carolina Deaths, 1931-1994,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FG42-CMT : accessed 14 February 2017), Charles Newton Lillie, 13 Dec 1984; citing Lincolnton, Lincoln, North Carolina, v 49A cn 49094, State Department of Archives and History, Raleigh; FHL microfilm 1,985,160.

County and state of birth and the parents names (although off a bit) are a match. Most important, the name of his wife was included.

I finally found an obituary online for his widow. Fannie May Sides LILLIE died on 28 July 2014 at CaroMont Regional Medical Center, Gastonia. I have not found a marriage record and her husband was not mentioned in the obituary. However, per the U.S. Public Records Index, 1950-1993, in the early 1990s she lived at the address found on Charles’ NC death record.

I would have liked to include the photo from her online obituary for comparison in this post but without permission I ask you to click on the link to see it. Does she look like either or both of the women in the photos above?

Charles Newton LILLIE (1908-1984) and Fannie May SIDES (1928-2014) are the names I would like to add to the top photo from the 1970s. Would you agree with me?

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2017, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #52 A Collection of Tintypes

Some of the older photographs saved from the trash can were tintypes. Seven of these have been featured in previous posts and two of them remain unidentified.

TintypefrontFrom left to right, top row: Otterbein E. PADDACK (ca. 1878), unidentified man, Alnie W. ROYALTY (ca. 1888). Second row: Florence ROYALTY (ca. 1874), Alnie W. ROYALTY (ca. 1893), Albert Spencer LILLIE (ca. 1872). Bottom row: Green B. GLASS (bef. 1897), unidentified couple, Charles W. ROYALTY (ca. 1885). A tenth tinplate, not included in this scan, was of Mary E. PADDOCK (bef. 1855).

TintypebackThe backsides of the tintypes have some information which helped in the identification. The two unidentified pictures will be featured in the coming weeks. The man in the middle of the top row seems familiar – enough for me to do a new round of comparisons.

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2016, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Tuesday’s Child’s Family Heirlooms: Great-grandma Laura’s Vintage Pedestal Candy Bowl

If you already have American made cut glass that belonged to a grandmother or another family member, cherish it as you would any prized possession, for no more like it will ever be made. ~ John C. Roesel, June 1983

I took a lightning speed crash course in glass making in America so I would sound at least a little bit knowledgeable about the cut glass pedestal candy dish which once belonged to my great-grandmother Laura Bell INGRAM, wife of William Henderson DEMPSEY.

In 1997 we visited Jamestown, Virginia, and learned the first industry to be established in America in 1608 at the settlement was glass making. This was about all I knew before I sat down to write this post.

The first cut glass was produced in America about 1771, over 160 years later in Manheim, Pennsylvania, at the American Flint Glass Manufactory founded by William Stiegel, an immigrant from Cologne, Germany.

glassdish1tinyAlthough this dish once belonged to my great-grandmother Laura, it did not come to me through my grandparents and parents.

In 2011 my 2nd cousin Robert sent me a photo and wrote, “My mom just came in and asked if you would be interested in a glass nic-nac that belonged to your great-grandmother (Fred Rothwell Dempsey’s mother). My mom says that she got it from my grandmother (Edith Roop Ramsey).

I was happy to receive the “nic-nac” Robert sent by mail across America and the Atlantic,  carefully packed and double boxed.

glassdish2tinyLaura died in October 1940 so I can date this cut glass pedestal candy or compote bowl to pre-1940. It stands 4 inches tall, 5 inches across the top, and weighs a pound, two ounces. The saw-tooth edge is scalloped and four pinwheel star patterns around the bowl and on the bottom of the pedestal.

glassdish3tinyWhen I took a closer look I noticed some scratches along the edge and in the inside of the bowl. I also found a seam, actually four, which tells me this is glass and not crystal.

In these days of additive manufacturing or 3D printing Mr. Roesel may be right about this being an heirloom to treasure as no more like it will ever be made (in the same way) but I cherish it for the way it came to me and because it once was lovingly cared for by my great-grandmother Laura.

© 2016 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

Jeanne Bryan Insalaco of Everyone Has A Story suggested doing posts on heirlooms in a discussion in the Genealogy Bloggers Facebook group and wrote Now Where Did I Put That? Several bloggers have taken her up on the challenge to write about their heirlooms and we hope more will follow our lead.

Other bloggers doing Family Heirloom stories:

Amy Johnson Crow’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks theme for 2015 Week 24 was Heirlooms. Visit her 52 Ancestors Challenge 2015: Week 24 Recap for the links to more posts in the comments.

Tuesday’s Child’s Family Heirlooms: Laura’s Relish Dish (2)

Earlier in December I shared my great-grandmother Laura Belle DEMPSEY née INGRAM’s glass relish dish shaped like a leaf and a bunch of grapes.

grapedish2Several readers said they would like to see a photo of it with my homemade Santa Fe Cranberry Sauce.

cranberry1tinySince we are taking it easy after all the feasting I thought this would be a great filler, pun intended, until next week.

cranberry2tinyWishing everyone a Happy and Healthy New Year.

 © 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

Jeanne Bryan Insalaco of Everyone Has A Story suggested doing posts on heirlooms in a discussion in the Genealogy Bloggers Facebook group and wrote Now Where Did I Put That? Several bloggers have taken her up on the challenge to write about their heirlooms and we hope more will follow our lead.

Tuesday’s Child’s Family Heirlooms: Laura’s Relish Dish

After I graduated from high school in 1976 I went to live with my paternal grandmother, Myrtle Hazel ROOP, widow of Fred Rothwell DEMPSEY, while attending West Virginia Tech. Grandma gave me several items including a cardinal feeding her young ones and this glass relish dish shaped like a leaf and a bunch of grapes.

grapedish2It belonged to Grandma’s mother-in-law Laura Belle INGRAM, my great-grandmother and wife of William Henderson DEMPSEY. It’s special to me because of who gave it to me and who it originally belonged to.

I use it for my homemade Santa Fe Cranberry Sauce I serve at Christmas with Yeast Rolls from Better Homes & Gardens New Cook Book ©1976 and the Traditional Stuffed Turkey with Gravy, Chicago Mashed Potatoes with Onion & Bacon, and Louisiana Maquechoux or Sautéed Yankee Brussels Sprouts. Recipes are from “An All-American Thanksgiving Sampler” found in the November 1996 issue of the Good Housekeeping magazine.grapedish1After I took these photos of the dish I searched the internet for grape bunch shaped glass dish. I was surprised to find photos of exactly the same dish. On Ebay sellers describe it as a relish, nut, fruit, or candy dish. There is no mark on the dish which would identify the glass-maker and some sellers attribute the dish to Anchor Hocking. It may have been sold as a set of five with four small and one larger dish.grapedish3Since it belonged to my great-grandmother Laura she must have bought or received it before her death in 1940. Is this Depression glass – machine-pressed glassware, mass-produced in the US from the late 1920s to the 1940s and often used as giveaways to persuade customers to purchase goods?

It may have been a giveaway at the time but to me it is priceless.

 © 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

Jeanne Bryan Insalaco of Everyone Has A Story suggested doing posts on heirlooms in a discussion in the Genealogy Bloggers Facebook group and wrote Now Where Did I Put That? Several bloggers have taken her up on the challenge to write about their heirlooms and we hope more will follow our lead.

Other bloggers doing Family Heirloom stories:

Amy Johnson Crow’s 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks theme for 2015 Week 24 was Heirlooms. Visit her 52 Ancestors Challenge 2015: Week 24 Recap for the links to more posts in the comments.

Unpacking the Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can Collection

Have you been following my series of posts on the Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can?

Thursday evening one of my Facebook friends commented on my latest post asking if I thought they had really been retrieved. The answer, as of Wednesday, is definitely YES! They are now ALL in my possession.

Several months after these precious photographs were nearly destroyed a second time due to a fire in a downstairs neighbor’s home, my cousin Joe, after not finding anyone in his area who wanted them, decided to pack them up and mail the entire collection to me. Thank you Joe.

old1tiny
The package I received this past Wednesday
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Partly unpacked content
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Dear Cathy! Please enjoy! Cousin Joe
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The largest photographs from the package
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The postcard size photographs….
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Another stack included large,…
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…and medium to small photographs.
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Tintype (middle), penny pictures (top), and WWII period prints (left and below)
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A family group photograph on glass (lower right)

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #16 Charles W. ROYALTY (1861-1922)

This is a spin-off of my 52 Ancestors: #14 Albert Spencer LILLIE (1848-1913) ~ Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can blogpost in which I featured a few photos from a collection of old photographs my 4C1R Joe Rooney shared with me. I asked Joe about using the photos and he kindly wrote, Please use them at your will.  I feel it is keeping it in the family and don’t need credit.  If anything, I appreciate your evaluations, identifications and detective work.  I’m hopeful you and yours enjoy them.  On a blog, in a book, above a cloud.”

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

Links to previous posts in this series may be found in Old Photographs

#16 Charles W. ROYALTY (1861-1922)

charlesttTintype, a cheaper form of photography, were not produced from a negative. Images were reversed, as if looking in a mirror. Notice in the above Charles’ jacket is buttoned left on right and hair parted on the left while in the photo below the jacket is buttoned right on left and his hair is parted on the right.

charlesfamilyCharles with his wife Lizzie M. WALTER and their son Alnie born in February 1888. Alnie appears to be about 5 which helps to date this photograph at around 1893-94.

Lizzie’s dress must have been made by a very experienced seamstress. I remember learning in my Home Ec sewing classes about placing patterns on the grain and marking patterns so plaids or stripes would match up. It seemed complicated at the time and plaids were usually avoided. The sleeves and bodice of Lizzie’s dress appear to have been bias cut to mould to the body.

On the 1900 census Charles was listed as a farmer and owned a mortgaged farm. By this time the family included a new member, daughter Fay who was born in 1897.

charleskimball
Charles with his horse “Kimball”

The photo (above) was labelled with the name of his horse Kimball on the back (below).

charleshorsebackWhile researching the timeline of this family to date these photographs I learned Charles and Lizzie’s must have separated and divorced by 1910. Their daughter Fay ROYALTY age 12 was found with John B. and Elizabeth M. SCHULTE in Paducah, McCracken County, Kentucky. Fay was listed as stepdaughter of John who had married “Elizabeth” less than a year earlier. It was a second marriage for both of them.

Son Alnie was living in Monett, Barry County, Missouri, with his wife of 0 years, Theresa RICE. His father Charles has not been located in 1910 or 1920.

charlesalnieCharles (middle) with his son Alnie (right); unknown man on left. This was taken 1916 or earlier as Alnie was killed in a train accident on 14 July 1916. Just seeing things. So you can see us. Will try and send you a good picture soon.
Note: A correction to this photo description was made following Alnie’s grandson commenting on this post.

charlesalniebackMy or Pa’s adress for his mail is delivered to me. 817 4th St., Monett, MO. This message would suggest that Charles may have been moving around quite a bit. Beeing a horse lover he may have travelled around and worked as a blacksmith or farrier.

charlesblacksmithCharles (far right) in front of Greathouse Horse Shoeing with three unidentified men.

Following the death of his son Alnie, Charles may have moved to Iowa (after 1920) to be closer to his married daughter Fay. His ex-wife Lizzie was not mentioned in the obituary of son Alnie and may have died before 1916. Charles died 25 January 1922 in Oneida, Delaware County, Iowa, and is buried in the Fairview Cemetery in Earlville, Delaware County, Iowa. His daughter Fay died in 1925 and is buried in the same cemetery.

 Joe Rooney kindly gave me permission to use these photographs on my blog.

Joe ROONEY wrote on 15 February 2015: This collection of photographs was scanned at 300 dpi color by me. The original photos were sent by Sandra Lillie about ten years ago after she found them cleaning out a relative’s garage in Southern Illinois, finding no other takers (suckers). She believes they were a collection by L Vance Lillie. Many of the pictures seemed to be removed from frames or were in albums evidenced by fading characteristics and may have been from other’s collections. I scanned the reverse if there was laboratory advertising or writing. Some of the authors’ identification may be figured out of the handwriting matches. I did not scan the reverse of photos where there was only a three digit number that I believe to be sequence numbers on a roll of film. I didn’t spot any obvious helpful commonalities.

© 2015 Cathy Meder-Dempsey

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Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #15 Mathilda J. “Tillie” ROYALTY (1859-1939)

 

tomtilliefannie
Tillie with her husband Tom and daughter Fannie ca. 1895

Tillie ROYALTY, daughter of Samuel ROYALTY and Joanna PALMER and sister of Florence ROYALTY, married Charles Thomas “Tom” WELLS about 1886, most likely in Pope County, Illinois. They were the parents of Charles Edgar WELLS b. 1886 and Frances “Fannie” WELLS b. 1892, both in Pope County. After the births of their children they were seen in Bedford County, Tennessee, in 1900 and in Johnson County, Illinois, in 1910.

tom+tillie
Tom and Tillie in early 1910s

 

tillieolder
Tillie by herself ca. early 1910s, taken before move to California

Tom, Tillie and their children moved to California in the early 1910s, before 1915 when Tillie’s sister Florence visited them. They lived in San Luis Obispo County, California, in 1920 and 1930 when the census was taken.

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2015, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

Old Photographs Saved From Trash Can ~ #10 LILLIE Family 1920 Reunion

In 1920 following the end of the World War, or The Great War as the Britons referred to it until the 1940s, Isaac and Florence LILLIE got the family together for a reunion in Pope County, Illinois. Tables were loaded with food for over forty guests.

tableA family group photograph was taken in front of the Isaac S. Lillie home.

reunionThis group photograph did not have any persons identified. While working with the photographs from Joe Rooney’s collection I’ve become familiar with some of the faces in this family. I was able to pick out Isaac and Florence in the very back. Their son Roy and Ike’s brother Tom in the back row. Tom’s wife Florence and Isaac’s brother-in-law Lyon Glass in the middle row. Do you remember Chester with his his big catch of fish? He would be the young man at the far left by the porch swing.

To compare photos I did a screen split and viewed photos side by side, zooming in on persons in the group photo. When I got to the next photograph I made an interesting discovery. Can you tell what it was?

smallgroupTen men and a woman are lined up in front of a bank as seen on the door behind persons #10 and #23. Joe Rooney labeled it “SamRoy3rdleft.” I compared photos of Samuel Royalty “Roy” Lillie, son of Isaac, with this photo and #5 is Roy. But who are the others?

I then noticed everyone in the lineup was also in the family group photo. More importantly, they were ALL wearing the same clothes. Could this photograph have been taken the same day as the reunion? With the exception of Roy, is it a lineup of the sons and daughter of Albert Spencer Lillie and Pernecia Elizabeth Glass?

When I made this discovery I emailed Joe explaining that I believed the lineup to be a photo of the Lillie brothers with their sister, with the exception of Roy. He then sent  another copy of the family group photo with names written in for 27 persons. It was his “working” copy. At one time while researching the family Joe had travelled around visiting the cemeteries and older living relatives. Joe first noticed the family group photo while visiting with his cousin Edna Elizabeth Lillie. He made a sketch and added names of people Edna identified. Then he went to visit Edna’s sister-in-law Marie Losnegard Lillie who was living in a nursing home. She was able to identify a few more people.

Joe agreed with my idea that the lineup was representative of the Lillie siblings. They are lined up from left to right, youngest to oldest. As Roy was a grandson and not of son of Albert and Pernecia we believe that he is standing in for Reuben D. Lillie b. 1891.

Joe wrote about Reuben’s absence, “Marie Losnegard told me that Reuben Lillie had been off to The Great War and decided to stay there and not return to the USA afterwards. I subsequently spoke to Edna Lang (Lillie) and she laughed and said Reuben Lillie robbed banks and went underground. The blacksheep.

Wouldn’t it be great to find out if this story of Reuben being a bank robber is true or false? I found he married in Bexar County, Texas, in 1918. Reuben and his wife were roomers in Nye County, Nevada, in 1920. His wife was identified on the “working” copy (see #18 below) but I wonder if she, a fairly new bride, would go the reunion without her husband. I found no trace of Reuben or his wife in 1930 and 1940. They simply disappeared after 1920.

Key to descendants of Albert Spencer LILLIE and Pernecia Elizabeth GLASS identified in family group photo as well as persons who may have been present but have not been identified. (click on link to see descendancy list)

keytophotoKey (identified persons in bold print)
1. Isaac Spencer Lillie b. 1872, husband of #2
2. Florence Royalty b. 1868, wife of #1
3. Neele Owens Lillie b. 1898, wife of #6 (UPDATED: 17 Nov 2016)
4. unidentified woman
5. Samuel Royalty Lillie b. 1895, son of #1 and #2
6. Robert Wiley Lillie b. 1895, brother of #1
7. John Calvin “Jack” Lillie b. 1883, brother of #1
8. Jesse Lyon Lillie b. 1893, brother of #1
9. George Wyte Lillie b. 1874, brother of #1
10. Thomas Nathaniel “Tom” Lillie b. 1881, brother of #1, husband of #22
11. Frank Greenberry Lillie b. 1877, brother of #1
12. Albert Preston Lillie b. 1887, brother of #1  OR Reese Gentry Lillie b. 1892, son of #1
13. Edward Bicourt “Ed” Lillie b. 1889, brother of #1
14. Chester Beryl Lillie b. 1900, son of #9
15. identified as Anna ? Lillie (poss. Annie Hester Mosley Lillie b. 1880, wife of #11)
16. unknown woman
17. unknown woman
18. Elizabeth Ruth Breitzka Lillie b. 1893, wife of Reuben Lillie
19. Green Berry Lyon Glass b. 1864, brother of #2
20. Allie D. Obermark Glass b. 1870, wife of #19
21. unknown woman (poss. Marie Green Lillie b. 1875, wife of #9)
22. Florence Sibbie Kaufman Lillie b. 1880, wife of #10
23. Rosa Lee Lillie Jeffords b. 1873, sister of #1
24. unknown woman
25. Jenava “Geneva” Mason Lillie b 1871, stepmother of #1
26. Eugene N. “Blue” Lillie b. 1906, son of #11
27. Eli Burton Lillie b. 1915, son of #11
28. Edgar Jacob Lillie b. 1914, daughter of Reese
29. Effie Florence Lillie b. 1912, daughter of Reese
30. boy (poss. Raymond Egbert “Splitty” Lillie b. 1904, son of #1)
31. Elsie E. Lillie b. 1909, daughter of #11
32. Ruth Joanna Lillie b. 1907, daughter of #1
33. Hazel Vickers Lillie b. 1897, wife of #8
34. identified as Verna Lillie (she was not born until 1927;  may be her mother Jessie Loretta McKellar Lillie b. 1890, wife of #7)
35. Ruby Pernecia Lillie b. 1909, daughter of #1
36. boy
37. girl
38. girl (poss. Elaine Lillie b. 1913, daughter of #11)
39. boy
40. girl (poss. Doris Lillie b. 1916, daughter of #8)
41. Edna Elizabeth Lillie b. 1917, daughter of Reese
42. child (girl or boy?)

Persons, listed oldest to youngest, who may be in the photo but not identified:
Marie Green Lillie b. 1875, wife of #9
Annie Hester Mosley Lillie b. 1880, wife of #11
Albert Preston Lillie b. 1887, brother of #1
Jessie Loretta McKellar Lillie b. 1890, wife of #7
Reese Gentry Lillie b. 1892, son of #1
Myra Stewart Lillie b. 1892, wife of #13
Pearl Eve Lillie b. 1896, daughter of #9
Neele Owens Lillie b. 1898, wife of #6
Thelma Holt Lillie b. 1901, wife of #5
Raymond Egbert “Splitty” Lillie b. 1904, son of #1
Emma Roxey Lillie b. 1906, daughter of #25
Bella P. Lillie b. 1907, daughter of #9
Charles W. Lillie b. 1908, son of #25
William Chester Lillie b. 1911, son of #13
Elaine Lillie b. 1913, daughter of #11
Edith Lillie b. 1913, daughter of #25
Anna Pernecia “Necie” Lillie b. 1913, daughter of of #13
Charles Lillie b. 1914, son of #8
Harlan J. Lillie b. 1914, son of #7
June Rozena Lillie b. 1916, daughter of #7
Edith M. Lillie b. 1916, daughter of of #13
Doris Lillie b. 1916, daughter of #8

No babies or very young infants are in the photograph. There were two children born 1918-1919. James E. Lillie b. May 1919 son of #13 and Florence Alberta Lillie b. Oct 1918 daughter of #7.

bestwishescathy1

More about this collection, how it came to be in my possession,
and links to previous posts in the series can be found here.

Please contact me!
Are you related to a person mentioned in this post? Send an email to
openingdoorsinbrickwalls @ pt.lu or message me on my Facebook page
Opening Doors in Brick Walls.

© 2015, copyright Cathy Meder-Dempsey. All rights reserved.

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